RingMaster Review Interviews – Death Tribe

For those who may not know who you are, introduce yourselves quickly.

Hello this is Anthony Kaoteon talking to you about my new project Death Tribe as we have released the new album in 22nd of February https://deathtribeofficial.bandcamp.com/releases

Describe your sound in as few words as possible.

It is big. It is intense. It is diverse. It is metal.

Who are your three biggest influences as a band?

Life, Nature and injustice

What’s the meaning behind your band name?

I wake up every day grateful that I am still breathing, and this has given me the motivation to do the best with my time as our time might come at any moment. This is why I decided to create a tribe that reminds themselves of death and how fragile humans are so that we celebrate every single breath.

How did you approach the new album in terms of writing and recording?

I wanted this record to sound diverse and enjoyable from beginning till end instead of having one static genre. This is why you can find tracks from black ’n’ roll, death metal to groove metal and they still stick together like a solid unit which makes it really interesting.

Do you have any personal favourite songs on the release?

Every now and then my favourite changes depending on the mood.

Explain the meaning behind the album title, ‘Beyond Pain and Pleasure: A Desert Experiment’.

Relative to the idea that we might die any second and when you have death on your mind at every choice you realize that there is no pain or pleasure just experiences. Hence the first part of the album title and the second part is paying homage to an event that happened in Dubai where various talents from the region got together to play music regardless of their cultural differences which was an influence for me to have multiple artists on the album.

Do you have a current video in support of its release? Describe the concept of the video.

The video concept is derived from the lyrics and how hollow and shallow life can be. I went for an animated video to best deliver the message.

Do you have any live dates lined up at present?

No.

What are your favourite songs to perform live?

‘Hollow’ and ‘Beyond Pain and Pleasure’

If you could open for anyone, who would it be?

Today it would be great to open for the likes of Behemoth, Gojira and Slayer on their last tour.

Any comical stories from your time as a band you can share with us?

Not that I can think of

Any closing comments?

More music, more metal, releasing KAOTEON third album with Adrian from At The Gates on drums and Linus from Obscura on bass.

Find out more about and from Death Tribe @ https://www.facebook.com/DeathTribe.Official/

Questions by Elliot Leaver

The silent roar of darkness; talking Evocation with Skin Drone

SD_RingMasterReview

Within the metal underground, it is fair to say that anticipation for the debut album from US band Skin Drone has been increasingly eager in many quarters. The web based project is the creative union of vocalist/multi-instrumentalist Erik Martin of Critical Dismemberment and multi-instrumentalist/producer Otto Kinzel from Chemical Distance and the founder of Bluntface Records. Next month sees the release of debut album Evocation; a proposition offering emotionally and lyrically dark tales as raw and caustic as they are seductive and elegantly evocative. The album pulls the listener into ravenous experimental landscapes of imposing shadows and emotional turmoil shaped by a fusion of extreme, industrial, and avant-garde metal with provocative ambiences, to simplify it all. It is powerful and invigorating, and the source of a hunger to dig deeper into its heart. So with big thanks to Erik and Otto, that is what we have done as we explore the world of Skin Drone…

Hi Guys and thank you for sharing your time with us.

Can you first tell us how you both met?

Erik: We met through Operation: Underground [a compilation album on Blutface Records]. Critical Dismemberment was on that release and Otto mixed/mastered the song for us. From there, we became good friends throughout the months and when Otto approached me about Skin Drone, there was no way to say no.

Otto: After Operation: Underground, which my label Bluntface Records released, I started working with Critical Dismemberment much more and they eventually joined the label. So by that point I had already been talking with both Erik and Chase Fincher (who did all the mixing & mastering on Evocation) for some time. I was always impressed by both of them and we all became really good friends. Erik and I have a lot in common so I think we naturally connected on a musical and personal level. When I asked Erik if he’d be able to help me out with vocals on some songs he jumped at the chance. That first song was what ended up becoming Witching Hour, and Erik hit a home run with it! I was so blown away by what he wrote and performed that I knew we had to pursue this more. Long story short, here we are. And it’s funny because even though Chase isn’t a “member” per say of Skin Drone, he played a huge role in the final product because he’s the one that brought the tracks to life when he mixed the album.

