Chasing Ghosts – These Hollow Gods

Since forming late 2014, UK outfit Chasing Ghosts has increasingly impressed year by year, release by release. Their first year brought well-received single Everything Changes, attention upon the band swiftly nudged and further stoked last year through the Fearless EP. Now we have new single These Hollow Gods, another slice of the band’s fusion of rock and metal, and another step forward in their potent songwriting and compelling sound.

Formed by bassist/keyboardist Lee Brueton, the Chasing Ghosts line-up is completed by vocalist Nelson Cancini, lead guitarist Harry Mitten, and rhythm guitarist Ashley Clark. The Milton Keynes based band draw on the influences of bands such as Paradise Lost, Anathema, and Moonspell for their sound and the past year has been a big one for it and the band, culminating in their signing with Danish label Mighty Music for the release of their first album next year but before then this new single.

These Hollow Gods is about “our role models, idols and those that we ultimately view as gods in family, religion, music and celebrity. Those that we worship and devote our lives to, but then reveal themselves to be nothing more than false hope, disappointment and betrayal”. Straight away it entangles ears in a spidery groove; it’s tempting web soon joined by Cancini’s potent emotive tones and the restrained yet powerful touch of the rhythms. It is a slow saunter of a stroll which continues to entice and captivate ears but one with a volatility which, though it never quire ignites, is a constant threat and alluring shadow to the gothic melodies which almost seep through ears into the psyche.

The track simply grows note by note, going put on a blaze of intensity leaving a lingering appetite for more.  If a sign of things to come, Chasing Ghosts’ upcoming album should feed that want and will be very much anticipated after These Hollow Gods.

These Hollow Gods is out now.

Pete RingMaster

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Chasing Ghosts – Fearless EP

Chasing Ghosts_RingMasterReview

Last year British quintet Chasing Ghosts made a potent introduction to themselves with the single Everything Changes; a song soon finding itself featured across fifty radio stations in the UK, US, and Canada, including ‘BBC Radio, ‘Total Rock’ and ‘Metal Nation Radio”. Now the Milton Keynes band is poised to unveil their debut EP Fearless; three shadowed strapped and emotionally charged tracks woven from the heavy throes of dark metal and gothic rock.

Formed by in the final days of 2014 by bassist/keyboardist Lee Brueton, a line-up change since the release of the aforementioned single has seen vocalist Nelson Cancini, lead guitarist Maycon Milani De Matos, rhythm guitarist Ashley Clark, and drummer Gary Fuller linking up with Brueton. Earlier this year, the quintet set about recording the Fearless EP at the renowned Lynchmob Studios in London, subsequently creating an encounter which quickly sparks intrigue and an appetite to hear more of the band.

Current single Fallen From Grace is the lead track from Fearless and already following its predecessor in earning strong radio support and play through again linking up with Pluggin Baby. From its initial caress of melody driven guitar, the song works on the imagination. It dips into an evocative smoulder as darkly toned vocals begin to share the track’s emotive heart. Presumably they being Cancini, there is a plain almost dour element to the voice which ignites to much more impressive heights as an emotive roar sweeps through the atmospheric shadows and heavy textures of the song.  Growing in character and strength with every minute spent with it, the track is magnetic drama continually making a richer seduction of ears and imagination with its Paradise Lost scented proposal.

Alongside the song are the similarly impacting proposals of Dark Skies and the EP’s title track. The first of the pair is bred from the same template as the single and begins in a very similar way but soon, as keys and guitars weave their poetic webs, reveals its own distinct character and emotionally shadowed adventure. Blending low key almost monotone flavours and colours with rousing flames of sound and energy, the track also blossoms with time and attention, invading ears and imagination with its lingering drama and temptation.

The title track swiftly reveals more urgency and an immediate intensity than its companions, a fire which as the band impressively mixes to greater effect the diversity of vocals, creatively blazes away and steals the show from the other two equally enjoyable songs.

As impressive as that earlier single and confirming the potential it suggested, the Fearless EP sees Chasing Ghosts growing into their sound and its own uniqueness with the promise of more to come while reinforcing their stature as a band to watch.

The Fearless EP is released September 2nd on iTunes and Spotify.

