Malka – The Constant State

Malka 3_RingMaster Review

Listening to the debut EP from US band Malka is like looking into a reflection within solidly disturbed clear water, eyes exploring a myriad of openly different but connected realms and possibilities. The Constant State is the equivalent for ears, each song revealing its own unique fusion of shoegaze, psychedelic rock, and dream pop but coming together for one intimate yet expansion flight of sound and imagination.

Hailing from New York, Malka consists of Darko Saric (guitars, synths, vocals), EJ DeCoske (guitars, synths, vocals), David Ciauro (bass, vocals), and Michael Dawson (drums).Emerging in 2013, it seems the quartet quickly began enticing support and acclaim with their sound locally and soon further afield, no real surprise when embracing the rich persuasive sounds of this their first release. The album is a kaleidoscope of immersive atmospheres, fascinatingly varied vocals and harmonies, and evocative melodies, all infused with lyrical explorations as intensely provocative as the sounds around them.

Malka - The Constant State cover artwork_RingMaster Review     A Flock Of Crows is the album’s first embrace, warm melodies from guitars and synths caressing ears whilst brewing a slightly volatile ambience for the captivating touch of vocals from across the band. Equally the rhythms have a darker, hungrier but welcoming edge too, the beats from Dawson especially enticing as the song merges a wistful dreamscape with energetic catchiness. There is no escaping a seventies /eighties feel to the encounter either but it is one woven into a tempting which also hugs broader essences from surrounding decades amidst a modern breath.

It is an enthralling opening to The Constant State backed and surpassed by the ethereal beauty of For Now We Live. As melodically meditative as it is atmospherically and rhythmically invasive, the song is like the first, a tenacious incitement which in many ways is imposing with its mesmeric glaze of post and psych rock infused with emotionally tense vocals and sultrily sonic hues. The song is irresistible, much as its successor the surf seeded Mientras Se Respira. The Spanish narrative is offered by the mellowest croon of voice with matching bewitching harmonies, whilst around them the guitars court an alternative rock colouring which is as much Pixies like as it is suggestive of a My Bloody Valentine or a Cocteau Twins. A smouldering kiss on the senses and imagination, the song further unveils a stirring diversity to the band’s sound and songwriting.

   Wolves And Sheep steps forward next with a pulsating shimmer to its almost festering hug of sonic light and melodic reflection. The track, as all upon The Constant State, provides a full beacon of light yet there are shadowy textures and tempering essences which only add to the drama and mystique of songs. Certainly this and its companions generally need time and many plays to truly open up for ears and thoughts to explore, but with a great trespass of sonic endeavour and expression brewing for a fiery climax, the song emulates all others in providing an increasingly magnetic and enjoyable trip through compelling atmospheric trespasses of the senses.

Both Diamond Girl and Corazon Sin Sangre keep the listener fuelled with adventure and diverse terrains of sound and imagination in potent persuasions, the first with its enslaving and increasingly dramatic sixties spawned smoulder of psychedelic pop and the second through its spatial yet intimate dark pop meets post rock drenched soar. Though each misses the extra ‘something’ of their predecessors, each song is pure temptation for album and ears from fresh and alternative soundscapes.

The release comes to a close with Swoon, easily our favourite track springing from the album. There is a familiarity to it from the first melodic breeze but it is an indefinable air which only adds to the thickening emotional theatre and climatic texture of the song. It is gentle but also lively tapestry of sound and invention, the perfect irresistible end to one potent introduction.

It would be fair to say that The Constant State, though making a strong first impression, grew into the thrilling adventure it is over time, an enticing and definitely enjoyable first touch evolving into the breeding of richer explorations and pleasure. The final thought is that Malka has the potential to bring major propositions to the British rock/ indie pop scene ahead and to be honest they already have with The Constant State.

The Constant State is available now @

RingMaster 23/07/2015

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Follow The Lion – The Candy and Gravity Motel

Follow The lion_RingMaster Review

UK alternative rock band Follow the Lion has a sound which immediately feels so right on ears whilst offering something seemingly already familiar. The latter aspect though is deceptive and arises primarily from the fact that once infected by the band’s new EP, there is very little likely you will be putting it aside just as a passing fascination. Our experience is that the band and release becomes a heavily devoured incitement from first contact, becoming an old friend in no time at all and casting that suggestion of being something recognisable simply from constant play. Bottom-line though is that consisting of three provocatively bewitching tracks, the EP is a compelling and highly seductive slice of emotionally and skilfully tenacious rock ‘n’ roll from a band surely destined for big things.

Follow The Lion began in 2013 taking diverse influences from the likes of Pixies, Massive Attack, The Beatles, Nirvana, Tricky, and King Crimson into their emerging invention and sound. The Leeds band was soon lighting up the local live scene, subsequently venues across the north west of England, and this summer festivals like Live at Leeds and Long Division. Now the Steve Whitfield (The Cure, Bill Bruford) produced and Celt Islam mastered The Candy and Gravity Motel EP is poised to work on ears and appetites nationwide and from our findings there is little chance of escaping its or band’s lure.

cover_RingMaster Review   The release opens with its title track, making a gentle entrance through a sparkling weave of guitar and keys within which a firm rhythmic coaxing from bassist Mase and drummer Danny Jay Barnett steps forward. It does not take long for a whisper of Black to nudge thoughts whilst the sonic shimmer of the track carries hints of bands like Bernaccia and Soundgarden. They are mere essences though, the song as it further opens up its contagious theatre of melodies and smouldering sonic temptation, evolving into a unique and sultry serenade but one with a snarl to its emotions and unstoppable virulence to its character. As rhythms get bolder and the sonic enterprise spicier, the glorious roar is a blaze of temptation and enthralment merging various strains of rock and creative expression.

Down By The River comes next and within its first breath offers a catchy welcoming of riffs with a low key jangle. It is swiftly in control of ears and attention, especially once the initially reserved beats link up with a brooding bassline. They spark a fiery embrace of guitar which in turn elevates the energy and vivacity of those rhythms. It is a captivating start given fresh energy and magnetism by the distinct tones of Daniel Francis, his voice expressive and evocative with potent variety to his delivery. His own guitar prowess provides a firm and enticing canvas for the rich and colourful enterprise of lead guitarist Richard Swann to further spark an already gripped imagination, his spicy tendrils captivating within the flowing caresses of Paul Smith’s keys and the darker rhythmic frame. The song is irresistible, feisty and infectious but with a thick weave of emotive drama to leave no stone unturned in thrilling the listener.

The voice of Francis, superbly backed by Smith, is like the music around it, a perpetual source of riveting incitement. He never bellows and forces the strong lyrical side of the songs upon the senses, yet seduces and provocatively roars with undiluted persuasion across every song, as shown by Low. Carrying a definite eighties air to its melodic and catchy stroll, like Colin Vearncombe meets Spandau Ballet in many ways, the closing song washes over the senses with poetic radiance though again there is a raw and dark edge to it which adds to the fullness and weight of the enthralling encounter.

There have already been many good things said about Follow The Lion and their debut EP, from Tom Robinson for one, and now lost in the arms of the spellbinding release it is easy to see why and say you too should make a reservation with The Candy and Gravity Motel.

The Candy and Gravity Motel is available from June 29th @

RingMaster 29/06/2015

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Diamond Youth – Nothing Matters

dy Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

It may be only thirty minutes in length but Nothing Matters, the debut album from US alternative rock band Diamond Youth, is jam packed with boisterously contagious songs to party hard and long to. It is a riot of fun seemingly bred on flavours inspired by the likes of Queens Of the Stone Age, Weezer, and Foo Fighters but with plenty of its own distinct characteristics and flavours to create something individual to Diamond Youth. For personal tastes the release is stronger and most tenacious in its first half but every offering within Nothing Matters is a compelling slice of pop rock equipped with feisty persuasion and a good strain of tenacious mischief.

Diamond Youth hails from Baltimore, emerging around 2010 with a line-up featuring members of Trapped Under Ice, Terror, and Down to Nothing; all sharing a common background of art, design, skateboarding, and of course music. Influences range from band such as Pixies, The Nerves, and unsurprisingly Queens Of The Stone Age, and it is fair to say that the quartet has increasingly lured attention through a host of EPs starting with DMND and Don’t Lose Your Cool in 2011. It is Orange in 2013 and Shake a year later, both as the new album released via Topshelf Records, which provided the spark to greater focus and acclaim enveloping the band, in turn sparking strong anticipation for the band’s debut full-length. It will leave no one disappointed and is destined to not only recruit another wave of eager spotlights and fans whilst simply creating a fun time for all.

Recorded with engineer Dave Warsop, the album starts with its title track, swiftly entrapping ears and appetite with stirring rhythms and spicy hooks encased in vocal and melodic revelry. Quickly, especially as the vocals impressively cast their tempting on proceedings, that QOTSA air is an open breeze bringing even greater catchy bait to the vibrant persuasion. It is the tangy hook though which brings the biggest smile in the emotions, that and the adventurous ideation lining the song from first note to last.

Nothing-Matters-Cover Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     The excellent opening to Nothing Matters is quickly matched by Thought I Had It Right, another song with thick hooks and entrancing harmonic tempting. Slightly more restrained in energy compared to its predecessor, the song saunters and sways with a rich Muse like sultriness to sound and voice. Every syllable comes coated with a spice of angst whilst melodies like a fine wine just become more seductive and effective on the senses with very passing moment. There is also a volatile edge to the contagion posing as a track, its sonic presence flirting with causticity as it forcibly infests and ignites ears through to the imagination.

Spinning steps up next with an even more reserved nature though melodic and vocal passion in turn create a blistering roar courted by a snarl of a bassline. Fair to say that it might be the least feisty song on the release so far but it is the most tempestuous and fascinating, and subsequently quite irresistible as also the following Far Away from Earth. Rhythms straight away lay down an anthemic potency before quickly finding themselves skirted by a deliciously grizzled bassline and a brewing sonic mist of guitar. The mellow croon of vocals does bring a magnetic tempering but ultimately only seems to inflame the growl and rebellious attitude of the song as it erupts in a cauldron of pop infectiousness and rock ‘n’ roll predation. Crunchy and warmly smouldering simultaneously, it teases the psyche like Josh Homme toying with Muse as it creates yet another instant pinnacle upon the album.

A more summery swagger comes with Succulent next, a surf rock/ garage pop colouring the sweltering climate of the bewitching instrumental. Its heated charm and warm elegance are emulated in next up In the Clouds, a bubbling shimmer of sound and harmonies which takes the listener by the emotions and leads them on a dance of addictive devilry. Six tracks in and five of them are easily single potential, an instrumental having little chance of being chosen let’s be honest.

From Riptide onwards, band and album seems to explore a different avenue with a lessening of the agitated sonic invention and an increasing of more immersive melodies and warm radiance. Tracks as this compelling ballad still have a fire in their belly but such the alchemy of virulence in earlier songs they just miss, and it is just, casting the same persuasive spark. Nevertheless the song has ears engrossed and satisfaction full whilst the static kiss and melodic coaxing of No Control and the post punk like rhythmic lure of The Nothing, ensure only the keenest attention is given. The second of the two especially has thoughts and enjoyment lit before Deep Love explores some dark pop beauty. It has a feel of UK artist Rooster Cole to it, with its sombre ambience encased in an excitable adventure of sound. The track is superb, a match for anything before and without doubt also a song on its own sure to trigger greedy reactions.

The album closes with The Difference, itself a humidly aired release of emotional and musical drama, and a fine end to an increasingly impressing encounter. Diamond Youth has taken the qualities nurtured in previous releases to new thrilling and at times spellbinding heights. Whether you want an out and out romp to party with or something with a melodic embrace to sink into, Nothing Matters delivers one very enjoyable time.

Nothing Matters is available now via Topshelf Records @ or

RingMaster 20/05/2015

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Prowling the dark side of being: exploring the corners of Invertia with Dave Coppola


An invasive corrosion of senses and emotions, Another Scheme of the Wicked from US band Invertia stands to the fore of psyche invading threats and violating seductions unleashed in 2014. The album is a virulently compelling incitement of senses and thoughts from a duo in guitarist/vocalist Dave Coppola and drummer/programmer Tim Winson who seem to instinctively press all the right buttons with their provocative sonic and primal explorations. With an appetite to find out more about the band and its dark depths, we had the pleasure to talk with Dave who helped us explore the new album, the creative union between the two, the art of remixes and plenty more…

Hello Dave and welcome to the site and thanks for agreeing to talk with us.

Thank you for the interview, my pleasure!

First of all can you tell us about how you both met?

We actually met thru a mutual friend.

Was there a musical connection right away and how long before thoughts of creating a band took hold?

We started working on songs right away. We basically just started tracking guitars to a beat. Those songs would eventually become Blasphemy Be My Name and Perpetual Alert from the first album. We didn’t think of it as a “band” at first. It was just a recording project that became a band! We never thought we would play live when we met, that’s for sure. It’s crazy when we think about how we started to where we have come; for example opening for Blood of Heroes with Bill Laswell, getting a remix done by Justin Broadrick from Godflesh, to putting out an album with Ohm Resistance. It’s unreal.

Did you have any specific intentions when working on your first songs or was it more of let’s play and see what evolves initially?

It was more let’s see what happens. I never thought Tim and I would still be doing this years later…I’m glad we are though.

Invertia2Though your sound seems to be tagged most often as industrial black metal we found it to be so much more and pleasingly impossible to tie down. What are the most predominate inspirations upon yourselves which you feel have spiced your writing etc.?

Thanks for the kind words! We have all kinds of inspirations whether it be bands, film, books etc. There are too many to name, especially between the two of us. I listen to a lot of metal like Mayhem and Burzum, and industrial as well, Godflesh and Ministry. Tim likes the Residents and Adam Ant. We both like the same bands like the Pixies and the Butthole Surfers. William S. Burroughs and George Carlin are huge influences as well. Also the film They Live by John Carpenter is having a huge influence on the new album which is currently underway. So that’s why we sound the way we do.

You have recently released Another Scheme of the Wicked, a captivating and intrusive hybrid of sound and enterprise. Did it in creation fulfil or your hopes and thoughts or has it evolved beyond even your expectations with its potency and might?

We did the best we could, we always do. That way no matter what anybody says about it we are still satisfied in the end. Albums are like Presidents, it takes time to see the mess you made!

It feels a much darker and more predatory encounter than your previous release, more dangerous one; does it feel like that to you and if so was that a deliberate aim from the start or an organic emergence?

I agree, it is much darker…It has a little more of a dynamic feel to it than the first one. I’m not saying it’s a dynamic album just more than the debut haha! We are fast and in your face the whole time with this album other than the remixes. When we were writing we didn’t sit down and plan it that way it just happened. I think that’s the way it goes for most artists, you never know what you’re going to get at the very beginning. It’s always a surprise at some point during the process.

How do the songs come together and evolve primarily between the pair of you?

Typically myself or Tim will write a beat, I’ll put the guitars and bass down and go from there. Tim will take the beat and make it into drum sections and the song will evolve over time. Songs can be like a photo, you have to capture the evolution at the right time or you’ll miss it.

Tell us about the intent and premise behind Another Scheme of the Wicked.

The intent was to put out a decent industrial metal record. The premise was to make it original and not your every day run of mill metal record. I think we achieved that if I may say so. The album got mixed reviews from the metal community. I knew it would, and at the end of the day I’m glad it did.

The five tracks come with another five remixes, each an interpretation of the previous quintet, was this planned from the first seeds of the release?

Not at all… That was pure luck with a sprinkle of dedication. If you would have told me this album would have those artists on it remixing our music, I would have laughed at you.invertiacoverofficial

In many ways the remixes are doppelgangers of the originals for us, though it is debateable which are the darkest and most frightening versions. Did you give free rein for the likes of Justin K. Broadrick and End.user in their take on your songs?

Absolutely…There was no way I was going to tell those guys what to do. There is no way I could have. You can’t tell Justin Broadrick or Kurt Gluck how to do their job, they just do, that’s why we chose them. That’s the element of surprise I enjoy in this art form I spoke of earlier.

It has to be admitted we have never been fans of remixes, or maybe just do not understand their function though those on Another Scheme of the Wicked have impacted far deeper than most others we have come across on our thoughts. What is it about them which inspires you and lent the idea to include them on the new release?

We are big Skinny Puppy fans and we always liked the way they remixed everything. So I guess it just comes down to demonstrating a different point of view thru a common theme. I always thought that was interesting. I think it gives an extra depth to the album when played in its entirety. The next album we may, if at all, do them separately. To be honest my thinking was it’s just cheaper for the people purchasing the album to not have to buy remixes. But this time around we will give them the choice.

I have to ask as it must happen to someone somewhere, how would you deal with a remix which you did not like and felt did not warrant a place or fitted on one of your releases?

Well, we would be pissed; we hope it would not come to that. That’s why we asked the artists we did, and of course they were very professional in sending us either a couple of versions or following up with us to make sure everything was cool.

Back to your songs; at times they seem to be alive as they ignite the imagination and emotions, feeling like they have hidden depths unrevealed to the listener. How intensively did you take sculpting and shaping the songs of the release?

We are very picky in studio. We have a simple chemistry, and it goes like this. If Tim doesn’t come out of his seat during playback of the initial arrangement, it’s not good enough and I’m back to the drawing board. That’s how I know it will ignite the imagination and emotion, because we can see it in ourselves. If it works for us it might work for the listener as well.

InvertiaWas it an on-going honing process until recording time?

Pretty much, mostly the guitars and arranging…We can bring in ideas on the spot with samples and bass parts.

How about the lyrical side of your music? Was that an intensive development and what inspires their breath predominantly?

The lyrics are inspired by just peoples wrong doing really…People’s hatred for one another and trying to get the last laugh on your own species. It’s a place I don’t like to go for too long a time. We would probably have more material if I frequented the place that inspires the lyrics more often, but it’s a creepy spot.

Tell us about the other projects you are both involved in, and were involved in a couple of the remixes on Another Scheme of the Wicked I believe?

I have another industrial project called TranZi3nT and Tim has another project call R3TRD. We use them as a break from Invertia.

What is next on the horizon of Invertia?

We just released a new single for download at called Existence Exit. It won’t be on Amazon or ITunes as they called the cover “pornographic”. You can judge for yourselves.   We also a have a 7” single coming out called Forever Incision that will have a live version of Facility of the Feeble on it, which is the opening track of the debut album. That will be put out through our label Ohm Resistance, which you will be able to get at soon.   As for the new album we are hoping for late spring time. We are looking to play some more live shows as well. Hopefully 2015 will be a good year for Invertia!

Thanks again for chatting with us; any final thought you would like to leave us with?

Thanks Pete! It was a pleasure doing this interview, good luck to you!!!


Read the review of Another Scheme of the Wicked @

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 08/12/2015

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The Art of Amputation – Distorted Pop Song/ Californian English

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Listening to Distorted Pop Song, one half of the new AA-sided single from UK progressive rock band The Art of Amputation, is like being wrapped up in a warm duvet against a squalling wind. It is a thick haze of melodic and sonic enterprise which gives you a fuzzy feeling in the senses warding off shadows and at times reality. Aligned to the more tenacious and incendiary Californian English, song and single is a captivating offering from the London quintet, not a startling one but an encounter which though an instant enjoyment takes its time truly seducing the emotions.

Formed when Hugh Fox (drums, programming, percussion) and Allan Harrod (vocals, guitar, keyboards) linked up as a duo after the break-up of a previous band, The Art of Amputation soon Picture 172became a trio as the pair began writing and recording their debut EP. Realising they needed another guitarist to realise their explorations inspired by the likes of Weezer, Pixies, The Beatles, and David Bowie, they recruited Mark Hyden (guitars, vocals). Next Freddy de Lord (keyboards, vocals, saxophone) was enlisted with subsequently their acclaimed self-titled EP unveiled in April this year. With a line-up now completed by Tim Harrod (vocals, percussion), the band unveil their new single, a release which as mentioned does not take the listener by the scruff of the neck but as it smoulders vibrantly, leads them into a sultrily twisted seduction which in turn recruits a keen appetite.

Distorted Pop Song emerges from a distant horizon, keys and sonic endeavour light smog which spreads as the song nears and mellow vocals glides resourcefully across the senses. In full view the song becomes a rich and thick tapestry of emotive vocal hues and evocative melodic colour immersing a heavier rhythmic and shadowed enticement. It ebbs and flows with bulging waves of sound and enterprising textures to toy with the imagination whilst its blustery climate and provocative embrace comes superbly lit by voice, keys, and exotic flames of sax.

Its companion Californian English has a more indie rock essence to its breath and presence, thoughts of Editors coming to the fore as the song opens up a persuasion of jangling guitars and flowing keys around a great varied vocal enticement. Again there is a rich and dense atmosphere to the song, psychedelic breezes colluding with jazz and rock intrigue for an enthralling weave of sound. With slightly more bite to its presence, the song is the peak of the pair but both tracks of the single standout and raise a hunger to know and hear more from the band.

Alongside the darkly enchanting EP, The Art of Amputation’s feistier new single reinforces their impressive emergence whilst showing further adventure and character to their songwriting and sound. The single is not the spark to a fire in passion’s belly but definitely a richly satisfying stoking of their embers from one of the more exciting prospects within the British scene.

Distorted Pop Song/ Californian English is available digitally now via Ruby Music @

RingMaster 17/11/2014

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Dumb – Two Bottles Video


    UK melodic noise makers Dumb is earning a fine and eager reputation for their vivacious and energetically contagious sound, something the new video and song Two Bottles sparks another keen ardour for with its expressive and emotive freshness. The second track on their recently released AA single Supersonic Love Toy/Two Bottles through One Beat Records, it makes another potent and earthy persuasion to the thrilling emergence of this Birmingham band.

    Filmed by James Woods at Viceroy Shoots, the Two Bottles video like the song itself is a relaxed party of freedom and losing inhibitions. It provides an almost fly on the wall like narrative to scenes around the central core of the band as they play the song in an informal manner. Visually too there is a clarity and at times starkness in colour, tone, and scenery which lays suggestions of making adventures from little stimuli and uninspiring climates. The video provides fine seeds and potent imagery for the imagination to interpret and dance with whilst the song provides a weave of melodic jangles and provocative rhythms from its opening seconds which equally flirts with thoughts and emotions, not forgetting inspiring feet to add their keen shuffle to the experience.

   Dumb has already fired up appetites for their sound though the release of debut single Dive and the following Retina as well as their acclaimed live performances which has seen them sharing stages with the likes of The Charlatans, The Vaccines, New Order, Darlia, Skaters, LSA, Superfood, Baby Strange, Charlie Boyer and the Voyeurs and many more. Recorded with producer Cam Blackwood (Darlia, London Grammar, George Ezra), Super Sonic Love Toy/Two Bottles takes the band’s presence and stature up another level with the new video an additional impressively magnetic enticement into the world of Dumb.

   Musically the band combines inspiration from Pixies and Built To Spill into their own indie/noise alchemy, one with an elevated distinctive twang to its breath and expansive depths to its passionate sonic sculpture. The other song on the single release also has a video already released to match its thrilling sound; Super Sonic Love Toy making an engagingly and evocatively expressive temptation on ears and imagination matched by the monochrome air and beauty of the video merging the band at play, work, and scenic stalking. Whereas plenty of videos just place a band in a set to play out the latest track, both videos and Two Bottles especially, leads the listener into an honest world of lyrical and emotional intent.

    Dumb is a band on a feisty march with Two Bottles its latest irresistible invitation. It is easy to imagine that very few will be unaware of the band over future horizons but as the new video suggests, why wait for it to happen when the gateway to fun and adventure is there already. So we suggest heading over to the band’s website at to immerse into both songs and videos and catch Dumb on the start of their certain ascent.

Two Bottles song and video 9/10

RingMaster 17/03/2014

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Deathcrush – Skool’s In

deathcrush pic

As instantly impacting as a right hook to the jaw, Skool’s In from Norwegian band Deathcrush easily shows what the buzz covering the band right now is all about and proves it is more than justified. A seamless collage of sounds and invention brought with a primal growl and uncompromising hunger, the 12” debut from the Oslo trio is a scintillating and passion gripping tour-de-force, and one you only feel is scratching the surface of the band’s depths and future.

Released on the back of their limited flexi disc release within a double poster magazine, Skool’s In is a four track vinyl temptress which is devilishly seductive and mercilessly addictive, and again that is only the tip of the sonically and rhythmically carnivorous bewitchment. Since forming the threesome of vocalist/guitarist Linn Nystadnes, bassist/vocalist Åse Røyset, and vocalist/drummer Vidar Evensen has garnered potent acclaim and fanbase through their live performances across Norway, Europe and beyond with their thick and magnetic noise rock originality. Recording a bundle of songs with Billy Anderson (Swans, Melvins, Mr. Bungle) and Jørgen Træen (Datarock, Annie, Sondre Lerche), the band is with Skool’s In starting off a much anticipated series of singles, the first a mighty scintillating beginning it is.

Opening track Lesson #3 for Gina Kikoine / You Now takes no time to unleash a bass snarl which preys on the ear whilst the drums stalk a1169124254_2with their own teasing design. Across it the vocals of Nystadnes and Åse Røyset either alone or together enchant with charm and menace whilst the guitar splits and sculpts the air with flesh singing sonic narrative. It is a powerful insidiously sirenesque persuasion which brews an intensity and smothering embrace which defies escape and breeds addiction whilst the electronic teases and taunts only excite the senses further into greater lustful submission. Like a mix of Melt Banana, Spinnerette, and 4 Non Blondes, but not, the track is a blistering almost disorientating sabre swipe of noise rock with acidic pop infectiousness and an exceptional start to the EP.

The immediate pinnacle is soon followed and matched by Lesson #4 for Wharton Tiers / Strauss, a track which explores even darker intensive shadows and the sonic creative destructive depths of the band and their craft. The first soundscape of the song is an apocalyptic like burning corrosive flight which takes a breather for the vocal almost childlike kisses to sooth and strap the passions in before making another fall through a synapse scraping imagination poking tempest. Nor as easily accessible as its predecessor but completely equal in impacting strength, aggressive persuasion, and unbridled excellence, the song leaves no doubt to the extensive intent and expanse of the band’s sound and ideas. It helps pile on the rabid anticipation for future singles and releases, something which is just as easily fed by the next up track.

     Lesson #13 for Nanker Phelge / Fire was the song which featured on the flexi-disc and within such immense company stands as potent and unique as before whilst increasing further the band’s reputation and stature. A track which from the start stalks and prowls the senses providing ammunition for heart and mind whilst feeding the senses and emotions with a slow romp of ridiculously contagious sound and imagination, the track just traps and enslaves with its ear bracing synapse eroding guitar and bass crawl within a rhythmic herding of the passions. There is a post punk charm and punk voracity to the song which reminds a little of the Au Pairs and The Raincoats whilst the noise slicing of the atmosphere is Pixies/ Valentiine like, yet again these are slight references  to something unique to Deathcrush.

The outstanding release is completed by the Fire remix of the third song by James Njie. It is a pop /dancefloor igniting electro stomp with a breath of J-Pop to its mesmeric and irresistible dance. Still managing to retain an element of the carnivorous side of Deathcrush the track is a crystalline treat which makes us almost reassess our thoughts on the point of remixes.

Released via Norway Rat Records, Skool’s In is just magnificent, a raptor of brilliance within a noise and mental examination, and the undeniable debut of a band which is going to coax and command our attentions and passions for horizons to come.


RingMaster 07/10/2013

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