As you have already touched on, you are both heavily involved in other projects, solo and with others, and Otto you with running Bluntface Records too; so when did the seeds to the actual project of Skin Drone first arise?

Otto

Otto

Otto: I had been trying to get a variation of Skin Drone off the ground for probably a year or so prior to hooking up with Erik. And I had basically no luck whatsoever. So when I started working with Critical Dismemberment, and subsequently got to know Erik and Chase better I knew that there was special talent there. As I mentioned, Witching Hour was the first song we collaborated on together. I had a rough demo with just guitar and drums recorded when I sent it to Erik to try his hand at it. I never had a serious vocalist attached to this project and the whole thing was basically dormant in my efforts to get it off the ground. Erik came back with a very impressive performance and lyrics, and I was blown away. I specifically remember thinking “damn, if we can make this work, even with 1,000 miles between us, we might be onto something really special”. And the momentum kept building with each song afterwards as both of us got more comfortable working & writing with each other. The chemistry was very natural; I don’t remember ever really having to “force” anything in the creative process.

What was the initial spark and indeed the moment where you knew it was going to work?

Erik: For me it was hearing the final mix of Witching Hour when we first started. It just felt right and when we really started to venture out into the experimental with Shepherd Of The Damned, we ran with it and embraced the sound we were crafting, that for me cemented that we were a force to be reckoned with.

Otto: Shepherd of the Damned was the first song we did where there were multiple changes in the timing, and in the overall feeling of the song. The levels of dynamics in that were tricky to start but once we had the final version, I think we both knew we had stepped our game up a notch.

Did you set out with a particular intent and direction for Skin Drone or let things organically arise?

Otto: Everything that happened was organic. Sure, we tried to push in a particular direction. At first I think we just wanted to pursue the technical death metal type of sound. But funny enough, the more we “tried” to push for one specific style, the more things spun out of control and took on a life of their own. It was fairly early on that we realized that we needed to just “run with it” so to speak, and however the songs came out is how they came out. It’s hard to explain because so much of it was done by “feel”; but everything was organic.

As you mentioned you live hundreds of miles apart and more. So I am assuming a physical coming together for the project is near to impossible, so how does the writing and creating process work between you online?

Erik: Usually it starts off with a demo that we toss back and forth a few times until we have something that we feel out did what we accomplished with the last song. Some take longer than others but for the most part it is no different than writing in the same room; the only difference being that when we are communicating our ideas to each other, we have to be very clear as to what we are trying to achieve sonically. There is always the potential if we are having an off day that it could derail the entire song, but we always catch ourselves before that happens.

Is this a time consuming process in the creation of songs and do you work on them one at a time or work away on numerous tracks at the same time?

Otto: I’d say no more or less of a time consuming process that what a “regular” band goes through. Some songs naturally take longer than others to complete but as a whole we work at a very efficient pace. That’s because both Erik and I each do a lot of work on our own time to develop our parts and work thing out, before presenting them to the other person. And yes we’ll typically have a few songs continuously in the works. For me it helps because if I’m stuck on a certain song or just not having any luck then I can go work on something else, and still make progress without holding the whole project up.

Erik_RingMasterReview

Erik

You have just released your striking and enjoyably often disturbing debut album, Evocation. How long has it been in the making?

Erik: If memory serves me correctly, we wrote the first song in autumn of 2014 and finished the last one in the beginning of summer in 2015. It was then gone back over and mixed/mastered in the winter of 2015. We have the luxury of being able to take our time and not have to a label or pay for studio time, I feel like that lack of pressure really shows in the music.

Is it a project which has had to grow around other commitments or were you able to create it in a period of no other musical distractions?

