Escape The Ocean – Internal Landscapes


UK band Escape The Ocean may not at this moment in time have a sound to break down boundaries or set new fires of individuality, but as it pleases and entices within debut EP Internal Landscapes you cannot stop feeling that there is something extra within the craft and imagination of the Kent based quartet which will see them finding their distinct personal voice at some point. The release is an enterprising and accomplished piece of progressive and math rock fusing which leaves a strong depth of satisfaction in its vibrant wake.

Formed in the beginning of 2011, the foursome of vocalist/guitarist Lee Morrison, bassist Glen Savage, guitarist Lewis Monks, and drummer Liam Foy have taken inspirations from the likes of Coheed and Cambria, The Fall of Troy, At the Drive-In, Glassjaw, The Smashing Pumpkins, Tool, Karnivool, The Butterfly Effect, and Primus and created a sound which maybe has a familiarity at times but is undeniably inventive and skilfully crafted. As mentioned Internal Landscapes has something which catches the ear and thoughts and that ignites a definite promise for the band ahead and pleasure now.

From the brief Entry To An Interior, a melodic intro so short it is merely an appetiser for and leading into the following All 942970_469733693114439_161646567_nSigns Point To Yes, the first full track immediately soaks the ear in strong vocals and fiery melodic enterprise from the guitars, their touch acidic around the great vocal delivery of Morrison a strong appealing blaze veined by the rhythmic sinews of Foy who in turn is aided by the throaty prowl of Savage. As the song proceeds and the progressive flames of Morrison and Monks explore the air you feel loud whispers of Mars Volta amidst the impressive venture being craved out. Not the most instant and infectious of the tracks making up the EP but it is nevertheless a strong and inviting start.

One Sided Dice gently enters in next, the elegant caress of guitar a simple yet full persuasion before the emerging twists of invention increases the lure with a less dramatic but still an At The Drive In like similarity. Once again the vocals are a strong factor, the expressive tones of Morrison and the overall emotive narrative finding mutual understanding in the restrained yet potent sounds and energy surrounding its call.  The temperature of the song undulates and increases the nearer to its climax you go but at no point is the sweltering breath and touch of the track less than tempting.

Mesculine Vigil and Exit Wound complete the release, the first like its predecessor a more reserved but passionate encounter. The guitars again cast a colourful sonic painting over the rhythmic canvas, their invention sparking surges of emotional flaming and descriptive evocations whilst the closer from again a Mars Volta like mesmeric start, builds an intriguing weave of arousing textures and potent endeavour. It is a fine end to an equally enjoyable debut. Escape the Ocean may have a way to go to develop their unique voice but for craft and imagination no one is left wanting by Internal Landscapes. This is a band and release which definitely should be checked out.


RingMaster 02/07/2013

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