Lucy And The Rats – Self Titled

There are some things which are simply bred for temptation, propositions instinctively natured to lure like sirens. Among their numbers is the debut album from Lucy And The Rats. Deceptively unassuming but one virulent contagion, the release is an irresistible slice of pop punk with a snarl in its heart and the most disarming melodies and harmonies on its breath like a winning blend of The Shirelles, Honey Bane, and Spinnerette.

Lucy And The Rats is the new band from now UK based singer/guitarist Lucy Spazzy, formerly one third of Australian punksters The Spazzys. Once settled in London in 2015, she set about assembling a new band being “bored of playing at home by herself”, subsequently linking up with guitarist Joe To Lose (Los Perros, Johnny Throttle), bassist Mike Cannibal (Animal Cannibal), and drummer Manu (Thee Tumbitas). A pair of ear grabbing singles followed as the band made a stir on the live scene in the Capitol, in turn nationally and all over the world sharing stages with the likes of Buzzcocks and Paul Collins along the way. Produced by Johnny Casino and Jim Diamond (White Stripes, Dirtbombs), their first album is an inescapable tap on the shoulder of the broadest attention and recognition, a sweet sounding proposition so so easy to run off with.

Opening up with Pills, the album instantly had ears attentive and the body rocking. Soon the song strolls along with a summery glaze over eager catchiness as hooks collude with flirtatious riffs and rhythms. There is a whiff of The Shirts to the track as its heart embraces the instincts of pop and rock ‘n’ roll around the magnetic presence and tone of Spazzy.

The following Make You Mine wears a similar hue of sound but quickly reveals its own personality and The Waitresses meets The Crystals like temptation. Again feet were keenly shuffling and hips swinging as melodies seduced hand in hand with golden harmonies but all the while a punk edge stirs accentuated by the wiry enterprise of the guitars, they repeating that taunting prowess in next up Lose My Mind. Imposingly infectious, the song suggested involvement within seconds, manipulating it a few breaths later much to the lusty pleasure returned.

The likes of the surf kissed seduction that is So Simple, a mellow kiss on ears with the melodic smooch of The Dollyrots and rapacious touch of Valentiine, and the pop bouncing Melody just devour attention while the viral shadows of the bass grumbling Night simply danced with the imagination as the song took hold of the waist. It is truly hard to pick a favourite song within the album, all three among the options but the third makes an especially compelling statement.

Through Fall our passions pretty much echo their ardour as it swings with flirtatious grace and mischief, next up Hold On Me emphasising similar manipulation with rolling rhythms and deceptively controlled yet rousing energy with Spazzy tempting like a pop punk conjuring Pauline Murray. All three just leave a greed for much more, the latter laying on the temptation with some great hooks out of the Only Ones songbook, before Girl saunters along without a care in the world sharing the kind of creative snare addiction was invented for.

The album closes with Can’t Surf; a fifties inspired pop ’n’ roll romp which may have lost the heart for hitting the waves but had us riding its enterprising currents with zeal. The track is a thrilling end to one glorious encounter. Lately we have found pop punk to be a touch vacant on real uniqueness and though Lucy And The Rats have a sound which is much more flavoursome than that tagging, their album is the  fresh and inspiring breath within both pop and punk, indeed rock ’n’ roll we have been yearning for.

The Lucy And The Rats debut album is out May 25th digitally with Dirty Water Records and on vinyl through Surfin’ Ki Records, Monster Zero Records, and Stardumb Records.

https://lucyandtherats.bandcamp.com/  https://www.facebook.com/Lucy-and-the-Rats-817424101645809/

Pete RingMaster 23/05/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Eureka California – Versus

EC _RingMasterReview

With songs as sonically dysfunctional as the lives in their themes, flavours and attitude at times bordering on dissonant, Versus is one of those albums which nags and pesters until it has attention involved in its mischievous challenge. The release is the new and third album from US garage rock/pop duo Eureka California, a band from Athens, Georgia who over the past three years or so has increasingly stirred up eager fuss for their sonic psychosis around an intimate and self-referential lyrical devilry.

Consisting of guitarist/vocalist Jake Ward and drummer Marie A. Uhler, Eureka California made its first mark with the Modern Times EP in 2011, the band at that point a trio. The following year saw the release of debut album Big Cats Can Swim; its awareness stoking success then potently built on by firstly a 7” split with Good Grief in 2013 but more so by well-received second album Crunch a year later. The pair of encounters also saw the band as the duo now luring fresh spotlights with Versus, their first offering recorded in a studio.

It opens with Eureka California’s Night In, a pop jangle with thumping beats and a hungry horde of riffs around the expressive tones of Ward. There is a seventies power pop/punk feel to the track and a raucous feistiness which sets the theme and tone for the album. Like The Undertones/Only Ones meets The Hives whilst spaced out on toxic pizza, the song is a rousing start to the album swiftly backed up by the just as addictive Sign My Name With An X. It too has rebellion in its creative belly and belligerence in its touch as it engineers another slice of bracing garage punk pop. Imagining Melvins and The Replacements colluding with The Super Happy Fun Club gives a hint at the spirit raising, imagination inciting exploit. As all tracks bar two, the song is a swift, psyche infesting shot of creative adrenaline barely touching two let alone three minutes; just diving in, rushing out, and leaving greed loaded exhaustion in its wake.

The fuzzy pop ‘n’ roll of Another Song About TV strolls in next, its initial lure a scuzzy blaze which settles down for a hook stocked flirtation of guitar and voice. Uhler’s rhythms have a less imposing nature to their swings this time around but certainly have meat to their jabs and devilment in their invention across the brief and contagiously sweet incitement before it disappears in an instant to be replaced by the dirtier and more sonically irritable Sober Sister. The track soon has ears bristling in pleasure and thoughts grabbing the lyrical prowess and tenacity which swings through digs and humour at the turn of a syllable whilst spotlighting moments and experiences seemingly twisted from the listener’s own.

art _RingMasterReviewThrough the grouchy bounce of Ghosts, growling sounds and vibrant vocals uniting to seriously captivate, and the acoustic off-kilter charm of Fear and Loathing in the Classic City, band and album just tighten their grip on ears and appetite. The following Cobwebs on the Wind then sees them uncage more rapacious riffs and chords within a muggy and forcibly enticing invitation to body and spirit before Caffeine lays its raw balladry on ears with initially melancholic causticity which brews up into a raucous tempest of noise and emotion.

Surf rock meets post punk is one aspect of the compelling Realizing Your Actuality which steps up next, its early sultry coaxing over steely rhythms irresistible and only reinforced by the corrosive crescendos which erupt then fall before taking over the track’s thick and inescapable persuasion for extended periods. Weezer-esque in its calm, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club toned in its predacious exploits, the track adds another big peak to the successes of Versus.

Another acoustic incitement in the reflective shape of Everybody Had a Hard Year steers eager ears the way of album closer I Will Write Mine Over Potomac and its own melodic caress leading to ravenous sonic and rhythmic ferocity. A song about “loneliness and fraying nerves”; the track ebbs and flows in intensity with thoughtful calms and a raw agitation which almost grinds on the senses. Though finding it a slow burner compared to others within Versus, it is an enthralling proposal which just gets under the skin as deeply as the album succeeds as a whole.

It might be pushing it to say that Versus is going to be the most unique album you hear this year yet everything about it is fresh and seeps Eureka California distinctiveness. Plus it rocks like a bitch and that is more than good enough for us.

Versus is out now via HHBTM Records and @ https://eurekacalifornia.bandcamp.com/album/versus

http://eurekacaliforniaband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/eurekacalifornia   https://twitter.com/eurekacalifone

Pete RingMaster 06/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Attack The Day – Shadows

Attack The Day_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

If you are hankering to be in on the ground level of something potentially very special then check out Northern Ireland alternative rockers Attack The Day and debut release, the Shadows EP. The six track release is a compelling and striking introduction to the County Fermanagh quintet which, though it is early days, suggests it is the beginning of bigger and bolder things. Ripe with varied flavours and imagination bred twists, its rich persuasion comes stocked with strong ideas which are not always fully realised but persistently spark a hunger for more in ears and appetite.

Formed 2012 in Lisnaskea, Attack The Day completed their line-up two years later with vocalist Dáithí Murphy. Since forming the band has been a constant presence on the local live scene subsequently spreading further afield and adding the sharing of stages with the likes of Cadaver Club, Axecatcher, The DMs, and Making Monsters to their CV as well as a tour with Germans Suddenly Human across Ireland and the UK. The release of Shadows is the next potent step in breaking broader attention, and as it consumes and ignites ears with every listen, success is expected here.

The EP opens with Intro, a minute long piece of guitar shaped coaxing which does not startle but certainly has intrigue and attention to what is following aroused. It slips away to make way for Alive, a track instantly bulging with metal seeded riffs and badgering rhythms within an aggression wash of guitar. The vocals of Murphy step into the mix with a raw and aggressive delivery, his unpolished lure soon enhanced further by additional anthemic contributions elsewhere. Tagged as alternative metal/rock band, band and song soon show they are just as rife with punk confrontation and hardcore tempestuousness as well as an inventive want to infuse other slithers and spices of varied styles.

Shadows Artwork_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     Boisterously anthemic, the track is matched and swiftly surpassed by Egyptian. More controlled in its entrance, the song quickly prowls ears vocally and musically as the guitars of Mark Cadden and Donavan McBrien cast nagging unrelenting bait with the brooding bass of Ciaran Fitzpatrick growling around them. As the persistence and intimidation of guitars and Shane McGovern’s heavily jabbing beats continue to brew a thick tempting there is no mistaking an early Therapy? feel to the encounter, especially when Cadden spills some potent sonic enterprise into the brewing tempest. The song simply continues to grip as it leads the listener into the even more impressive Divided.

The third song emerges with a post punk coldness to vocals and tone, the dark resonating bass initially the lone provocateur apart from firm beats before just as chilled tendrils of guitar winds around its addictive bait. Like Babyshambles meets Psychedelic Furs, the song gets under the skin with its infectious charm and inventive tenacity. It never explodes into a tsunami of sound and persuasion but leaves a breathless satisfaction in its wake all the same. The song is superb and if using just one offering to make a choice whether to embrace the band or not, it has everything you need to know about their craft, quality, and potential.

So too has the EPs title track to be fair, its Deftones like breath a lingering seducing within a fiery lure of melodies and sonic endeavour, veined by again a captivating rhythmic whipping up of attention. Though it has a feisty energy, the song crawls over the senses, preying on ears and imagination with increasing drama and explosive almost hostile unpredictability and enterprise, climaxing in an Able Archer like roar.

The release closes with This Is How It Ends, McGovern and Fitzpatrick providing a gripping and menacing canvas to which guitars and the increasingly impressive melancholic tones of Murphy lay their potent craft and expression. This time a feel of the Only Ones emerges, though as across the EP, any references spring from a sound and presence distinct to Attack The Day. The song is a swarm of monotone but endearing textures and a tangy grooving of guitar which also has a foot in eighties post punk and nineties alternative metal, it all adding up to something fresh and contagious.

As suggested earlier, there are elements within Shadows which do not go as bravely far enough as they might but with every listen the EP just grows and impresses more. Attack The Day is a presence to make a note of at the very least but recommended to dive into right now so you catch their ascent from its first wind.

The Shadows EP is out now @ https://attacktheday.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Attack-The-Day/164901066967572

RingMaster 19/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net