Erik: For me, I had just finished my parts on the Critical D debut, so for 99% of this, I was musically not distracted.

Otto: I had no distractions musically. I always try to make sure I can give 100% focus and energy to the material when I’m in writing /recording mode.

Can you give some idea to its themes?

Erik: The themes are mostly centred in occultism, rituals, witchcraft, paganism and even some calling out thieves in organized religion. There are also certain personal elements hidden in plain sight, but we leave those to the listener to decide what is fiction and what is real life. It adds a level of mysticism that we build upon musically.

I was going to ask about that; as much as it trespasses the senses and psyche, there are just as evocative moments of melancholic beauty and intimate psychosis to songs. So to push for more insight, how much of their inspiration and exploration comes from the emotionally personal side and experiences of you two, lyrically and musically?

Erik: Lyrically during the writing process I was in a very dark place. Dealing with vices and very confused on what life even meant; that included the people in it. You could liken it to just doing what I had to do in order to keep breathing. All that translated to some of the darkest and angriest lyrics I had ever written. The best example of this is Salvation. That song is about a spirit that drives his killer insane and ultimately kills him and makes it all look like a ritualistic suicide. If you really pay attention to the lyrics, you start to see a very personal story of being consumed by something and the only way out is death it seems.  There are examples of this spread out through the entire album; it is all just up to everyone’s individual interpretation of the lyrics.

For us Evocation is the darkest most invasive nightmare, yet equally at times, a shadowed but understanding emotional affair between listener and song. How much was this deliberately sculpted and again how much an organic evolution?

Otto: From my perspective, watching how Erik was so methodical; in his approach to writing the lyrics and developing the themes, I would say it was deliberate. He did a wonderful job orchestrating how it all went together, like an architect. For the music and the basic song structures, all of that was organic and natural. But when it came time to add the lyrics and really focus in on shifting the songs into their “final” state, Erik was the guy commanding the ship. I know how personal and painful a lot of these lyrics are to him and I’m so impressed with his commitment to the art.

There is also a real cinematically ambient feel to some parts. This is a style in your composing which you might explore more, or already may have?

Erik: The cinematic effects (I hope) remain a staple of our sound. Already in writing some rough ideas for record two, those ambient parts will go along with the heavy parts and we will throw in some curveballs when it comes to the time changes and the melancholic parts of the music. I think we are hungrier to really explore the depths of what we can do sonically and evolve as a band.

Skin Drone - Evocation _RingMasterReviewAs we mentioned earlier, you both have other projects which between them I can say have given some of our favourite releases in recent times. When you get an idea for one, is there now an element of stepping back and looking to see if it might fit better with say Skin Drone or vice versa?

Erik: 100% of what I write in my solo project is open for us to try and make a Skin Drone song. You just never know when you put something together that you think will not work actually turns into something that makes the record. Sometimes stepping back from the craziness for a day or two can yield some badass results.

Otto: I had some random riffs and drum patterns kicking around here and there, that for one reason or another just never got used. It was fun to go back and rediscover some of that stuff. I record tons of music, almost every day. So I have a huge catalogue of material that runs the gamut from metal and industrial to dark ambient and more instrumental/score type of compositions. Most of this I just do to capture an idea so almost everything is unfinished and in a “demo” type of state. But I like being able to capture an idea and then have it saved, so someday later on if I find a place for it I can go back and see if it works.

There is no escaping the raw and bold kaleidoscope of styles within Evocation either. What are the artists or flavours which have most inspired your own inventions would you say?

Erik: For me it was a lot of Deconstruction era Devin Townsend Project. Another I was reminded just recently was the Declaration album from Bleeding Through; most notably the song Sister Charlatan. The heaviness along with orchestral parts was really my first taste of the two blended together and since then has always been something I’ve wanted to incorporate into music. Lastly, Landon Tewers who uses a lot of ambience and really dark imagery with his lyrics was a huge influence. He was my introduction onto whispering vocals and I absolutely loved it.

Otto: Pink Floyd, Frank Zappa, Mike Patton and almost all of his various bands, Ministry, KMFDM, Obscura, Gorguts, Nirvana, Kyuss…those are a just a few. If you give me long enough I can come up with a ton of stuff haha.

What comes next for Skin Drone and yourselves individually?

Erik: For Skin Drone, it’s riding the album cycle until there is no more gas in the tank and then some. After that we probably take a short break and get back into writing the next record with our foot mashed on the gas. With Critical D on hiatus, Skin Drone is my one and only focus.

Otto: Like Erik said, we’re going to promote the hell out of Evocation until there is literally nothing left to promote. We’re prepared to work as hard as we’ve ever had to work in our lives to get the music out there and make sure people hear it.

After that? I think we’ll take a short rest so we can recharge our creative batteries and then jump right back into writing the next album. We already have some rough ideas kicking around for themes.

Once again many thanks for chatting with us. Anything you would like to add?

Otto: Evocation drops June 14. Please pre-order your copy at http://skindrone.bandcamp.com/releases!

Check out our review of Evocation @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/05/10/skin-drone-evocation/

https://www.facebook.com/skindrone   https://twitter.com/SkinDrone   http://www.bluntfacerecords.com/

Pete Ringmaster

The RingMaster Review 19/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Absorb – Vision Apart

Absorb_RingMaster Review

There are a few metal bands around the globe with the name Absorb, but certainly standing out in sound alone are the German death metallers carrying the title. Emerging back in 1989, the Bavarian quartet released a pair of demos before splitting up in 1994 but thirteen years later, founders Pfisty and Jochen reformed the band with new and fresh ideas bubbling up to take a sound already unafraid to twist and evolve its death metal seeding, to new potent places.

With a new line-up in place around the original pair, Absorb released Dealing with Pain in 2010 to strongly welcoming reactions from media and fans alike. As their live presence embraced shows with the likes of Obscura, Cannibal Corpse, Pestilence, One Man Army, Sodom, Vader, Hatesphere, The Black Daliah Murder, Morbid Angel, and Arch Enemy amongst a great many over recent years, more personnel changes were gone through, eventually leading to the current line-up of vocalist Volker and bassist Daniel alongside guitarist Pfisty and drummer Jochen who now the unleash the band’s new EP Vision Apart. A gnarly tempest of four diversely flavoured extreme metal furies, the release is a ravenous and rabid confrontation suggesting that Absorb, who recently signed with GlobMetal Promotions, have tapped into a vein of creative venom that could awaken broad attention.

Vision Apart Cover Final_RingMaster Review    The EP starts with a predatory gripping of ears through Perfect Whore, nagging riffs a perpetual tempting as vocals and drums descend greedily on the senses. With the bass a more reserved but no less potent protagonist in the mix, grabbing its moment to grumble within breaks with toxic prowess, the track climbs over the senses and imagination like a serpent. The sonic tendrils of the guitar are as seductive as they are venomous, still flirting with virulence as hostile eruptions unite in a bruising tempest. The track is a superb start to the EP, death metal infused with slithers of other varied metal and noise induced invention.

The following Los Muertos de Hambre is just as flavoursome within its carnal turbulence, again acidic grooves and alluring riffs veining the smog of sonic intensity. Clean vocals bring another enjoyable colour to the forceful prowl, their delivery adding a scent of heavy metal to the creative savagery. Though not quite matching the plateau of its predecessor, the song is a fascinating tapestry of styles and fluid ideas, something definitely fresh and appetising to the more formula genre releases escaping this past year.

The song Undead springs with a similar breeding to the previous track, but quickly revealing its own insidious character in presence and imagination with an impressing mix of vocal enterprise again adding weight and texture to the track. With the bestial sounds at its core and Volker’s great guttural delivery a glorious violation as addictive as the whirling sonic lacing of guitar, the track opener fires up the ears and passions with instinctive ease before making way for closing incitement World Stops Turning.

The final track stalks to the thrash seeded backdrop of driving riffs and rhythmic barbarism interspersed with slower meanders, creating the most destructive and cancerous moment on the release, and another seriously riveting trespass to get involved with. Like Vision Apart as a whole, it is hard to say major originality is being cultivated but the freshness to it all, and the blending of contrasting flavours creates something highly enjoyable and different to contemplate.

Their name might be relatively common but certainly Absorb’s sound has a personality of its own which is very easy to suggest trying out.

The Vision Apart EP is out now.

https://www.facebook.com/Absorbmetal   http://www.absorb-metal.eu/

Pete RingMaster 03/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

XUL – Extinction Necromance

Photo Credit – Jenna Hindley, Midnyte-Sun Photography

Photo Credit – Jenna Hindley, Midnyte-Sun Photography

Extinction Necromance is a release which wholly captivates whilst hitting the listener with a tsunami of malevolent sound and intent. Consisting of four tracks covering thirty minutes, the EP is a barbarous affair which at times defuses or certainly overshadows the invention and diverse textures within its depths through a continual tirade of vocal and emotional hostility. There is no hiding place from the encounter either, except the off button, but its creators Canadian metallers XUL, ensure that is never an option with their craft and fascinating enterprise.

XUL hails from Vernon, British Columbia and cast a merciless trespass of blackened death metal upon the senses. Influences to their intent include the likes of Behemoth, Dissection, Immortal, Emperor, and Watain, strong flavours noticeable in the band’s sound but without leaping miles away from such inspirations XUL has woven the spices into a sonic narrative built on the sole character of their imagination. Formed in 2008, the quintet released debut album Malignance four years later, a well-received encounter stirring up Canadian extreme metal especially across the Western side of the scene country, a recognition reinforced forcibly by the band’s live presence which has seen them share stages with the likes of Obscura, Exhumed, Vreid, Kampfar, Woods of Ypres, Macabre, Withered, Cephalic Carnage, Archspire, and 3 Inches of Blood. New EP Extinction Necromance sees the band explore their darkest depths and most malevolent emotions, filtering all into intensive examinations of ears and psyche.

It begins with Frozen, We Drown, an immediate consumption of the senses through prowling riffs and grooves punctuated by lurking rhythms. There is also an underlying swing to the opening baiting of ears, a trait which is regular bait whether in a gentle melodic persuasion, a rugged rampage, or an unbridled savaging. There is also thrash bred virulence at the start which with the rabid sonic intensity subsequently evolves into a melodically scenic landscape of constantly developing climates and unpredictable intent. The track continues to shift and switch its attack and sound, merging murderous sonic and rhythmic affairs with almost seductive hugs of calm and evocative suggestiveness. XUL’s sound, as each song upon the EP, is not suitable for a lightweight consumption. It is with continual examination that the busy terrains and almost insidious nature of the aural tapestries unravel for increasingly dramatic and impressive proposals. That is not to say it is not a potent first introduction made, just a matter of almost too much to digest and get a handle on initially.

Album Artwork done by Remy C. of Headsplit Design

Album Artwork done by Remy C. of Headsplit Design

It does ensure every listen is a slightly different and fresh adventure too, epitomised by the following Orbit of Nemesis. It rises from the release with a heralding fanfare of horns and celestial harmonies, the epic air suggested in the orchestral hints of its predecessor in full regalia here. Like a majestic bird soaring into an expansive and thickly coloured atmosphere the track sparks the imagination but like the same being swallowed by the jaws of a violent storm, the expressive opening of the track is devoured by a bestial sonic explosion. The band surges over the senses from within that assault; volleys of violent beats from Lowell Winters the spearhead of a hellacious onslaught brought by the bass predation of Marlow Deiter and rabid guitar causticity from Wallace Huffman and Bill Ferguson. With the raw primal tones of vocalist Levi Meyers leaving their own inhospitable residues in ears too, it is a gripping fury taken to greater heights by the toxic but sonically invigorating grooves and shards of melodic imagination spilled by the fingers of Huffman.

As the first track, though maybe not as openly tangible, there is an evolving aspect to the raging and another swing to its vicious stroll, an ingredient which marks each song in varying ways and degrees as shown by third song Chaos Requiem. Rolling in on a ‘gentler’ gait and intent than its excellent predecessor, the song is soon sledgehammering the senses as guitars weave a tempting lure of melodic intrigue and expression. The turmoil is exhausting, ensuring that the brief respites when they emerge feel like oases in the merciless storm. It is increasingly gripping and an intensive incitement which as mentioned needs time to fully explore but more than rewards the effort.

Final track Summon the Swarm coaxes with the calm of water and a reflective melody before unleashing sonic and rhythmic carnage, but a tempest openly and precisely sculpted by each element of the band. It also delivers a thick anthemic lure alongside its punishing tirade of sound and voice, the track at times as intoxicating as it is corrosive as it frees a maelstrom of emotion and musical drama, especially in the closing ravishing of ears.

The more time Extinction Necromance is given the more it impresses, an undeniable success which marks XUL out as a band to watch closely as they surely start luring in a more global attention, starting right here. It might not quite be the best blackened death metal protagonist you will meet this year but it will be the one of those enticing the most repeats plays.

Extinction Necromance is available from May 19th @ https://xulmetal.bandcamp.com/album/extinction-necromance

http://xulofficial.ca/   https://www.facebook.com/Xulband

RingMaster 19/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Ophidian I: Solvet Saeclum

Technical death metal is having an impressive flourish of releases right now with already the outstanding new album from The Faceless and the excellent more progressively toned release from Over Your Threshold having enthralled the ear these past few weeks. Now there is a third to excite and intrigue the debut album from Icelandic metalers Ophidian I. Though it feels like an apprentice alongside the two mentioned in some ways, Solvet Saeclum is an impressive and powerful release exuding great promise and dealing in nothing but satisfaction. The album takes no prisoners but once within its muscular grip, its nine tracks light up the senses with skill and enterprising invention. Arguably it is not bursting with the most groundbreaking sounds but it is hard to fault its imagination and passion.

Formed in 2010 and featuring members of Severed Crotch, Beneath, and Angist, Ophidian I were soon in the studio recording demo tracks, the band returning to Studio Sýrland in Iceland for the recording of their album the following year alongside Jóhann Ingi (Beneath). The band signed with Russian record label SFC Records the same year as plans were laid for their debut to be unleashed in 2012. Now it is here, it is an album which shows all the rewards of hard work and intricate detail, its sound a compulsive consumption which leaves sonic trails in the air with its melodic technicality and bludgeons flesh through aggressive intensity.

The release opens with the guitar fingering of Mark Of An Obsidian, its introduction a slow tease upon the ear and a breath which is warm and welcoming. As the guitars unveil their sonic heart the track evolves into a surging onslaught of barbaric riffs and combative rhythms. Drummer Tumi is a storm of crippling beats whilst bassist Þórður prowls the track with an evil glint to his play, both combining to bring a menace and depth to the expressive technical skill of guitarists Símon and Unnar. With the vocals of Ingó a guttural fury throughout song and album, it is a mighty confrontation the band offer behind its progressive artistry, though the song does not explore this element as much as later tracks do but still offers a mesmeric heat within the sprawling oppressive energy.

Shedyet followed by the title track, both stretch themselves more than their predecessor as the band get into their creative stride. The first of the pair surges between rampant attacks and dazzling prog lilted asides which make seamless and evocative interludes between the overall enveloping tempests of intensity. It is a beast on the prowl despite its eager attacks whereas the following Solvet Saeclum leaps at the senses with an incessant eagerness and sharp ideation to ensure nothing but focus and interest in its direction.

All the songs are strong and inventive brutes but the trio of Tectonic Collapse, Ellipse, and Ethereal Abyss, stand apart from the others. The first is a serpentine violation which festers within the senses with corrosive inventiveness. It is abrasive and disorientating through its ravenous intense energy and heady melodic conjurations, the guitars twisting the air with ingenious blackened skill and mischief whilst the rhythms chew on the ear with unrelenting aggression. It is the outstanding track on an impressive album though the other pair are not left wanting in their effectiveness. Ellipse is a technical mischief to excite and ignite the heart whilst Ethereal Abyss is a song with a maelstrom of flavours to its glorious body, its death cored heart veined with jazz and progressive essences which entwine around a black metal groove. Arguably it is the most inventive song on Solvet Saeclum and only enhances the deep promised the band and release inspire.

Solvet Saeclum is a great release which fans of the likes of The Faceless, Necrophagist, and Obscura will lap up. Ophidian I may not have reached the top rung with their album but with a release this strong it is certainly on the cards at some point.

www.facebook.com/OphidianI

RingMaster 28/08/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Over Your Threshold: Facticity

Facticity, the debut album from German progressive death metalers Over Your Threshold, is one of those intricate little beasts which need multiple ventures in its company to appreciate and discover all of its aural nooks and sonic crannies. It is a striking and adventurous release to occupy the senses with accomplished skill and strong invention. Personally it did not admittedly ignite a frenzy of adoration but without doubt made the hours in its company compulsive, refreshing, and ultimately rewarding.

Over Your Threshold was formed in 2006 by guitarists Lukas Spielberger and Leonhard P. With drummer Julian Matejka joining the following year the band started drawing attention with their live shows which saw them support the likes of Obscura, Deadborn and Hokum locally. Their self released debut EP Progress In Disbelief caught many an imagination in 2008 as the progressive infused death metal the band was exploring found more eager recipients. With bassist Christian Siegmund having joined in 2009, the quartet entered the studio in 2011 to record Facticity. The result a release which is a technical and aggressive storm which finds an equal balance to bruise and light up the ear with ease. With the added guest skills of Steffen Kummerer (Obscura, Thulcandra) and Jonas ‘JoeC’ Fischer (Hokum, Ex-Obscura) bringing their own craft to the album, it is a release of enterprise and passion. Since its recording Leonhard P has left the band to be replaced by guitarist Kilian Lau and new vocalist Ludwig Walter.

Released through Metal Blade Records, the album goes for the throat from the off with opener Cortical Blindness and its synapse juggling manipulations and ear plundering riffs. The track mesmerises and disorientates masterfully and though it emerges as not the heaviest assault to appear on the album, it is a challenging and satisfying introduction. The guitars and rhythms instigate whiplash at times but also ‘croon’ the senses into a gratified state with their blend of pace, energy, and intrigue. Immediately the song also reveals the stunning invention of bassist Seigmund. His fretless bass, additive lines and obvious skill a hypnotic conjuration, the work of a bedlam spawn predator with fine control and even deeper imagination.

The following Contextual Fluctuating and Obscure Mind Stasis bring darker shadows with their presence. The first is a blackened consumption which within its dazzling melodic weaves, has a menacing and corruptive heart. The second song has an even more malevolent breath to unsettle and taunt the ear but again the melodic soundscape of ideas and guitar is a flourishing shaft of warmth permeating the dark corners. The drums alongside the bass are ominous and commanding, framing all the impressive invention within their muscular arms tightly. It is a magnificent track which steals top honours, just.

As tracks like Self Exhibition, Body Part Illusion, and Antic, descend and feast the ear with excellent musicianship and unmistakable invention, Facticity only pleases more and more. There is never a moment one can sit back and just immerse within a song as there is so much going on, though never to excess. This means as mentioned earlier, many returns to the release are needed to fully grasp its wealth, the continued effort though always enjoyable and rewarding. The third of this trio of tracks is another exceptional song which lights up the air with its electric contagion. It offers the most intensity and threat to be found on the release, its heart snarling at the senses with a vicious hunger. As ever though, the melodic and startling progressive play is rife and magnetic within the sprawling oppressive weight.

Over Your Threshold have created an album which is immensely impressive and gratifying, though as mentioned for some reason it did not fire up enough passion to elevate it the highest plateaus of acclaim. But as that well used line goes, Facticity, it is not you it is me.

https://www.facebook.com/overyourthreshold

RingMaster 28/0/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Spawn of Possession – Incurso

Having heard impressive things about Swedish technical death metal band Spawn Of Possession there was an added intrigue about the eagerness that accompanied the venture into the new album from the band, Incurso. One can read a never ending flow of words in praise but it is only when the sound and creativity hits you that you understand the height or depth of a band or their release. Nothing indicated the stunning and immense power, uniqueness, and pure imagination that were to unfold as Incurso laid its wizard spawn artistry and ingenuity upon the ear. First listen has one staggering under the sheer weight of diversity and inventiveness not to mention the all consuming intensity, but given further attention and shared experiences the album becomes part of everything, as potent as breathing and as lingering as death.

       Incurso is the third album from the band and their debut on Relapse Records. The five year wait has been long for their fans to endure and an unpredictable time for the band with multiple line-up changes sine predecessor Noctambulant. Last year saw the combined might of guitarists Jonas Bryssling ( last remaining band founder) and Christian Müenzner (Obscura, Ex-Necrophagist, Ex-Defeated Sanity), bassist Erlend Caspersen (Deeds Of Flesh, ex-Blood Red Throne), drummer Henrik Schönström (Unmoored, ex-Torchbearer), and former drummer Dennis Röndum who moved to fronting the band with his inspired vocals, emerging and together conjuring and album which not only sets the senses aflame but manipulates and toys with them like maniacal puppeteers.

It really is hard to describe the majesty and incredible technical skill as well as the pure organic feel the band creates on the album. Incurso is a release that hits you instantly but also takes time unveiling all of its qualities and deeply rooted additive grip. Whether listening to it for the third or thirteenth time something new finds its way into the ear bringing each listen a surprising and new experience taken with a close hearted friend. Repeating dreams or nightmares offer something new with each venture into your sleeping state, Incurso does the same bringing new shadows and light with malicious twists each and every time it fingers your senses and consciousness.

The release opens with instrumental Abodement, a piece which is for them relatively straight forward but opens up the ear with a skilled musical weaning before taking one into the maelstrom of intrusive delights ahead. Where Angels Go Demons Follow takes no time getting down to business, its guitars slicing through the ear with crafty intricate skill and maximum venom whilst the slightly reserved rhythms rather than blast its victim wears them down with incessant niggling. The bass plunders the nerves with intimidating riffs whilst Röndum spews out his intent and words with the blackest malevolence. Combined they pilfer the senses of feeling until they lie numb and shell shocked under the intense testing. This is only the second track; you can imagine how one feels as the closing threat of Apparition takes its leave.

As songs like The Evangelist, a track which spatters the ear with intensive rhythms and provocative riffs whilst meandering through scorched diversity, and Deus Avertat rupture and expel a sonic beauty and devastation upon every corner of the mind and body, the album just grows in greatness and more power. The second of these two songs courts the mind with acidic intrusions whilst leaving it with bruised contusions from its unrelenting complex and sophisticated senses blowing conjurations. From beginning to end the album ignites and fires up so many emotions and thoughts to match its vast cacophony of ingenious creativity, songs like Servitude Of Souls and No Light Spared as triumphant as those already mentioned.

Imagine the likes of Obscura, Gorod, Uneven Structure, and Meshuggah boiled down to a puree and then added to something distinctly different and you get Spawn Of Possession. Incurso is a monstrous beast, and as it annihilates and blisters the senses with its technical brutality and sophisticated creativity it takes them into new realms and pleasures, lighting them up and eager for more and more of its violations. The album hits hard and fast inviting you to spend more and more time in its devious arms, but the delights it gives when you succumb are beyond measure, try it!

RingMaster 09/03/2012

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