Cold Snap – World War 3

CLDS - 2015 Promo Pic - 600x400

It roars, it bellows, and it rages with all the spite found in a pit of venomous snakes, but most of all World War 3 provides a seriously mouth-watering treat to open up 2015’s metal offerings in blistering style. The explosive confrontation of Croatian band Cold Snap, the album is an imagination sparking tempest of groove metal infused with a very healthy dose of nu-metal and various other spicy strains of extreme provocations. It comes with slithers of familiar and recognisable moments and sounds which only add to the drama and pleasure found in its maelstrom of inventive and adventurous enterprise. If you are looking for your first bold purchase of 2015, then World War 3 is a major contender which will not disappoint.

Coming out of Varazdin, Cold Snap formed in 2003 and was quickly into their stride with increasingly impressing live shows which subsequently saw them play with the likes of Disturbed, Suicide Silence, Pro-Pain, Dead By April, Ektomorf and Unearth as well as playing festivals such as Metal Camp, Metal Fest, and Wacken Open Air. There has also been well-received releases increasingly pushing the band’s presence into broader attention, debut EP Mea Culpa of 3005 the forerunner of their albums Empty Promises and Perfection of 2008 and 2010 respectively. Following the departure of guitarist Vlado Soldatek last October, the foursome of vocalist Jan Kerekes, guitarist Leo Friscic, bassist Zoran Ernoic, and drummer Denis Roskaric has driven on with the release of the Tue Madsen produced World War 3 through Eclipse Records. It is an attention grabber from start to finish with the weaponry and ingenuity to awaken the attention and passions of metal fans around the world.

From the first breath of Straight to Hell, song and band are rampaging through ears and brewing up a keen appetite for what is on offer. Rhythms barge and riffs snarl over the senses, only stepping back slightly as the impressive vocals of Kerekes vent with narrative and eventful ferocity. Guitars and drums are soon back to throwing their muscles around though as the song flirts with essences of Mudvayne and Slipknot embroiled with those of American Head Charge. It is a formidable and addictively flavoursome mix given originality by the unpredictable invention and enterprise of Cold Snap. Raging and accusing as it opens up the album’s premise of looking at the ‘end of days’ we live in through every form of our lives, the song is a tremendous start swiftly emulated by the psyche revelry of Carnival. Exploring a (Hed) PE like fusion of groove and punk rap, the song smoulders with intimidating character, expelling furies of waspish grooves and sonic predation. It is a stunning encounter, stalking ears and thoughts with compelling craft and threatening intensity under the rhythmic slavery of Ernoic and Roskaric.

Friscic’s guitar is equally imposing and sonically inflammatory but even more skilled and adventurous within the following Rise Again and its Disturbed meets One Minute Silence stampede CLDS - 9038 cover - 1500of sound and enterprise. As in most songs, every passage and indeed moment comes with a subsequent twist in the flow and imagination of the incitement, here a sultry and tangy croon of guitar the respite in the tempestuous majesty of the aural protest.

The brief and warped rabidity of Unleash Me comes next to intrigue and excite as it leads the listener into the destructive heart of Monster, the unveiling of the danger portentously suggested in the first of the pair. The second track sways and challenges like a heady mix of Skindred, Devildriver, and Limp Bizkit, filtering their strengths into another uniquely gripping and seriously contagious storm of aggression and sound. Every second and aspect of the song ravages and seduces ears; stirring up even greedier appetite for the album, though that is something which applies to every track it is fair to say.

The much calmer atmosphere and thick provocative depths of Dead Guardian continues the diverse nature of the album, its sublime dark caress a gentle coaxing which increases in intensity and anger as the song proceeds to release its controlled but bile loaded roar. It relaxes again but only to start the compelling process all over again. With Kerekes increasingly impressive and extending the variety and adventure of his vocals, the track is a brew of enthralling emotions and antagonism leaving ears and thoughts engrossed and easy prey for the sensational brawl of Doomsday. Opening in a similar vein to how the previous song crooned the senses, it is soon a boiling vat of emotional hostility and raging sounds but psychotic enough to fluidly drop into deranged calm before a great bedlamic mix of various caustic styles. Another major highlight of the album it is matched by the might of Silent Killer, but only after the bewitching cyber haunting of instrumental Freedom has its moment to prey on the psyche and challenge the imagination. Silent Killer opens with riveting guitar bait before launching a Mudvayne seeded challenge vocally and sonically which in turn courts a rhythmic threat and anthemic tenacity spiced with Korn colouring. Again it has to be stated that for all the comparisons what emerges is something fresh, adventurous, and virulently infectious.

