Astral Cloud Ashes – Too Close to the Noise Floor

Album Art_RingMasterReview

With three attention grabbing and imagination sparking singles under the belt, Astral Cloud Ashes unveil debut album Too Close to the Noise Floor. It is a collection of songs which arouse and serenade the senses, often simultaneously as the project’s mesmeric songwriting and emotive melodic elegance seduces.

Astral Cloud Ashes is the new project of Jersey bred songwriter/musician Antony Walker, previously better known as one half of the Channel Islands hailing Select All Delete Save As. Having already created music under the name ALPA, amongst other monikers, Walker quickly sparked attention to his latest project last year with first single Too Close To The Noise Floor, the now title track to the new album. Primarily a solo project but with backing vocalist Jason Neil a permanent fixture in the band, Astral Cloud Ashes draws on inspirations ranging from The Cure, Bloc Party, Interpol, At the Drive In, Mars Volta, and Say Anything as well as flavours bred in indie and alternative rock/pop. Equally though, the album shows bold ventures into more progressive and post rock pastures without losing the instinctive catchiness and melodic romancing found in those earlier propositions.

Mixed across its tracks by Gareth [The Fold], Edd HartwellPaul Miles, Daniel Szanto,  and Walker himself, with the mastering undertaken by Tim Turan, Too Close to the Noise Floor opens with The Man I Had To Become. Instantly a temptation of bubbling guitar captures ears, the coaxing quickly joined by a wave of rhythmic jabbing and a thicker weave of melodic guitar and harmonious vocals. It is a gentle yet boisterous affair easily whipping up the imagination and spirit with Walker’s distinctive tones the mellow flame within a more combustible web of enterprise. It is a great mix which marked those early singles but already seems to have blossomed within the album into a more adventurous and confident entangling of the listener.

The great start is followed by the album’s title track, Too Close to the Noise Floor showing a rawer, more imposing energy as it takes the imagination into the intimacy and adventure of cosmonautics but equally involves “family values and unwanted first-world paranoia” in its energetically hugged theme. Punching its rhythmic and contagious essences home, it also carries a hazy climate to its atmosphere with the bass a deliciously throaty lure amongst nothing but virulent temptation. Embracing a XTC feel and Melvins like revelry, the track has body and appetite eagerly involved in swift time.

Grateful for the Ghost In Our House steps forward next and as the last track showed a more formidable presence to its predecessor, this song reveals a fiercer predation to its opening and subsequent invention within another wash of suggestive melodies and smouldering dynamics. Though not in the actual sound, it is easy to see where an influence of The Cure comes into play, Walker creating an emotional and musical drama which has the senses riding a roller coaster.

Recent single Get Real follows, strolling along with the ever present catchiness which Walker conjures with seeming ease across every track. Guitars pop and bubble throughout the song as rhythmic tenacity creating an anthemic frame to the vocal and melodic ingenuity before Flashback takes over. A calmer and mellower engagement but even more emotively forceful, the song caresses ears with a lone guitar melody before being joined by a heavily shadowed bassline aligned to a broader floating melodic enterprise. Vocally, Walker provides an introspective narrative as provocative as the poetic almost volcanic fuzziness of his guitar. Adding another individual shade and hue to the album, the track shows the broader landscape of Walker’s songwriting and an intimacy, whether personal or observational, which fuels his words.

With drummer Max Saidi guesting, Avant Blah! strolls boldly in next, its lo-fi pop ‘n’ roll blending Weezer infection with Pavement-esque invention while its successor Lites almost lumbers into view in comparison with the brooding bass and irritable riffs to the fore. In all songs there is a great repetitious quality brewed by Walker, here almost coming over drone like to great effect around the solemn melody and the similarly melancholic vocals. As it expands though, a wave of rich textures and rousing energies flood the song, returning throughout the low-key yet thickly enjoyable, almost imposing encounter.

The excellent This Once Great Place has an air of The Cure again with its atmospheric landscape, reminding of the A Forest/Pornography era of the trio across its own captivating journey before the equally impressive Housing in a Bubble makes a grab for best track with its more punkish/grungy roar of sound. Everything about it has a snarl not heard on the album previously; revealing more of the diversity the release carries whilst stirring up a fresh greed in ears and pleasure.

Our Holiday brings Too Close to the Noise Floor to a sombre and enthralling close, the track initially a dark sigh but soon building its own catchy canter loaded with spiky hooks and spicy melodies around another slightly foreboding and compelling bassline. Once more thoughts of Robert Smith and co are sparked but again as a flavour in something individual to Astral Cloud Ashes. It is a riveting end to a striking and increasingly impressive first album from Walker.

The clues to the project’s potential were there in its first trio of singles, and now confirmed and partly realised by Too Close to the Noise Floor. The feeling is that there is plenty more to come and to be explored within that promise, and going by the strength of this thoroughly enjoyable offering, we are all in for many treats ahead.

Too Close to the Noise Floor is released July 11th @ http://apple.co/1RFvoL8

https://www.facebook.com/astralcloudashes   https://astralcloudashes.bandcamp.com/   https://twitter.com/AstralCloudAsh

Pete RingMaster 08/07/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Infectious roars: talking Rosedale with founder Mike Liorti.

Rosedale_RingMasterReview

The brainchild of Torontonian Mike Liorti, Rosedale is an aggressive pop band which commands attention. Formed in 1989, the band has moved and evolved through numerous personnel and situations, all the time Mike honing the sound and imagination which has lured potent praise to EPs and albums. With thanks to Mike we recently explored deeper into the world and body of Rosedale…

Hello Mike and thanks for talking with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Thanks for having me. Rosedale is currently just me. I have different members all over the place but I’ve been solo for almost 5 years.

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

I’ve produced, managed, and played keys/lead guitar for my friend Alex Baker. We recorded his album January Blues in 14 hours and toured it for a couple months. He’s an incredible artist and has definitely influenced me to keep it simple. I also filled in on guitar/guest vocals for a couple bands that played as my band such as Time and Distance (Charleston, WV) and Your Favorite Coastline (Virginia Beach). Both were very fun experiences. I programmed some FX and lights into their back tracks for fun. And they both taught me a lot about writing even before I played for them and I was just a fan. I also sang vocals on a Disney musical called Radio Rebel. I sing all the vocals for the GGGG’s character, Atticus Mitchell.

What inspired the band name?

The band name came from a street that was on our way to the local music store, L&M. We would walk to that music store almost every day and write songs on their awesome gear. We ended up becoming friends with all the employees and recorded with some of them. So that store and the walks to it represent our roots and where we came from. Still, to this day, I’ve met some of my musicians while checking out music stores, taught parts and sold gear to people in music stores, and we often get people saying “I feel like I walked into the lighting room at Guitar Center” as we’re about to start our set. So it’s safe to say I’ve always been the store rat. And it’s taught me more than a college degree would have.

rosedale2Was there a specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Initially we were very influenced by our local heroes, Moneen. The Used and Boxcar Racer/Blink 182 were also up there on our direction list, but every time we hit the clean channel, it was for Moneen. We were about growing pains and dreams to leave our home town (very original…) As everyone sort of fizzled out into real life and new bands, I migrated the message of Rosedale to more of a motivational message to stay focused on your dreams, show the world what you’re made of, be grateful for what you have, and never give up.

Do the same things still drive the project when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

They’ve definitely evolved over time, especially with new members coming in for tours. I try to take titbits of their influences into the parts/intros/endings so they have a little more fun every night and it keeps things fresh for me. And I definitely still enjoy playing old songs and putting a twist on them. Right now we’re doing an 8 minute “anniversary version” of our 2006 single you’ll count to Ten (for whatever ten people care) which I just now realized has some serious irony in the title.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved? Has it seen more of an organic movement of sound or more deliberate intent to try new things?

Rosedale’s sound has definitely matured into more of a listenable aggressive pop. We no longer put our amps on 11 and sing/yell from our throats the whole set. But there’s definitely a lot more raw passion and expression on stage and in the recordings so it’s overall much more authentic. There’s also a lot more orchestration and traditional symphony/big band instruments in the tracks now- big choir vocals too. That evolution just sort of came naturally through my classical upbringing and appreciation for classic movie score composers like John Williams and Hans Zimmer. I just figured ‘hey nobody has really mixed that with punk rock’ and it’s made some cool songs. It takes a lot of time to score them out and program them to sound realistic but it’s a really rewarding process to hear them back.

Are there any in particular inspirations which have added colour to not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

There are definitely influences all over the place in my music and approach on life (Some more surprising than others). You might not think Lil’ Wayne has a strong influence on the decisions I make, but he does. I don’t smoke or drink syrup, but I often think “what would Weezy do?” whenever I feel like closing up shop early after a long day in the studio. I watched a documentary on how Michael Jordan switched from basketball to baseball and I was just as inspired to work on my show from it as I was from seeing an Angels & Airwaves concert. So influences are drawn from everywhere for me. If it sounds good to me, I’ll roll with it, if it has meaning to my life, I’ll write about it.

Is there a general process to your songwriting?

My process is No Process. I like to change it up every time I write a song and challenge myself. If I started writing on piano last song, the next one I might write on guitar, or uke, or acoustic, or just a pad. If I was using pro-tools to demo it out, I’ll try Logic or ableton or Reason for the next demo. If I just finished a sad song, next one is gunna be happy; slow song, fast song etc. The last thing I would ever want Rosedale to be is a recipe that has every song on the album sounding the same…as much as that works for bands these days.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

I just write. Personal life memories, something that is on my mind a lot, whatever the chords/song reminds me of. I try not to decide what I’m gunna write about before writing a song. I usually just dive into it, even if there’s no music yet, and realize what I’m writing about once there are a few lines down.

Give us some background to your latest release.

Rosedale was released February 2016 and is a self-titled release because it’s basically all about Rosedale; where it all started, my personal story, why I am who I am, and the struggles I currently face. I recorded it at the studio that mentored me into the recording world, Drive Studios in Woodbridge Ontario. I’ve been good friends with Steve Rizun for the past few years and knew that studio inside-out so it made perfect sense to do the album there. It’s every control freak’s dream to have the key to the studio and I was like a kid in a candy store. 14 hour days flew by in that place.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind its songs.rosedale_RingMasterReview

The on-going theme, naturally, is to do what you love and never give up. Sacrifice everything else for the one thing you truly wanna do with your life.

Do you go into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

A little bit of both. I do like going into a studio with all the ideas mapped out and just replacing the tracks with better tones/takes. But sometimes I’ll just have a couple tracks and a tempo laid out and say “I’m saving this one for the studio…I wanna get crazy with this one”.

Tell us about the live side to the band.

We have a programmed light show and a bunch of automation on our mics to make it sound like (and sometimes bigger than) the record. We also bring our own fog machine. It helps make every show epic and works well with our music. Whenever I think “man, I set all this stuff up for nothing” I’ll see someone taking a picture or video and lose all regret.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there?

Toronto is very tough to have as your home base. I rarely play it because it’s always such a let-down seeing everyone bail last minute. [With] most Canada shows that seems to be the case for some reason; like you have to create a big buzz elsewhere before your hometown cares about you again. I wish all it took was good music. The best place for music is Germany/Austria. Anywhere where German is the main language, good music prospers. I hear the same thing about Japan too but I’ve never been there myself.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

The internet and social media should be much more useful than it actually is. Contemporary social media has ruined music, straight up. It’s the independent musician’s worst enemy. It was great in the MySpace days but now, thanks to the corporate sharks taking over, it’s just one big useless distraction polluting everyone’s common sense. Will it ever be useful/free again? One can only hope. Don’t get me wrong, there’s a lot of positive things that social media is to thank for, like connecting with new fans personally has never been easier! But overall it’s just become one big cess pool of gimmicks, memes, vented personal matters, and ads.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Keep your stick on the ice.

https://www.facebook.com/ROSEDALEmusic   http://www.rosedalemusic.net/

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 01/07/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Creative espionage and inventive intimation: an interview with Aiming For Enrike

 

Photo: Marius Mada Dale

Photo: Marius Mada Dale

Without doubt, one of the year’s most exhilarating and inventive propositions has been Segway Nation, the new album from Norwegian duo Aiming For Enrike. The encounter is a fascinating instrumental adventure in sound and captivating aural suggestiveness; a multi-flavoured infectiousness created by drummer Tobias Ørnes and guitarist Simen Følstad Nilsen. Offered the chance to learn more with the duo, we set about discovering the creative heart of band and album.

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

First of all can you tell us about yourselves as individuals?

We are two quite calm persons; a guitar player and drummer. We love making and playing music, so we spend a lot of time in the rehearsal space, practicing, jamming, and composing.

When did you first meet and what sparked the idea to form the band?

We met in 2010, when we attended a music school in Oslo. We were both into experimental noise rock music. After seeing some mind-blowing bands like Monolithic and Zu, we wanted to do something like that as a duo. By using loops we managed to get a huge sound even though we were only two. In the beginning we had more of a noise/prog sound but over the years the songs developed into more conventional song structures where we have incorporated a lot of influences from electronica, funk etc.

Is there a specific meaning behind the band name?

Yes, but not worth sharing😉

Photo © Haakon Borg / Magpie

Photo © Haakon Borg / Magpie

It is wonderfully difficult to pin down the Aiming For Enrike sound for us, how would you describe it to newcomers to the band?

It’s an adventurous band with good melodies, cool grooves, and lots of energy. It has a very distinct sound, but still the music can go in many different directions.

What and who have most inspired your musical ideas and subsequently sound would you say?

Our sound is kind of schizophrenic and has a lot of layers because of a wide range of influences. Of course we can be inspired by other things in life, but I think it is only music and music gear that have a direct influence to our sound. Aiming for Enrike is the result of two people and sounds like something none of us would have made by ourselves.

Here are some names: Miles Davis, Josh Homme, James Brown, Nels Cline, Radiohead, Sonic Youth, Greg Saunier, Hot Snakes, Glen Branca, Mike Patton, Moha…

I am no expert on the broad expanse of the Norwegian music scene right now, generally coming across the diversity of metal and rock bands from there, but I get the feeling that your music is a one of a kind there; something unusual to the Norwegian landscape of sound. Is that the reality and if so how have they taken to it?

In Norway it is very common to have musical collaborations across genres. If you look at the jazz and improvisational music scene, you have lots of artist who play music that have more in common with pop, rock/metal, electronic music than traditional jazz. In jazz festivals you can go and see pop acts, and in commercial festivals there are jazz bands playing. So I think in general people are very open to new stuff.  Most artists are not so focused on sounding like the other one. It is a good thing to be original, and have your own thing going. We don’t know of any other Norwegian band that sounds like us but way more people than we would have guessed have been positive and open to it.

You have just released new album, Segway Nation; a release which had our imagination as busy and enthralled as ears and feet. Where does a ‘typical’ Aiming For Enrike song start composing wise?

We always start by just playing. We spend a lot of time just improvising, or trying out different kind of ideas. It is important that we are inspired when we play, and that there is a fun factor. We try to follow our intuition, and not doubt our choices too much. Then we record our ideas and make tunes out of them.

Throughout the album, there is an organic freedom, almost as things were created, played, and improvised in the moment. Tell us about the recording of Segway Nation; were songs already AimingForEnrike-SegwayNation_RingMasterReview2400written before recording them or was there an element of conjuring twists and turns there and then?

Everything is played live in the studio, without any click track. That might create a more «free» or improvised feel. On Segway Nation we composed all the songs before we recorded them, but there are some parts in the songs where we improvise. It can be open sections, or written parts played in different ways. That keeps it interesting for us, and hopefully for the listeners. Some of the more «free form» songs like Minitrue and Phone Phobia are the result of some improvised recording sessions.

