Jingo – Make Some Money, Buy Some Love

jingo_RingMasterReview

March 11th sees the eagerly anticipated second album from British rock band Jingo and it is very easy to say that it does not let expectations, bred from the band’s previous impressive releases, down. The ten tracks making up Make Some Money, Buy Some Love are the band’s most eclectic bunch yet, at times in an understated way with closer attention revealing the new myriad of flavours and broad imagination bringing them to life. Just as importantly, it is another mesmerising collection of songs feeding in us and their growing wealth of fans an already eager appetite for the band’s invention and carrying the potential to excite another hungry wave of newcomers to the world of Jingo.

Formed by husband and wife, guitarist/vocalist Jack and vocalist/keyboardist/guitarist Katie Buckett, Jingo seem to have made a strong impact with every move since Jingo played its debut live show was supporting Blur’s Graham Coxon. Through a clutch of captivating singles, creatively provocative EPs, and striking debut album The Art Of Loving of 2014, as well as a live presence seeing the London based band take their imagination and craft across the UK and over to the US, France, Germany, and Belgium, Jingo has enticed rich interest and fan support which has through a highly successful pre-order campaign enabled the band to release Make Some Money, Buy Some Love on CD and vinyl as well as digitally.

With its line-up completed by the invention of Nima Safai, Michael Hussain, and Kelly Lenahan, Jingo has from day one never been easy to pigeonhole. They are generally tagged as alternative rock and have found themselves compared to the varied likes of Portishead, The Magic Numbers, Not Blood Paint, Fleetwood Mac, Interpol, and Jess & the Ancient Ones along the way. As Make Some Money, Buy Some Love again proves Jingo spins broad tapestries which explore diversity with zeal to match their eagerly creative imagination.

art_RingMasterReviewRecorded in New York with producer Kahan James, and mastered by Kevin Blackler (Raconteurs, RHCP etc.), Make Some Money, Buy Some Love opens up with Lifer, the alluring tones of Katie cradled by melodic coaxing as the bass strolls with a controlled but carefree grace. Crisp beats add to the enticement instantly flirting with ears, the song’s underlying funkiness infesting its gait and the listener as pop catchiness and lyrical romancing tempt. Drama is never far from a Jingo twist and turn, its boldest attraction lining Katie’s vocal prowess especially here in a gem of an introduction.

All of the track’s qualities and more emerge in the following Sirens and Vices, Its rhythmic bait quickly infecting feet as melody woven grooves seize hips. Both elements add to the flirtatious nature of the song, impassioned vocals and raw, fiery textures growing in the blend of smouldering and raucous seduction. Grabbing ears and imagination from the first second, it only tightens its grip second by second squeezing lustful responses out before making way for the pop revelry of Money. It is instinctive catchiness with a steely backbone and bold attitude though, dancing persistently and mischievously as the song teases with playful coquetry.

From a busy bedlam Gaia emerges with its own melodic grace and emotive eloquence next, Katie joined by the equally potent tones of Jack as keys and guitars paint their own poetic picture over a more forceful rhythmic spine. It is pure magnetism with a just unveiled eye catching video to match.

Never Love Again also has little trouble winning attention and pleasure as its evocative melodies and warmly invasive essences hug captivating vocals. The song never quite reaches the heights of its predecessors but never lacks a second of enjoyable adventure before the outstanding Death Counts takes over. The track is nothing less than melancholic beauty becoming more exotic, almost sinister, and relentlessly beguiling with each passing seduction of passion fuelled notes and vocal fascination.

The body is back jumping around with Let’s Be Friends next; its noir lit drama and tenacious rhythmic dexterity enough alone to enslave the imagination. Katie is like a devious puppeteer in the midst of the brew of fire bred grooves, agitated beats, and frequently concussive energy; her lures as inescapable as the gloriously tempestuous textures making up another mighty highlight within Make Some Money, Buy Some Love.