The final trio of songs all add to the increasingly impressive stature of the album, Court is Corrupted stepping up first with its venomously pungent bluster and creative rabidity. It is a growling provocateur, intent on enslaving the listener with bruising and vicious craft, something it definitely has no problem succeeding with. Chameleon seizes its chance next to rage across senses already softened elsewhere on the album. Juggling rhythms and rancorous vocals under a mesmeric sonic climate, it is soon throwing off its shackles to stomp belligerently and contagiously whilst establishing another pinnacle in the mountainous range of songs.

The closing My Emptiness unveils a final new twist in the album, its Palms whispered peace the calm before the storm of Machine Head hostility tempered by melodic metal tenacity. The song continues to shift and evolve across its eight minutes leaving ears blissful and thoughts captivated.

Wrapped in just as impressive artwork, World War 3 is a real treat from a band looking ready to stand boldly and confidently in the biggest spotlight of global metal.

World War 3 is available now via Eclipse Records @ http://www.eclipserecords.biz/brands/Cold-Snap.html

http://www.cold-snap.com/

RingMaster 13/01/2015

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Another Dead Hero – Dystopia

Though it makes a potent initial impact, Dystopia does its best persuasion over time, worming under the skin to provide a perpetually pleasing and exciting proposition. It is an album which can be described as being made up of familiar parts but those essences aligning for something fresh and invigorating from a band drenched in potential and riveting creativity. Bands such as Rage Against the Machine and Deftones are constantly and to be fair rightly offered up as references to the sound of Another Dead Hero but it is only part of the imaginative incitement provided by the band, spices twisted into something more distinctive and flavoursome from the UK quintet.

Hailing from Burnley and formed in 2003, Another Dead Hero has spent the subsequent years building and honing their sound whilst infecting the expanse of Britain with their uncompromising creative attitude and adventure. As evidenced by their album, the band has a raw touch and breath to their music, an honesty to their sound and invention which is just as potent as the imagination within it. The live presence of Another Dead Hero has persistently marked the band out, as has their previous trio of albums, but it is Dystopia which it is easy to feel has the key to reach the strongest spotlights.

The dark climate and menacing atmosphere of Intro opens up Dystopia, its electronic jungle intimidating scenery for the imagination to spark against before the piece flows straight into Change The Game. Beats and riffs are soon rummaging in ears before settling into an imposing and formidable provocation. Limp Bizkit spiced vocals and scythes of guitar cross the spine of the song whilst an aggravated persistence breeds in the guitars to pressure ears even more potently. It is a strong and pleasing start which slips into darkened Deftones mellowness before merging both climates along the way. The vocals of Josh Baldwin roar and croon with a flavour of Keith (now Mina) Caputo to their provocative tone and texture, whilst the fierce raps of drummer Gaz Connor and the grizzled tempting to the bass of Craig Robertson snap and growl with dark intent. Added to the guitar antagonism and craft of Daniel Crawshaw and Josh Beckwith, it all makes for a formidable full start to the album with its closing One Minute Silence like finale especially anthemic and biting.

The following Greed grumbles with a heavy breath and intensity from the start, the Rage Against The Machine essence which was a loud whisper in its predecessor steering the stalking brilliance of the track. The instant blaze of sound and anovocals soon drops into a prowling gait led by weighty bass shadows. It is a scintillating passage to the song, again One Minute Silence coming to mind alongside that of Zack de la Rocha and co. It is also a minimalistic attack but gloriously gripping and incendiary for ears and passions as it preys on thoughts and psyche with every dark twist and furious blaze. It is the first pinnacle of the album setting a high plateau for System to aspire to. The song is a muscular and busier offering but still holding a rein on its attack to stroll with threat around the senses. Life of Agony comes to mind as the brief track expels its intensive provocation before making way for the volatile hostility of Bullshit (Voice Of Lies), a furious and confrontational assault unafraid to venture into calmer waters. It as the previous song does not match the early peaks but easily provide compelling and richly satisfying confrontation.