Another great aspect to the album is the way it inspires the listener’s imagination to create its own adventures. Can you tell us about some of the actual themes and inspirations to the tracks and their suggestive dramas?

We didn’t have any specific plans for this. But it is a good thing if the listeners make up their own adventure in the music. I don’t think there are any specific themes to the songs, but there are specific inspirations to some of the songs. It can be a groove, melody, riff etc.

The past few years has seen some impressive and ear striking duos emerge with varying styles and dynamics within their union. Often it seems that the slimness of personnel allows a band to bring its live presence much more easily to recordings. It is the same with you guys; there is a feeling that listening to Segway Nation would be like standing in front of you on stage. Do you think there is some validity in that thought from your perspective; less bodies and minds leads to less of a leaning on technology and tricks when recording music?

There is more space in the music when you are a duo, and that makes it easier to follow your intuition and play in the moment. Since we record our music live in a room, the recording becomes very representative for us as a band. There are very few options sound wise with only a guitar and a drum kit, so I think it is hard to lose the live feeling in the recording.

Marius Mada Dale

Marius Mada Dale

Tell us about your live side; how you translate the dynamics of songs to the stage?

It works really great! We played the songs live many times before we recorded them. So the recording is not much different from a live performance. With the live performance you will also get the visual aspect and a bit more playful approach to the material.

What is next for Aiming For Enrike now that the album is out and earning acclaim and new hearts?

We are working on new material, which is turning out really good! And we have some festivals coming up this summer; first there´s Nattjazz festival in Bergen, then Øya festival in Oslo. We are planning a European tour in the fall! So lots of cool stuff coming up!

Once again many thanks for giving your time to us. Anything you would like to add?

Check out our album Segway Nation, and also the live in Rohdos garage videos on YouTube.

Read the review for Segway Nation @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/05/06/aiming-for-enrike-segway-nation/

https://www.facebook.com/aimingforenrike    http://www.namemusic.no/aimingforenrike/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 04/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Cardinal Bay – Answers EP

CARDINAL BAY_RingMasterReview

Making a potent introduction with their debut EP last year, UK post hardcore band Cardinal Bay have upped their game with its successor Answers. It is a five track proposal which growls as it dances on the ear, all of its tracks being as seriously catchy as they are emotively and aggressively forceful.

The strength of the band’s 2015 debut EP Way Back Home, released in their second year together, suggested that the Bridgwater quintet had the potential to make some big musical statements ahead and Answers certainly lives up to that promise in many ways. It comes after a year, since that first release, where the band undertook many UK tours, playing around the country alongside Amaryllis, Lost Atlanta, Chasing Cadence, and Breathe in the Silence and supported Funeral for a Friend before playing main stage at the UK’s biggest youth music festival, Butserfest. The early months of 2016 have been no different in business and success, the five-piece having made a recently acclaimed appearance on the main stage at Teddy Rocks. Now it is time for the Jonny Renshaw (Devil Sold His Soul) recorded Answers to lay down a marker for what many are calling the most exciting band to recently emerge in the post hardcore scene.

art_RingMasterReviewFrom its first moments, the Answers EP certainly does little to dismiss that type of claim, its title track slipping into ears with a melodic jangle as feisty sounds flirt with its background. Pretty soon rhythms and riffs are jostling for attention too as the strong harmonic cries of Josh Rogers colour the song’s air. It is not an over striking start but the song easily has attention held, especially once Roger’s strong vocals stroll with a throaty bassline from Jonny Dibble for company as beats jab and skirt their tempting. As the guitars of George Hill and Dave Small cast a web of melodic suggestiveness, the song simmers nicely with the occasion eruption of raw vocal growls matched by an increase in energy led by the lively beats of Matt Ward.

A strong start to the EP, the song is a sign of things to come with bigger and bolder things waiting to really spark the imagination starting with Out Of Sight. The second track has a far more imposing air to it straight away, swinging beats hitting with a heavier hand as again raw vocal squalls court the impressing melodic tones of Rogers. The band does have a flare with creating infectious pop seeded enterprise too and that also blossoms within the tenacious encounter, almost so well that its make the rawest hues of the track seem unnecessary.

Its feisty presence is matched and eclipsed by the outstanding roar of the following #Shotgun. Instantly it has a virulence and fiery edge which seduces and ignites the imagination and appetite to their strongest reactions yet. There is something familiar to the song, an indefinable essence which only adds to its drama and magnetism built on shadowy rhythms, melodic adventure, and a rampant catchiness more than conducted by Roger’s powerful delivery.

Masquerade makes a more tempered impact next though from its initial grouchy attack amidst a spiral of sonic enterprise, the track easily engages and increasingly pleases ears. It lacks the spark of its predecessors musically, the ear grabbing bite which chains attention but certainly makes up for it with the now expected great vocal quality of the band.

The EP comes to a close with There Are No Flames In Hell, a track which slowly burned itself into the passions. By its end though, and helped by round after round of its infection loaded chorus, it emerged as another strong and lingering favourite. The track contains every impressive element of the band and its sound, giving plenty more reasons why so many are waxing lyrical about Cardinal Bay. With the Answers EP to the fore, 2016 is looking like being a big year for the Somerset band.

The Answers EP is out now @ https://cardinalbay.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/CardinalBay   http://cardinalbayuk.tumblr.com/   https://twitter.com/CardinalBayUK

Pete RingMaster 17/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Astral Cloud Ashes – Flashback

Flashback (artwork)_RingMasterReview

Having made a strong and captivating introduction to itself with the single Too Close To The Noise Floor, the Channel Islands hailing Astral Cloud Ashes are about to follow up that success with Flashback. Providing another potent teaser to a forthcoming debut album, the new single also reveals another dynamic and colour to the project’s songwriting and sound. Whereas its predecessor was a lively stroll of infectious enterprise and energy, Flashback is a calmer and mellower emotive engagement and just as magnetic.

Astral Cloud Ashes is the new project from Antony Walker, one half of the duo Select All Delete Save As which especially earned deserved acclaimed with their album Ultra Cultura in 2014. Walker has been exploring his own solo creativity for a while, often under the name ALPA, amongst other monikers, but as quickly suggested by his first single as Astral Cloud Ashes, this new venture is one with the potential to match and even eclipse the previously mentioned ‘day job’ band. Sound wise Walker draws on inspirations from the likes of The Cure, Bloc Party, Interpol, At the Drive In, Mars Volta, and Say Anything for an indie/pop/rock persuasion, presumably self-tagged, as future-core.

Flashback caresses ears with a lone melody initially before the guitar is swiftly joined by a heavily shadowed bassline and floating melodic enterprise. At the same time, Walker provides an introspective narrative as gently provocative and ear pleasing as the harmonic embrace of sound around it. Guitar jangles, crisp beats, and emotive toning subsequently add to the web of alluring textures building the captivating proposal; a song wearing varying shades of The Lightning Seeds, Pavement, and Dinosaur Jr. to its melodic and evocative charm.

The track is a warm and fascinating encounter showing, as suggested earlier, another aspect to the band and offering another reason to keep an eager ear open for the first Astral Cloud Ashes album later this year.

Flashback is released May 4th across all major online distributors.

https://www.facebook.com/astralcloudashes/

Pete RingMaster 29/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Ooberfuse – Secret Tattoo

Ooberfuse_RingMasterReview

Having recently returned from a prestigious Nashville songwriting camp sponsored by the UK government (UK Trade and Industry), the band part of a small number handpicked UK artists working with Nashville’s songwriting royalty, electronic pop duo Ooberfuse unveil their new single in the shape of the magnetically alluring Secret Tattoo. It is a vibrant smile on the senses; a song which bubbles and simmers like a pot of warmed honey as sweet as it is compelling.

Ooberfuse artwork_RingMasterReviewThe Woolwich based Ooberfuse is the creative union of Hal St John and Cherrie Anderson, and a project which has seduced much of the world across hundreds of gigs including performing to an audience of 2 million in Madrid and playing for hundreds in one of Rio de Janeiro’s notorious favelas. They have toured across the UK, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Brazil, Canada, the Philippines, and Iraq whilst stirring up support from the likes of Paul Oakenfold, Sister Bliss (Faithless), Ministry of Sound, BBC Introducing’s Tom Robinson, and Amazing Radio’s Jim Gellatly. Following the successful trip mentioned at the start, Ooberfuse has UK spotlights in their sight again with Secret Tattoo, the successor to their praised 2015 single Fall and a song inspired by the thought, “Although love hides its face away from the gaze of a loveless world it nevertheless sprays, like urban graffiti, colourful designs on the flesh of the human ear.”

Secret tattoo opens with a Yazoo like electro invitation quickly joined by the highly persuasive tones of Anderson. Backed by similarly alluring hues from St John, her voice dances on the senses; offering a warm siren-esque kiss on the ear as elegant and tempting as the weave of melodic synth cast suggestiveness around her. There is also a touch of Depeche Mode to the song as its meanders with purpose and resourceful enterprise across the imagination. Its body is slim, textures uncomplicated on the ear but together they create a pop song which lures the listener into a sultry embrace of emotive and electronic flirtation.

No demands are made by Secret Tattoo, just an invitation from Ooberfuse to immerse in its infectious charm; one easy to accept request.

Secret Tattoo is released April 29th

Upcoming Tour Dates:

9 May – London, Soho, Spice of Life

25 June – London, Hayes, Hayes Community Centre

6 July – Stonyhurst, Clitheroe, Stonyhurst College

http://www.ooberfuse.com/   https://www.facebook.com/ooberfuse   https://twitter.com/ooberfuse/

Pete RingMaster 27/04/2016

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Matinée – Empty

matinee_RingMasterReview

With the melodic charms of debut album, These Days, still luring attention over a year later, backed by subsequent singles, the Italy hailing, London based Matinée are poised to unveil a new magnetic encounter posing as a single. Empty is a warm kiss on the senses, a melodic blush of elegance and catchy enterprise which equally is a rousing adventure hard to stop feet and enjoyment showing eager reactions to. The single in many ways echoes the creative exploits of that first album but at the same time pushes the invention and rich weave of flavours to new captivating heights.

Since emerging a handful of years back, Matinée has persistently impressed and fascinated a growing following of fans and attention. The success of their album has been matched and backed by a live presence which has drawn its own praise with the quartet sharing stages with the likes of Razorlight, Mystery Jets, Futureheads, The Wombats, Pete and the Pirates, British Sea Power and many more along the way. Empty sees the band linking up with Tony Doogan (Mogwai, Carl Barat, Glasvegas) again, the producer repeating his part of These Days, alongside Chris Geddes art_RingMasterReviewfrom Belle and Sebastian this time around.

Empty opens on a gentle rhythmic pulse and a charming drizzle of melodic rain, each synth cast drop a golden burst of warmth and enticement. The vocals of synth/guitarist Luigi Tiberio only adds to the attraction, his Italian accent bringing a touch of the Mediterranean and further infectiousness. Once the bolder, darker hues of Alfredo Ioannone’s bass and Alessio Palizzi’s lively beats join the affair on ears, the song is an enthralling blend of light and shadows amidst darker emotion and creative festivity.

Just as impressive in the song as the sounds offered, is the way sometimes the keys seem to lead the way, in other moments the guitar of Giuseppe Cantoli do or the vocals of Tiberio potently backed by those of Ioannone. The reality is that everything is equal yet the ebb and flow of the song, its rich crescendos provides a deceptive and very pleasing drama which consumes attention.

If you have yet to enjoy a Matinée performance, Empty is the perfect moment and adventure to spend your ticket on.

Empty is released April 29th via Neon Tetra Records.

https://www.facebook.com/thematineeband

Pete RingMaster 25/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com