RingMaster 01/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Wonder Stuff – 30 Goes Around The Sun

Wonder Stuff_RingMasterReview

We all have particular releases which sparked the beginnings of a lustful affair with music, encounters which provided the ignition and others which more than most re-ignited and kept the fierce flames of emotional involvement burning ever since. For us The Eight Legged Groove Machine was certainly one of the latter; an album which simply gripped ears and spirit and gave a lust for music another mighty booster shot. That was 1988, and now thirty years after taking their first creative steps, The Wonder Stuff unveil their eighth studio album in the magnetic shape of 30 Goes Around The Sun.

Some have said that the band will probably never see a hit single again to match those escaping the likes of Hup and Never Loved Elvis; more than likely not make the same kind of impact as they did in those early successful years. They might be right, time will tell, but listening to 30 Goes Around The Sun, its title a reference to the life span of the band so far, they have the potential of coming damn close. There are moments within the twelve track romp which are prime Wonder Stuff majesty and other moments which captivate like the first touches of the creative sun on a cold rock pop landscape, and fair to say from start to finish the album has ears and the imagination grooving with the band’s finest effort in a while.

30 Goes Around The Sun saw the band return to “revisit it’s old stomping ground of Stourbridge” to record the album for its making and the persuasion of renowned heavy metal and hard rock producer, Simon Efemey (Paradise Lost/Napalm Death/The Wildhearts), to come back home to produce the record too. With a welcoming acoustic Intro to first catch attention, band and album instantly leap into ears with the feisty exploits of Don’t You Ever. Straight away engaging riffs offer a smile with their bait whilst the warm lure of Erica Nockalls’ violin adds emotive suggestiveness as rhythms begin their catchy tempting. Swiftly the song becomes an infectious canter, the guitars of Miles Hunt and Dan Donnelly romping along with sonic enterprise matched in alluring kind by the darker hues of Mark McCarthy’s bass. Once the distinctive and reflective tones and words tones of Hunt join the affair, the robust attraction has commandingly gripped ears and appetite. The track does mellow out a touch as it evolves and maybe loses a spark or two of its initial blaze though that is more than compensated by the melancholic strings and backing vocals of Nockalls as well as the anthemic swing of Tony Arthy’s rhythms.

cover_RingMasterReviewThe following In Clover offers another eagerly catchy and emotionally evocative slice of rock pop with violin and melodies alone, a tapestry of folkish seducing. There is a scent of Construction For The Modern Idiot days to the enthralling song, a fresh echo within something soon revealing its own masterful character before For The Broken Hearted shares its celebratory swing and melodic sunshine with the senses. Again folk and rock pop collude to infest hips and emotions, the track one of a great many within the album which has the listener’s instincts to move and grin firmly in its contagious hands.

Good Deeds And High offers a gentler moment for a breath to be taken though the imagination is busy with its melodic smoulder and sultry temptation. The unity of guitar and violin is certainly impossible to resist with a success more than matched by the pairing of Hunt’s and Nockalls’ vocals. Helped by springy rhythms, the song’s vivacious serenade gets right under the skin with a web of persuasion matched and reshaped by One Day On as it parades its own evocative lyrical and pop prowess for ears and pleasure to indulge in.

A sturdier bulk comes with The Affirmation as bass and riffs cast an imposing incitement from the off, though it still acts as an invitation rather than a demanding proposal. Within it, Hunt as ever provides an emotion seeded lyrical exploration and reflection, another aspect of band and songwriting which has only matured and blossomed over the three decades. It is a potent and increasingly compelling track but one quickly and persistently outshone by the glorious Last Days Of The Feast. Some tracks just hit the sweet spot and this is definitely one. It has all the youthful adventure and mischief which marked early Wonder Stuff songs but equally a modern snarl and imagination that hungrily hooks ears and thoughts. Physical involvement in the track is as swift as an emotional one, its place as a pinnacle of the album certain, but quickly crowded round as tracks like The Kids From The Green treats ears to further infectious proposals, this one with a perky croon with similarly spirited melodies around vocal memories.

Swarthy hues flood the funk coated Weakened next; its mix of textures and flavours another ridiculously magnetic drama and contagiousness whilst Misunderstanding Burton Heel is one of those tracks which seems to know what personal loves in a song are and provides them wholesale with a Wonder Stuff twist. Jaunty shadows cloak rhythms and emotions whilst animated melodies and racy hooks built a kinetic trap for ears and by now a very greedy appetite. The track is superb; a rock ‘n’ roll siren which, if not matched, is potently backed by the album’s title track. The final offering from 30 Goes Around The Sun, it is a slice of English Americana, a last turn in the multi-faceted aspect of the album and a highly enjoyable end to a rousing encounter.

Past successes always means high anticipation and expectation for new propositions, something The Wonder Stuff seem to easily take in their stride and with 30 Goes Around The Sun go on to create new memorable and at times momentous experiences.

30 Goes Around The Sun is released March 19th via IRL Records across most online stores.

Pete RingMaster 17/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out

Zedi Forder – Self Titled EP

cover_RingMaster Review

Having a lustful attraction to its member’s other projects, there was always a fair chance that the self-titled debut EP from UK rock band Zedi Forder was going to incite the same kind of appetite but of course you never know. Well actually maybe we do as it seems any project linked to bands such as Tricore, An Entire Legion, and Rind Skank, not forgetting Kerl, the solo project of one of its members, is primed to excite and ignite personal passions and those of a great many others. The four track Zedi Forder introduction is no exception, another bundle of songs which blow ears and emotions away whilst proving once more that some of the most compelling songwriting and sounds in heavy rock/metal are waiting to be discovered in the heart of the British music scene.

Zedi Forder is right now a duo, soon to be trio as they search for a bassist, and consists of Guildford based vocalist/drummer/songwriter Chris Kerley and guitarist Mark Carstairs, men behind the list of exceptional bands mentioned above. Inspirations woven into the band’s sound include the likes of System Of A Down, Led Zeppelin, Korn, Mastodon, Red Hot Chilli Peppers, Queen, Incubus, Paradise Lost, Nirvana and many more, but as is soon apparent within the EP, all mere colours in a unique tapestry of imagination, creative mischief, and pure aural majesty which if it reminds off anything it is a little of the duo’s previous adventures.

The EP starts off with Killakarta, a track instantly warming ears with punchy beats and lightly growling grooves. In no time the recognisable tones of Kerley are enticing, his presence as magnetic as ever to match the potency of the sounds around surely one of the best unsung vocalists in British rock as well as songwriters. The track continues to boldly stroll, its calm but open swagger as endearing as the brewing drama of sound fuelling its confidence and sparking the imagination. Warm breezes of melodic seduction blossom in the expectations avoiding craft and emotional theatre of the song though a more predatory and aggressive shade continually lurks in the shadows to resonate with the lyrics. It is a mouth-watering start to the release but just the teaser to greater alchemy.

I’m the one leaps in next with sinews showing and nostrils on the point of being flared but it is a ruse as almost as quickly the track twists on a meaty piece of bass bait into a hip swaying funk kissed swing of melodic and contagious dexterity. Like 12 Stone Toddler meets KingBathmat with a definite and understandably rich vein of An Entire Legion (AEL) to it, especially when it bursts into an energetically and almost dirtily tantalising blaze, the song is just irresistible. Quite simply it is a gorgeous hook laded slab of melodically flirtatious and feistily rousing rock ‘n’ roll, and one of the very best things to come from a Kerley composition/collaboration.

Humour has never been too far from the band’s member’s creativity and is just as potent in Zedi Forder and within the grin sparking Nachoman, a song which is just as provocative in its social commentary as sonic flame of sound. Again we have to offer some similarities to AEL and songs like Scurvy Johnson, but equally it is another song bred with a diversity of flavours and almost whimsical imagination for a smouldering creative charm offensive complete with a rousing snarl and anthemic seduction.

Final song is Time after time, two and a half minutes which really does growl whilst springing a web of riffs and jabbing beats which bleed infectiousness in every grungy enticement and wicked swipe. I guess you could offer the inventive roar and aggressiveness of Tricore as a scent to the closing song, spices which are unavoidable due to the familiar voice and creative flare Kerley and Carstairs, but once more there is plenty of fresh tenacity and ripe originality to sculpt its own identity and bring an outstanding encounter to a rich, thrilling close.

It is fair to say that other bands with Kerley and Carstairs at the heart have criminally gone undervalued bordering on unnoticed by major attention and success. Thankfully making music which leaves a lasting imprint on body and imagination through creative originality and adventure is a passion, a vocation for the pair at the heart of Zedi Forder, so we get to feast on their alchemy once again and so should you, it would be rude not to go off and discover its majesty, wouldn’t it?

The Zedi Forder EP is out now as a name your price download at the Tricore Bandcamp profile.

Pete RingMaster 02/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out

Potergeist – Crocodile Teeth

Potergeist 1

The lure of a southern blues swamp is unleashed once again by Greek band Potergeist through new album Crocodile Teeth, and once more ears are treated to a contagion of dirty uncompromising rock ‘n’ roll which is as unique as it is familiar. The band has a sound which even with constant evolution across releases has a recognisable presence but comes as something undeniably individual to the Athens quintet. As the new album shows it is fresh and it is invigorating, and one thoroughly enjoyable stomp.

When forming in 2004, Potergeist had a more straight forward Kylesa /Down like southern metal sound as evidenced on debut album Southwards two years later. By the time of its successor Muddy Mermaids in 2012, the band’s sound had got harder and more aggressive whilst delving into the darkest depths of blues. Tagged as swamp metal by the media, the Potergeist sound was matched in progression by the attention given them and a live presence seeing the band share stages with the likes of Lynyrd Skynyrd, Monster Magnet, Pro Pain, The Haunted, The Shrine, Kylesa, and Paradise Lost. The outstanding Swampires unleashed its swamp toxicity in 2013, Potergeist’s third album darker and more voracious in sound and presence again. Though not outgunned in attack and ferocity, fair to say Crocodile Teeth takes the Potergeist sound to yet another depth of quality and invention.

Feeling as intense and intimidating at times as the last release the Peter Rutcho (Falling in Reverse, Revocation, Bury Your Dead, Havok, Seemless, The Ghost Inside) produced and mixed Crocodile Teeth reveals the band’s fullest and rounded sound yet, settings its stall out in the brief intro Swamp Muse Summoning before going for the throat straight after with its title track. Riffs and rhythms are an immediate barrage and temptation backed by a quickly emerging tangy groove. It is the first bait to the sturdy stride of the song quickly accompanied by the grizzled tones of vocalist Alex S Wamp. He is soon showing the great prowess of his grouchy and clean tones as guitars and bass cast their own intimidating and dynamic enterprise. There are no major surprises in song, or indeed album, yet as suggested earlier there is freshness and distinctive essence which ensures this is no run of the mill metal or Potergeist offering.

Crocodile Tears Artwork   The following Visit From A Swampire canters in on an infectious swing, riffs as rampant as the energetically skilled swings of drummer Tolis Toleas whilst grooves are as fiery as the melodies and solos which breed throughout. The track easily has body and emotions involved in its anthem as does What Then which comes next. The song is a touch more restrained in aggression and energy initially, but soon a bracing canter of raw riffs and rapier like rhythms entwined in the spicy grooves and bluesy melodic hooks of guitarists Nick XP and Stratal. Complete with an irresistible swagger, the song keeps things boiling over before in turn making way for the southern metal drawl and heavy rock brew of Truth. The track begins with the same groove the previous song left on but is soon sculpting its own tenacious and aggression roar. There is a touch of Crowbar in some ways to the song as the bass of Kostis Vihos brings a predatory proposal against the as dramatic but more welcoming vocals and sonic adventure cast elsewhere.

Atonement takes over next and is soon spreading a weave of southern rock inspired melodic spicing around the ever formidable and engaging rhythmic strength of the Potergeist sound. Featuring guest backing vocals from Anna Stephanou, the song is a warm slice of blues rock ‘n’ roll equipped with a dark edged groove and a blaze of imagination around the constant lure of Wamp’s vocals.

Roaming ears with a thick stance of sinew swung beats and bestial riffs The Preacher And The Witch stalks the appetite next with its magnetic web of sound. Both Fotis Benardo and Penelope Anastasopoulou add additional vocals to the tapestry of sonic and melodic craft. It is a fine song if without the spark of certainly the early songs, though much is down to a big personal appetite for when Potergeist go hell for leather in their rock ‘n’ roll, and quickly over shadowed by the excellent Eve. It too is more reserved in its gait and coveting a more classic metal whisper to its body but moulds everything and more of the band’s potent enterprise into a pungent slab of anthemic persuasion.

The album closes with Last Punk Standing, a compelling bellow of a song aligning mellower melodic tempting with a rigorous snarl resulting in a dramatic and impressive end to another mighty offering from Potergeist. We will admit that the previous Swampires still has the steal on the passions but there is no denying that Crocodile Tears is the band’s most accomplished proposition yet and one of the most enjoyable and satisfying slabs of metal driven rock ‘n’ roll you will hear this year.

Crocodile Tears is available digitally now and on CD and Vinyl via G.O.D. Records

RingMaster 08/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @


Paradise Lost – The Plague Within

Pic Ester Segarra

Pic Ester Segarra

Whether a fan or not, there is no escaping or denying the impact Paradise Lost have had on the doom/gothic and indeed metal scene in general since emerging back in the late eighties. They have also shown and revelled in the seduction of melancholy and beauty of pain through propositions which emotionally and sonically have ravaged senses and devoured the rawest corners of themselves and listeners alike. The UK band has been one of the most pungent forces in dark metal across their thirteen studio albums and as an explosive live incitement; an unrelenting inspiration continuing to ignite ears and spark imaginations with no sign of diminishing as evidenced by new album The Plague Within. Where the album sits in the landscape of the band’s inventive history we will leave for others to discuss, but fair to say that Paradise Lost have unleashed one of their and metal’s most emotionally and physically dark, musically voracious and compelling recent proposals with their fourteenth protagonist.

The album is an evolving predator and seductress from start to finish with songs that provide the fiercest intimidation and warmest enticement within their own investigations of sound and human condition inspired turmoil. It is also startlingly diverse and unpredictable, not to say previous albums lacked such qualities but virtually every twist and narrative within The Plague Within throws a curve ball to certainly expectations and assumptions of the Paradise Lost sound.

It starts straight away with opener No Hope In Sight, its cloud of shadows enriched by immediately spicy guitar enterprise from lead guitarist Greg Mackintosh. Vocal scowls from Nick Holmes infuse the air soon after as the song eventually settles into its melancholic and predatory stroll, the thick rhythms of drummer Adrian Erlandsson and throaty lures cast by bassist Steve Edmondson aligning with the steady tempting of rhythm guitarist Aaron Aedy and Mackintosh. A Type O Negative croon emerges as the always impressive clean delivery of Holmes entices over the jagged riffery nagging ears, though subsequently the early tempestuous air returns to immerse the enthralling nature and persuasion of warmer hues.

Press_Cover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review    The riveting start leads to the far more caustic and ravenous presence of Terminal. There is a militant feel to the rhythms right away, their heavy swipes belligerent against the rasping vocals and sonically acrid air around them, whilst the guitars have a corrosive edge to their riffs and melodic entwining of ears. It is a solid and tightly gripping encounter, a blackened examination of emotions but does miss the spark of the first track and the following An Eternity Of Lies. The third song opens with keys and an instantly captivating orchestral caress, with a guitar quickly joining the tempting with its own melodic hues. Keys continue to brew and expel a gothic hug on the imagination as the song blossoms, an aural portrait invigorated by the drama of guitars and the diverse delivery of Holmes. It is a bewitching encounter, a melodic fascination infusing a heavier rapacious tempting across its rich and volatile dark dance, and quite irresistible.

Already the potent diversity of songs and album is apparent and highly persuasive, continuing in the contagion that is Punishment Through Time. The song is a thick and ferocious rocker of a track, but controlled in its assault and dirty in its rock ‘n’ roll. Fair to say it was a track not expected, the song almost welcoming even with its lyrical despair and predacious character, and almost arguing with the earlier claim that The Plague Within is one the band’s most intensive and darkly suffocating offerings yet. There is a black heart to it though that is emulated and shown in its fullest rancor in Beneath Broken Earth. The track prowls with emotionally leaden jaws and an oppressive animus of tone and intent led by the bitter guttural growls of Holmes. A tsunami of slow hate and erosive doom ferocity, the song almost draws a death rattle from the senses with its weight and enmity.

Both Sacrifice The Flame and Victim Of The Past enthral with individual uniqueness, the first a hymn of melodic and vocal beauty within a funereally paced and cancerous stalking of the senses whilst its successor with a similarly sedated energy, certainly initially, blossoms from a mellow seducing of vocal and melodic charm into a creative and emotional turbulence. With a storm bred atmosphere, the song ebbs and flows between the two climates as it reveals and explores its morose yet enticing landscape; again Paradise Lost crafting a sublime collusion of extreme and contrasting textures in one inescapable seducing.

The epic like heralding of Flesh From Bone at its start is one irresistible essence backed up swiftly by a saunter through blackened and cavernous symphonic terrain before exploding in a venomous spewing of rabid rhythms, scarring riffs, and voracity soaked vocal animosity. Fearsomely enchanting in its full hostility, the song makes way for another imposing slab of rock ‘n’ roll posing as Cry Out where blues rock grooves and acidic ingenuity infiltrates inventive bad blood. It is another, as so many encounters within The Plague Within, which has a host of turns and detours of sound that there are almost songs within songs. The blackest, ravenous anthem is soon a passing memory in that precise moment in time though as the colossal Return To The Sun brings the album to a mighty and climatic close. As brutal as it is melodically immersive, the track is an intensive exclamation mark to The Plague Within, a final creative swipe to emphasise what is one masterful and threateningly majestic proposal.

Fourteen albums in and into their third decade, we can safely say that Paradise Lost still provides one of the benchmarks for aspiring metal bands to contemplate, the proof is all there in The Plague Within.

The Plague Within is available now via

RingMaster 05/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @

Chasing Ghosts – Everything Changes

Chasing Ghosts cover

Not even touching six months as a band, Chasing Ghosts is already stirring up the UK rock scene and online radio interest with their epic sounds and now new single Everything Changes. London based, the quartet create a melodic rock propositions which certainly on the evidence of their latest song is as imposing as it is seductive and as atmospherically provocative as it is creatively intensive. The buzz around is that Chasing Ghosts is a band on the march and there is nothing about Everything Changes to bring doubt to that claim.

Formed as 2014 became its successor, Chasing Ghosts draw on inspirations from the likes of Paradise Lost, Therapy, Metallica, Alice In Chains, Moonspell and more for their dark and adventurous evocative sounds. Bassist/keyboardist Lee Brueton and guitarist Harry Mitten had already played together for four years in the band Embersfire and once united again they proceeded to write a trio of songs before booking Chapel Studios in Lincolnshire to record them. Next step was to find the rest of the band, an unusual way round of doing things but with the addition of vocalist James Marsh and drummer John Watt, plus the impressive adventure of Everything Changes alone, the band obviously knew best. A three track demo recorded with Enter Shikari engineer Tim Morris resulted from the session and brings us the band’s new single, whilst the other songs This Fear and From Depravity show themselves to be both similarly impressive explorations.

The single opens on a dawning wave of dark shadows and sounds, their invitation swiftly erupting into a thick wave of melodic persuasion and earthy rhythms as immersive as they are imposing. You sense some of the essences of those earlier mentions influences as the song expands and evolves, but the one band which really comes forward as the rich endeavour of song and sound engulfs ears and imagination, is Johnny Wore Black. Both he and Chasing Ghosts are openly adept at aligning dark emotive shadows and fiery beauty into physically and mentally stimulating propositions. The flowering provocative sounds of the keys and guitars back this up, almost entwining around each other across the song with fluid and impacting enterprise whilst the vocals of Marsh become as transfixing as the emotionally tempestuous sounds around him.

    Everything Changes is an exciting introduction to Chasing Ghosts, a striking doorway into their sound and potential soaked presence. It is a promise already coming to fruition across the three songs making up their demo and most potently revealed in the single, but one hinting at even greater adventures ahead.

Everything Changes is out now.

RingMaster 20/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @