Nine Dart Finish – The Misadventures of…

Nine Dart Finish is a British outfit drawing on the wide influences of the likes of Weezer, Supergrass, Queen, and Ian Dury for their pop fuelled rock ‘n’ roll; The Misadventures of… is their debut album which unapologetically has the body bouncing as fun floods every pour of its magnetic enterprise. The trio from Birmingham has already lured potent attention from fans and media alike with a handful of singles especially potent; appetites for their boisterous sound which their first album can only multiply.

Consisting of former Coffeeshop member in lead vocalist/bassist Daz Yardley, guitarist/vocalist Christopher Mobbs, and drummer Andy Proudman, Nine Dart Finish first drew ears with debut EP Fall To Pieces late 2015. Since then their hook loaded pop ‘n’ rock has grown and become more creatively mischievous by the song. The Misadventures of… brings all the enticing dynamics and lusty grooves of the band’s sound as well as those devilish hooks the threesome seems to instinctively conjure together in one rousing enjoyable place.

Bringing the lively antics of recent singles, highlights of that first EP and new tracks together in one captivating union, The Misadventures of… roars into view with the outstanding The Cut of Your Jib. The track is wild rock ‘n’ roll, almost feral in its energy as riffs and rhythms harry ears just as eager vocals blaze. As the album continues it is easy to see why certain tracks were chosen and potent as singles and teases for the full-length but for personal tastes it is tracks like the raucous rock bred opener which trapped the keenest attention and passions. With a touch of Queens of the Stone Age to its contagious tempest, the track is a garage rock lined clamour getting the album off to a magnificent start.

The following Fall to Pieces is a far calmer proposition as a melodic jangle colludes with vocal harmonies before the track settles into its warm catchy swing. There is no preventing the quick shuffle of feet to its stroll, keys adding to its summery scent as vocals and melodies entangle before In the City uncages its own rock ‘n’ roll flame. Within its slightly rawer attack, hooks tease and tempt as riffs nag, Proudman’s beats striking with relish as they drive the infectious escapade.

Recent single Kicking & Screaming is next, a song which blossomed by the listen as its organic rumble aligns to melodic enticement. The former gives the otherwise gentle seduction a volatility which imposes without truly erupting, a combination gripping ears within a grunge pop like proposal while Charlie Bonkers offers up a melody woven slice of Brit Pop nurtured enterprise. It is fair to say that the song did not impact as potently as those around it on our tastes yet as honest to admit it had the hips swinging and vocal chords playing without any trouble.

You Don’t Bother Me similarly did not quite grab as strongly as many of its companions with its sixties hued pop but again involvement in its enticement was unavoidable as with the blues kissed rock of Falling for You. Both tracks epitomises the band’s knack at weaving varied and seriously catchy adventures though each is swiftly overshadowed by the album’s finest moment consisting of its final three songs.

From its initial melodic caresses Fabio’s Overture blossoms into a truly mesmeric slice of pop rock, emotive strands in voice and sound entangling another lure of virulent catchiness as inescapable whether the song is ablaze or simply smouldering. Its thick enticement leads into the rousing devilry of You’re so Cool. As again pop floods its bold rock ‘n’ roll, the track nags and taunts attention with relish. With something of UK duo The Sea about it, the track is superb rivalling the opener for best song honours though they are equally matched by the tenacious stomp of album closer London. There is a certain mod like hue to the song which only adds to its outstanding character and roar.

Though as mentioned there are some tracks which undoubtedly eclipsed others for us, The Misadventures of… is one thoroughly enjoyable involvement from start to finish. Nine Dart Finish have a sound with open growth in every new song so expect many more lustily fun times ahead as well as right now with their new offering.

The Misadventures of… is out now through iTunes and other stores.

http://ninedartfinish.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/NDFmusic/   https://twitter.com/ndfmusic

Pete RingMaster 17/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Kleenex Girl Wonder – Vana Mundi

Creating melodic centrepieces with a lyrical heart as rich as their aural temptation is seemingly as second nature to US singer songwriter Graham Smith as breathing; proof easily gathered over closing on three decades of releases either under his name or as Kleenex Girl Wonder. As the latter he has spun yet another feverishly flavoursome collection of melody bred pop ‘n’ roll songs in the shape of new album Vana Mundi, one of those albums which schemes to get under the skin and into the imagination as it echoes contemporary life in its own distinct way.

Latin for ‘Empty World’, Vana Mundi reaches into the heart of life, into its selfish and selfless sides with often the latter emerging from the exploration of the former. It is as intimate as it can be seen worldly, suggesting experiences have bred its heart and thoughts as much as observation. It opens up with Practical Effects and immediately holds attention with guitars creating a lively clamour followed by a gentle stroll with a swing which just infests hips. Smith’s vocals soon follow to similarly beguile in their own distinct tongue and breath. Thoughts sprung to Britain’s Astral Cloud Ashes the closest comparison we can suggest to the uniqueness of Kleenex Girl Wonder, wondering if this also one man project was inspired by Smith a touch in its own individuality.

The excellent opener is quickly followed and matched by the bouncy saunter of Greek Fire, the resonating thud of rhythms alone a potent lure behind the boisterous and flirtatious exploits of voice and guitar. With each passing second each aspect accelerates its lustful gait and appeal, only relaxing to repeat the irresistible cycle with even greater enterprise and energy. Superb in every essence, the song sets a marker to be regularly worried across the release if maybe not quite by next up Trattegio. In saying that, the song only has attention and appetite keen with its calmer and eagerly infectious endeavours featuring guitarist Thayer McClanahan and drummer Matt LeMay alongside Smith.

Not for the last time on the album, Kleenex Girl Wonder brings a slight Kinks like hue to ears; Sounds Good a mellow engagement with volatility in its depths which rumbles rather than erupts across its reflection while Sexy Legitimate Threat casts an acoustic hug which soothes as lyrics strike. Like a magnet the song just draws ears and the imagination, every listen more intense as its simple but richly layered body pounces with greater enjoyment the result before The Mesomorph prowls the senses with its controlled yet open rapacious intent and tone. The dark edge of bass and rhythms seductively collude with the melodic and harmonic intimation of Smith, every handful of seconds within the song adding fresh drama to its increasing ingenuity.

Impossible Shadow is similarly inventive and distinct with its folkish aural festivities and subsequent shadow lit calms. Alongside its predecessor this pair provides the most imaginative exploits within Vana Mundi, its most powerful and impressive moments among nothing but rich moments of invention; the latter especially with its XTC-esque adventure.

The rawer buzz of Ask Mountain is not slow in tempting with arousing enterprise either; its melodic clamour resourceful and deviously catchy as electronic beats dance. It is infectiousness just as prevalent within the buoyant romp of Sunday Night Fever, a controlled but busy song with waves of energy in its voice and intent.

The album closes up with Picture the Kid, another vociferously rousing encounter with a great Frank Black like hue to its creative theatre and expressive breath. It is an irresistible end to an unavoidably fascinating and enjoyable release. It was a pleasure from the first listen earning only lustier responses thereon in; the album of summer’s dark side.

Vana Mundi is available now via Reesonable Records @ http://kgw.me/album/vana-mundi

https://www.facebook.com/kleenexgirlwonder/   https://twitter.com/grahamsmith

Pete RingMaster 26/06/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Cat Dail – Fight for Love

Sparking a spring in the step as it dances with the imagination, Fight for Love is the new release from US singer songwriter Cat Dail. It is a seven track offering which creates a web of styles and flavours woven into one irresistible party for ears with the Chesterfield, NH bred Cat. She has been a potent participant in her national Indie rock scene since the nineties and surely is now about to tempt far broader attention with this contagion fuelled new album.

Not only as a whole but individually the songs within Fight for Love are joyful conspiracies of sound. Whether you call its instincts as pop, rock, funk, blues or whatever, and all apply song by song, the fusion of flavours is a perpetually imaginative and magnet combination. Each track has a unique personality and invention united in the welcoming enterprise of Cat’s voice and lyrical temptation.

The EP begins with Can’t Buy Love, the song slipping in on a rhythmic impulse to spread a tantalising climate of woozy intimation and sound around the immediately engaging tones of Cat. Seductively haunting and suggestive in its melodic air, the song similarly captivates with its hip sparking sway and slow but lithe gait; the craft of guitarist/bassist Teddy Kumpel and drummer Shawn Pelton, as across the whole release, matching the prowess of Cat. Surf, blues, and country spices all add to the smoky temptation getting the EP off to an ear grabbing start.

Similar hues collude in the following Player, a slice of rock funkiness and melodic rock with a whiff of Fleetwood Mac to its lively stroll. Once more the vocals just dance on the ears as they lyrically tease, the song’s imagination just as rich and pleasurable as the song fluidly ebbs and flows in its constantly inspiring energy before Catch Fire grips feet and hips with its mellower but just as manipulative shuffle. Reggae nurtured flavours unite with surf rock currents as the song flirtatiously entices, a country twang teasing in its swarthy air.

Both tracks just hit the spot though are still eclipsed by the following Wonder Love, a heavier slice of pop ‘n’ rock which almost prowls the senses before uncaging one inescapably catchy chorus. Everything about the track is pure temptation amidst creative manoeuvres which just got under the skin in swift time, again an array of flavours combining to charm and bewitch.

Featuring trombonist Clark Gayton and Steven Bernstein on slide trumpet, Flow Zone is equally as compelling and joyous with its Talking Heads meets Molotov Jukebox conjured canter. Unsurprisingly another individual collage of flavours is honed into an ear gripping adventure around rhythms which alone incite body and spirit to indulge. It all adds up to the best track on the release, one which lingers and teases long past its departure.

The EP concludes with the pair of She Can Fly and Molly & Matchbox. The first offers an alluring sunshine of pop lined sound, a radiant embrace of melodic romance added to by the keys of Andy Erin and led by the perpetually tempting voice of Cat. Its successor is a country rock bred encounter with sultry climes and melodies around instinctively open vocals and words. There is also a fire in its belly which bubbles up from the song’s natural simmer and though, simply down to personal tastes, the song did not thrill as its predecessors it still ensured the album closed on an unmistakable high.

However you wish to describe Cat Dail’s sound, which as its press release asks “Is it Blues? Funk? Rock? Soul? Folk?” it is sheer magnetism and pleasure within Fight for Love, a record which puts a smile on the face and in the spirit.

Fight for Love is available now @ https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/kyalb01283297 and https://catdail.bandcamp.com/album/fight-for-love

https://catdailmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/catdailmusic/   https://twitter.com/catdailmusic

Pete RingMaster 26/06/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Flesh Tetris – Insert Coin EP

Pic Chris Clark

We have all come across and been excited by the prospects of Super Groups; adventures bred from the union of various members of renowned and occasionally legendary bands. Sometimes it leads to new pleasure sometimes disappointment. In the far busier landscape of the musical ‘underground’ such fusions of talent are as prevalent and very often much more thrilling as in the mouth-watering case of UK outfit, Flesh Tetris.

The London quintet makes their introduction to the world with debut EP Insert Coin in May; a collection of songs which with the ease of the summer sun has the spirit rising, body dancing, and juices flowing. To be honest our imagination and excitement had their running shoes on even before a note of their first release was heard; racing away just from the names behind this new proposal. Flesh Tetris sees the coming together of members from four of our indelibly favourite bands and, to us, new musicians just as easily grabbing ears and appetite. First there is long-time friend of The RR, guitarist/bassist Andy Duke of Top Buzzer, Cauldronated, The Duel and a clutch of other projects fame. Then there is the inimitable presence and vocal prowess of vocalist Eva Menon also from Cauldronated as well as the distinct creative mischief and character of vocalist Andy Heintz from The Men That Will Not Be Blamed For Nothing who has already released one of the year’s essential gems in the shape of the album Double Negative. Alongside the three is Karen Bell who quickly reveals herself as one mighty ear lure with keys, voice, and theremin on the EP and drummer Jez Miller, who lays down inescapable bait with his manipulative swings.

pic by Neil Anderson

It is a line-up which quickly turned an instinctive interest because of their other adventures into lusty attention and an eager appetite for their sound. Described as “Retro SciFi Eurotrash”, Flesh Tetris weave a kaleidoscope of styles and flavours in their music, embracing everything from punk and its electro form, to pop and rock, techno, industrial and much more. It makes for something fresh, virulently infectious and imaginatively gripping eager to throw the body and imagination around like a puppet through its animated antics.

Insert Coin opens up with Rabbits, keys initially hugging, inciting, and worming under the skin with lively rhythms for company before Heintz and Menon add their vocal character. The pair have two of the most distinctive voices and unique deliveries in music which alone just stir the passions but together…well it is as if they were born to be alongside each other at some point such their magnetic union. Swiftly the song had the body bouncing and vocal chords employed, its electro dance a viral infection to feet and hips as the cosmic enterprise of Bell and the hypnotic escapades of Duke and Miller romp. With more chance of there being parity across society than escaping the creative fingering of the song, Insert Coin is off to a flyer and only builds from there.

Next up Partners in Crime instantly looms up with intrigue and adventure, like an adult electro bred Scooby Doo adventure with defiant threat and noir kissed romance at its heart. The great grizzled tones of Heintz and the equally alluring European lilted suggestion of Menon take ears and thoughts on the run, sound providing scenic temptation before the seriously magnetic tones of Bell serenade from the midst of the caper. Few bands have one great vocalist, to have three feels greedy and just another reason to explore Flesh Tetris. The track is superb, managing to even eclipse its outstanding predecessor before The Hardest Part swings in with its dub nurtured electronics and rhythmic intimation. Duke has hips swerving with a gentle but keen hunger whilst the controlled skittishness of Miller’s beats is an additional glorious itch to movement. Within this magnetic landscape vocals prowl and roar stirring up even greater greed and lust for a track which simmers before it boils compared to the more instant explosions of those before it but sizzles to the same heights all the same.

The EP closes up with Glass Bottom Boat, a seaside ode starting with a poetic casting regaling the romantic days of old Brighton. As waves lap a delicious hook springs its bait, a potent lure which you would surmise could only come from the imagination of Duke such its individuality. With Bell’s keys flirting alongside, the slice of smiling rock ‘n’ roll quickly has body and participation rocking; nostalgic pop nurtured harmonics adding to the song’s grin. Imagine a fusion of The Revillos, Chicks On Speed, and The Dreadnoughts and you get a whiff though nothing more of the great EP finale.

Flesh Tetris describe their music as “pop music for unpopular people” and if this is what ‘hate’ inspires we for one quite content to be among the disliked at the kind of thrilling party where you Insert Coin and salaciously enjoy.

The Insert Coin EP is released 26th May across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/fleshtetris/

Pete RingMaster 24/04/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Louis Antoniou – Lonesomeville / I Let The Rain Fall Hard

Having already given the year a well-received single in You Ain’t The Girl this past February, British rocker Louis Antoniou brings a two track offering this March to enhance his emerging presence on the national rock scene. It is the union of two individual songs bound in Antoniou’s increasingly distinctive touch, a pair which just lures continued attention of the Londoner.

Planning five singles this year, Antoniou has already earned a potent reputation through his live presence, one sure to be escalated by his songs going by the three unveiled so far this year. Whereas You Ain’t The Girl has a rousing rock pop heart, new offering Lonesomeville embraces the sixties rock ‘n’ roll instincts of the artist which were lurking in the background of its predecessor. The song bounds in with a boisterous stroll, bouncing into view on an eagerly infectious groove and rhythmic shuffle. Antoniou’s tones are just as catchy, their slight twang extra spicing on the bold swagger of rhythms and the tenacious enterprise of the guitar; it all luring eager attention.

https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/1nu3r9zwt617K1O43pdmEb

I Let The Rain Fall Hard embraces a blues rich hue which with the singer’s natural rock ‘n’ roll bent quickly entices ears and appetite. A tale of lost love within a climate of intimacy and melodic melancholy, the song still cannot help strolling along with a vibrant catchy gait which eagerly gets into the natural swing of hips and the shuffle of feet.

Both songs make an ear pleasing next step in the blossoming career of Louis Antoniou with anticipation for the next single alongside.
https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/3fGJNr4l7mFb5DnPEno9Kz

Lonesomeville / I Let The Rain Fall Hard is released March 16th.

https://www.louisantoniou.com/    https://www.facebook.com/Louisantonioumusic/

Pete RingMaster 14/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

Reverse Family: 365 days of songwriting

Last August we gave you a first look and insight into the epic new project from Reverse Family. Starting the following October, the plan with 365 was to release 52 EPs as one a week for a whole year, each of their songs representing a single day in the inspiring life of its creator.

Reverse Family is the solo project of Dermot Illogical, though you may know him as Andreas Vanderbraindrain, the frontman of British outfit The Tuesday Club. With its brainchild embracing the various talents of others, Reverse Family first grabbed keen attention with debut album My Songs About Life Mid Crisis in 2016. In so many ways 365 is a whole new ball game for the band, a project taking the listener into the heart and thoughts, not forgetting darkness, Dermot personally experienced as he came to terms with personal despair through the death of a great friend and band mate, going through divorce, dealing with the serious illness of both parents and other traumas taking Dermot to the edge.

Since that first collection of songs sent our way to announce the release of 365, the project has been in full swing with some more teasers sent for our ears to explore. So time to give you more insight into a collection of songs which we can say to date has grabbed the imagination and pleasured ears in varying persistently enjoyable ways by focusing on a few more which have recently been unveiled.

Day 20 provides The Suns rays are just like birthdays, an inviting stroll built around a great post punk bassline as crispy beats align to the distinctive tones of Dermot. Reflecting on the radiance of the weather as emotions rise and fall, the track is a thickly infectious affair nagging away at ears like a pleasurable itch.

There is great diversity to the sound and personas of songs with 365 too, Was I a good man (day 15) swinging along with a sixties garage pop hues as guitars offer their psych kissed jangle while No Reason to run (day 6) has the rhythmic shuffle of a King Trigger aligned to an off kilter twee/ indie pop croon. Hugging a melody which enthrals in its nagging simplicity, the track is simply mesmeric, almost shamanic in its virulent enterprise.

Equally irresistible is the bricks and mortar snarl of Sunshade City (day 21). It has a gnarly tone around the pulsating shadowy lure of the bass, both at the heart of its post punk/industrial examination while with matching success We Got It (day26) sees Reverse Family embrace early Adam and The Ants textures in its resourceful punk dance. With so many tracks unveiled already it is hard to pick a favourite but this always figures in any contemplation as too does  the twang lilted Keep Being the Good Guy (day 25). Its country punk tinge and another irresistible bass line and tone court the ever virulent vocal delivery of Dermot, it all uniting in one seriously catchy persuasion.

Seductive acoustic discord flirts from within Dark pop (day 7) and insatiable askew pop punk is bred through the rousing antics of Pay the price (day 3) while School gate politics (day 64) is a prowling harassment with menacing shadows and post punk intimation, kind of like a Bowie meets Artery contemplation. All three are additional pinnacles in the lofty landscape of tracks released to date and definite favourites with us among so many more.

It has to be said though that Movin’ forward (day 74) is the cream of the crop, its repetitious swing and hook lined lure simply irresistible; a real ear worm as dark as it is vibrant. There are numerous potent ways to get into 365, such as the delicious lithe tenebrific pop ‘n’ roll of Your wandering hands (day 82) but Movin’ forward is addiction in the waiting.

There is so much more to discover already with 365, aside from our glimpses, with EPs released currently standing at 19 as you read, and all there for your exploration, @ http://reversefamily.co.uk/  with plenty more adventure to come which you can keep up with through the Perfect Pop Co-Op magazine. 365 is DIY majesty with drama to be found at every turn and so much pleasure too.

https://www.facebook.com/reversefamily/    https://twitter.com/PerfectPopCoOp

Read our introduction to Reverse Family and 365 @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/08/26/day-by-day-with-reverse-family/

Pete RingMaster 06/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Christmas Parade

Mistletoe, mince pies, and Xmas songs are all major ingredients in festivities whether you have an appetite for them or not. Without our site having a cookery page, we take a gander at a few of the latter to help get you in the mood.

First up is Merry Christmas To You from British punks Peter118. Stoke-based, the band is the brainchild of Peter Field, former member of Senseless and Ambassadors of Shalom. Originally a solo project, the band has grown into a quartet with Field’s wife Janine on bass/backing vocals, Sam Critchley on drums, and Alisha Palmer on guitar/backing vocals. This year the band has already hit the spot with In Stereo, a split EP alongside US punks No Lost Cause and in particular with the single taken from it, Wasting.

Featured on the compilation Rodney On The Rock Presents: Santa’s Got a GTO Vol. 2 alongside tracks from the likes of CJRamone, Color TV, The Ramonas, Frankie and the Studs, and The Dollyrots, Merry Christmas To You is a slice of old school UK meets raw US punk as infectious as it is enticingly raw. Spicy grooves and hooks collude with hungry riffs and rampant rhythms across less than two minutes of richly appetising rock ‘n’ roll. Admittedly we do not have a natural appetite for Christmas offerings but for songs like Merry Christmas To You we eagerly raise a glass.

Another track hitting the spot is Goodbye Psychotic Christmas. From Brian Kroll & My Son The Bum, who equally have laid down one of the year’s bright spots in the single Mad Man (Playing in a Mad World’s Game) this past February. My Son The Bum has shown itself a band unafraid to explore distinctly individual styles and flavours in their releases and prime songwriter Brian Kroll shows he is a dab hand at seasonal offerings too with the new single.

Draped around a vintage rock ‘n’ roll stroll, inspired by Gene Vincent according to Knoll, melodies wind their temptation as vocals equally lure ears. As much as there is that fifties hue, there is seventies festive seasoning too, the song echoing the seasonal gifts of bands like Mud and Showaddywaddy to capture the imagination and raise the spirit for parties to come.

Introducing us all their Christmas Girl is Italian band Carnaby. Inspired by their experience of being away from loved ones during Xmas due to band commitments, the song is a catchy slice of pop rock with a great sixties pop/seventies mod flavouring.

Hailing from Canicattì, Carnaby was formed in 2010 taking their name as direct reference to the famous London street and its sixties musical heritage. Consisting of brothers Joseph and Vincent Sandonato, Pietro Pelonero, and Giuseppe Racalbuto, the quartet moved to Bristol in 2016 and is currently working on their debut album for release next year.

Christmas Girl is an infectious embrace of familiar essences borne of those earlier mentioned flavours. It sways and teases with its open love of sixties pop, its melodies a warm enticement as rhythms share their firmer touch with the same kind of inescapable catchiness. The track is not particularly unique but a whole lot of fun, just as Christmas should be.

Completing our look is some Holiday Season pop rock from Jeff Michaels. From Boston, MA, singer songwriter Michaels continues his tradition of the past five years in releasing a holiday single and accompanying video. This year it is It’s Been a Long Time, Christmas and its ” simple call for the return of Christmas, and the brighter days we all need.”

The song is a gentle croon with an instinctive catchiness, emotive keys, and a country hued lacing sure to please appetites for mellow yet boisterous pop. Michaels’ voice is equally as enticing, his melodic strains a warm caress matching the tender hug of the sounds around him.

In a time where this type of song can be as unwelcome as some relatives these are four tracks which buck the trend and will easily add something enjoyable to your seasonal soundtrack.

http://peter118.weebly.com/    https://www.facebook.com/Peter118UK/   https://twitter.com/peter118uk

https://www.facebook.com/mysonthebum/    https://twitter.com/mysonthebum    https://www.facebook.com/briankrollmusic1

https://www.facebook.com/carnabyband/    https://twitter.com/carnabyband

https://www.jeffmichaelsband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/pg/jmichaelsrocks/

Pete RingMaster

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright