The Scabby Ghouls – Self Titled

Though horror punk is never slow in providing new excursions to venture six feet under with, of which many bring great memorable pleasure, there have not been quite so many in recent times to truly get the teeth into with sanguinary lustfulness. The Scabby Ghouls and their self-titled debut album is one such incitement, a collection of pulp horror driven devilry to bless any meeting of The Monster Club.

Hailing from Omaha, The Scabby Ghouls have dug up a sound as pop contagious as it is horror bloodied and punk driven; a mixture which if not on the major side of unique is fully immersed in the fresh and irresistible within their first full-length.

The album claws out from its mausoleum with opener Body Surfin’, immediately enveloping ears in dark mischief carrying drama as guitar lures mix with the voluptuous throb of the bass. The rolling beats of Nathan Christensen swiftly join and steer the incursion on ears and imagination as too the instantly alluring tones of vocalist/rhythm guitarist Denise Hazard. In no time the web of temptation becomes an appetite embroiling bedlam of creative mania entangled in the equally unhinged grooves and wires of guitarist Louie Hazard. Like a disembodied hand haunting Christopher Lee, the song stalks and fingers with increasing relish and like the big white lingering below its surface has no qualm about taking a more than welcome bite.

The great start is only escalated by the song named after the band. It too prowls the listener, checking them out before springing to its bold feet and instantly indulging in a rapacious saunter. With an essence which reminds of UK outfit Trioxin Cherry at times, the track is equipped with inescapable hooks and teasing riffs matched in temptation by vocals and the great throbbing bait escaping Alex Steffens’ bass. It all comes with a feral lining which is even more pronounced in next up Midwest Zombies, yet a raw wildness which only seems to enhance the instinctive virulence and catchiness of tracks let alone the individual prowess of the quartet.

Black Dahlia Bombshell is next up and soon eclipses its predecessor with its blood-lusting stalking and the subsequent rousing incitement of its viscera driven chorus. The track is pure horror punk wickedness resembling something inspired by the song books of early Misfits and Frankenstein Drag Queens from Planet 13 but quickly established as individual to The Scabby Ghouls before Dreaddy Krueger unleashes its own viral sonic blood-letting shaped by inescapable infernal hooks, rapacious riffs, and rhythms which twist the body like a puppet.

As potent and manipulative as both songs are, their ability to trespass and make the body do their bidding pales to the dexterity of the EP’s final and best tracks. Road Ragin’ is simply glorious, an insatiable surge of tarmac tearing, contagion loaded rock ‘n’ roll with a chorus which infests vocal chords within its first few words. The incitement musically is just as devious and enslaving while album closer, Knife Fight, is an old school punk nurtured holler taking in all-comers with voracious irritability to its infection loaded rumble.

Anticipation for the next endeavour from a band is nothing new or particularly rare but not often it comes with a side line of drool like that already escaping the wait for the next spook animated horror show from The Scabby Ghouls.

 The Scabby Ghouls album is out now via Out-O-Tune Records; available @ https://thescabbyghouls.bandcamp.com/album/the-scabby-ghouls

https://www.facebook.com/TheScabbyGhouls/

 Pete RingMaster 21/03/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Omaha – Chapters EP

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Creating an emotive weave of melodic and alternative rock with at times a loudly whispering underbelly of post hardcore/metalcore courtesy of the initial sound the band emerged with in2012, UK band Omaha powerfully show they are one fascinating and potential fuelled proposition through debut EP Chapters. It is a vibrant and invigorating encounter which swiftly and with little difficulty grips ears and attention. It also reveals a persuasion which only grows and impresses with greater intrigue and potency over every venture of its provocative textures and intimate passion; so much so that even if Chapters does not quite light the fire in individual passions it will most likely still instil a want to check out the band and their next release without reservation.

As mentioned formed around two years ago, the Leicester quintet has been honing and evolving their sound over the past couple of years, and in tandem continuing to draw and impress fans as well as the music industry along the way. 2014 though was a year where the band’s presence and sound made a potent break through, Omaha signing with American label We Are Triumphant after impressing them on a UK tour and also linking up with Monument Music on a management deal. It is fair to say that things are moving for the British band, a potent step forward which Chapters only reinforces whilst suggesting is just the first step to stronger and broader spotlights.

Thumping beats open up the EP as first track Devilish Acts instantly stakes its claim on ears, an initial bait which with scythes of tangy guitar strikes, has little difficulty raising full attention. This potency only increases and blossoms to greater persuasion as the heavy dark shadows of bass from Arron Bailey and the following vocals of Jack Voss link up with richly enticing acidic guitar swipes and the just as insistent beats of Jake Clark. Relaxing around the full emergence of Voss’ swiftly impressive tones, the music becomes a gentle caress but only for a brief moment before erupting again with emotion and intensity to match the vocals. The track seamlessly slips through inventive scenery of ideation and sonic expression across its appealing canvas, the guitars of Ben Corbett and Freddie Goli showing as much drama as they do craft and adding to an emotive theatre coloured to vibrant effect by the rest of the band.

The impressive start is backed by the weighty presence of Stranger’s Embrace. Throwing a reserved but potently anthemic chorus at the listener amidst an almost prowling landscape of gallery_7_2_42683melodic reflection and emotional angst soon after its start, the song straight away opens another character to the sound and songwriting of the band. Linking pungent and imposing intensity with melodic caresses, it does not quite live up to its predecessor but with a great rhythmic enterprise and open adventure across the whole band, the song only leaves a hunger for more of the same, which Homebound shows little reserve in offering. Making a slower but no less dramatic entrance to the first pair of songs, Voss stretches his impressing qualities yet again whilst the track again without finding that final spark, easily leaves appetite full and thoughts keen to explore more.

It is an urge rewarded in fine style by the outstanding G N D, a song bursting in on a rhythmic swing and soon dancing with a charming melody crooned over by Voss. A slight clarity dousing effect grasps his tones for a great piece of thought in the production, the smothering touch over his energy producing an almost angst ridden urgency from the singer which simultaneously conflicts against and compliments the sparkle of the guitar. The veil is washed away once the song expels its energetic breath, a vivacious landscape of harmonies and melodic expression bonding with Voss and the shadow kissed rhythms thereafter. It is a gem of a track taking top dog honours in the EP but challenged from then on by firstly the impassioned vocal and sonic roar of There’s No Room For Doubt. At times Omaha brings for no more reason than their ability to craft emotional anthems which are as contagious as they are dramatic, thoughts of former UK band Always The Quiet Ones; this song especially spicy in that suggestiveness and quiet captivating.

Chapters closes with the excellent embrace of The Final Scene which features guest vocals from Rebecca Need Menear. The song is a gentle emotion soaked temptation which carries an intimate drama and a tapestry of creative invention in the riveting rhythms of Bailey and Clark and the tantalising web of sonic colour crafted by Corbett and Goli, and the stirring tones of Voss and Need Menear do it no harm either.

Chapters is an exciting and potential walled next step for Omaha, with only the fact that not as many songs make a lingering persuasion away from their company than maybe expected. It is a minor comment though in a thoroughly engaging and engrossing proposition from a band badgering a new stature and bigger success.

The Chapters EP is available via We Are Triumphant from January 20th @ http://omahaofficial.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/OmahaOfficial

RingMaster 19/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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