The volatile temperament of I Don’t Care comes next, a song merging the reflective elegance of a Nine Inch Nails and Palms croon with the agitated resistance of RATM and Kennedy Soundtrack. It is a transfixing encounter, a revolving wind of melodic caresses and sonic causticity which entwine for an intriguing and captivating proposition. Its lingering presence is emulated by the next up Infection. As all songs there is a raw and abrasing resonance to its presence which almost haunts the senses as the resourcefulness of the guitars and rhythms explore their individual, and here almost tribal antagonism. Like the album generally, it is not a song to set off a fire in the passions though it has them boiling up nicely, but a song which as its title suggests worms away for lingering and just as potent pleasure.

Stoner presents a more voracious offering, its fuller alternative metal and heavy rock persistence a provocation which veins its bracing bait with melodic mystique and spicy grooving. Grunge flavouring also offers its colour to the song’s landscape, essences of Soundgarden and Gruntruck adding rich hues to the nu-metal/alternative metal exploration. An excellent examination of ears and thoughts it is matched by the weighty energy and depths of Fist Full Of Anger. From a melodic coaxing the song ripples with grizzled basslines and fluid vocals, flexing its sinews and emotional fury with evolving intensity and diversity. It is another which smoulders rather than burns but emerges as an enthralling emotive struggle.

The more than decent ebm/electro fuelled instrumental Control MKII makes a break in the rage of the album, though its air is equally portentous and challenging, before the dark sinister tones of the outstanding Feed Me Your Lies moves in on the imagination and passions. Its gentle but predatory start is hypnotic, smooth vocals and tantalising melodies seducing ears before the track shrugs off its calm for a rugged and thrilling confrontation. The track never explodes, walking that edge before providing another dose of the mesmeric enticement which opened it up, and though the lack of that final spark is missed it cannot stop the track making another dramatic and thrilling statement within the album.

Closing with a fiery and enjoyable remix of Remember This Day, a track from previous 2009 album Generation Zero, Dystopia is a feistily satisfying release. There are times where songs hold a too similar character though it is never long before inventive and exciting twists ignite their canvas, but ultimately the album provides more than enough proof that Another Dead Hero is heading towards the fullest attention nationally and beyond, especially if they find the underlying strain of originality which arguably is still untapped.

Dystopia is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/dystopia/id704561906

http://www.anotherdeadhero.co.uk/

RingMaster 13/10/2014

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Hawk Eyes – That’s What This Is

hawk eyes 2

Following up their last year’s acclaimed album Ideas, UK disorientators Hawk Eyes smack the listener right between the eyes with new EP That’s What This Is. Consisting of four tracks which in many ways take off from where their predecessors left off, the release is a carnivorous tempest of voracious invention and rapacious imagination which sculpts it all into an irresistible blaze of hunger driven energy and merciless confrontation. It is a mighty EP that lends forcibly the notion that the Leeds quartet is one of the UK’s dramatically promising and securely entrenched rock bands.

Originally called Chickenhawk until a couple of years ago, the band took little time to make an impression and inspire thoughts of being a potent force in waiting for the UK scene. Debut album Modern Bodies of 2010 churned up good attention and responses as did their live performances whilst Ideas with a new band name and shift in sound drew the strongest suggestion of the might and promise of Hawk Eyes. Written at the tail end of last year, as were many of the tracks to be found on their forthcoming new album, the PledgeMusic funded That’s What This Is provides a bruising storm of greedy riffs, bone snapping rhythms, and sinew clad rabidity which leaves the lungs low on breath and body caving in from exhaustion.

The opening title track wakes up the senses immediately with crisply swung beats and taunting rubs of guitar before settling into an 1098024_516515751751798_1760845154_nenergetic ride of driving bass riff and punchy rhythms coated in sonic intrigue and punk fuelled vocals. It is a striking encounter which only gets stronger and more potent as it unleashes a blend of punk ‘n’ roll and melodic metal which simply cages the passions into a maelstrom of pleasure and urgent participation. As it rampages the track reminds of the likes of One Minute Silence, Therapy?, and the other similarly musically clad emerging band leading UK heavy sounds, Fuckshovel. It is an outstanding and ridiculously anthemic infection setting the release off at the strongest pinnacle and though as mentioned it feels like a continuation of the previous album it openly brings a maturity and imagination which is a few leaps on.

The tall order to back up such an immense start is given to the kinder touch of Never Never, Just Not Now, a song that leads with less barbed catchy hooks and softer persuading melodies compared to the more savage attack of the previous song, though that is not to say it lacks a bite and the provocation which demands full emotional attention and limbs to cast their energised shadows in unison. With muscular rhythms framing sonic flames of craft and enthrallment and a melodic wash which takes in sound and vocals whilst still providing an acidic taste which intimidates and caresses, the song majestically rises to the challenge set without quite gripping the lip of the level. It does show the wealth and depth of sound and imagination within Hawk Eyes, an invention which does not over play or push anything beyond its use to songs but brings everything into a purposeful intent to provide the sturdiest captivating rock ‘n’ roll, in this case in a body that gives the likes of the Foo Fighters a run for their money.

Cheap has an alternative rock offering to again bring diversity to the release, though yet again the rugged passions of the band make their stirring mark with bestial riffs and cantankerous grooves more than eager to chew on the senses for the smouldering melodies to subsequently soothe. With a raw underbelly and a brawling attitude at its core the song is another jaw smacking treat which with its companions only make the anticipation for the impending album impatient, that lack of want to wait further cemented by closing song More Than A Million. Snarling up the senses in another tirade of ravenous predatory riffs and wickedly entwining grooves alongside a stalking of drums and bass animosity from its premier breath, the track entraps the listener in a web of ravenous sonic mayhem fortified by a rhythmic lashing and scarring guitar brutality, their reins held in the hold of the excellent melodic and passion bred vocals.

It is a thunderous conclusion to an invigorating release which keeps the band on course to head, alongside a few others admittedly, the world invasion of British hard balling rock. Hawk Eyes have their vision firmly set on your passions and That’s What This Is certainly gets the deed done.

www.hawkeyesmusic.com

9/10

RingMaster 19/08/2013

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Reigniting passions and fight: An interview with Yap of One Minute Silence

PIC by Stefan Ferreira

PIC by Stefan Ferreira

 Like so many the return of UK rap metallers One Minute Silence bred a big sense of excitement for us when the band announced their return after a seven year absence a couple of years ago but it was the release of their first new material which came just a few weeks back that things took on real hungry proportions. The Fragmented Armageddon EP  was an absorbing and inciting confrontation that showed the band had lost none of the fire and fight inside its creativity and thoughts. Given the chance to find out more about the returning force we asked vocalist Yap about things like the cause of the ‘hiatus’, the spark that brought the band back, and of course the new EP as well as more politically shaped questions. Here is what he shared with us…

Hi Yap and thank you for sparing time to talk with us at The RingMaster Review.

I know we were not alone in having a strong twinge of excitement at not only hearing of the return of One Minute Silence but your first new release in a decade, the Fragmented Armageddon EP. Did you have any sense of the appetite for your return and hunger for new OMS sounds?

In a small nutshell – I went on a journey to ground myself, and came back grounded. I felt more focused as a person, more grown up.  I had ideas, but everything in the OMS camp is of an organic process, so it was just all about waiting to see what would happened when we regained our collective music head.

Can we first ask about the decision back in 2003 to put the band on the back burner? What was it that brewed and led you to that decision?

Like I said, I needed to go on a journey. I felt squashed in the music industry and in life in general. I was unhappy inside

Was it originally planned as a hiatus with thoughts to return at some point?

I had no thoughts of anything to be honest. I didn’t know what planet I was on, or where I was going. I just dropped the ring into the fires of Mordor and I left.

What filled the time of OMS’s member in the subsequent seven years?

All the guys kept their heads in music. Massy spent a lot of his time learning to produce his own sounds. And Glen, being the musical madman that he is kept himself busy mastering his mile. I subsequently went on to make a couple of albums that fell under the name Pink Punk. It was hardcore slam poetry produced by John Hendicott.

So what triggered your return in 2010 and was it an idea which found a receptive response with you all?

PIC by Stefan Ferreira

PIC by Stefan Ferreira

It was a slow burner in regards to us finding our flow again. We were all fresh in our heads, but on different roads musically. It was just a feeling burning in my belly that I wanted to explore I guess, and the guys felt the same way. It was very refreshing for us in many respects too though; being away from it all for so long and so on. It didn’t feel stale is what I am saying.

Always being a band to provoke and bring political and world issues to the attention do you think the time away brought a new and inspirational fuel to your personal and the band’s fire as much as anything musically seeded to spark your return?

Back in the day I was a young man carrying a lot of internal anger, and this shaped the sound of my words. I feel I am a better fighter now mentally as I carry no anger in my soul. This gives me more focus, and so I hit harder and better than ever before. It has allowed me to throw punches in the Zen sense, and direct my words with more precision if you like.

As the new songs on Fragmented Armageddon shows you do still have that fire in the belly not only musically but lyrically and politically but do you think it is much harder now to make an impact on the younger generation with so many seemingly seduced by the inane reality shows culture and the force feeding of primetime blandness musically and entertainment wise into their psyche?

I think there are a lot of blind people out there, but as the recent student marches have shown, there is also a healthy awakening. I think people are ready now more than ever for the truth. People need to be. The ship is sinking after all, and no one can shout conspiracy when the water is almost above their nose.

Why do you think each subsequent generation over past decades arguably lost the instinct to question and fight the wrongs of society, as the likes of bands like yourselves, Amen, RATM, UK Subs, Refused, Flogging Molly etc. have not lost their snarl and passion to inform and bring things to attention.

Generations have always been a mixed bag. Some listen and take action against the corruption of the day, while others march the line.

Do you think the unrests you pointed at and we are seeing across the globe will eventually translate into something similar in size in the so called more democratic countries like the UK and wake up the sleeping generations?

Chaos is coming. The four horse men are saddling their horses. It’s only a matter of time. We can’t stop what’s coming now. All we can do is our very best in the face of it. Millions will die. There’s nothing anyone can do about that fact. All we can do is keep promoting the truth until we find balance as a species. It’s a long road.

922931_561590037195380_1533141906_nBack to the music, Fragmented Armageddon contains two new OMS tracks, Fruit From The Lie and Pandemic Schizophrenia which immediately squashed any doubts that the band may have lost any of its potency creatively and passionately. Did you have any similar questions of yourselves about that aspect when first reuniting and writing?

To be honest I felt we were ready to write our best music.

There is also open evolution in your invention and sound bringing in new flavours and imagination to the songs, what inspirations or new ideas have you explored this time around with your songwriting and music?

I am glad you noticed. I am a more rounded person now in every respect. I have been out on the circuit trying to bring some of my philosophical ideas into the world arena. I believe I have new ideas that will help open the world of philosophy to a brighter day. My work in linguistics and psychology has brought me to a new door in my head, and once it opened everything changed. Obviously my lyrics would be an extension of my new broader perspectives.

Did the different musical ventures the band’s members investigated in the ‘time off’ also bring fresh avenues for your imagination to contemplate with your new material?

Yes, in many ways. I have a much broader understanding of sound now, as do all the guys in OMS.  However, trying to incorporate our new ideas took time.

Are the two songs a strong representation of what your next album will feel and sound like, can we get excited yet?

Yes, they are a good indicator. We have many great songs in the pipeline. All we need now is the finance to get it all together. Time and timing as Massy likes to say.

Have you approached the song writing and recording of the songs any differently to your previous albums and EPs?

In some respects yes, and it other respects no. It’s very hard to corner it.

Your line-up contains new drummer Martin Davies, how did you link up with him and what has he brought to the band which is not openly clear on the tracks for us outsiders?

Martin has been working with Glen for the last few years, and so Glen brought him to the bands attention. We knew from the first best he was our man. It’s quite astounding to listen to him in action in the studio. There’s nothing he can’t do on the kit.

You are currently working on your new album so can you give any spoilers for us about it?

PIC by Stefan Ferreira

PIC by Stefan Ferreira

It will represent the zeitgeist of our times.

Other than the album what is on the near horizon of One Minute Silence?

We are waiting to see where the wave will take us. It’s all easy and in good flow. We are just a bunch of happy people, and if we get to finish another album, well then great. If we don’t, I will sit in fields pondering the universe regardless.

Once again a big thanks for chatting with us.

Have you any last thoughts you would like to leave us with?

We were touched by the response we got on our return. We hope we find our way back to the live stage. We hope we find our circle in the pit. Peace to all.

Thanks Pete.

Read the Fragmented Armageddon EP  review @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/06/16/one-minute-silence-fragmented-armageddon/

Pete Ringmaster

The Ringmaster Review 23/07/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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One Minute Silence – Fragmented Armageddon

OMSPreachershot_HighRes

On hearing that UK rap metallers One Minute Silence were about to rampage across thoughts and senses again after a seven year hiatus it is fair to say excitement was high and expectations hungry. Just maybe there was also a wonder and fear that the band would have lost their potency through the long break. Listening to new EP Fragmented Armageddon wiped any such concerns away, the release confronting the ear with the power and imaginative attitude sculpted sounds we are used to from the quartet and when played alongside last album, the 2003 released One Lie Fits All, and the likes of the Revolution EP or the single We Bounce, it is like they have never been away. It is an absorbing and inciting confrontation which awakens thoughts and passions and though the release has elements which do leave one a little dissatisfied in the lack of more new material, it is impossible not to  feel even more enthused from its creative tempest.

Since the hold on the band its members have eagerly explored new musical styles within projects set in the likes of folk to electronica and jazz to beat poetry. These are essences which appear to have brought influences and inventive ideas to the new phase of One Minute Silence though their core is still openly rap metal with hardcore/punk grievousness. The band on the evidence of the EP has certainly lost none of its fire in sound and politically inspired narrative neither, lyrically and in attitude but at the same time appear to have stretched into new avenues to express their passions and intrigue the mind and senses. It is hard to make a full declaration of there being new venture to their sound and enterprise and imagination from two songs of course, the planned album to be released next year will confirm if that is so, but it is easy to be assumptive in the strong possibility indicated by Fragmented Armageddon. With original members vocalist Yap, guitarist Massimo Fiocco, bassist Glen Diani linking up with new drummer Martin Davies, One Minute Silence will easily grab attention with their returning release, the collection of new material, re-workings, remixes, and an acoustic track sure to spark up and refresh the greedy appetites which feasted on the band before.

The Freeport Entertainment released EP brings opening track Fruit From The Lie into view through a compelling sonic mist but Fragmented Armageddon EP coveras soon as the recognisable voice and taunt of Diani’s bass and the vocals of Yap encroach the ear everything steps into place musically and emotionally for the passions. As spine-tinglingly distinctive as ever and ripe with that expected sense that band and song are about to leap for the jugular, the track instead takes its time, teasing with chilled atmospheric embraces and melodic dances whilst drums brew up an agitated framework to further captivate and feed on the listeners reactions. Once the explosive heart of the track does erupt air is driven from the lungs and thoughts ignited from the blaze of rapacious energy and provocative lyrical persuasion. The track continues to ebb and flow in intensity and attack but is a continual aggravator of the mind and instigator of unashamed selfishness to hear and feel more from the song, which it delivers with raging invention across its rhythmic barracking and sonically carved melodic fascination.

Second new song Pandemic Schizophrenia opens amidst street unrest and a social emergency call, vocals beginning a raw stance whilst bass and drums spear the scenery with monosyllabic punches. It is a potent warning on the ear with the guitar riling the ambience further as it leads to another contagious bruising laced in a sonic heart driven fire of intensity. Not quite corrosive but defiantly abrasive, the song tantalises and strokes the ear with addictive grooves and predatory imagination whilst the vocals of Yap prowl and incite it all, his delivery at times an acidic torrent of expression which sounds like a mix of John Lydon and Kirk Brandon. Like its predecessor it is a stunning track and ensures the wait for their proposed album is going to be impatient.

The release continues with firstly a reworking of You So Much As Move, a track from the One Lie Fits All album, and two remixes the second of the same song by Fiocco with before it a remix of Fruit From The Lie by Ben Hurd. Though they all feel like fillers to stretch the comeback release they do not hold back on providing satisfaction, the first of the trio a rampant and slightly rabid expanse of atmospheric temptation and carnivorous ravishment. It is shaped with enthralling enterprise and thought, its intent chewing on the senses whilst simultaneously bewitching them into uncaring submission. Though not a fan of remixes here, both tracks do leave a welcome taste in the mouth even if fires are not sparked by their presences, which also applies to the closing acoustic song Early Morning, though again the melodic emotive caress offered leaves sure and undeniable pleasure.

     Fragmented Armageddon is a great return from One Minute Silence which shows them to be as strong and creative as ever. It is also a rich tease for their future album and following stage return. World be warned the impacting storm has not lost its bite.

www.facebook.com/oneminutesilence.band

8/10

RingMaster 16/06/2013

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44 Fires – The False Flag Agenda EP

    44 fires pic 

     44 Fires has brought a confrontation of bruising rock n roll to London and the UK for a while now, the band which just gets better and better with each year and new song they unleash, earning a strong reputation and loyal fanbase for their fusion of metal, alternative rock, and grunge. The release of their new EP, The False Flag Agenda shows that their rise and increasing presence within UK rock is not going to be slowing down any time soon, in fact with the release being as impressive as it is they might just be leading the scene very soon.

The three tracks making up The False Flag Agenda grip the ear and thoughts with skill and invention from the very first second of all their individual declarations, each a snarling and provocative encounter lyrically and sonically leaving long lasting impact and pleasure. That ability to make a lingering mark has been a trait of the quartet since it first formed though the new EP is undoubtedly their finest moment to date. Emerging from ‘a collective desire to return to the musical roots of each of our band members’, 44 Fires took shape in 2011 with the union of guitarist Jay Franklin (War Criminals/The Final Hour/The Duvets & Big Twin) and drummer Aaron Beard (The Final Hour/Latch/HOYB). They were soon joined by vocalist Brian Small who joined from No Silent Order and bassist Dan Turton, since left before the recording of the EP. Infusing a mix of essence from inspirations such as Clutch, Pantera, Rage Against The Machine, Metallica, Alice in Chains into their own distinct ideas, uncompromising politics, and invention, the four piece was soon riling and inspiring audiences and fans whilst earning a growing positive response from the underground media. It has been a rolling brawl of a rise for the band which has grown with each year and will surely explode once The False Flag Agenda rampages through the senses of the country.

Previous songs have always had a hook and eyeball to eyeball intent which has gripped and recruited strong attention but as opener Army Besides Me alone shows, the band has honed it into a potent weapon and persuasion which compares with anyone. The song lays a blaze of guitar across the ear first before the throaty bass of new member Tony Hampton dances slowly upon the grazing. It is an instantaneously inviting embrace soon employing greater sinews through the challenging narrative of Small, his forceful and expressive delivery the perfect vehicle for the intent of the song’s attack, and the ear snapping rhythms of Beard. Not so much in sound but in stance and construct, the song reminds of One Minute Silence and the band easily rival the Americans with this scintillating start. The bass is a persistent incitement throughout the song too, the spine to which the guitar and sonic imagination inflame their enterprise around, all combining for a powerful and enthralling encounter.

The following Idiot unveils an accelerated hunger to its press upon the ear, riffs and rhythms snarling and biting with elevated aggression and intensity soon matched by the vocals of Small. With a contagion soaked chorus making its play not long into the song too, the track stomps with insatiable appetite upon the listener to spark a mutually greedy response in return, the blend of rock and metal with a shifting and unpredictable blaze of enterprise and virulence, ensuring full involvement. Not content with succeeding in seducing the passions to its anthemic cause the song also sneaks in a spicy groove at one point which offers scything discord and delicious venom to brand the connection is permanent.

The band follow up the best track on the release with one which decides rather than stand toe to toe to win the affections it will offer a smouldering lure  with an incendiary potency to its call. Merging a slow suasion of melodic rock and grunge enticement with a spine of metal entrapment, Freedom is the most intense and provocative track on the EP resulting in a presence as distinctly different and equally impressive as the other more direct finger poking riff loaded songs. It is a stirring fire for thoughts and emotions completing an outstanding release which places 44 Fires to the front line of not only underground but we suggest UK metal in general but do not take our word for it check the band out @

http://www.44fires.com

9/10

RingMaster 22/05/2013

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Fuckshovel: This Is What We Are

F

    This Is What We Are is an album you cannot fail to become wrapped up in and find yourself recruited to its defiant brawl of irresistible noise and energy. Unleashed by UK rockers Fuckshovel, the release is a riotous storm of rampant rock n roll with no intent to compromise or accept mere appreciation of its forceful sounds, it is all or nothing and for us it is everything such the compelling and inciting muscular pleasure on offer.

Formed in the back street of London in 2005, Fuckshovel has a striking sound which is so easy to joyfully describe. The quartet stare the listener straight in the eyes with a confrontation brewed from the metallic imagination and might of Therapy?, the defiant pose and infectious punk abrasion of The Ruts, and the raw dirty rock n roll of The Wildhearts. To that you can add essences of early Anthrax and The Adicts but primarily throughout the album the first trio come to mind with the punk quartet the major spice to the music which is undeniably from the distinct ownership of Fuckshovel. The pedigree of the band members included experiences gained through playing with the likes of Cradle of Filth, Decimator, Basement Jaxx, Plan B, and remnants of Phil Lynott’s Grand Slam, the foursome infusing those elements into their new venture. The years since has seen the band share stages with bands such as The Germs, Fucked Up, Jaguar Love, Glen Matlock, and Innerpartysystem, receive an invitation to showcase material at SXSW in Texas to great success and response, as well as receiving acclaim and strong radio play upon the release of debut single Long Time Dead, something equalled by the accompanying video too.

Released on February 18th, This Is What We Are is primed to thrust the band to the widest national recognition well if Fuckshovel cover artworkirrepressible and skilfully contagious sounds are any degree of persuasion and the album has those in thrilling abundance. Recorded with producer Rohan Onraet, the album just barges through the ear from its first note to the last middle finger vocal scowl of the release. It is a merciless tempest of antagonistic rhythms, crippling riffs, and caustic emotive vocal. Opener Germs Of Empire bursts free with drums and guitars fighting each other for attention though both receive the fullest from the first bruising touch they deliver. Once settled into its stride the track brings in the Malcom Owen like vocals of Jon Stone to further inspire The Ruts flavouring already washing over the senses whilst the music spreads into a sinewy rock adventure with attitude and melodic teasing to the fore. It is a fiery encounter which starts the album off at a great height and alone makes the release and band one you want to know much more about.

The Antidote scrapes over the ear next, the scarring riffs of Ian Fisher and enslaving drums of Dave Hirschheimer demanding whilst the glorious throaty bass tones of John Faulkner bring instant submission to their predatory mastery. The track is less distinctive than the first but with ease lays a contagion and beckoning which is impossible to refuse. It takes no time in grabbing the enthused enlistment of feet and emotions whilst unveiling compelling enterprise to keep things unpredictable and inciting, the same claim which can be said of Black, another song which arguably does not venture to far into new territories but is just a thrilling assault of ravenous riffs and sonic teasing. It has a towering presence nonetheless to leave one exhausted at its departure and enamoured in its company.

The first Fuckshovel single and their newest stand side by side and both spark the richest of rapture. Long Time Dead chews synapses with its gnarly bass attack and niggling sonic riffing before unleashing a punk rock furnace of imagination and greedy raptorial addiction. Anthemic and as infectious as lustful thoughts, the track is a near demonic addiction brought through insatiable energy, rampaging sounds, and aggression veined by a bass sound you just drool over. New single Schizophonic is the same viral violation in a different guise. Once again the bass of Faulkner ensnares the heart whilst the sonic manipulations of Fisher leaves the senses twisted in ardour within the numbing result of the barbed beats from Hirschheimer. The punk and rock tempest evolves with the vocals into a presence which consumes and riles willing emotions. It is a riot which can only be devoured again and again.

This Is What We Are is an outstanding debut from a band we can only see becoming a real force in UK rock. Tracks such as the melodically snarling Vegas Nerve, the towering All You Got with its Dead Kennedys like hooks and One Minute Silence aggressive gait, and the violently cajoling Skull and Bones all continue to ignite more unbridled fire and euphoria for the release whilst the closing pair of tracks, the insistent juggernaut 2500 Days and the unruly Portia’s Box without arguably reaching the heights of the rest of the album, impressively close off an impressive and exciting debut. The release is rock n roll at its very best and Fuckshovel the worse antagonistic nightmare for all who like a quiet life.

www.facebook.com/F.Shovel

RingMaster 17/01/2013

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