Spreading The Disease – Insurrection

Getting our claws into their outstanding debut EP at the beginning of last year, we suggested that UK metallers Spreading The Disease had “much bigger and bolder trespasses waiting to be nurtured and uncaged as the band evolves.” The release of their first album Insurrection has more than confirmed that thought and realised those hopes in uncompromising and rousing style. The album is a furnace of creative irritability and ravenous imagination, a rabid cauldron of metal bred flavours and angers which confirms Spreading The Disease as one of the most exciting propositions emerging on the British metal scene.

The creation of bassist Steve Saunders, formerly of another fine proposition in The Self Titled, Kent hailing Spreading The Disease emerged in 2014 and quickly lured keen attention through the single Bulldozer and their explosive live presence. Last year the Viral EP stamped the band as a new beast on the UK metal scene, its plaudits garnering release backed by a year scorching venues and ears to equal acclaim. Insurrection is the next step in the band’s evolution and rise; an encounter roaring with the new maturity and invention fuelling the band’s songwriting and sound and snarling with even greater ferocity and quarrel.

The band’s lined up has gone through major changes since Viral, Saunders and guitarist Martin Osbourne being joined by vocalist Connor Russell Snyder and drummer Jack Apella. Whether the spark or just coincidence, the new line-up has coincided with that new evolution and creative breath in an already striking sound. When starting up Spreading The Disease, Saunders wanted to “produce a sound and music that although draws from many bands and influences throws it all into a melting pot and comes out the other side with something that in this day and age is hard to achieve, a sound of their own; a distinctive style that cannot be pigeon holed to say the least.Insurrection announces the band has achieved that aim; yes there are plenty of recognisable flavours but woven into something compellingly individual to the quartet.

The album opens up with Find My Path and a lure of melodic metal with a darker bass resonance which increasingly looms in on the senses before igniting in a blaze of emotive ire and sonic intensity. Even so it holds its tempest in check, teasing and coaxing attention whilst intriguing the imagination with its unpredictable bait. As it slips into the ethers, the following Words Unspoken is boiling up to launch its sonic lava on the senses. Within seconds a great groove has body and spirit inflamed; its open Pantera inspirations extra pleasure as it burns away. There is a disorder to the song, a tempestuousness which threatens as it pleasures with the band’s vocal backing to the magnetic growls of Snyder excellent, an anthemic call in the heat of the song’s furnace.

There is a ‘calmer’ air to the following Dischord, well a less corrosive tone though it too is a bear of a proposal which is as caustic as it is imaginative. Osbourne paints the trespass with magnetic enterprise, his melodic tendrils and searing grooves as potent as the cantankerous riffs which escape his strings whilst the bass of Saunders springs its own invasive grooving to thrill. Though living up to its title in tone and presence, the track is a web of raw adventure though soon outshone in that department and might by the song Spreading The Disease. Already the album is the source of great variety in sound and style, pushed further by the fourth track and its fusion of nu and groove metal with far darker metal bred textures courting hardcore nurtured antagonism. The song is outstanding, a brawl in the waiting and raw seduction in the making.

Through the Stone Sour/ Sick Of It All spiced Greed, a striking and virulent invasion of punk infused groove metal which just gets more addictive listen by listen, and the similarly textured but far more savage Save Me, the album hits another plateau. Song by song to this point it has just grown in stature and impressiveness, a peak which Whores Of War nurtures to another high with its melodic suggestion and feral antipathy. Its attitude born rancor and sonic annoyance swiftly grabs ears and appetite; the rhythmic vindictiveness of Saunders and Apella as rousing as it is carnivorous and superbly bound in the captivating enterprise of Osbourne. Snyder skilfully bawls from the midst, his power and emotion undoubtedly giving Spreading The Disease a new weapon in their arsenal.

Even darker depths are tapped into by Method To My Madness, Saunders leading the way with his malevolence spewing bass with the band soon uniting in open crankiness and imposing dexterity. The track does not quite match up to those around it yet it grips attention and enjoyment from start to finish with moments where its creative psychosis just hits the spot before Can’t Let Go offers its plaintive reflection, again Stone Sour hinted at within its increasingly volcanic cry. Female vocals add to its magnetism, again the band pushing their imagination and the landscape of the album.

The Rage Against The Machine natured Brexit Wounds snarls and hollers next, Spreading The Disease once again twisting open inspirations into an aural rage of their own design. Plenty of other spices blossom as the song grows and spills its aggravated heart, whiffs of Red Hot Chili Peppers and Slayer arising in the excellent attack before the album closes up with Last Goodbye. It too embraces a Zack de la Rocha and co flavouring, melding it to a hardcore/groove metal furor as skilfully sculpted as it is ferociously delivered.

It is a storming end to an album which sears the senses and ignites the spirit. Insurrection is a brutal imagination bound treat from a band which we will not say has come of age as you still feel there is much more for they and pleasure to plunder ahead but has certainly established a new plateau for their sound and their position within the UK metal scene.

Insurrection is out now across most online stores.

 

 

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Pete RingMaster 01/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Toxik – Breaking Class

As the number of metal bands returning after extensive breaks or simply break-ups often decades earlier keeps going up so are the amount of impressive releases emerging from these reunions. Adding to the list and almost heading it is the new EP from US thrashers Toxik. Offering three tracks of the genre in its old school breeding, Breaking Class is everything that is irresistible within thrash metal with a healthy freshness linked to experience that newcomers can only learn from and be inspired by.

Subsequently one of the most potent forces with thrash once emerging in 1985, New York hailing Toxik released a pair of increasingly recognised as classic albums in World Circus (1987) and Think This (1989) as well as built a potent live stature which included sharing stages and touring with the likes of King Diamond, Testament, Dream Theater, Exodus, Pantera, Candlemass and many more. Disbanding in 1982, interest in the band was clearly evident with the release of a pair of live DVDs in 2007 and 2010. Announcing their return three years after the second DVD with Shadows Fall’s Jason Bittner replacing original drummer Tad Leger, Toxik very successfully toured Europe and South America showing the lingering support for the band. Since then the line-up has seen James D’Maria of Generation Kill replacing Bittner and vocalist Charles Sabin (from the band’s second album, Think This) taking over from original frontman Mike Sanders as well as bassist Shane Boulos linking up with band founder and guitarist Josh Christian. It is a unit which seems to be a perfect fit as Breaking Class ravages the senses, an organic roar driving its rapacious sound and intent from the EP’s opening seconds.

Those first moments come courtesy of Stand Up, the track spiralling from an initial sample woven lure with wiry guitar swirling around senses jabbing beats. Straight away instincts for anthemic metal are awoken, vocals a rousing incitement backed by hungry riffs and a brooding bass line which almost dances with an established appetite for its flavours. There is a great Anthrax like tenacity and tone to the track around its chorus but equally a modern crossover essence bringing whiffs of bands such as Suicidal Tendencies and Municipal Waste into play but all spices assimilated in a proposal familiar, new, and distinct to Toxik.

The outstanding start is more than matched by the EP’s title track, Breaking Class a devilish surge of riffs and whipping rhythms fuelled by an energy and devilment just as evident in Sabin’s instinctively persuasive vocals and tenacity. Christian similarly has ears and imagination hooked with his aggressive and inventive web of riffs and sonic enterprise, never allowing the listener to settle without adding a new twist then another then….

As compelling as it is riotous, the track is itself more than matched by the closing Psyop; that healthy brew of flavours within the opener uncaged again within its more predatory climate and gait and again involved in an adventurous and almost challengingly unpredictable proposal. It maybe old school nurtured but the song, as its companions, show that does not mean things have to be restrained in boldness and imagination and they certainly are not in the hands of Toxik.

With hints of a new album in the works, it is as if Toxik has never been away just taking their time to create what is one of the most enjoyable thrash stomps of recent years.

The Breaking Class EP is released August 4th with re-ordering available now @ https://toxik.bandcamp.com/album/breaking-class

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Pete RingMaster 18/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Worselder – Paradigms Lost

As French metal continues to prove itself a hot bed for adventurous new bands and voraciously tempting sounds, quintet Worselder add their stock to the brew with new album Paradigms Lost. A web of flavours and styles fused into ear pleasing, imagination catching encounters, the ten track release is a quick and easy to devour proposition revelling in additional time offered to blossom into something even more impressive.