Last year’s sensational single Sweet Anne follows, Katie and Jack united in crooning temptation as initially the song gently grows in ears. Soon it is in full swing with boisterous rhythms skirting the tangy funk infused hooks and lecherous grooves uniting and barging against each other. It too has an irresistible tempest like texture to its body but equally melodic calm makes a compelling persuasion in between the song’s moments of vociferous and explosive carnival like devilry.

The album is completed by firstly the melodic romance and harmonic charm of Supersymmetry, one simply bewitching encounter with fire in its heart and finally by the pop rock seducing of The Shell. Both tracks solicit emotions and body to get involved in quick time and each leave only a want for more, the perpetual hunger which seems to come with every Jingo encounter.

For Make Some Money, Buy Some Love, Jingo has honed their sound into something as diverse and bold as ever but exploring both with a more seamlessly and easily flowing touch; the result being another Jingo moment which makes the world a better place.

Make Some Money, Buy Some Love is released March 11th

http://jingomusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/jingomusic/   https://twitter.com/JingoMusic

Pete RingMaster 22/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

SJ and the Flying Pigs – Fireball

sj-pic_RingMasterReview

Few can escape the lure of a feel good proposal and that is exactly what is on offer from UK band SJ and the Flying Pigs and new single Fireball. With an engaging spring in its step and an infectious swing in its heart, the song simply gets under the skin and shows plenty of reasons why the band is igniting the music scene in their home city of Cambridge.

SJ is a country singer songwriter who has already lured attention and acclaim with her debut solo album, Nashville Sessions, which was recorded in Tennessee and released 2014. Since then she has frequently gigged across the UK and the Cambridge live music scene where she brought together her own backing band, it coming together within the walls of and taking its name from the City’s prestigious pub The Flying Pig.

sj-firebal-artwork_RingMasterReviewWith Kieran Morgan on banjo, Nicky Terry on fiddle, Ian Griffith on drums, Oli Steggles on slide guitar, and Joe Taylor on bass alongside the vocal and guitar craft of SJ, the band quickly show why they have gone down so well at festivals such as Secret Garden Party and Strawberry Fair with Fireball. From its opening melodic sigh, the track strolls with zeal and purpose, rhythms marking their territory as SJ’s voice calls upon ears and appetite with ease. Like flowing wine, that familiar country twang infests guitar and melody as warm harmonies tease, it all adding up for a rousing good time raising a smile in the listener as broad as the song’s own.

Written with her American songwriter friend Meghan Saletta and inspired by the popular Nashville whiskey Fireball, the song romps like a liquor fuelled shanty; a spirited proposition sure to spark fun in ears and hearts even within those not normally captivated by its source genre.

Fireball and the same-named EP it is from are out now through iTunes and Spotify.

Upcoming Live Dates:

29th March – Hard Rock Café, London (‘Hard Rock Country’)

8th April – Kings Head, Orford Suffolk

16th April – The Burston Crown, Diss

19th May – Faerie Fest, Sussex

3rd June – Strawberry Fair Festival, Cambridge

http://www.sjmortimer.net/   https://www.facebook.com/sjandtheflyingpigs   https://twitter.com/sj_mortimer

Pete RingMaster 21/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Wills & The Willing – Butterflies

wills-pic-2_RingMasterReview

Any song which simply bewitches ears and imagination just has to be shouted out about and that is exactly what is happening to Butterflies, the new single from Wills & The Willing; we now joining in the chorus of lusty praise. The song is irresistible, its intimacy raw and honest, like an aural L. S. Lowry reflection, and its lively melancholic outcry of a chorus spirit rousing; a combination which simply and totally captivates.

Beginning to stir when poet/lyricist Ian Wills linked up with Brendon Taylor, Jesse Wood, Jason Knight, and Martin Wright late 2004 and bursting to life in the spring of the following year, Wills & The Willing has since seen a ‘revolving door policy’ in its line-up while coming under bigger spotlights over time through their gigs and two seriously well-received albums. Returning from an eight year hiatus with Wills joining up with Sean Genockey, Charlie Morton and John Hogg (Moke, Rich Robinson, Roger Daltrey) for its creation, third album Dream In Colour, released last year and spawning their new single, has been no exception.

Inspired by the town of Wotton Bassett and the tearful repatriations it embraced, Butterflies instantly tugs at thoughts and emotions as Wills slips through ears with his poetic craft to put the listener at the heart of the emotion drenched moment imprinted on people, thoughts, and history. That alone, as a single piano melody courts the words, is powerful enough but add a soaring spirit lifting chorus and there is no escaping a real sparking of the heart. The music is just as cinematic in its own way as the Will’s words, his reflection vocal in its honesty and stirring in its touch to transport the listener.

To be honest, no words truly echo the raw power and impact of the song, so allowing its melancholic beauty into your ears is the only thing we can further add and urge.

Butterflies is out now.

http://www.willsandthewilling.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Wills-The-Willing-945565462157130/   https://twitter.com/IWILLS

Pete RingMaster 09/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Lauren Hoffman and The Secret Storm – Family Ghost

lauren-hoffman_RingMasterReview

Often there is nothing more seductive in music than emotional and creative melancholy, a thought wonderfully backed up by Family Ghost, the debut album from Lauren Hoffman & the Secret Storm. Coming from the latest project of songwriter/vocalist/musician Hoffman, no stranger to acclaim through her solo releases, Family Ghost is an imagination stoking dark theatre of word, emotion, and beauty, or as potently suggested by its press release, “A whirl of cabaret, broken ballads, and indie rock, it is a collection of heart-bending narratives that double as emotional exorcism.”

Hoffman’s songwriting was already alive but was further nurtured by Jeff Buckley after she met him backstage while waiting for her father. He became her mentor up until his death in 1997, just one month before she released her debut solo album. Released by Virgin Records, Megiddo was critically acclaimed and subsequently followed by just as evocative and striking encounters. Hoffman assembled the Secret Storm a few years ago with its intimately and personally open Family Ghost built on songs written over a decade ago as well as newer explorations by their creator.

The release opens with Don’t Look Back, a tantalising serenade with wistful melodies and a brush of rhythmic coaxing around the enticing tones of Hoffman. The shadowy groans of cello from Cathy Monnes (of the indie-pop Sally Rose Band) are as potent and persuasive as the imagination of keyboardist Ethan Lipscomb, both bewitching textures in a swiftly riveting encounter. Its thicker crescendos of sound and evocation just reinforce the persuasive majesty of the song while all the time Hoffman’s vocals sublimely capture ears and thoughts.

family-ghost-artwork_RingMasterReviewFrom its gothic, funereal spiced enterprise, the band unveil a lighter gait and atmosphere with second offering Feel It All, though again the darker hues of cello and brooding tones of Jeff Diehm’s bass provide rich drama against the livelier air cast by guitarist Tony Lechmanski (Bella Morte) and Kevin Ardrey’s boisterous beats. Though less pronounced the vaudevillian touch of its predecessor colours the track to captivate before Let The Waves Crash On Me hugs the senses with its country rock/folk lit embrace. Its reflective heart and rich weave is a kiss on the ear, Hoffman a beacon at its core.

Sick With Love radiates in melancholic intimacy and vocal openness next while In The Sun bewitches as it grows in gentle but open intensity and imagination with each passing second. Both tracks easily excite but find themselves outshone by the following I Just Broke Up With A Guy Who Looks Kinda Like You. Carrying a Young Marble Like Giants like minimalistic air and seduction as bass and guitar entangle their descriptive prowess, the irresistible song blossoms into a tenaciously catchy slice of pop ‘n’ roll with spicy melodies and swinging rhythms. Even its magnificence though has to play second fiddle to the album’s title track which seduces straight after. There is drama in every riff, theatre in each ear flirting hook, while rhythms and vocals bring their own creative imagination to the compelling tapestry. Like a siren, the song lures the listener into its busy evocation of spirit and emotion.

Through the noir lit stroll of Fast Lane there is no let-up in the album’s grip on body and appetite. The song is as funky as it is jazzy, as folky as it is poppy; its dark rock ‘n’ roll nurtured croon simply haunting infectiousness. It is majestic in an understated but bold way, a success matched by the similarly catchy saunter of Broken. A thin but rich melody initially courts the magnetic presence and tones of Hoffman as the track offers another slim yet thickly provocative adventure and insight to get seriously caught up in.

The exotic bordering sinister hug of The Dragon comes next, the track a shadowy seductress in air, intent, and voice increasingly infesting and seducing body and psyche from its first provocative breath. There is also volatility in its nature which only adds to its might on the way to taking best track honours.

Family Ghost is concluded by the calm yet emotionally inflamed Til It Lasts, a fine end to a release which is Lauren Hoffman at her most creatively adventurous and open, backed by a band with as much suggestiveness in their sounds as in the singer’s heart bred words. It is darkly magical and sure to be on the favourites lists of a great many.

Family Ghost is out now on iTunes and other stores.

http://www.thesecretstorm.com/   https://www.facebook.com/laurenhoffmanmusic/   https://twitter.com/ShhSecretStorm

Pete RingMaster 07/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Vullnet Neziri ft Curtisay – Someday I’ll be Somebody

VN_RingMasterReview

Following the success and acclaim found by his previous singles, Macedonia born singer Vullnet Neziri has linked up with Jamaican rapper Curtisay for his third outing, Someday I’ll be Somebody.

From giving praise winning performances on TV show The Voice Of Albania in 2013, Neziri has honed his craft and sound over the two years leading to the release of his debut single You Got Me in 2015. Last year he followed it up with Rollercoaster, a song drawing more eager ears his way. Both songs and indeed Someday I’ll be Somebody show a variety in his releases which is sure to make his first album, scheduled for release later in 2017, an intriguing promise laden proposal.

As his debut track, Someday I’ll be Somebody was written by Academy Award and Grammy Award nominated, Golden Globe winning songwriter Diane Warren and was previously recorded by Justin Bieber. Neziri with Curtisay alongside gives the song a fresh identity which makes it far more interesting proposition than with its previous outing. With a warm jazzy lure around the opening vocal licks of Curtisay, there is instant warmth which entices ears. It is only escalated by the distinctly individual styles of both men, Curtisay providing a variety lined revelry against the emotion fuelled croon of Neziri.

Surrounded with a sound just as eager to imaginatively play, Someday I’ll be Somebody is an inviting slice of enterprise for all pop loving fans.

Someday I’ll be Somebody is out February 3rd through Hook and Rhyme Records.

https://www.facebook.com/Vullnetneziri1

Pete RingMaster 31/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Rogue Network – Binary

binary-ep-cover_RingMasterReview

If like us you were taken by their debut EP of 2015 and the two track single last year which it spawned, you will be pleased to know that The Rogue Network has taken things on their part and our attraction to another level with Binary. The four-track EP is another slice of the band’s blues fuelled rock ‘n’ roll yet revealing a broader canvas of sound as catchy as it is adventurous.

The band, taking inspirations from seventies nurtured blues/soul, has increasingly grown into a compelling proposition since emerging in 2015. Led by vocalist/guitarist Gerallt Williams, The Rogue Network re-energised an already growing interest and support for the band’s sound and live presence with the Milk and Honey/Lowland City single in 2016, a tantalising melody rich affair now eclipsed by the Binary EP.

From the first eager throes of opener Operator, band and release has ears and attention locked in. A tasty groove makes first contact, grumbling pulsating electronics and bassline in close attention as sonic enterprise brews around them. With a controlled easy going gait, the song soon eagerly strolls through ears, harmonies and fiery grooves in turn wrapping the potent tones of Williams. There is feistiness to the track which infests every aspect, giving it a raw tempestuous texture which never erupts but adds weight to the infectious funk clad encounter.

It is a fine, seriously catchy start quickly backed up by the melodically charmed Venodotia. There is a Paul McCartney-esque feel to the song, its pop prowess Wings hinting as picturesque lyrics and suggestive melodies embrace and inspire the imagination while Hammond spiced keys add extra colour. It is easy to get lost in its lure, its infectious chorus and a refreshing canter especially though it is soon overshadowed by the EP’s best track.

Ruby is pure enslavement, a slice of pop ‘n’ roll which chains appetite and lust as soon as its opening drama reveals the salaciously seductive bait of piano and the sinister charm of atmospheric melody. Demanding to be a single, the track dances like a mischievous temptress with body and spirit, its spicy blues flirtation alone irresistible around a chorus which has vocal chords dancing without inhibition.

The EP is concluded by Pam Fi, a Welsh sung proposal with rumbling bass and crisp beats clad in fiery melodies as wiry grooves infest the imagination. It is, as now expected, an inescapably catchy tempting bringing the release to a fine conclusion, quickly defusing the niggle of not knowing what its lyrical heart is sharing.

The Rogue Network have really hit their stride in songwriting and sound, Binary relishing another step in craft and boldness which if it continues suggests even bigger exciting things ahead.

The Binary EP is out now across most online stores.

https://twitter.com/THEROGUENETWORK   https://www.facebook.com/theroguenetwork/

Pete RingMaster 18/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Weaves and carousels with Demi The Daredevil

demi-the-daredevil_RingMasterReview

It is fair to say that bands which bring a diversity of imagination and sound together stand out from the thick music crowd more than most and that is exactly what is happening with Demi The Daredevil. Since forming in 2006, the Texan outfit has explored their art rock natured sound without allowing it boundaries, persistently luring attention from fans and media alike to now knock on global awareness. We recently had the chance to do our own exploration of the band with one of its founders Jeff Azar to look at the beginnings of Demi The Daredevil, that journey through sound and imagination, their latest release and much more…

Hello, many thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to the bands beginnings?

My name is Jeff Azar from an Art Rock/Dark Theater band called Demi the Daredevil. It all started in our hometown El Paso; El Chuco as some like to say. Jovan (RIP) and Marc started playing guitar together, and I was introduced to them by a mutual friend. I started off on the drums in this band.

Were you involved in other bands before Demi the Daredevil? If so what influence did those experiences have on what you are doing now?

Marc is in a few other bands. I jammed with some people sometimes. I guess they helped me realize what direction I did NOT want to go in.

What inspired the band name?

Demi is short for demigod, which is a half man half god. Kinda like a Hercules type.

Not sure about Daredevil. Marc and Jovan chose Demi the Daredevil over The Rootbeer KamiKazis.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

No, at least it was more intuitive rather than a logical idea behind what we were doing. When we first started, Jovan was inspiring from random things like film scores or TV show theme songs or video game music and we punk rocked those out. We didn’t have too much of an audience in mind, we just wanted to make loud fast melodic music.

When my brother came into the mix later down the road, I thought we’d have two ideas: classical music merged with the pop world and the world of movie acting/very obvious themed songs. Currently, the main goal is to have 1) good chord progressions 2) good melodies 3) and killer grooves. Besides that, there is no one idea musically, and as far as the lyrics go, I’m speaking to those who struggle with mental health.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

That’s a good question. At first it was the pure fun of playing and analyzing music, with no thought of an audience. Then the drive became to be a critical success. Now, the drive seems to be connecting with kindreds, with like minds. Wanting a sense of community is the drive.

dtd_RingMasterReviewSince your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

This band has had a lot of style changes. There have been phases, which might have made it hard to pinpoint an audience. But it was a necessary exploration…. Anyway, at first it was balls out punk rock or power pop. Then during a Beatles phase it became more reserved and softer. When my brother Thomas came into the mix, it became very Broadwayesque, because he’s a classically trained pianist and likes Broadway styled melodies.  Now, there don’t seem to be rules. As long as the songs are accessible, emotional, and will stand the test of time at least for a little while, we can inspire from soft rock, power pop, classical, funk, dark cabaret, etc…

It has been more of an organic movement of sound rather than you deliberately trying new things?

It’s always been an organic movement of sound. At every point in the history of this band we’ve just dished out what we were taking in at the time. For me it’s intuitive writing in that I take in a bunch of impressions, and then somehow something is synthesized from all those impressions.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Yes. You’re right about there being such a wide range of influencers. I’ve obsessed over bands during each stage…And can’t list them all. But, even though I’m ashamed to keep bringing up this contemporary band that only in the last year has been the biggest personal influence, Twenty One Pilots has had a major impact on my personal approach. I had similar subject matter to Tyler lyrically; he just said it better with zero pretence. He got me to get more sober, gave me faith in making songs that don’t have to be master crafted mega hits, just as long as they are good and accessible. They made me go the distance with grooves, and incorporate all these intricate rudiments I learned in drum line. And they created online community of a certain type of fan with a very particular identity which I’d like to reach too. The live show energy; I could go on. Please stop me.

Is there a regular process to the songwriting within the band?

For me, I need to start with a timeless and emotional chord progression…Or at least a variation of one.  That is most important to me. I try out syncopated rhythms with the core instruments. Melody then is experimented with. Previously written poetry is put more into lyric and song form. Recording programs help with happy accidents. There is a long phase of punching the song up after the main idea is there…So many bases to cover.

Where do the biggest inspirations to your lyrical side come from?

Lyric inspiration starts from what I think is a big realization or feeling.

I then take months to get a more bird’s eye view on it and to say it better than when I tried to describe it initially.

Can you give us some background to your latest release?

A lot of the lyrics for it were written in strange places, like an attic on the UT campus during my last summer of school there, a couple psych hospitals(a lot of time to reflect there), and in a tee pee (which I needed to live in to save money for marketing). The band was in flux, and our producer lived in New York. So it took a long time to coordinate with our producer long distance, which left me a lot of time to treat the songs like Frankenstein until they were the best they could be.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.dtd-art_RingMasterReview

The EP is called Secret Schizoid. The schizoid, defined by a psychologist Rollo May, is someone unable to feel, or to have close connection with others. They are out of touch with themselves. So these tracks are tracking that recovering the self process and piecing it back together.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to leave plenty of room for development as you record?

Definitely a band that goes into the studio with songs more in their finished state. Unless a group of musicians are dedicating enough time with each other to make magic happen going into the studio without set ideas seems like a nightmare. Plus we really just need to record live drums in the studio. The rest can be tracked at home.

 Tell us about the live side to the band?

We’re starting to prep for the live shows and trying to make them theatrical, in the sense that we we’re creating little inner dialogue scenes with voices on the back tracks, or I should say monologue scenes because they are like schizophrenic voices, in between songs…And making it engaging with the audience. We want people to feel like they are part of the inner turmoil.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it? Are there still the opportunities to make a mark?

Yes, there are opportunities to break through; the key is knowing what kind of person your fan is and send them personal messages. Build relationships. Also learning how to using social media to reach them. Facebook offers a really useful audience insights tool to learn more about your fans, and a power tool editor to advertise correctly.  In terms of playing live shows to regional fans when you don’t have money or resources to book nation or worldwide tours, promoting your shows to potential fans in whatever area will make it more worth your while. No industry ppl who can take you to the next level will mess with you without fans, and you can’t leverage anyone in the industry without fans.

You touched on social media there, how has it impacted impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

At first, the social media made us feel insecure because we just got crickets. After understanding how to use it (to spread your music to people who are care about that kind of music), it’s a free marketing tool. You have to learn how to use it and adapt. If you want to get signed to a company, you need to prove you have engagement from a Fan-base because that is in our control now. If you don’t care about getting signed you still need to use social media to have a Fan-base. You can play a show to ten people, two whom really likes you, or you can reach 8,000 people by $20 to market a live performance online for example.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add for the readers?

Thank you for asking good questions! Yes, admit insanity, embrace your humanity.

If you are plagued with self-doubt, are conflict ridden, and someone who asks existential questions listen to our Secret Schizoid EP 🙂

http://www.demithedaredevil.com/    https://www.facebook.com/demithedaredevil/   https://twitter.com/demidaredevil

The RingMaster Review 13/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright