Cléo – Pinball Machine

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A song which leaps through ears with all the energy and excitement of a carnival, Pinball Machine is one of those singles which simply gets under the skin. The new release from rock popper Cléo, the track with its tenacious punk like character and full on fun attitude is not necessarily a brand new adventure for the pop world but certainly makes for an enjoyable and captivating escapade.

Cléo is a Brazilian bred singer/songwriter/ actress/dancer who now resides in London. The list of inspirations on her creativity and music is long and includes the likes of Madonna, Cyndi Lauper, No Doubt, Pat Benatar, Britney Spears, Spice Girls, Green Day, Foo Fighters, and Linkin Park. These are flavours at times openly colouring her shapely sound but equally, and certainly with Pinball Machine, Cléo has her own rich vein of distinctive creativity lighting up her music too. 2013 saw the release of the extremely well-received Unlucky Girl EP, an encounter converting more fans, media, and pre-assuming critics to the visually and aurally vibrant presence of Cléo. Now Pinball Machine is poised to stir up ears and attention once again and such its charismatic and mischievous enterprise, it is hard to imagine it luring a new rush of interest.

Cléo is the initial temptation in the single, her raucous call the spark to short choppy riffs, jabbing beats, and a thickly provocative bassline. It is a potent coaxing with a great almost predatory nature to it, an edge leading ears and appetite into the swiftly looming frisky chorus where harmony soaked vocals and melodies bounce with energetic eagerness.

As it continues to flirt with its more shadowy side as well as magnetic festivity there is that constant, almost Gwen Stefani like, familiarity to the song yet tempering that, Pinball Machine offers subtle twists of attitude and latent aggression which turns the offering into something personal and invitingly individual to Cléo. Quite simply Pinball Machine is a persistently alluring proposition from a lady we can expect to hear much more of in the future.

Pinball Machine is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/pinball-machine-single/id959356901#

http://www.cleospage.com/

RingMaster 01/03/2015

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The Pineapple Thief – Magnolia

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     Magnolia is a melodic serenade, an album which across its immersive seduction is equally unafraid to roar and show a creative and sonic muscle. The new full-length form UK rock band The Pineapple Thief, it is an absorbing proposition, maybe not one to set the passions ablaze but certainly an encounter gripping ears and imagination in a riveting embrace.

The Pineapple Thief began in 1999, formed by vocalist/guitarist Bruce Soord as initially an ‘experimental bedroom project’. It has proceeded to be an attention grabbing band earning acclaim and success across its thought inspiring journey and releases, Magnolia their tenth album. The successor to the acclaimed Someone Here Is Missing and All The Wars of 2010 and 2012 respectively, the new release feels like the offspring of all the influences and essences of the band’s previous exploits; dreamy, progressive textures and enterprise combining to evolve into new bracing pop infused rock adventures. As mentioned, the Kscope released album might not ignite a lustful ardour but with ease it makes for one of the most vivaciously captivating propositions this year, managing to really bring the band’s renowned live power and intensity into a release for arguably the first time.

As soon as the jangling touch of opener Simple As That hits ears, band and album are in control of attention with the swiftly following vocals of Soord even more coaxing through their mellow tone. It is a gentle caress initially, Soord’s guitar as gentle as his voice before the dramatically impacting and thrilling eruption which follows turns the track on its head. It is a glorious and contagious expulsion of riffs and crisp rhythms released by Soord and Dan Osborne respectively, an intensive flame of energy and emotion with the vocals a mesmeric lure. It is hard to avoid suggesting a Muse comparison, but with the richly enticing bait of Jon Sykes’ bass adding to the subsequently sultry and pleasingly imposing stance of the track, there is a uniqueness which belongs to The Pineapple Thief. Anthemic and gripping, it is an impressive start to the album matched immediately by Alone at Sea. Entering on a bubbly hug of keys from Steve Kitch, the song flirts with ears and thoughts through suggestive melodies and the vocal prowess of Soord. The track proceeds to weave and entwine around the senses with a provocative weave of melodies and harmonies, a shoegaze breath at times kissing the narrative, but also stirring them up with sinew sculpted flames of heavier rock endeavour. As with many tracks there is a familiarity to the fascinating canvas but only adding to the infectious bait and addictive enticement.

Neither Don’t Tell Me nor the title track quite touches the plateaus of the first pair but both cast engaging and impressively compelling persuasions. The first is an emotive shuffle of rhythms and acoustic chords under a warm yet cloudy TPT Magnolia cover artexpanse of keys. This is coloured with a riveting orchestral expression which as across the album is arranged by Andrew Skeet, and a rawer incitement of guitar, whilst the second of the pair soars through another sky of orchestral beauty into an emotive climate of smouldering passion and bewitching elegance. As said they do not quite match their predecessors, but forcibly leave appetite and feelings greedy for more with their enthralling enterprise and skilled composition.

The slow Coldplay like balladry of Seasons Past is a tantalising flame of vocals and provocative melodies which seduces thoughts if not emotions to the same success, already personal greed for the more forceful elements of the album steering reactions, as also found by Coming Home. Despite that though, there is no escaping the incendiary beauty and orchestrated radiance of the strings in both tracks and the dramatic intensity and adventure of the second of the two. Vocally too there is no defence from the potent lure of Soord’s voice and the supporting harmonies of Sykes, their individual and united contributions as poetically inciting as the sounds around them.

The tenacious twang of guitar, matched by a similar bass riff, through the heart of The One You Left to Die instantly grips ears and appetite, the track going on to bind an immersive web of intrigue and melodic intimacy around its thrilling spine. It is a hypnotic flight of invention which sets up the senses for the rowdy roar of Breathe perfectly. That mighty expulsion setting the song off though it is soon awash with crystalline melodies and floating vocals before merging its peace into the original rugged and explosive bellow of sound and energy. The track is like a blend of House of Love, Doves, and Feeder, and another pinnacle of the album.

The stringed and emotionally shadowed From Me comes next, its dark charm engrossing before making way for the outstanding Sense of Fear. Guitars lay an irresistible web of jagged riffs to capture the imagination before aligning them with jabbing beats and a climactic embrace of keys and fiery melodies. It is only a moment in the shifting scenery of the song though, a slow provocative vocal caress aided by glances of keys bringing a dulled yet tantalising breath before a sturdy stride of intensive sonic flames and rhythmic bait have their potent say. It is a scintillating encounter which brings the stage presence of the band closer to the comfort of the home.

Magnolia closes with first up the graceful flight of A Loneliness and lastly the bordering on sinister noir wrapped elegance of Bond. The former is a strong and satisfying offering but between the previous track and the cinematic brilliance of the final song it is unable to leap out of their shadow and soon forgotten against the magnificent weighty body and emotional colouring of its successor. Both songs ensure the album ends on a high though, The Pineapple Thief never relinquishing its hold on ears and imagination across its aural and creative fascination, emerging as quite simply a must investigate proposal.

Magnolia is available now via Kscope @ https://www.burningshed.com/store/kscope/collection/284/

http://www.pineapplethief.com

16/09/2014

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Post Adolescence – Goodbye from the Future

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As impressive a debut and introduction that it was, the album My Nothing from US pop rockers Post Adolescence was as much potential as it was substance. Certainly the release opened up a fresh world from the band to be explored which in turn welcomed a soaking of deserved attention from certainly the underground media. It easily awoke a keen appetite in fans too for its fusion of Brit pop, post punk, and fiery melodic rock; the band finding themselves regulars on underground radio shows including ours. You can only feel though that what came before will pale against the response to the band’s recently released second album Goodbye from the Future, an encounter which realises all the promise of its predecessor and so much more. Consisting of seven thumping incitements it ripples with a maturity and confidence which leaves anything else the band has offered in the shade, offering pop infused rock ‘n’ roll of the highest compelling order to bring another sparkling highlight in the year.

The Seattle quartet seem to have taken time to hone and explore their already captivating sound over the four years between releases, resulting in as stated that maturer craft and invention to their virulent contagiousness described as songs. Formed around 2008, the band employed influences from the likes of Placebo, Manic Street Preachers, Ash, Buzzcocks, and Suede into their own imaginative songwriting and the new release again openly shows their inspirations but within a more distinctive voice to their sound. Led by the ever emotive and passionate tones of guitarist Johnny Straube, his Brian Molko like vocal warble nestling even more comfortably within the resourceful landscape of colourful sound crafted by his stringed prowess alongside the equally impressive skills of guitarist/keyboardist Adrian Garver, drummer Brian McCrossen, and bassist Gar Hooker (who since the album recording has left to be replaced by  Siobhan McCloskey), Post Adolescence has grown into a aggressively potent protagonist for ears and imagination. There is a new spark and flame to the band, and a fiercer almost punk like energy which gives life to each song as evidenced from the first moment.

Opener Asexual takes mere seconds to intrigue and stoke up an eager appetite as its initial blaze of caustic guitar comes with almost Post Adolescence - Goodbye from the Future Album Artbrawling like intent. The immediate urgency kicks up another gear as thumping rhythms batter the ear and riffs lick their lips with stronger intensity. With infectious twists and hooks playing around the distinctive vocals of Straube, the track continues to stomp with punk mischief before throwing in another curveball through a mouthwatering lure of magnetic electro inspired keys. Additional discord and warped melodies also flavour its unrelenting stride as the song makes a brilliant start to the release, an incendiary fuse to inventive revelry to come.

The following Everybody’s Sober Nowadays is given a big task to match its predecessor but it does so with individual ease, its more controlled attack and purposeful lyrical incitement swiftly captivating thoughts as keys and guitars cast a creative web to take care of ears. The song has a thick body of sound but each element is allowed clarity to add their light and shadows, the bass of McCloskey especially an appealing cloud against the more constrained rhythms of McCrossen and the fire pit of sonic endeavour and melodic intrigue offered by guitars and keys. Melancholic with the heaviest shadows, it continues the impressive flight of the album before making way for the title track where a caress of guitar coats ears first before the bass roams emotively around the emerging melodic and vocal narrative. The strongly appealing song is a tender and reflective proposition which, as all songs, is unafraid to open up its lyrical heart and show it is looking ahead with hope from within darker corners, evidencing a description of the album by Straube, “Goodbye from the Future is a final word to all the relationships from past songs, a message that won’t occupy his thoughts anymore. It’s about moving on.”

Recent single Hindsight steps up next, instantly treating ears to an electronic web as Straube’s voice opens the entrance to another sinewed proposition of honest riffs and mesmeric melodies within a raucously catchy embrace. As with the music there is a richer antagonistic edge to his delivery which brings a new potent character to sound and songs, whilst in this particular romp a devilish pop punk element is at large to create a presence which swings somewhere between Top Buzzer and Fall Out Boy. It is a masterful persuasion which ripples with ingenuity; swiping hooks, seductive harmonies, and raw passion all adding to the tenacious triumph.

The defiance soaked Fuck Off strolls in next, its tidy and keen gait making another swift persuasion if without sparking the same depth of passion for its bounty as other songs on the release. Once again there is a noticeable pop punk/power pop element to the easily pleasing stomp, a song which goes without the originality which marks the rest of the proposition and marks out the delicious Blindsighted. To be honest there is a familiarity to the glorious breeze of melodic seducing with envelops imagination and emotions too, but it only brings richer spice to the synth pop spawned beauty. It is a fascinating and irresistible weave of evocative melodic colours and sonically sculpted hues within a spellbinding web of bracing textures and mellow elegance. The best song on Goodbye from the Future it almost alone shows the new plateau Post Adolescence walks.

The album is concluded with What You Would Call Socialism (I Would Call Civilization), a final emotionally anthemic, musically enthralling dance to spark another wave of unbridled satisfaction. A sturdy yet radiant adventure with more of the unpredictable and eagerly bristling invention which has emerged in the band’s song writing and sound, the track is an exciting finale to a thoroughly impressive and thrilling release. Post Adolescence has graduated from a strong enjoyment into a mouthwatering and breath-taking proposition; it was on the cards with their first album but expectations have been left looking pretty feeble by the brilliance of Goodbye from the Future, and you still feel it is only a step in something even greater to come.

Goodbye from the Future is available now @ http://postadolescence.bandcamp.com/album/goodbye-from-the-future

http://www.postadolescence.com/

9/10

RingMaster 18/06/2014

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Everybody Looks Famous – Earth

credit Edward Taylor - Digital Flow

credit Edward Taylor – Digital Flow

As the potent creative climate and vivacious breath of the Earth EP pleases ears and catches the imagination, UK pop rock band Everybody Looks Famous offer plenty to justify the growing buzz around them. This is a band soaked in potential and though the EP maybe does not realise that promise as rigorously as you feel it could have it certainly makes for a fine and enjoyable slice of melodic rock.

Hailing from Tamworth, the quintet of Lex (vocals), Tom (guitar, vocals, synth), Joe (guitar, vocals), Grace (keys, Synth), and Phil (drums) formed in 2010 and made their first potent impression with their debut EP, I Break My Own Rules two years later. Signing with Go Faster Records that same year and releasing the single Spotlights, Everybody Looks Famous began drawing a more nationwide bred attention which debut album Fuel To Fire in the August of 2013 certainly did with its feisty and appealing collection of pop rock with essences of melodic punk infused offerings. With their stock live also gaining a strong reputation, the band sharing stages with the likes of Tinie Tempah, Scouting For Girls, and Canterbury, the band now release the crowd funded Earth EP, another sizeable statement of intent and craft from the impressively emerging band.

Echo starts things off and immediately a melodic elegance seeps from the guitars and the enchanting vocals of Lex, the combination ELF EP Cover Artswiftly courted by a thick vibrant punctuation of rhythms and evocative keys. It is an enthralling start which expands its lure whilst infusing a punchy stride of beats and raw guitar stabs, a magnetic proposition which smoulders and tempts voraciously though it never explodes as thoughts and expectations assume. It is like the EP in that respect, the release and songs never quite igniting into a crescendo or confrontational fire but persistently coaxing and feeding the imagination and emotions.

The undeniably riveting start though is quickly rivalled by The Wanderer, another song merging reflective emotive tenderness with raucous rapaciousness for thoroughly engaging results. With additional vocals from the guys alongside the striking tones of Lex, her voice impressive with every syllable and thick harmony, as well as sonic invention aligned to poetic keys, the song further reveals the accomplished intent and imaginative songwriting and sound of the band in strong if not dramatic style.

The absorbing enticement continues with the rhythmically driven Hiding Places, the drums a commanding lead into another embracing weaves of persuasive melodies and warm vocals. More rock ballad than the previous songs, it still has a bounce and shy swagger to its heart which hugs the ears as the guitars sculpt a web of sonic almost progressive descriptive hues to colour the track’s highly expressive canvas. It does not have the weight and hold of its predecessors it is fair to say but easily shows another string to the imaginative bow of the band to keep attention and appetite keen.

The release ends with the melodically pungent ballad These Days, a song which across its emotive body has a rhythmic weight from the first moment which strikes firmly and a passionate growth of energy which brings exciting flames to the song. It is a fine finish to a highly enjoyable release, not one which will leave mouths wide open and thoughts bowled over but undoubtedly one to reaffirm and spread further the promise and already exciting premise of Everybody Looks Famous.

The Earth EP is available June 16th @ http://www.everybodylooksfamous.com/

7.5/10

RingMaster 15/06/2014

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Katsuo – Creators

Katsuo Online Promo Shot

    Rife with more ideas than occasionally and debatably it knows what to do with, it is fair to say that the Creators EP from Katsuo is a feverish dance of sound and imagination which is impossible to ignore. Five tracks of electronic pop merged with dubstep, alternative rock, and just a whisper of j pop, the release is an undulating, in success, and rousing inciter of the dancefloor with just enough to suggestively infect even the more hardened resistance. First listen raised doubts and a strain of antipathy but it has to be admitted over time Katsuo and EP became a deviously addictive proposition with moments which just had to be enjoyed more and more.

     Katsuo is the project of multi-instrumentalist Alex Larkman which he formed in 2012. Gaining experience in numerous bands, the musician wanted to ‘create something edgy, contemporary, and innovative’ so taking inspirations from the likes of Fall Out Boy, 30 Seconds to Mars, Skrillex, and Prince into his invention created Katsuo. The first year saw debut EP Silver Tongue released as well as the single Warrior a little later. Their well-received success was built upon last year by the release of the Stereo Jesus video which featured Suicide Girl and Front Magazine cover girl Rebecca Crow (Katherine Suicide). Again it only enhanced the presence and hunger for the sounds being unleashed, something the Super Happy Records released Creators can only emulate and drive on.

     The title track kicks things off and immediately has pulsating beats resonating through the senses whilst an electro rummaging Katsuo Cover Artworkingrains an even deeper alluring presence. As much a contagious agitator on feet as a bed of hot coals, the song is soon striding with a hungry energy alongside the compelling vocals which have been laying down their particular infectious bait from the first second. Assumptions soon kick in that this rampant electronic taunting and enterprise is the way of the track but Larkman is soon dismissing expectations as from the vibrant brew of electro pop urgency with guest vocalist Nakisha Esnard adding her glorious harmonic tones to the mix, a burst of swing and jazzy temptation with delicious dark piano enticement included breaks free from the feisty melodic waltz. Fusing it all in a continuing anthemic seduction with virulently addictive endeavour and adventure, the track is an excitable and exciting start which like the whole EP feels like a bit of a guilty pleasure for more heavily boned and aggressive tastes but simply is predominantly irresistible.

     The following I Wanna Know continues the enthralling start, its industrial bred entrance a reserved yet keen coaxing which welcomes and wraps around the strong and smooth vocals of Larkman. Again there is sense of ‘should I be liking this so much?’, but as the mischievous and provocative slice of electro pop rock continues to embrace the ears there is little resistance to its uncomplicated and radiant presence. Carrying an essence of eighties synth pop to its magnetic croon the song is another thoroughly appealing highlight on an already satisfyingly teasing release.

    From here on in the EP loses some of its potency on personal tastes though the next up Secret Supervillian featuring US singer songwriter Zoe Ann still recruits feet and appetite in its richly catchy web of electro rock infestation ripe with melodic craft and vocal harmonies. There is the spark missing which ignites the previous pair of songs though, and especially with the seductive voice of its guest bringing the strongest temptation it feels like a missed opportunity. With a tantalising brief interlude of cheerleader driven tribal toxicity embraced by electronic groaning sitting between this track and the following As Good As Mine, which itself hosts another guest appearance this time from Mark Bolton, the EP still nestles nicely in the emotions but here without sparking and igniting the imagination as it started out achieving so easily. The second of the two songs is too boy band like for these hungry ears and is a soon forgotten encounter though this is down to personal tastes only. It is a pop song to be fair which has all the tools to capture the passions of teen girls and day time radio whilst to its latter melodic narrative the emerging growl will satisfy soft rock pop enthusiasts. Well-crafted and presented the track is a straightforward flight of pop sound spreading the charm of the release if not the kindling for a fire in the emotions.

   The closing song The Wicked hints at the same results with its acoustic opening and vocal harmonies but it saves itself with dark electronic revving and a bewildering yet inviting mix of ideas and sounds. Just when you think the song is about to fall into a bland pop abyss it comes up with a twist to nudge attention though equally when you hope it is about to expand those elements it slips back into the uninspiring caresses. Arguably messy in its mesh of ideas but persistently nagging with shards of temptation it is a more than decent if not inspiring end to the release.

    The Creators EP is two scintillating long term incitements and three generally pleasing if not lingering pieces of pop kissing. The release will not be for everyone though certainly it offers enough at its start to entrap and enslave all imaginations at least once but with promise soaking every step it is easy to see Katsuo emerging into strong acclaim and greater potency within dancefloors and electro pop appetites over the time ahead.

http://www.theycallmekatsuo.com/

www.facebook.com/theycallmekatsuo

7/10

RingMaster 17/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Welcome Matt – POPJUNKFLUFF&HYPE

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Without one of our favourite albums of last year was The Panhandle Years from The Welcome Matt, an album which compiled a wealth of tracks taken from the project’s previous seven albums to introduce a very talented sound and presence to the wider world. It was a refreshing and exciting introduction for us to the band and San Francisco based musician Matt Langlois who is The Welcome Matt. Following up its impressive persuasion, comes new album POPJUNKFLUFF&HYPE, a release which quite simply carries on where its predecessor left off, inflaming the passions and creating some quite irresistible and enterprising rock pop.

Finding success and acclaim with his work with Members Of Sound from 2009 through to 2011, a musical project which released a new song every month for two years and resulted in two major CD releases from this work with an array of Bay Area musicians and producers, Langlois in many ways brought his solo project into its strongest limelight, certainly in respect of an emerging world awareness with The Panhandle Years. It was a kind of summing up of his adventure and creative journey to that point which POPJUNKFLUFF&HYPE now extends with its own delicious stomp of imaginative infection.

The Welcome Back opens up the ‘return’, lightly jagged guitars coaxing attention as the distinctive expressive vocals of Langlois wait for a moment before beginning their narrative. Into its full stride the song unveils a bluesy melodic embrace aligned to sixties tinted harmonies and melodic temptation. Lifting its knees the track eventually moves from an inviting walk into a feisty stomp, one weaving tendrils of contagious seventies pop rock and sixties charm into a gait which never truly explodes into riotousness but leaves the senses energised as the sounds toy with them. It is a mesmeric start which awakens a healthy appetite for the release and immediately feeds the anticipation bred by the album’s predecessor.

The following Key of G opens with Bolanesque strumming and vocal harmonies, the influence unmistakable and a pleasing lure into a song which evolves the inspiration into a compelling striding of inventive persuasion, guitars and keys almost wanton in their temptation whilst a throaty bass sounds has their back, it bringing shadows into the equation. It is impossible to resist its enticement; it like many of the songs breeding a familiarity within a fresh and magnetic wash of imagination. Its successor Let It Lead You, the new single from the album, is very much the same, its presence and teasing that of a recognisable friend but in a brand new enterprising suit. The rhythmic beckoning at the start instantly has feet and hunger on alert whilst the keys and vocals alongside, not for the first time upon the album, a virulently addictive groove littered with potent hooks seduces with every note and touch. It is a deviously effective pop song and catchy doorway into the album and The Welcome Matt for newcomers.

Pop Junk Fluff and Hype steps up next, a funk fed introduction taking little time in recruiting thoughts and emotions as it romps eagerly around the ears. Fiery rock guitars flame over the pop canvas whilst vocals and keys leap with energetic rigour and enterprise. It is a spellbinding mix of styles and flavours, electro and alternative rock adding to the insatiable and outstanding toxicity. Just as epidemically enthralling is Mode Of Transportation, a fusion of power pop and indie/electro rock which plays like a mix of The Motors meets Cockney Rebel with a splash of Cheap Trick. The song almost prowls around the senses and imagination even in its radiantly hued stance leading the listener into yet another impossible to ignore or resist piece of excellent rock ‘n’ roll.

A Hail Mary mischievously teases from the outset with a discord bleeding caress of chords and electronic nagging, its suasion early XTC like with a little Hot Hot Heat festivity to its riveting coaxing whilst Get Shameless is a foot stomping dance of hypnotic rhythms and frisky melodies. Keys and bass add their individual textures to the electric dance as Langlois immerses the listener in a skilled and adventurous addiction.

Both Mind Control and Lets Really Go continue the impressive exploits within the album, the first with a seemingly Sparks bred form of pop punk with hooks and a bass pulse which stick welcome barbs in deeply and the second through a devilishly compelling transfixing slice of country rock sing-a-long with slithers of punk and rock ‘n‘ roll adding their teasing.

Cast A Line brings POPJUNKFLUFF&HYPE to a Bolan/Kinks tasting and enjoyable end to conclude a thoroughly thrilling and incredible contagious encounter. It is a storming blaze of pop rock which feeds every want and need with accomplished infectious ease, and an album all should pay attention to.

http://www.welcomemattsf.com

9/10

RingMaster 18/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Through Colour – Somnium

through colour pic

The first of a concept-based 2 EP release, Somnium is a potent and passionate release from a band who after many years of making good impressions, has seemingly come to that point where impressions have become strong recognition. The five track release from UK rock/pop band Through Colour is a striking and accomplished introduction, though also one which only fleetingly ignites real fire in the passions for its undoubted impressive songwriting and excellent delivery. There is very little to hold up against the release, if anything at all but there is just a lack of that extra spark to make a lingering heart erupting declaration.

Nevertheless Somnium is a formidable release from a band which formed in 2004 in North Wales. Initially called My Turn To Kill until 2009 when they felt a change was needed to suit their style and evolution of sound, Through Colour next released the well-received debut mini album, Dream In Black And White which was recorded with Romesh Dodangoda. Its success and shows alongside the likes of Enter Shikari, Fightstar, We Are The Ocean, and The Misfits only added to the stock of the band. Then in 2011 the Manchester based quintet took a break to work on new songs but now the line-up of vocalist Steve White, guitarists Lee Crimes and Jazzy Bones, bassist Kieran Joyce, and drummer Shaun Humphreys return with Somnium, a release sure to bring further stature and awareness to their potent sound and songwriting.

Opener Daydream immediately takes attention by the hand and carries it and emotions on a vibrant dance of heart bred adventure and20212_10151367174122185_1827981421_n melodic colour. Instantly pleasing with a fresh breath which is coated in the kind of anthemic lure which is impossible to ignore let alone resist, the song thrusts jangly riffs and strong vocals through the ear from its opening second. The temptation is elevated with the fiery chorus and subsequent almost teasing twist before the verse, the rhythmic juggling especially impressive within the strong wind of sonic expertise and lingering hooks. The track makes a stirring start and remains the major pinnacle of the release despite the valiant efforts of the other songs.  Lyrically it has a passion to match the vocals and music, all combining for an infectiously memorable and deeply satisfying entrance into the EP.

The following Lost takes a gentler caress to the ear to open its account, the excellent vocal style and tone of White again a compelling inducement. Into its stride the tugging on the emotions is brought on a more restrained gait compared to its predecessor but one with plenty of sinew sculpted energy and eagerness whilst the rhythms of Humphreys cast a muscular and pleasing frame to the guitar scythes and melodic persuasion. A slow burner of a song in many ways it is a good confirmation of the promise oozing from the opener if without finding the heights of the first song.

Both Ink and Broken hold a seemingly personal aspect, certainly taking the potency and strength of the emotive tone on White’s delivery, and feel linked, not as a two part offering but in tone and emotion. The first is an absorbing encounter, the keys and vocal harmonies delicious hues to the provocative canvas of the track though there are elements which sound too familiar for comfort but from an unrecognisable source to be fair. It makes for a song which ebbs and flows in the passions though like the previous track it is one which makes a stronger call and suasion the more you share its colourful flight. The second of the two tantalises with riveting rhythms and again the excellent harmonies the band bring to their songs so skilfully and effectively. Once more it is a song which at times is pure scintillating mesmerism and in other moments finding things to annoyingly feed expectations. Nevertheless it is an excellent track which like the rest shower the ear and thoughts with a wave of promise and adventure which makes the future of the band one to anticipate hungrily.

The closing Till The End is the weakest on the release but yet again has plenty to feed an awoken appetite for the band. The orchestral embrace of the song makes for a dramatic but thoughtful presence whilst the evocative wash of the song is a magnetic caress but ultimately the track in comparisons to the rest of the EP is lacking the trigger to bring the imagination and emotions to the boil.

Somnium is a fine collection of songs though and a companion which leaves a healthy intrigue and intent towards its forthcoming companion EP. Through Colour has the craft and sound to make big waves in UK rock pop, they just need that final fuse or trigger to make it a long term enthralling one.

http://www.through-colour.com/

https://www.facebook.com/ThroughColour

8/10

RingMaster 30/09/2013

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