Hailing from the foothills of the Pyrénées mountains, Worselder emerged in 2008. Quickly they tempted local and in turn national attention with a sound drawing on each individual member’s influences and experiences in previous outfits alongside nineties inspired thrash and power metal; an instantly rich mix only blossoming in depth and adventure across the years and releases. Debut album Where we come from was released in 2010 to strong responses though it was the MMXIV EP four years later which especially sparked critical acclaim and led to the band sharing stages with the likes of Firewind, Dagoba, Black Bomb A, and Huntress among many. Recorded across 2016 with Elise Aranguren and mixed and mastered by Bruno Varea (Dagoba, Satyricon, Lenny Kravitz), Paradigms Lost sees the Worselder sound and invention at a new level of maturity and imagination. It is a release which as suggested makes a potent impact straight away but shows greater strength upon subsequent listens as its layers and less open complexities are increasingly revealed.

Infighting gets things going, the opener luring ears with a brooding bassline before rapacious riffs and bone rattling rhythms courted by toxic grooves erupt. Equally rapacious vocals from Guillaume Granier and the band soon join the surge before things settle down a touch with the vocalist quickly showing his potent range and dexterity. There is a whiff of industrial metal to the track initially, Society 1 coming to mind as the track jabs with spiky discontent, but soon its melodic and grooved instincts are entangling and stretching its thrash fuelled charge.

It is a great start hinting at the wealth of flavours ready to embrace ears across Paradigms Lost and its next up title track. From the crackle of fire and portentous rhythms within a similar atmosphere, the song strides forth with melodic vocals and harmonies lying keenly on more rapacious and aggressive sounds. The guitars of Yoric Oliveras and Jérémie Delattre cast another instinctive incitement, a mix of predacious trespass and sonic imagination to be hooked on whilst the scything beats of drummer Michel Marcq rousingly pierce the heavy prowl of Yannick Fernandez’s bass. The track’s twists and turns are as fluid as the array of sounds woven together within the excellent proposal but carry an unpredictability which has the imagination firmly enthralled within the first listen.

The instinctive rock ‘n’ roll prowess of next up Seeds of Rebellion has ears won just as quickly; the similarly striking and irresistible song proceeding to instil that core with anthemic dexterity and spicy grooves. All is delivered with lust but control amidst expectations spoiling imagination loaded with a bold unpredictability before Idols unveils its classic/heavy metal attributes within an aggressively tenacious air. Though the track does not quite ignite personal tastes as forcibly as its formidable predecessors, it only grows and pleases more and more with every listen.

Through the melodically calmer waters of The Sickening and the old school spiced Severed, the album has total attention. The first is a tantalising mix of warm melodic temptation and more bullish volatility as vocal and lyrical insight explores ears and thoughts. At times sultry and exotic, in other moments a more rapacious challenge, the track captivates from start to finish, giving neck muscles and hips a workout with its emerging thrash inspired grooving. Its successor similarly casts a net of ear entwining grooves this time fuelled and coloured by that power/classic metal essence with Granier’s croons and roars on melodic fire.

My Consuming Grief has a darker edge and deceitful volatility to its heart; a shadowy emotive power skirting and courting the drama and adventure of the melodic power metal seeded exploits. It too has ears and imagination swiftly gripped before Home of the Grave dances on the senses with its opening melodic flirtation. It is a glorious enticement only increasing its invitation as darker heavier hues from guitar and rhythms join in. Managing to become more primal and charming with each passing minute, the track provides another addictive highlight to the release.

Worselder toy with the imagination through The Haven next, a song exploring dark hues more akin to the likes of Dommin and Rise To Remain though its instinctive classic metal attributes shape the excellent encounter before the album closes with the shadow clouded, atmospherically apocalyptic Land of Plenty. In its imposing darkness there is hope and elegant melodies bring that light as the song rises from its solemn beginnings to challenge and inflame the senses. More of a slow burner than other tracks within Paradigms Lost, it almost festers in ears and imagination as it makes a potent impact and striking moment to eagerly point out.

Inspirations to the band apparently include the likes of Coroner, Testament, and Pantera; a trio which across the whole of an album but especially in the final song alone you can appreciate in a release which simply draws attention back time and time again as we can attest to. Paradigms Lost has all the qualities and impressiveness to push Worselder into global attention, now it is up to the world to embrace them.

Paradigms Lost is available now through Sliptrick Records on Amazon and other stores.

http://www.worselder.com/    https://www.facebook.com/worselder/    http://worselder.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 20/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Desert Kingdom – Self Titled

desert-kingdom_RingMasterReview

Hailing from the suburbs of Melbourne, Desert Kingdom recently made their introduction to greater attention with their self-titled debut release offering seven slabs of fiercely muscular stoner bred rock ‘n’ roll relishing the band’s inspirations. Certainly uniqueness is not as forceful as the physical power and prowess of the band but there was no escaping a richly pleasing and rousing first glimpse of the potential loaded quartet.

Consisting of vocalist Ritch, guitarist Emmett Young, bassist Brett Wright, and drummer Paul Coste, Desert Kingdom swiftly get down to business as opener You’ll Burn descends on ears with sinew woven riffs and swinging beats. Instantly infectious, it is a commanding coaxing for ears only increasing its potency as choppy tenacity infects those initial chords and a heavy grumble escapes the bass. The raw scowling tones of Ritch are equally as persuasive, it all combining for a fiery slice of stoner heaviness clothed in the influences of bands such as Orange Goblin, Kyuss, and Down.

desert_kingdom_art_RingMasterReviewThe atmospheric, drama soaked entrance of Mafiaso Opera deceptively makes a gentler proposition but its sinister air is soon a tempestuous torrent of catchy beats and predacious riffs. As vocals rage spicy grooves wind around the rhythmic temptation, varied metallic strains linking arms in a familiar yet fresh incitement. Brawling with the senses through every passing second, the track quickly eclipses its impressive predecessor, stomping with raw aggression and captivating enterprise before Doghouse Blues prowls with an equally rapacious intent to that of the previous track while military seeded rhythms impose their agreeable authority. Like a blend of Gruntruck and Pantera with a whiff of Mary Beats Jane, the track irritably rumbles leaving satisfaction full if not quite matching the heights sparked by the pair before it.

If the last track prowls then 7 Years stalks the senses with its doom bred trespass, sonic flames erupting within the pressure as choice grooves entwine voice and the engaging ponderous gait of the rhythms. It too lacks the sparks of those early successes but again only and increasingly pleases as its waspish sound intensifies in tandem with the song’s boisterous aggression with subsequent blues toxicity adding to the fun.

Abstainer rocks like a lustful dog next, its hungry riffs and heftily swung rhythms alone a carnal incitement while Fuck You is sonic belligerence and muscular aggravation bred to raise the spirit as the release re-hits the early plateau it began upon. With spicy hooks and scorching grooves, the track has all the attributes and open potential to raise expectations that Desert Kingdom will come under the scrutiny of the broadest spotlights if not now in the time ahead.

Concluded by the boozy blaze of Whiskey, sawdust and spit rock ‘n’ roll with all the groove laced liquor you could wish for, the release is a very easy to return to stomp. Originality might be a touch on the scarce side but enjoyment is full, something never drawing complaints.

The Desert Kingdom album is out now via Black Bow Records across most online stores.

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Pete RingMaster 01/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Renegade Twelve – Self Titled

renegade-twelve-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

With a character which refuses to be pigeonholed yet openly embraces every flavour of melodic metal and heavy rock you care to mention, the self-titled debut from Renegade Twelve is oh so easy to like. Offering ten rousing slices of rock ‘n’ roll as inventive as they are seemingly familiar, the release is a formidable and increasingly captivating introduction to the British outfit.

Hailing from Suffolk, Renegade Twelve emerged in 2014, formed by long-time friends in lead guitarists Jacob Mayes and Dan Potter, bassist Josh Barnard, and drummer Jack Mcsloy. It was with the addition of vocalist Sam Robson that the jigsaw of talent was finally complete, a union driving the band through over 100 gigs in 2016 alone in support and preparation for the release of their first album.

Recording it with producer Rupert Matthews who has collaborated with the likes of Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, The Who, The Eagles, and Black Sabbath, Renegade Twelve quickly unleash their individual and united enterprise with opener Mad Max. It opens from afar, sonic melodies and fiery energy brewing up their engines at a distance until ready to stand toe to toe with the listener. Once in place it is an imposing yet not overtly aggressive proposition, Robson soon leading the surge of adventure with his quickly impressive tones as guitars weave their sonic tapestry around the swinging rhythms of Barnard and Mcsloy. A definite Avenged Sevenfold colouring coats the song but it also offers plenty more to get the teeth into.

Vanity follows with its own blistering weave of melodic and heavy metal, its instinctive roar equally brewed on an array of textures from alternative and groove metal to classic rock. With ease, as its predecessor, it sparks the spirit and energies before Heroes Of Mine embraces ears with its melody rich, almost folk metal spiced enterprise before settling into its muscular melodically persuasive rock ‘n’ roll canter. Though the track is eclipsed by those around it, there is no lessening of appetite and enjoyment already bred by the album especially as the technical imagination of the guitarists dance evocatively on ears.

A carnivorously toned bass growl is just one ingredient in the thickly riveting success of Bipolar, anthemic vocals and raw virulence another as it energetically and at times venomously prowls the senses. It too just misses out on matching earlier heights yet has attention solely in its inventive hands especially when the organic animosity of its heart erupts and fuels a great passage of irritability.

renegade-twelve-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewThrough the predatory landscape and infection clad swing of the outstanding This Town the album hits a new plateau, the track a boisterous funk lined stomp with a defiant snarl on every corner. Its individual nature adds to the already open variety within release and Renegade Twelve sound, a diversity further stretched by the power balladry/classic metal blaze of War Plane and in turn the epic yet intimate bellow of Somme. The first of the two leaves nothing to be dissatisfied with but is overshadowed by its surrounding companions with the sensational second of the two pure creative theatre with no signs of indulgence or wasteful seconds.

Yeah Boi swaggers in straight after, grouchy basslines and punchy beats joining cantankerous riffs in an irresistibly compelling instrumental unafraid to reveal a Pantera inspired swing bound in spicily toxic grooves. It sets ears and pleasure up perfectly for the fiercely catchy antics of MFC, a blistering sonic ravaging of ears, and straight after the melodic hug of closing track Bill & Chief. From its gentle, acoustically nurtured start, the song catches ablaze with melodic and emotive flames to bring the album to a conclusion as impressive as its start.

Renegade Twelve is a stunning debut sure to appeal to fans of most flavours within the metal realm such its richness of styles. The fact that the band still finds a pretty distinct sound even with its familiar essences is testament to the imaginative writing and unmissable skills of its individuals.

Renegade Twelve is out 27th January.

http://renegadetwelve.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/Renegade-Twelve-1393405887586971/   https://twitter.com/renegadetwelve

Pete RingMaster 25/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Big South Market – Muzak EP

the-big-south-market_RingMasterReview

Weaving strands of hard and blues rock with grunge and stoner essences for a sound equally familiar and enterprisingly fresh, The Big South Market is an Italian band making a powerful introduction to themselves with their debut EP Muzak. Five tracks of rousing rock ‘n’ roll the encounter is an impressive offering from yet another duo showing that you do not need multiple bodies to make a mighty roar.

From Barletta, The Big South Market was formed in 2015 by vocalist/guitarist Giuseppe Chiumeo, founder of the crossover band The Rest Side, and drummer Ruggiero Ricco from thrash metallers Cancrena. Quickly they made a potent impression playing all across their homeland, broader attention now being tempted by Muzak and its fiery contents.

Opener Big Deal immediately threatens welcoming ears with thumping beats as wiry grooves wrap around. It is an intoxicating start which only blossoms in strength and sound as Chiumeo and Ricco unite their imposing enterprise. Like a blend of Gruntruck and Crobot, the song growls and seduces, getting under the skin in no time as it vocally snarls and musically sears the senses.

tbsm_cover_RingMasterReviewIt is a stunning start swiftly matched by the similarly fiery lures of Before (You Make It Deeper), itself a fine blend of stoner and blues endeavour as raw as it is imaginatively woven. As with its predecessor there is plenty which seems familiar yet more than enough to create a proposition which stands apart from the crowd, riffs and grooves a web of instinctive adventure in an imposingly big yet uncluttered roar of sound.

A southern air lines the blues rock of next up Moodrink, its grooves and rampant rhythms a spirit sparking enticement as soulful vocals roar. Hinting at the likes of bands such as Pantera, Kyuss, and Royal Blood, the track robustly croons and writhes in ears while the following Red Carpet involves its predecessor’s creative liquor in an even richer slice of virulent blues infused rock ‘n’ roll.

As it strikingly began, Muzak ends on a major highlight with Desert Motel, a slab of desert blues built on enjoyably intrusive rhythms and boozy blues tenacity around the ever potent vocals of Chiumeo. A less energetic proposal compared to earlier tracks, it replaces a full throttle charge with emotively suggestive grooves within melodic fire as an underlying intensity soaked in attitude and ferocity murmurs.

It is a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable first look at The Big South Market, a pair showing the potential of eventually matching the stature of other great rock n’ roll duos.

Muzak is out now across most online stores.

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Pete RingMaster 11/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Outright Resistance – Me Vs I EP

Outright Resistance

Outright Resistance

There has been a following roar of impressed voices and recommendation to the ascent of UK metallers Outright Resistance within the UK metal scene and especially over recent weeks with the release of the band’s new EP Me Vs I. It is a defiant and aggressive growl of raw groove woven metal often openly suggesting inspirations from bands such as Lamb of God, Chimaira, Stone Sour, August Burns Red, The Agony Scene, and Pantera but unleashing its if not fully unique certainly own kind of irritable sound.

Formed in 2011, the Stevenage bred band soon had debut EP Don’t Eat My Organs stirring up awareness whilst hitting the local live scene with a raw passion. Shows with the likes of Hacktivist and TRC were including in a host of gigs across Hertfordshire, Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, and London, all adding to a growing reputation which was invigorated further by last year’s Poveglia EP and especially now through Me Vs I, with being one of six finalists in the 2015 London arm of the Bloodstock Metal to the Masses competition in between.

Me Vs I opens with its title track, a short piece of drama which finds more sense and potency once having journeyed through the whole EP and its honest no punches pulled look at prejudices and ignorance among other things. Maimed In Chelsea is the next proposal and boy does it start off with a wallop, riffs nagging the senses before being quickly joined by thumping rhythms and the grasping roars of vocalist Paige Lee. In no time it is into a grouchy stroll with Pantera-esque grooves entangling harsher rhythmic predation. Backed by the band, Lee continues to orchestrate the venomous nature of the track with her imposing vocal trespasses, the guitars of Michael Worsley and Joe Jacobs creating a contagious web of grooves and riffs for an outstanding full start to the EP which just becomes more addictive and viciously dynamic with each passing minute.

me-vs-i-artwork_RingMasterReviewProve Them Wrong steps forward next, displaying an even eager desire to consume the senses as riffs and the scything beats of Michael O’Neill descend. Soon displaying a more familiar heavy metal nature to its onslaught and melodic toxicity, the track is a hungrily enjoyable canter with the bass of Chris Everett a predatory incitement alongside the growling antagonism of Paige. Missing some of the extra sparks which ignited its predecessor, the song nevertheless leaves a heavily satisfied appetite behind before the outstanding Pain grabs attention next. From its first rhythmic coaxing there is a belligerence and defiance to the character of the song, a tempestuous attitude which fuels riffs and voice but still content to share its moments with spicy melodies and electronic intrigue across an increasingly rousing and enjoyable encounter.

An echo of Paige’s own personal journey having to deal with transphobia, Gee, Dysphoria challenges as it roars, rhythms a concussive assault and riffs a relentless incursion on the senses as vocals uncage an animosity toned but plaintive call for understanding. With melody spiced grooves and fiery enterprise straddling its intensive outpouring of the heart, the song demands attention being soon matched by successor Destiny Is All and in turn outshone by the closing ravaging of Take The Blame.

The first of the two stalks the senses; riffs again a niggling proposition as beats cantankerously swipe and vocals crawl with similar intent over song and listener while the second is a thrash/death metal spiced tempest as virulently catchy as it is violently imposing and bound in short but flavoursome grooves. Standing alongside Maimed In Chelsea as the EP’s best moment and showing the most adventurous nature of all, the song is a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable release.

Me Vs I lives up to the promise and potential suggested by plaudits towards the band so far, suggesting greater things to come from Outright Resistance while leaving keen enjoyment.

The Me Vs I EP is out now @ https://outrightresistance.bandcamp.com/album/me-vs-i

https://www.facebook.com/OutrightResistanceBand/   https://twitter.com/OR_Band   http://www.orband.co.uk/

Pete RingMaster 20/10/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright