Skies In Motion – Life Lessons

It is probably fair to say that there are a couple of metal bred flavours we are finding ourselves uninspired by at The RR right now, metalcore being one. There are plenty of good and enjoyable bands emerging within the genre but few which truly break from the familiar and creatively routine. UK outfit Skies In Motion is one which defies that thought especially with their new debut album Life Lessons now leading their persuasion.  It is a ferocious magnetic collection of songs as irritable and aggressive as they are creatively and melodically captivating. Certainly plenty of its appeal is down to striking potential but equally there is an imagination and enterprise at play which only excites.

Hailing from Derby, Skies In Motion stepped forward in 2012 and has increased their reputation year on year  with their live presence alone which has seen them share stages with the likes of Killswitch Engage, Devil Wears Prada, August Burns Red, While She Sleeps, Unearth, Slaves , Skindred, Don Broco, Our Hollow Our Home, Gnarwolves and many more. Their initial sound was more hardcore driven though still embracing melodic strains. Life Lessons merges those flavours with its metalcore instincts, resulting in an assault which at times maybe embraces familiar essences but is a relentlessly fresh and intriguing proposition.

The press release for the album suggests bands such as While She Sleeps and Architects are good comparisons and it is not too hard going along with that as opener Architect bites. It initial melodic invitation is a deceit giving no suggestion of the creative carnage to follow though it is not long before an invasion of riffs and rhythms accompany enticing throat raw vocals. Intrigue is quickly gripped and fed as the track evolves into successor Cascades where djent spice predation is followed by hardcore causticity and metal antagonism, vocalist Adam Connor tenaciously riding the tempest. It is a stirring mix which welcomingly infests ears and appetite, the rhythms of bassist Dan Wheeler and drummer Sam Gaines continuing the predatory invasion as guitarists Dave Stewart and Andy Shaw weave a carnal tempest of craft and temptation. Connor is as striking as the sounds around him, the diversity of his attack thoroughly enjoyable and as potently backed by those around him.  There is also infectiousness to the track which borders on poppy, a catchiness which never undermines the ferocity.

The following Realizationship is similarly woven if even more irritable and too a web of seduction and sonic violence which never stops twisting and turning within its storm. The song lacks the final striking essences of its predecessor yet with teasing grooves and fury loaded flames of melody it masterfully hits the spot and an imagination already submissive to the inventively evolving landscapes the band shares within songs.

Another plateau is breached by next up Happy Families, its stabbing riffs and wiry tendrils an instant trap to fall into which only tightens as steely grooves and rabid riffs join rapacious rhythms and a virulence of contagious antics. Connor impressively leads into and drives the chorus of vocal spirit, sound relaxing a touch to embrace the infectious roar though that moment of unity is surrounded by a compelling net of discord and unpredictability. The track is superb and another reason to suggest Skies in Motion is a real force in the making.

Learn The Hard Way is next, its grooved body a fiery cauldron of sound and emotion with some of the most delicious melodic and harmonic lures heard in a fair time while the following Ugly lives up to its name in tone though it too has a swing and exhaustive rigour which simultaneously incites and devours the body. Both songs reveal more of the bands craft in writing and performance, the latter simply a beast of cyclonic contagion to become increasingly greedy for even before Finding Myself Lost has the chance to stamp its intense authority over the senses. It is fair to say that some tracks, like this one, needs time to truly appreciate; to explore and discover its deep qualities beneath a surface which pleasures if not overwhelms though truthfully every song has a wealth of adventure ready to share with increasing listens.

Both the carnivorous Sword Swallower and the emotively conjured Gonvena provide a mercurial adventure of sound and imagination, the first a savage turbulence which flows into an emotionally acute oasis of calm while the second goes from poetic beauty and melodic reflection to blistering intensity. The second is especially bewitching, Connor further impressing with his melodic prowess and the band with its fluidity through extremely contrasting climates.

When Home Feels Distant (And Distance Feels Like Home) lacks some of the captivation and adventure of the previous two but still has ears gripped and pleasure lit with its Avenged Sevenfold spiced tapestry, next up Five Years finding the same success with its own heart bred tempest of sound and raw aggression. It too misses some of the keen ingredients of earlier encounters but leaves satisfaction full and a want for more, hungrier.

Concluding with Hopebringer, another track which needs time to blossom into a fascinating and invasive fury of sound and potential, Life Lessons needs no help in luring ears and attention back again and indeed again. It is a debut which more than suggests, actually declares Skies In Motion as a band able to bring a fresh breath to the hardcore/metalcore scene. Whether they can live up to its potential time will tell but we would not bet against it.

Life Lessons is out now @ http://skiesinmotionuk.bigcartel.com/product/pre-order-life-lessons-albumu

http://www.skiesinmotion.com/    https://www.facebook.com/skiesinmotion    https://twitter.com/skiesinmotion

Pete RingMaster 14/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dream Awake – Don’t Hold Your Breath

An encounter which persists with its persuasion after making a pretty strong first impression, growing in thoughts and enjoyment all the time, Don’t Hold Your Breath is the sophomore EP from Northern Ireland melodic metalcore quintet Dream Awake. The successor to their well-received debut of a couple of years ago, Pathfinder, the five track offering is a potent new step in the ascent of the Belfast band.

Recorded with producer Daniel Kerr of Avenue Studios (Our Hollow Our Home, Create To Inspire, Shields), Don’t Hold Your Breath certainly provided an attention grabbing first listen initially though its real strengths taking it out of the crowd were not so imposing. Subsequent outings with its melody rich and threateningly aggressive enterprise gave the time to discover a real depth in adventure and creative resourcefulness. There are moments in which the EP fails to escape familiar traits among genre companions but even those times are built with a potential of greater and bolder individuality.

It begins with the ear grabbing The Weathering, a track featuring the guest talent of Napoleon vocalist Wes Thompson. Its atmospheric opening is soon vined by Chris Byrne’s suggestive guitar and subsequently immersed in the volatile tide of rhythmic thunder and vocal causticity. The raw throated roar of David Houston is in turn replaced by the excellent clean tones of guitarist Conor Kelly, a calmer presence in the growing tempest where the bass of Craig Leetch springs a bassline which swings around ears and appetite while the beats of drummer Daniel Kelly manage to share the fierce touch of the song’s irritability and the tempering touch of melody. Even Kelly’s warmer delivery has a fire in its belly at times and put all together it is a magnetic affair which only further impresses with every listen.

The following Mind’s Eye tempts with a melodic enticing before its wave of adventure surges through ears; again warm and harsher textures colluding in the persuasion. As Byrne’s strings dazzle, Kelly’s voice is a magnet with the dirty throat grazing of Houston a predacious element in the fire. Swiftly the track outshines its predecessor, finding uniqueness in craft and magnetism which was a touch more latent in the song before. Its roar continues to seduce and challenge bringing a greedier appetite to the fore for the EP’s tempting before Cataclysm comes at ears from a distance with gusto and a web of sonic intrigue. The guitars cast a web of suggestiveness as rhythms prowl, the scowls of Houston lyrically and emotionally scar the senses and as keys add their grace, a Linkin Park like tempting blossoms to lace the arising metalcore tempest with further imagination; the track, as the last outshone the first, out burning the second.

T.O.D. descends on the senses with rapacious intent and tenacity next, guitars and vocals offering a flavoursome mix of design and intensity with the guest vocals of Christina Rotondo bringing extra beauty to the seduction. Though arguably not as bold musically as the songs before it, the track sizzles on the ear before making way for the concluding throes of Heavy Heart. Again an atmospheric, almost haunting start has the imagination swiftly engaged, its suggestiveness continuing as a volatile climate erupts. For personal tastes, the track does not build on its great start as successfully as it might though there are certain moments where it is a magnet. Nevertheless it makes for an enjoyable end to a release as suggested grows with every listen.

Dream Awake has not quite established their full individual character of sound yet but the potent signs are there within their new EP. With a bolder adventure in the writing and maybe greater diversity in the still pleasing attack of Houston, you can expect the five-piece to turn their undoubted potential into genre pushing success and hopefully with plenty more fiercely pleasing outings like Don’t Hold Your Breath along the way.

Don’t Hold Your Breath is released August 18th

http://www.dreamawake.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/dreamawakeofficial/    https://twitter.com/dreamawakeni/

Pete RingMaster 15/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Death Kindly Waits For Me – Wire Iron Blood

death kindly

Let us cut to the chase right away and suggest that Wire Iron Blood might just be the best and certainly one of the most exciting post hardcore debut in recent times. An introduction to UK quartet Death Kindly Waits For Me, the three track release is a striking and dramatically captivating protagonist for ears and imagination, and the fact that it suggests there is plenty more in the creative tank of the band yet to be explored and developed only increases its impact. Expressively provocative with a sound coming from the At The Drive In/Fall Of Troy end of an ever broadening genre, Death Kindly Waits For Me is a dramatic fresh breath in the British post hardcore scene.

Northamptonshire bred, Death Kindly Waits For Me began towards the beginning of 2014, taking inspirations from the likes of Thursday, Being As An Ocean, Finch, and Taking Back Sunday into their emerging invention. Their melody rich and aggressive sound was soon drawing potent attention locally and even further afield as their increasing live presence saw the foursome sharing stages with bands such as Decade, Light You Up, Devil Sold His Soul, Terraform, Emp!re, Our Hollow Our Home, Hey Vanity, Attention Thieves and Flood Of Red. Now a national attention is on the radar as Wire Iron Blood is uncaged, and it is fair to say that expectations are already confident in the band’s success in luring a wider spotlight.

The EP opens with the outstanding Cutting Room Floor, a sonic lure swiftly thrusting ears into the impassioned vocals of Adam Fitch, his clean and earnest tones instantly magnetic. Alongside him the guitar of Max Freeston slowly spreads a coarsely melodic lure whilst the heavy bass tones of Adam Cator, just as quickly adds dark haunting shadows. Pierced by the controlled and reserved but rapier like strikes of drummer Josh Miller, it is not a dramatic start yet thoroughly intriguing and awakening an appetite to hear more. Soon into a steady stride and still employing the creative weave which set things off, the song increasingly impresses as it expands its presence musically and vocally, Fitch superb with his distinctive angst fuelled tones whilst the DEath KIndly...more punkish offering of Freeston is a potent backing and the raw roars of Cator nicely caustic. An additional anthemic strength emerges in the song and though musically maybe it does not blaze with startling originality there is nothing but freshness and adventure to the opener.

The same strengths flows though the following Best Friends. It character is shadowed and emotionally dark yet it flames with a contagious energy and a rigorously exciting imagination. Vocally once more the track shines whilst riffs and melodies create an infectious proposal which, as the EP, becomes more addictively enjoyable over time. That Fall Of Troy feel is a bright whisper across the song, whilst other elements hint at the more experimental adventure of The Mai Shi at times, but as the song evolves from a raging stomp into a melancholic croon in its finale, the track is thrillingly individual to Death Kindly Waits For Me.

The closing Decade Of War continues the excellent temptation, its emotionally sober but energetically impassioned heart a canvas for great rhythmic enterprise and colourful guitar endeavour to wrap with craft and tenacity. Vocally of course the song continues a weighty persuasion amidst impressive sonic imagination and by its end it is hard not to sigh in disappointment that there is no more and to swiftly go back to the beginning again and ensure there is.

As mentioned at the beginning, Wire Iron Blood is a starting point for the band which shows that they have plenty to discover and push within themselves. There is little nothing to shade the potency of the release though, with no reflection on Cator, personal tastes would like to see a diminishing or loss of the aggressive vocal squalls as they often feel at odds with the rest of the vocal delivery and at times songs. It is a very minor thing of course in a potential drenched start by Death Kindly Waits For Me, a band hard not to get rather excited over.

Wire Iron Blood will be available from 2nd March through all digital stores.

https://www.facebook.com/deathkindlywaitsformeuk

RingMaster 02/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/