Reverse Family: 365 days of songwriting

Last August we gave you a first look and insight into the epic new project from Reverse Family. Starting the following October, the plan with 365 was to release 52 EPs as one a week for a whole year, each of their songs representing a single day in the inspiring life of its creator.

Reverse Family is the solo project of Dermot Illogical, though you may know him as Andreas Vanderbraindrain, the frontman of British outfit The Tuesday Club. With its brainchild embracing the various talents of others, Reverse Family first grabbed keen attention with debut album My Songs About Life Mid Crisis in 2016. In so many ways 365 is a whole new ball game for the band, a project taking the listener into the heart and thoughts, not forgetting darkness, Dermot personally experienced as he came to terms with personal despair through the death of a great friend and band mate, going through divorce, dealing with the serious illness of both parents and other traumas taking Dermot to the edge.

Since that first collection of songs sent our way to announce the release of 365, the project has been in full swing with some more teasers sent for our ears to explore. So time to give you more insight into a collection of songs which we can say to date has grabbed the imagination and pleasured ears in varying persistently enjoyable ways by focusing on a few more which have recently been unveiled.

Day 20 provides The Suns rays are just like birthdays, an inviting stroll built around a great post punk bassline as crispy beats align to the distinctive tones of Dermot. Reflecting on the radiance of the weather as emotions rise and fall, the track is a thickly infectious affair nagging away at ears like a pleasurable itch.

There is great diversity to the sound and personas of songs with 365 too, Was I a good man (day 15) swinging along with a sixties garage pop hues as guitars offer their psych kissed jangle while No Reason to run (day 6) has the rhythmic shuffle of a King Trigger aligned to an off kilter twee/ indie pop croon. Hugging a melody which enthrals in its nagging simplicity, the track is simply mesmeric, almost shamanic in its virulent enterprise.

Equally irresistible is the bricks and mortar snarl of Sunshade City (day 21). It has a gnarly tone around the pulsating shadowy lure of the bass, both at the heart of its post punk/industrial examination while with matching success We Got It (day26) sees Reverse Family embrace early Adam and The Ants textures in its resourceful punk dance. With so many tracks unveiled already it is hard to pick a favourite but this always figures in any contemplation as too does  the twang lilted Keep Being the Good Guy (day 25). Its country punk tinge and another irresistible bass line and tone court the ever virulent vocal delivery of Dermot, it all uniting in one seriously catchy persuasion.

Seductive acoustic discord flirts from within Dark pop (day 7) and insatiable askew pop punk is bred through the rousing antics of Pay the price (day 3) while School gate politics (day 64) is a prowling harassment with menacing shadows and post punk intimation, kind of like a Bowie meets Artery contemplation. All three are additional pinnacles in the lofty landscape of tracks released to date and definite favourites with us among so many more.

It has to be said though that Movin’ forward (day 74) is the cream of the crop, its repetitious swing and hook lined lure simply irresistible; a real ear worm as dark as it is vibrant. There are numerous potent ways to get into 365, such as the delicious lithe tenebrific pop ‘n’ roll of Your wandering hands (day 82) but Movin’ forward is addiction in the waiting.

There is so much more to discover already with 365, aside from our glimpses, with EPs released currently standing at 19 as you read, and all there for your exploration, @ http://reversefamily.co.uk/  with plenty more adventure to come which you can keep up with through the Perfect Pop Co-Op magazine. 365 is DIY majesty with drama to be found at every turn and so much pleasure too.

https://www.facebook.com/reversefamily/    https://twitter.com/PerfectPopCoOp

Read our introduction to Reverse Family and 365 @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/08/26/day-by-day-with-reverse-family/

Pete RingMaster 06/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Christmas Parade

Mistletoe, mince pies, and Xmas songs are all major ingredients in festivities whether you have an appetite for them or not. Without our site having a cookery page, we take a gander at a few of the latter to help get you in the mood.

First up is Merry Christmas To You from British punks Peter118. Stoke-based, the band is the brainchild of Peter Field, former member of Senseless and Ambassadors of Shalom. Originally a solo project, the band has grown into a quartet with Field’s wife Janine on bass/backing vocals, Sam Critchley on drums, and Alisha Palmer on guitar/backing vocals. This year the band has already hit the spot with In Stereo, a split EP alongside US punks No Lost Cause and in particular with the single taken from it, Wasting.

Featured on the compilation Rodney On The Rock Presents: Santa’s Got a GTO Vol. 2 alongside tracks from the likes of CJRamone, Color TV, The Ramonas, Frankie and the Studs, and The Dollyrots, Merry Christmas To You is a slice of old school UK meets raw US punk as infectious as it is enticingly raw. Spicy grooves and hooks collude with hungry riffs and rampant rhythms across less than two minutes of richly appetising rock ‘n’ roll. Admittedly we do not have a natural appetite for Christmas offerings but for songs like Merry Christmas To You we eagerly raise a glass.

Another track hitting the spot is Goodbye Psychotic Christmas. From Brian Kroll & My Son The Bum, who equally have laid down one of the year’s bright spots in the single Mad Man (Playing in a Mad World’s Game) this past February. My Son The Bum has shown itself a band unafraid to explore distinctly individual styles and flavours in their releases and prime songwriter Brian Kroll shows he is a dab hand at seasonal offerings too with the new single.

Draped around a vintage rock ‘n’ roll stroll, inspired by Gene Vincent according to Knoll, melodies wind their temptation as vocals equally lure ears. As much as there is that fifties hue, there is seventies festive seasoning too, the song echoing the seasonal gifts of bands like Mud and Showaddywaddy to capture the imagination and raise the spirit for parties to come.

Introducing us all their Christmas Girl is Italian band Carnaby. Inspired by their experience of being away from loved ones during Xmas due to band commitments, the song is a catchy slice of pop rock with a great sixties pop/seventies mod flavouring.

Hailing from Canicattì, Carnaby was formed in 2010 taking their name as direct reference to the famous London street and its sixties musical heritage. Consisting of brothers Joseph and Vincent Sandonato, Pietro Pelonero, and Giuseppe Racalbuto, the quartet moved to Bristol in 2016 and is currently working on their debut album for release next year.

Christmas Girl is an infectious embrace of familiar essences borne of those earlier mentioned flavours. It sways and teases with its open love of sixties pop, its melodies a warm enticement as rhythms share their firmer touch with the same kind of inescapable catchiness. The track is not particularly unique but a whole lot of fun, just as Christmas should be.

Completing our look is some Holiday Season pop rock from Jeff Michaels. From Boston, MA, singer songwriter Michaels continues his tradition of the past five years in releasing a holiday single and accompanying video. This year it is It’s Been a Long Time, Christmas and its ” simple call for the return of Christmas, and the brighter days we all need.”

The song is a gentle croon with an instinctive catchiness, emotive keys, and a country hued lacing sure to please appetites for mellow yet boisterous pop. Michaels’ voice is equally as enticing, his melodic strains a warm caress matching the tender hug of the sounds around him.

In a time where this type of song can be as unwelcome as some relatives these are four tracks which buck the trend and will easily add something enjoyable to your seasonal soundtrack.

http://peter118.weebly.com/    https://www.facebook.com/Peter118UK/   https://twitter.com/peter118uk

https://www.facebook.com/mysonthebum/    https://twitter.com/mysonthebum    https://www.facebook.com/briankrollmusic1

https://www.facebook.com/carnabyband/    https://twitter.com/carnabyband

https://www.jeffmichaelsband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/pg/jmichaelsrocks/

Pete RingMaster

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Buster Shuffle – I’ll Take What I Want

As you shiver over the winter months, body and energy needs something to keep the cold at bay and spirit stomping and Buster Shuffle have just the right tonic in the shape of their new album, I’ll Take What I Want. Bursting with their most virulent and imaginative sound yet, the UK quartet’s fourth full-length mischievously swings and devilishly strolls as it grabs limbs and soul like a rascal puppeteer.

I’ll Take What I Want casts more of the fusion of ska, pop, and rock ‘n roll Buster Shuffle has increasingly pushed and established since emerging back in 2007. Each of their previous albums has added a fresh lick of enterprise and adventure but the street carnival of their latest offering is a whole new ball game and easily the band’s most unique and thrilling proposal yet. Debut album Our Night Out of 2010 swiftly lured acclaim and attention the way of the London outfit subsequently backed by a live success soon seeing the band share stages with the likes of The Holloways, The Wombats, Goldie Lookin’ Chain and Chas ‘n’ Dave, a list which Buster Shuffle over the years has added artists such as Lee Scratch Perry, Frank Turner, Drop Kick Murphys, Madness, The Blockheads, The Rifles, and Flogging Molly. The albums Do Nothing and especially Naked has increased their presence and reputation with unerring fun and craft something I’ll Take What I Want can only vigorously escalate.

With their street wise/reflective lyrics and multi-flavoured sound, Buster Shuffle instantly infest ears and appetite with album opener I Don’t Trust a Word You Say. Straight away a rousing wave of vocal and musical temptation surges through ears, vocalist Jet Baker leading the way with his tones and equally potent piano revelry as rhythms swing. Hitting an impossibly contagious stroll part ska, part old school punk with a dash of fellow Brits The Tuesday Club to it, the song instantly has the body bouncing and passions greedy with its boisterous antics.

The forcibly captivating start only continues as We Fall to Pieces steps in with its folk ska rascality, the song like a fusion of Blur and Tankus The Henge around the throbbing lure of Tim Connell’s double bass and the crisp beats of Terry Mascall. Again Baker’s piano and James Stickley’s guitar collude in creative chicanery as the former’s tones and words tantalise across two minutes of instinctively bold rock ‘n’ roll before Pretty Boy swaggers in with its own infectious dynamics and enterprise. Imagine Television Personalities and again Blur bursting in on Bad Manners and you get a flavour of the track’s gorgeous recipe of enticement.

There is no escaping a rich Madness spice within next up See You Next Week, its determinedly infectious canter pure instruction to the body to dance and ears to greedily devour before The Estate takes the listener into the danger and shadows of modern city life with its spunk pop manipulations. Set across two stages, the day light vivacity of its initial stomp is a darkened night lit rush by its departure, song and imagination running with instinctive eagerness to only increase the already rich impact of the release.

I’ll Be in Peckham has a touch of gypsy to its virulent amble next, its seductive yet off-kilter street  waltz manna to these ears as pretty much the whole of I’ll Take What I Want to be honest but especially manipulating as it sets up the warm gallop of the album’s madness soaked title track. It is ska pop to get frisky with, hips getting a keen workout as melodies and hooks unite in an irresistible web of catchy temptation.

With a throbbing tuba-esque hook to swing from, Your Mommy Is So Hot for Me is simply ska impishness so easy to devour, the band’s constant humour as virulent as their sound as too their lyrical prowess as shown yet again in the predacious flirtation of The Tables Have Now Turned and the indie punk pop jangle of Take Them All. Both songs tease and tempt with their creative twists and unpredictable turns, all lined with the never relinquishing infectiousness of the Buster Shuffle sound.

The album is completed by the folk littered contagion of Banana Thief, its ska spun carnival also embracing a country twang as tasty as its other infectious ingredients, and finally the instrumental skanking and harmonic seduction of the Outro Song. With its sixties espionage/sci-fi TV theme tune air and not for the first time, the golden hues of backing vocalist Carrie Griffiths radiating, the track is a masterful end to a real treat of an album. Also featuring the keyboard and vocal enterprise of Pete Oag, I’ll Take What I Want is sheer pleasure and addiction in one; quite simply another year high for music.

I’ll Take What I Want is out now via Burning Heart Records on iTunes, Amazon, and other stores.

https://bustershufflemusic.com/     https://www.facebook.com/bustershuffleofficial

Pete RingMaster 29/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Caesaria – Come on & Dance

The title track from their latest EP, Come on & Dance is the new single from French outfit Caesaria. As with the band’s previous releases the song sees the band’s fusion of electronic rock, pop, and dance music tease and tempt with ear grabbing enterprise, and like those encounters adds greater stock to the building reputation of the quartet.

Emerging in 2013, the foursome of Théo Chaumard, Ced Machi, Thomas Fariney, and Louis Arcens whipped up broader attention last year with the Bring My Ears Back EP. It was an ear grabbing introduction to a wider audience of the band’s magnetic electronic rock pop first heard in debut EP Sparks of Visions and since further explored in the singles Wavin’ Goodbye and now Come on & Dance. As its source EP, the track pushes the band’s songwriting and sound into a new adventure just as easy to dance to as anything before while offering even richer incitement for the imagination.

The song instantly wraps ears in an atmospheric electronic cloud, its touch gentle yet shadowed. From within the band’s already impressive enticement a harmony of vocals serenade, their varied textures matched by the blossoming sound and its flirtatious stroll. An unexpected passage of invention provided by Irish rapper Sheridan subsequently steps forward, adding further magnetism as potent as the dance of the rhythms dance and the eighties spiced temptation cast by the synths.

The track’s captivation is full from start to finish even if it never erupts into the vigorous celebration its energies suggest; in fact that restraint adds to its depth and character ensuring that expectations are left lonely in its adventurous and virulently haunting escapade.

Caesaria is a band beginning to make a potent mark on the European rock scene, something Come on & Dance will only assist.

Come on & Dance is released November 24th

http://www.caesaria.fr/    https://www.facebook.com/wearecaesaria/     https://twitter.com/WEARECAESARIA    https://www.instagram.com/wearecaesaria/

Pete RingMaster 21/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Vintage Calvinos – An Invitation To Infamy

Being engulfed in fascination for something is one of life’s pleasures and stepping into the kaleidoscopic world of An Invitation To Infamy is certainly both. The debut album from The Vintage Calvinos is an absorbing tapestry of sound and suggestion loaded with observation, insight, and a creative devilment which just gets right under the skin.

The band is the creation of song writer/bassist/vocalist David Baird who lured in some of the finest Scottish musicians to the Aberdeen based project and indeed, in the case of backing singer Xavia, literally just passing by talent of drawn to the pied piper-esque sounds coming through the windows of The Anatomy Rooms where the band was rehearsing. Together they have created a web of temptation in skilfully conjured word and multi-flavoured music which has the body swaying and imagination swinging in joyful enterprise and contemplation. From pop to indie, rock to folk and a host of numerous other spices, An Invitation To Infamy is a beautiful collusion drawn from the hearts of a collective of musical adventurers.

The instantly compelling rub of drama soaked strings as Prelude leaps upon ears and imagination sets the scene and tone of things to come, its vocal compulsion subsequently slipping into a warm slow waltz with a flowing energy which soon has hips leaning to and fro as guitars and strings engage with the romancing keys in entwining dulled yet potent percussive beats. The forcibly engaging piece leads into the waiting arms of Last Tango which opens with melodic drama somewhat akin to War of The Worlds. Its rich strains soon twist into a rolling stroll with more infectiousness than a viral cold and a net of creative intrigue which has ears and thoughts enslaved. Baird’s great vocals are more than matched by the backing of Xavia, both wrapped in the melodic dexterity of Paul Davidson’s guitar. With a second never wasted on predictability, the track is superb, almost reason enough alone to accept An Invitation To Infamy.

So Many People follows, the buzz of life breeding a slow carnival march, one seemingly infusing the tiredness of perpetually imposing life with the joy of being. Brass blows with an enticing clamour as rhythms throb, a welcoming cacophony parting for the melancholic spicing of Baird’s vocals and the stirring scythes of strings and in turn uniting for a creative throng which just magnetises the senses. Like a sonic pagan scented Lowry composition with a broader outlook, the track utterly seduces before new single You Are Always on My Mind infests the psyche. The striking coaxing of Mitsuki Takayama’s violin instantly grips, a hold tightening as the song evolves into a sixties pop scented canter. There is no resistance to its teasing temptations and lively catchiness, the quickly involved antics of body and vocal chords swift evidence. Davidson’s wall of keys is just as irresistible along with the theatre of strings and the rhythmic saunter of Baird’s bass and Fraser Peterkin’s drum beats.

The indie seduction of This Handsome Boy absorbs attention next. It is a track with a touch of Lightning Seeds to it at certain moments and pure pop contagion throughout led by the golden tones of Iona Macdonald and warm surges of brass expelled by trumpeter Bill Thompson, trombonist Denis Webb, and saxophonist Dave Carter. Sometimes there is something about it which feels quite familiar yet for no obvious reason as it floods ears with instinctive pleasure.

The album’s first single, No Room at The Inn released a couple of weeks ago, steps in to captivate straight after with its gentle stroll. Its proposal is low key, compared to other songs, but rich invitation into the album’s broadening musical and lyrical craft while Clouds smoulders with elegance and undiluted captivation. At times it sounds like a blend of Steely Dan and Weekend, a wistful seduction with intensity in its heart and an energetic adventure in its nature.

Through the haunting entrance and golden incestuous intimacy of Alice and the minimalistic but rich stirring of Lost, band and album continue to bewitch with adventurous diversity and creative revelry. Both tracks simply enthral whilst manipulating the body before Teardrops in My Eyes swaggers in with sorrowful melodies and sinful energy to reinforce the submission of ears and appetite before The Vintage Calvinos.

The dusky rock ‘n’ roll of Rock Dreams Part 2 is like a soundtrack to many of our musical upbringings and warm homage to its kings and quite irresistible as too after a magnetic instrumental reprise of No Room at The Inn, is closing track The Beautiful and the Damned. A shadow draped ballad to the lost and the lonely with the darkest outcome, the song is simply sultry aural beauty epitomising the craft and debut of The Vintage Calvinos.

With a host of other striking individual contributions involved in the collective creation of An Invitation To Infamy, all deserving recognition, the album is one of the year’s most essential encounters. The first listen is gold but only an appetizer to the delights and unbridled pleasures which follow with every subsequent union between ear and sound.

An Invitation To Infamy is released October 27th on Stereogram Recordings with the single You Are Always On My Mind out October 20th.

The album’s launch is to be held at Under The Hammer, North Silver Street, Aberdeen on Saturday 28th October 2017 from 2pm.

http://www.stereogramrecordings.co.uk/the-vintage-calvinos/    https://www.facebook.com/thevintagecalvinos/

Pete RingMaster 17/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Tiger Lilly – The Story So Far

Swiftly enamoured with the new single from British singer/songwriter Tiger Lilly, we thought we would rather than focus on one slice of goodness take a full look at the album it masterfully concludes and it proved to be a wise and highly rewarding move. The Story So Far brings together a collection of songs echoing her creativity and releases of the past eight years led by that new single, Broken Glass. It is a ‘best of’ offering in many ways but also a highly tempting introduction to new ears and keener attention of one captivating and imaginative artist.

Named at birth Dani, the Tiger Lilly name began as a consequence of being told she was “too dark to be Wendy” when playing Peter Pan in the playground, being tagged as Tiger Lilly. It was just one moment in her experiences of being bullied at school, one spark which led her to write about her thoughts and feelings in a diary at home whilst listening to music which in turn evolved into poetry and lyric writing to release her over whelming emotions and despair. The ability to share and expel the rawest most honest emotions has given a power to her music which is easy to connect to for whatever reasons which goes hand in hand with her want, need, to help others though music and her Music & Mental Health Awareness workshops which Tiger Lilly takes around the country to talk about subjects close to her heart; bullying, depression, anxiety and living with Borderline Personality Disorder.

Recently becoming the official Artist in Residency at The Westbury Hotel in Mayfair, the Slough hailing songstress creates a tantalising mix of rock, indie, and pop which never fails to surprise and tempt certainly on the evidence of The Story So Far. The album opens up with Chasing Ghosts and immediately has ears transfixed and appetite licking lips as an initial guitar strum is joined by Tiger Lilly’s magnetic voice. An eager catchiness is just as swiftly there teasing attention before the song blossoms into a bold and rousing rock stroll. There is an instinctive power to the sound and energy, one equally bound to passion delivered words but also an unpredictability which only adds to the creative drama and compelling temptation.

The track is superb, a glorious start soon matched in the mellower but no less potent Promises. With a slither of Americana in its melodic sway, impassioned rock in its own highly persuasive roar, the song hits the spot dead centre before Silence is Golden swings in on a melodic canter. There is a Pretenders-esque hue to the tantalising track, a whiff of Fleetwood Mac too as it dances on the senses into the passions.

Three songs in and you just know you need to hear more, an appetite only rewarded in return by the flirtatious antics of Throw Me A Line and the more fiery heart of Over, both taking ears and imagination by boisterous hands. The first is an indie rock tango, every rhythm a mischievous incitement and hook a teasing invitation as the tones and expression of Tiger Lilly enchants with passion, beauty, and energy. Its successor has a more restrained touch to its also lively enticement but energy replaced by a more incendiary intrigue and atmosphere as it bares its soul.

Physically calmer waters are dipped into by Green Eyed Monster though its heart and emotional climate borders on lava-esque as another country like breeze colludes with melodic rock instincts before the following Army provides a plaintive plea with its own emotion arousing crescendos.

Cradled in the emotive poetry of the piano, Tiger Lilly seduces ears and thoughts within New Year next, its melancholic grace and lyrical hope a warm hug while Woman simply bears its heart with melodic elegance and emotional fire. Both songs simply get under the skin though each has to bow to the majesty of closing track and that latest single, Broken Glass. Instantly there is a thicker intensity of shadows; imposing essences skirting voice and melody from the dark corners of the track but held at bay by the beacon of light in keys and voice. It is a highly evocative and magnetic encounter providing the perfect way into the creative and reflective heart of Tiger Lilly.

The album, through track order, is set up to have you rocking and dancing then emotionally embracing and reflecting with never a moment bringing a decrease in pleasure and two way intimacy. The Story So Far has been a captivatingly honest adventure with the next exciting chapter just beginning…

The single Broken Glass is out now on iTunes.

http://www.tigerlillymusic.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/tigerlillyofficial    https://twitter.com/tigerlillytweet    https://www.instagram.com/tigerLillyofficial/

Pete RingMaster 10/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

a blue flame – when your whole world turns to dust

Last year ears and acclaim were seriously caught up in the swinging rock pop adventures of What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remains, now a blue flame follow up its success with when your whole world turns to dust, a release which may be takes a touch longer to spark the same kind of reactions but gets there all the same.

a blue flame is the solo project of Leicester based songwriter Richard Stone and when your whole world turns to dust his third album with the first, someone else’s dreams will fill our home released in 2013 as Woodman Stone.  For his new offering Stone has ventured down the gentler melodic side of his previous album but managed to find the same eclectic flavours which marked out its praise collecting presence.  Essences of folk, swing, and cabaret peak out within when your whole world turns to dust. There are moments when it rocks with full eagerness but generally it basks in a mellower climate yet the same instinctive infectiousness which drove its predecessor again infests the new album whether tempting with an emotive croon or a spirited roar.

With a host of skilled musicians such as Andy Robertson, Adam Ellis, Damon Claridge, and Tony Robinson alongside the vocals and guitar of Stone, the album opens with Back to the Stars and immediately has the body moving to its slow sway and smouldering jazzy hug. The dark inviting prowl of the bass is courted by the seductive flames of brass, both suggestively skirting the magnetic tones of Stone. It is pure captivation setting the release off in fine style.

The following We Feel Like We Feel brings a 60’s pop scent to its melodic surf twanged breeze, a touch of The Everlys flirting with its Bit pop suggestiveness. It is a mix of essences then emulated with different flavourings within the excellent Don’t Wait where it is hard not to be reminded of The Divine Comedy, its English heart and infectious canter a tapestry of imagination and creative zeal.

A Mariachi scented Latin lure graces the show tune-esque rapture of the outstanding 21st Century Blues, a song which almost creeps up on you with its addictive chorus and imagination sparking enterprise but sure to have you making vocal contributions in no time before The Future’s a Mystery lays reflectively upon  ears and thoughts. Its calmer air and tone is an emotive caress, a melancholic serenade given greater emotive depth and texture by the cello of David Dhonan.

The acoustic cored stroll of A Better Way wears a great fifties influence to its intimate saunter, Robinson’s brass lures, as the lyrical reflection , an easy tempting to get carried off by while The Words Wouldn’t Form dances with ears and appetite draped in folkish hues. At this point we are midway through the release and Stone’s songwriting and imagination increasingly shows itself to be as ripe and magnetic as it has ever been but stepping forward with fresh maturity and boldness track after track.

The summery All We Need to Know similarly leans on English folk bred inspirations for its engaging meander, textures given more urgency and mischief in the rousing stroll of Everything’s a Lie immediately after. The second of the two also has an indie pop catchiness and joviality which takes thoughts to bands such as Jim Jiminee and The Sundays, a flirtatious element quickly grabbing feet and appetite.

The song’s energetic intent is gathered up and given further tenacity in Empty Head, the first in a pair of tracks which launch the kind of rock pop antics which lit up the last album. There is a fire in its belly and devilment in its character which simply carries the listener eagerly away into the waiting rock ‘n’ roll jaws of See What Tomorrow Brings. It too has a sixties essence in its tone, the keys as much to credit for the inviting flavouring, but equally a meatier almost rapacious edge which only inflames song and the pleasure it brings.

Completed by the smoky jazziness of Love Will Set Us Free, the increasingly compelling when your whole world turns to dust leaves real anticipation of major things, if not now, ahead for Richard Stone and a blue flame. Whether the album outshines one of our favourite releases last year in its predecessor, we are still debating but certainly it rivals it and most other melodically teasing offerings out this year.

when your whole world turns to dust is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/when-your-whole-world-turns-to-dust/id1279472334

https://www.facebook.com/ablueflame

Pete RingMaster 02/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright