David Sinclair Four – 4

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The fourth album from David Sinclair and the first with his band as a quartet, 4 is one of those encounters which makes a decent first proposal and then with increasing tenacity continues to endear itself to ears and thoughts over time. The David Sinclair Four release contains ten varied and highly flavoursome slices of rock ‘n’ roll which spring from a blues rock seeding but never restrict their enterprise to any single musical colour. Equally there is a feel good factor which fuels songs looking at and springing from the diverse culture of the artist’s home, London; the result of all essences together being one enjoyable proposition.

The current band line-up came together in 2013, bassist Jos Mendoza and guitarist Geoff Peel linking up with vocalist/guitarist Sinclair and his drummer son Jack, their addition turning the David Sinclair Trio into the David Sinclair Four. Before this the band had already released a trio of acclaimed albums in the shape of Hey (2006), Threewheeling (2008), and Take Me There (2013). Live too the band has been a greedily devoured proposal and list playing with the likes of Wilko Johnson, the Oli Brown Band, Marcus Bonfanti, Johnny Dowd, Graham Bonnet, and Willie Nile amongst many on their CV. Now the four-piece are setting about bringing the summer a healthy stroll of rock to swagger along through their new album, a release easy to see following its predecessors in drawing the plaudits.

The album opens with Sick Of Being Good and an initial potent caress of guitar to awaken ears. Imagination is swiftly stirred too by a subsequent sturdier stroll of energy and sound led by an infectiously enticing hook. The song continues to lure in appetite and attention with its blues hued catchiness and David’s vocals, backed well by the band. There are few surprises in the song but plenty to get hungry teeth into with an expressive guitar invention, warm harmonies, and colourful enterprise shaping every twist of the song.

The strong start is matched by the following treat of The Click-Clack Man. The tale about a character on the search to meet I am led to believe Tom Waits; the song has a seductive swing and resourceful adventure to its quickly enslaving presence. Hooks and grooves create an inescapable web to which a deliciously roving darkly toned bassline and crisply swung beats add further drama and temptation. The song is irresistible to feet and emotions, the biggest highlight on the album though often rivalled.

The sultry blues climate of next up Life Gone Cold brings further variety to the album, its slow saunter equipped with fiery flames of guitar and emotive intensity. It does not have the spark of the first two songs though but with again mouth-watering guitar craft and potent rhythmic bait alongside straight-forward and easily accessible lyrics, ears held easily before being excited again by Crude Emotion. Rhythmically muscular and casting a heavy stride from its first breath, the song is another unveiling of contagion posing as grooves and hooks. The swing of its body is an incitement to physical participation and the funk infused chorus bait to a vocal union, as band and track create another major moment within 4.

The excellent Down By The Canal comes next, and swiftly transfixes as the excellent guest vocals of Maxi Priest flirt with ears alongside the tones of David. The song’s reggae hued scenery is just as magnetic, drawing a swift smile with its engaging revelry before making way for the blues smoulder of World Turns Around. The harmonica of Paul Jones, another guest on the album, is a spicy flirtation matched by the fiery craft and sounds uncaged by Peel as the song swerves with the persuasion of a temptress within ears. Both tracks entice and reward enjoyably whilst providing further fresh textures and creative ventures within the album.

The remainder of the album for personal tastes does not quite match up to what comes before, though songs like The Illness & The Cure and Give Me A Rose which follow, only provide easy to consume and enjoy offerings with their individual blues rock spiced ventures. They just do not have the extra ingredient to ignite these particular ears, feeling a little flat against the quality sounds earlier in the release. It will obviously not be the same for everyone though and there is nothing less than enjoyment gained from the tracks or the closing pair of Coming Out Of The Rain and Coming Off The Rails, they also strong and enjoyable encounters but again just do not have that extra ingredient found in other songs upon the album. The penultimate song sees David dueting with Lorna Reid, who also co-wrote the song, their union another flavoursome delight, whilst the closing song again embraces the vibrant flair of Paul Jones.

The bottom-line though is that 4 is one highly satisfying and at times addictive encounter, David Sinclair and co’s finest moment yet and a definite recommendation for blues rock ‘n’ roll fans with an appetite for others like Paul Weller, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks and especially on the guitar and blues side, Seasick Steve.

4 is available now via IRL @ http://irl.bigcartel.com/product/david-sinclair-four-4 and on most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/DavidSinclairFour   http://www.davidsinclairfour.com/

RingMaster 12/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Sugarmen – Dirt

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With a sound which has a healthy eighties feel to it as well as a modern tenacity and enterprise, UK indie band Sugarmen unveil a rather enjoyable and infectious introduction to themselves via debut single Dirt. It is a rousing and feisty slice of pop rock but equally has a calming melodic tempting to create a nicely rounded and memorable first meeting between ears and the Liverpool quartet.

Sugarmen was formed by songwriters/guitarist Luke Fenlon and Chay Heney, soon concluding their openly creative line-up with bassist Tom Sheilds and drummer Sam McVann. Their inspirations are reflected in their record collections according to their bio and includes flavouring from the likes of Hooton Tennis Club to Peace, Parquet Courts to Alvvays, The Velvet Underground to Wild Beasts, and The Clash to Orange Juice, and it is this latter band which sprung to mind listening to Dirt, they and others like Josef K, The Farmers Boys, and The Bluebells. They were all bands capable of writing and creating the most contagious and blemish free pop songs and though it is only one song, Sugarmen suggest they have that quality too.

DIRT pink   Since forming, the band has played with the likes of Sleaford Mods and Paul Weller whilst this coming June will see them supporting both Blur and The Who in Hyde Park as well as playing the Dot To Dot Festival in May. The Sugarmen sound has also caught the ears and attention of Mick Jones (The Clash / BAD) who after hearing the band’s demo tracks, produced ten songs including the single with them; it all occurring in Paul Weller’s studio which he donated for the recordings. It is fair to say that the band is standing at the point of real attention and potent spotlights, a door Dirt makes the ideal key for.

The song opens on a strum and the vocal prowess of Fenlon, a gentle but potent coaxing which teases for a short while before a stab of sonic tenacity sparks the band into a lively and magnetic stroll. The bass of Sheilds is instant flavoursome bait with its throaty lure matching the striking appeal of the guitars in its own individual way. Hooks and chords, sonic colours and rhythmic jabs all converge on ears with captivating enterprise and contagious endeavour, ridden by the harmonic roar of Fenlon’s vocals and the backing of the band. A sniff of Arctic Monkeys makes a hint to join essences of those mentioned previously but the truth is that Dirt has a voice and character which is primarily Sugarmen and, as their live presence, increasingly persuasive.

Expect to hear more of and from the band ahead, and we suspect in increasingly potent doses.

Dirt is available now via Poor Old Soul Records @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/dirt-single/id978569563

https://www.facebook.com/sugarmenuk   https://twitter.com/Sugarmenuk

RingMaster 19/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Jake Evans – This is Life

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This is Life is one of those tracks which just triggers the sweet spot, treats it to a masterful seduction of stirring rock music which lingers and simply grows with time. It is perhaps no real surprise that the new single from UK singer/songwriter Jake Evans is so potent and exhilarating with its following of his acclaimed debut single Easy On My Soul, as well as impressive musical history, but there is something in its heart and presence which catches the breath and imagination far beyond expectations. It is a stunning encounter, thrilling and laying down a teaser of Evan’s forthcoming first album Day One which is irresistible.

Macclesfield based Evans first come to the fore with Rambo & Leroy, earning a reputation and spotlight which took him to the attention of Bernard Sumner and his band Bad Lieutenant after the second demise of New Order. As the band’s co-front-man, guitarist and songwriter, alongside Summer and New Order band mate Stephen Morris (also New Order) as well as Blur’s Alex James, Evans increased his reputation within the band’s success which led to invitations to support the likes of Paul Weller, New Order, Johnny Marr and Doves’ Jimi Goodwin once emerging as a solo artist in 2012. Easy On My Soul was drenched in eager acclaim upon its release slotting nicely in with highly praised appearances at Festival No 6 and the iconic Jodrell Bank music festival. This Is Life is the next adventure and certain to open up a new depth of ardour for his impressively evolving creative persuasion.

The song is a tide of virulent hooks coming in varied shapes and designs, the first an immediate temptation as This is Life opens. A sonic Jake Evans a2486262845_10sigh lights the fuse to a weave of acidically melodic guitar bred hues which instantly recalls The Cult, delicious bait which subsequently embraces the shadows of Sisters Of Mercy too as a great throaty bass seduction and crystalline keys explore the imagination. Evans’ voice has a slightly grainy feel to his expressive tones which only adds richer colour and texture to the contagious enticement, his delivery holding a whisper of Paul Marsh of The Mighty Lemon Drops, as does some of the melodic suasion lapping around his voice. It is a gloriously fascinating proposition which only flourishes further through fine guitar coaxing and a steady but potent rhythmic framing to the smouldering intensity and passion of the song.

Those essences of eighties and nineties bands bring a familiarity to the song which only increases its contagion and appeal but equally there is an originality and invention which as mentioned at the start, fondles and incites an instinctive rapture to the impressive encounter.

It is impossible not to breed a healthy anticipation for the impending Day One from This Is Life alone but placed alongside Easy On My Soul expectations and hopes reach skywards, though you sense they will be well fed and pleasured by Evans when the time comes.

This Is Life is available digitally June 16th @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/this-is-life-single/id879180547

https://www.jakeevansmusic.com/

9/10

RingMaster 15/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Towns – Get By

Towns promo

When the opening track Get Me There from Towns’ debut album Get By hit the ear it must be admitted that the defences rose up just a touch as a mesh seemingly bred from the world of Madchester consumed the ears. It was not an abhorrent proposition but seemingly recalling a scene happily left lonely in our thoughts many years ago. It has to be said though that through time, even within the first encounter with the release, the Bristol based band’s first album has seduced doubts and resistance to emerge as a rather riveting proposition. It has not defused all reservations but standing as a unique proposition in sound even with its heavy essences of The Stone Roses, the Charlatans, and a Shaun Ryder-esque swoon, the album is a magnetic call within which certainly extra additives of The House Of Love and My Bloody Valentine help the persuasion.

Formed by childhood friends, Towns has had a shed load of experiences since forming to test any band’s perseverance and confidence. From being declared as the best new band of 2011 by NME after just a pair of demos and no live shows, the band endured a former booking agent running off with over £1000 of the their money to almost bring the band to a stop and after having the high of working with Owen Morris (Oasis, Verve), seeing the label paying the costs being swallowed up by a major to their detriment. It seems to have made Towns only stronger though as they continue to draw acclaim and attention. Live their performances, which have seen them alongside the likes of Paul Weller, Spiritualized, The Twang, Toy, and Eagulls, has only enhanced their presence and emergence something expectations assume Get By will accelerate.

The first impressive thing about the Towns sound and release, is the wall of scuzz seeded sound which glazes every note and imaginative Towns_-_Get_By_-_Artworkswell within their songs. It makes for an almost mesmeric wash which the smooth smouldering vocals accentuate and blossoms within, something which definitely shines from within opener Get Me There. Emerging from a sonic mist with a grinning bassline and fiery guitars, there is an immediate swagger to the song, its rhythmic shoulders swinging and confidence almost arrogant within distorted melodies. It is an appealing lure but sounding so close to earlier bands mentioned and holding a Happy Monday’s like irreverence that it lies dormant against personal appetites even if winning over attention easily. To be honest the song does become more potent and enticing over time but always there is something stopping a full recruitment to its charms as subsequently achieved by other tracks. Nevertheless with its eager gait and thick breath of sound it makes a welcoming lead into the following Marbles.

The second song springs from a scythe of feedback with a percussive shake and acidic guitar flames before settling into a tender coaxing. It is smouldering lure which erupts into climactic expulsions of intensity and raw guitar enterprise as vocals simmer and glide with mellow countenance. The bass as with the first song stands out, this time with a rapacious edge whilst the guitars scorch air and senses with impressive endeavour which a cavernous production cannot deflate. It is an intriguing and gripping track which flows seamlessly into the throaty prowl of Trip Over. Like a blend of its predecessors, the song strides with sureness in attitude and sound which worms away under the skin, the album already at this point causing a reassessment of earlier thoughts. There is causticity to the song as in the previous one, which brings thoughts of Birdland to the surface.

Both Gone Are The Days and Just Everything add new raucous invention to the album, the first unveiling a blues toxicity which permeates every riff and flaring of guitar sculpting to great effect, whilst the second brings a sultry twang to its melodic bait again to carve an engagingly infectious persuasion. The surface feel and touch of Town’s songs do carry a too familiar edge amongst themselves and to other bands previously mentioned, but in their belly a cauldron of enterprise and instinctive invention is diversely at work, you just have to look closer.

Too Tired emerges from a crystalline resonance soaked sky to sway and swirl over the senses, its body a temptress and voice a spellbinding waltz which caresses with elegant expression and warm invasive melodies before making way for the thrilling Young At Heart. Its opening tasty groove is irresistible and again has that Birdland like lilt to captivate from its first intensive note. From there the song discovers a harmonious sixties beauty to its enticing which in turn coaxes a greater richness in vocals and sonic colour from within the song. The album is at its pinnacle in its middle as evidenced by this pair and Heads Off with its delicious gnarly riffs aligned to floating melodies and vocal harmonies. In full stroll the song is a raw and abrasing treat which its soothing twists revitalise for another hungry devouring of the caustic rub of the excellent track.

The emotive call of Mirror Ghost slowly envelopes ears and thoughts next, its loud provocative whisper casting a melancholic smile which tantalises the imagination and to a lesser degree emotions. It is a slow burner which convinces in proportion to its creative growth especially the further it drifts into a sonic antagonism, and though it lacks the spark of previous songs it is impossible to not find a good appetite for it.

The final two tracks just do not have the same reach and success, Everyone’s Out which features Robin Stewart (The Naturals), Dom Mitchison (Velcro Hooks), and Richard Clarke (Scarlett Rascal) feeding rather than exciting expectations and the reflective part acoustic, part sonically messy title track, a disappointing end to what turned out to be a rather thrilling and enjoyable encounter. The last two songs will easily please other appetites though whilst Get By as a whole is a release it is fair to say brings a slice of fiery sun to anyone’s day.

Get By is available on limited 12” vinyl (100) and cd from Howling Owl Records as well as digitally from online retailers now!

https://www.facebook.com/townsband

8/10

RingMaster 02/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Geva Alon Interview

Photography : Adi Ofer

With a string of shows in the UK to coincide with the release of his excellent new album In The Morning Light, Israeli singer songwriter Geva Alon has lit up the summer for a great many. The artist brings freshness and passion to folk rock and with his thoroughly engaging and striking album has drawn further great acclaim his way. To find out more about the artist and his new release we had the pleasure of having Geva Alon indulge are inquisitive questions and this is what he told us.

Hello and many thanks for taking time to talk with us.

Tell us first of all about the man Geva Alon.

I’m a pretty simple guy. I enjoy the simple things and try to avoid unnecessary drama in life.

Being a musician, that’s pretty hard to achieve and that’s a conflict I always have with myself.

I believe music became an important part of your life from an early age?

Yes, music was always around in our house. I started playing piano at the age of 6 and guitar at the age of 12.

Was music an ever present and your family a musical one?

My mom used to be a classical dancer and my dad just loved music, so the radio was often playing and my parents had a nice record collection.

What were the major influences musically and personally which inspired you?

My older brothers introduced me to The Stones, CCR, Zeppelin, Queen and Neil Young, so those were my first major influences, and I took it from there.

You are generally labelled as an indie/folk singer though we see you, going by the new album, as a more rock flavoured artist. How would you describe your music?

It’s hard for me to categorize myself in a specific music style. My influences range from indie, folk, country, blues, punk, rock & roll, new wave, grunge and more. My first band, THE FLYING BABY, was all about hard rock and grunge and then my first solo album was totally acoustic and folky.

Even now rock and indie music in Israel is a mystery and unknown to most outside of the country but when you started was it very hard to be heard outside of your home borders?

I guess the life before Facebook made it hard to connect with a wider crowd outside of my country and it used to be harder to book shows abroad and reach out to different countries. Now you see young bands go and do it on their own all the time. I think Israel has a lot to offer the world as far as indie music goes.

So what has been the key in regard to yourself that has brought you to a wider audience?

I think it’s all about perseverance. I just took off to California one day at the age of 19 and have never stopped playing gigs in Israel and other countries since. I think you have to bring yourself to the audience and not wait for them to come to you.

2000, saw you found the rock band you mentioned earlier, The Flying Baby, tell us more about them.

The band was formed by me and 3 other friends. At first we were all about jamming in and out of old rock classics and played mainly for ourselves for hours in an old bomb shelter in the Kibbutz. After a while I started bringing songs that I wrote and we started experimenting with them. We were young, naive and full of dreams. Wonderful times.

The band found some success in the USA as well as Israel?

Taken by:Yiftach Belsky

 

In the states we struggled and moved from one place to the next, booking gigs wherever they let us play and counting dollar for dollar to pay rent. We shared everything. It was hard but brought our musicianship to a much higher level. We felt that we were getting better and better all the time and wrote endless amount of songs.

You next joined up with rock singer Shy Nobleman. Was this as part of his band only or also allowed you to contribute in the songwriting aspect?

I met Shy in Tel Aviv after his first album was released. He was looking to put a new band together so I offered myself as a guitarist and ended up helping him a lot with the songwriting on the second album.

I get the impression reading about you that a solo career was always going to be the destination of your music, was that your intent all along?

Not really. I always thought that The Flying Baby would be my band forever but I also wanted to try different things. I felt that my folky side needed to come out somehow, so I started playing solo acoustic shows in a small bar in Tel Aviv every Wednesday night and tried new songs in different acoustic arrangements. That’s how my first solo album was born.

How do you approach your songs when composing them, is there a firm process you go through?

There are no rules really. Sometimes I write the music first and then add lyrics to it and sometimes the opposite. Sometimes I have an unsolved chorus and it takes months or even years until I find a solution for it.

Obviously your music from those early days has evolved but from your debut solo album of 2006 Days of Hunger to your excellent new release In the Morning Light, how has it and you as a musician changed?

It’s hard to say how, but I do feel that all the records that I’ve done are very different from each other.  I try to write about more direct and personal issues in my life with every year that passes. I want to reflect something more honest and simple in my music.

What have you explored on In the Morning Light which is different to previous releases like last album Get Closer?

I think that the songs on In The Morning Light are more uplifting somehow. Get Closer was very intense for me as far as the songs and the process so I tried to take a different approach in the new album and just let things be. We didn’t do any rehearsals before the recording and everything happened in the studio.

The album has a seemingly strong personal breath to it from within; does it come from your own experiences as much as outside inspiration?

Everything I write about is from my own personal experiences. The songs on the album were written after a very intense 2 years, and I felt that I had to pause everything and see where I was at. I did try to dig in deeper and write about what really matters to me.

As with its predecessor In the Morning Light was produced with Thom Monahan (The Jayhawks, Silver Jews, Dinosaur Jr.). He is a man you have found a deep understanding to what you are looking for in?

He is. We have a lot of things in common and I feel that he gets the way I see sound and how it should connect with the songs.

Are you a writer/musician who is open to suggestive changes from others or have a clear vision to what you want without allowing strong deviation?

Working with a producer you might as well be open to suggestions. I try to be very open to every input from everyone involved in the project, but on the other hand it’s important to know how to say “no this will not work here, let’s do it this way” sometimes.

Tell us about some of the amazing talent you brought in to help bring the album to life.

Actually, Thom brought them together and I kind of trusted him with it. It was great. The chemistry was amazing in the studio and I felt a strong musical connection with everybody in the band.

Some of the guys had a lot more experience than me and recorded way more albums than me. I felt that I was learning a lot and also doing something in a totally different way.

The album was led into view by the wonderful single The Great Enlightenment, probably our favourite song on the album too. Tell us about its seeds.

This is a very old song of mine actually. I wrote it before my first solo album was released but somehow it never made it onto an album. When I sat down to finish writing before the recordings I recalled that song and felt that this was the time for it. I made a few changes in the melody and harmony, rewrote the lyrics and there it was.

You have just treated the UK to some live shows, how did those go?

I love playing in the UK. The shows were great and I got to visit some cities I’ve never played before like Oxford, Brighton and Glasgow.

They were smaller more intimate shows I believe? You are no stranger to large audiences though having toured the US and supported Paul Weller, as well as playing festivals in front of crowds of 20,000. Do you have a preference though or get a different buzz from large or small settings?

I can’t compare between the two formats because they are so different. Each one has it’s pulses on the other. I’m glad I get to see all aspects of live performances.

What is next on the horizon of Geva Alon?

Thinking about the next album and I already have some songs lined up for it. In the near future there are a lot of gigs in Israel and in Europe coming up, so I’m looking forward to that.

Once more many thanks for talking with us and good luck with the album.

Read the review of  In The Morning Light https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2012/07/08/geva-alon-in-the-morning-light/

The RingMaster Review 27/07/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Geva Alon: In The Morning Light

Bringing a freshness and passion to the folk rock genre, In The Morning Light from Israeli singer songwriter Geva Alon is a thoroughly engaging and striking album. With a confident and imaginative grip it takes the listener through warm and near sultry climes with songs which inspire and are borne from the heart of the individual and life itself. The album is gentle, a flood of melodic caresses, and most of all a lake of enveloping emotion to comfortably immerse within.

From his days with his indie rock band The Flying Baby and playing with Shay Noblemen, Alon has grown through his solo work into a major presence in the music and ears of his homeland. Through his debut album Days of Hunger of 2006 and subsequent releases The Wall of Sound the following year and Get Closer of 2009, he has garnered a persistently and eager acclaim and following. His shows has found him playing alongside the likes of Paul Weller and Yo La Tango whilst tours has brought him an ever increasing enthused following through Israel, Spain and the UK.

Released through 2B Vibes Music/ADA Global July 16th, In The Morning Light finds Alon unveiling a rich and lush melodic beauty within his songs which simply and easily captivates. Personal preference dictates that some of the songs may not ignite passions as much as others but all deserve and get an embrace of attention and willingness to give their persuasion a chance. Produced by Thom Monahan (The Jayhawks, Silver Jews, Dinosaur Jr.), the album is a vibrant weave of light and at times shadows brought with a perpetual warmth and open heart.

The recent excellent single The Great Enlightenment opens up the album and still stands as one of the best songs to wrap itself around the ear this year. From its instantly striking atmosphere woven by stirringly emotive guitars and attentive rhythms, the track spreads its keen arms through the hypnotic vocals of Alon and a delicious melancholic bass moodily permeating the air. The song with their presence finds a dramatic edge to its lively ambience to leave an almost unsettling and quirky yet fully irresistible lingering glamour after its departure.

The album finds alongside Alon the prowess and ability of guitarist Daniel Hyndman from folk band Vetiver, Rufus Wainwright bassist Jeff Hill, and drummer Otto Hauser, and others. From the opener right through to the final song there is a unity which offers the suggestion they have been playing alongside each other for years, which is not the case but does show the strength and ability of the songwriting and all involved to find that consistent and natural understanding.

The variety across In The Morning Light is another pleasing aspect, the release from the indie rock start moving into the Americana tinted I See The Love and its successor the blues veined Carolina. The first song is a rounded earnest piece which with its Southern melodic twinges and dusty heated sun brings a different kind of but equally mesmeric pull for the emotions whilst the second simply induces a compulsion to delve into its walls born from the reflective lyrics and slightly plaintive sounds.

As mentioned consistency of the highest level spines the album but alongside the single the songs of I Wonder If She’s Fine, Come Here Anytime and She Calls My Name, steal the show. The first pair of songs has similarity in sound and essence without actually being alike. The best way to describe them is a sultry mix of The Walker Brothers and The Smiths, both carrying a sixties energy and innocence veined by inspirational barbed melodies and inspirational emotive class. Alongside the voice of Alon the guitars light up the ear in both, their scorched touch and welcome nothing less than infectious.

She Calls My Name is an outstanding disturbed pop song releasing shadows and heartbreak with a persistent hook which makes the term melodic addition feel weak. It reminds of eighties band The Mighty Lemon Drops and leaves one simply grinning with pleasure.

Geva Alon with the single The Great Enlightenment suggested his new album would be something worth investigating, In The Morning Light in fact goes beyond deserving a mere look to emerge as a must for all melodic passionate indie rock fans.

RingMaster 08/07/2012

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Geva Alon : The Great Enlightenment

With his fourth album due for release in July Israeli singer songwriter Geva Alon could not have given a better teaser and enticement to the forthcoming release than with his new single The Great Enlightenment. A senses caressing yet emotionally haunting song it sets up a definite anticipation and enthused interest for new album In The Morning Light due July 16th.

From playing with his indie rock band The Flying Baby for many years and Shay Noblemen, Alon has over the past few years become a major name in his homeland from his solo work and live shows which have seen him play alongside the likes of Paul Weller and Yo La Tengo and more recently wider afield acclaim with a Spanish and Israeli tour alongside Depedro, the new project from Calexico collaborator Jairo Zavala. His debut solo album of 2006 Days of Hunger brought his country-flavoured acoustic guitar inspired sounds to notice, the following releases The Wall of Sound in 2007 and Get Closer of 2009 which was produced by Thom Monahan (The Jayhawks, Silver Jews, Dinosaur Jr.) as are the new single and album, strengthening his ever growing recognition and acclaim. From the evidence of the new single his new album will only accelerate things again in and outside Israel as will a series of live shows in the UK this month.

The Great Enlightenment emerges upon the ear with an instant striking atmosphere brought by the emotive guitars and attentive rhythms. With a lovely melancholic bass moodily permeating the song there is an immediate sense of drama to the dreamy ambience. As the excellent tones of Alon expand the song brings a dawning of realisation within the warm lingering yet slightly unsettled air. The song is outstanding and draws thoughts and feelings which could quite easily have been inspired by a Twin Peaks episode. Alon vocally has been compared to the likes of Neil Young and Nick Drake and it is probably the most accurate description though his voice has a class and uniqueness all of its own which sets him apart.

The guitar prowess of Alon and fellow guitarist Daniel Hindman from folk band Vetiver is ear catching, both aided and complimented by the fine talent of Rufus Wainwright bassist Jeff Hill and drummer Otto Hauser, the quartet coming together to create a mesmeric song which inspires and enchants equally.

If you had any second thoughts or uncertainty about investigating In The Morning Light upon its unveiling just listen to The Great Enlightenment, it has all the reasons and persuasion you need.

Ringmaster 18/06/2012

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