Loose Fit – Self Titled

If we had taken the time to contemplate a fusion of the essential juices of bands such as The Raincoats, Essential Logic, Au Pairs, and Noseholes we might have conjured up something not too far removed from the pleasure now brought to ears by Australian post punks Loose Fit. In saying that though, the Sydney quartet has an openly distinct voice in sound and enterprise, it all in thrilling evidence within a self-titled debut EP.

Formed by vocalist/saxophonist Anna Langdon and drummer Kaylene Milner, fashion school friends who had bonded over their mutual love of experimental music, Loose Fit soon found itself taking creative shape with the addition of guitarist Max Edgar and bassist Richard Martin. Across 2019, the band earned a rich reputation for their live presence as they captivated a growing mass of fans around the release of their first single, Pull The Lever, earlier this year. It was a track which only enticed eager acclaim and support and they can expect more of the same through their irresistible EP, a “moody critique of the absurd” taking on themes of frustration, disillusion, fear, love, and rage.

That first single opens up the EP, Pull The Lever instantly gipping attention through the hulking drawl of Martin’s bass. Within a breath it sparks the groove and swing of the track, beats skipping alongside to escalate the temptation as the guitar teases from behind, it becoming more vocal and manipulative as Langdon’s voice with a spicing of disdain to its lilt again increases the organic addictiveness of the track. The infectiousness of the song has a touch of The Mo-Dettes to it, a punky contagion eagerly aligning to the post punk virulence just as rapaciously inspiring body and inspiration.

Riot is next up, surrounding the senses in a sonic mist before again the bass leads a voracious dance for song and body to launch themselves upon. Langdon’s vocals again mix confrontation with eager catchiness; attitude soaking both as Milner’s rhythms spring their voracious swing and Edgar’s guitar infests it all with a sonic ravening while the synth of Jonathan Boulet adds its lure.

As the first song, it proves a seed in an inescapable addiction quickly brewing which is only further stoked by the following pair of Reflux and Black Water. The first saunters in on another gripping bassline, Langdon’s sax chirping away alongside before matching its groove with its own cunning stroll. It had us hook line and sinker within seconds, only tightening the hold as again Langdon with Milner flirtatiously taunt ears with their Delta 5-esque vocal union. The second is the band’s new single and it too was soon preying on a readily given submission to the EP’s manipulations. There is a whiff of The Slits to the outstanding encounter, a spicing which only accentuates its calm but feral majesty.

The EP is concluded by Delete, a track enticing ears with the caustic persuasion of guitar and the glowing discordance of the sax, that alone enough to spark a lusty attention only spiralling with the grungy gurning of Martin’s bass and Langdon’s persistently persuasive and alluring vocals.

The EP is superb, manna for our post punk appetites with plenty more in character and sound to feast upon. We are sure we will not be alone.

The Loose Fit EP is out now via FatCat Records: available @ https://loosefit.bandcamp.com/album/loose-fit

https://www.instagram.com/loose___fit/

Pete RingMaster 18/04/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Noseholes – Ant And End

 

 

Such the dark majesty and ravening twisted exploits of debut album Danger Dance last year, we found it hard to imagine that Noseholes could eclipse its striking character and triumph. Well with its successor the German outfit has done just that whilst taking their sound into new intrigue loaded, virally compelling devilment. Ant And End has not wiped the floor with its illustrious predecessor but built on all its dark and aberrant brilliance to forge a whole new and sensational Noseholes escapade so easy to greedily devour.

Within a sound bred from the voracious instincts of post punk, no wave, and anomalous disco, the Hamburg hailing quartet of Henk Haiti, Steve Somalia, ZooSea Cide, and TH have ventured into darker corners and brighter trespasses with Ant And End. Still the body was a puppet to the band’s fiercely manipulative antics as they sprung a creative harassment to drool for, but the imagination was taken into the crevices of a more dystopian exploration bringing new esurient peril to their compulsive dance.

The album opens with Snowsuit Ranger and instantly roams the body with devious grooves and atypical enterprise. Rhythms tease and taunt, directing song and listener with their infernal bounce as eagerly tantalising vocals and deviant electronics are embraced by a quirky web of guitar. Like a distant relative of a merger between Au Pairs and Blood Red Shoes, the track is glorious, setting the voracious tone of the album and submissive mood of its victim alike.

The following IQ Model is just as rich a tempting, its gait a calmer virulent but clothed in mysterious atmospheric smog of intimation. The similarly reserved stroll of the radiantly dour bass fuels the blossoming industrial espionage of the song, vocals the magnetic narration to its seduction before the album’s title track got under the skin and had feet, hips, and instincts abound again. Whether an inspiration or coincidence, again eighties bred post punk/new wave spices up a slice of inescapable insistence, the likes of Delta 5, ESG, and Pylon hinted at.

The pure captivation of Vacuum Flies followed, its initial teasing shadows and suggestive drama alone hooking unbridled attention, the Essential Logic-esque flame of sax ear manna across the equally compelling rhythmic saunter which riveting vocals intimately drape over. With a Bauhaus hue adding to the pleasure, the song just mesmerised before letting Glimmering Mamba infest body and spirit with its hungry contagion. Not for the first or last time, there is a Gang Of Four lining to the irresistible rhythmic pestering, a nagging matched by the often simple but skilfully woven hooks and swarm of electronic baiting, but as always for all the hints given song and sound are unapologetically uniquely Noseholes.

Casino E Vino provides its own infective canter next, breeding a pandemic of temptation which lingers far beyond its final greed soaked lure while Radio Universe links its wires to body and imagination, the body in turn dangling and dancing like a willingly submissive puppet.

The album closes out with the pair of Jackson 4 and Baked Beans. The first springs its indie pop involved post punk exploits with boisterous intent, once more hooks and chords as lively and hungry as the inimitable rhythmic shuffle infesting is persuasion. Its successor though heavier, darker, and far more sinister manages to be even more viral like in its strands of temptation and collective jeopardy. Increasingly catchier and irresistible by the second, the track is a glorious end to a simply stunning album from Noseholes.

 Ant And End provides one of those moments when music proves why it is the most addictive and vital thing in a chaos searching world; indeed the second such revelation with Noseholes.

Ant And End is out through ChuChu Records on May 17th; available @ https://noseholes.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/pg/NoseholesBand/

  Pete RingMaster 17/05/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Noseholes – Danger Dance

If you are looking to have your imagination twisted into torturous shapes matching those drawn from the body, then checking out the twisted disco of German outfit Noseholes is a must. The ticket to its no wave/post punk/noise rock devilry comes with debut album Danger Dance, an encounter living up to its title in deed and temptation.

The Hamburg hailing quartet of Henk Haiti, Steve Somalia, ZooSea Cide, and TH have already been teasing and tempting through a host of well-received tracks which now collude with equally as compelling adventures within the band’s first full-length. Danger Dance opens up with its title track, a flirtatious bassline leading the coaxing as beats stroll alongside. Soon an equally seductive melody escapes the guitar, the combination reminding of the Au Pairs even as vocals spring their web of temptation and intrigue. The suggestive spice of keys and the alternating female and male vocals all add to the captivating drama relentlessly driven by addiction stirring rhythms

A just as potent rhythmic lure fuels the following post punk shuffle of Lush Box. Spirals of guitar and flames of sax latch onto the swagger of beats and bass; the song’s jazz bred discord and post punk dance bouncing around like a Delta 5 meets Blood Red Shoes tango before Styling shares its own riveting devilment with a similar but quickly individual template of flavours. To be honest the rhythmic heart of the first trio had us trapped hook, line and sinker, all the other psyche infesting imagination icing on their inimitable cake with only the briefness of each song a frustration, a common niggle across the album.

Yelzins Affair makes a more tempered start but one with intrigue and noir lit shadows in its breath and sound from the off. Creating a tapestry of creative languages and suggestion over rapacious rhythmic pulses and lean but potent melodic tendrils the song is a mysterious fascination allowing a breath for the body and adventure for thoughts.

Tenacious endeavour and energy breaks again in Ex Driver, a track which in its sonic webbing has a definite early XTC deviousness, while Bed Smoker bounds in on a boisterous rhythmic skip and melodic manipulation which has the body and imagination eagerly bouncing like a four year old. Both are manna to any post punk/noise pop bred appetite while the closing Aspirin Nation is pure joy to jazz infested noise rock mania. Its acidic instrumental dissonance and rhythmic pounce is captivation enough but add the Essential Logic-esque squirts of sax and again attention was lustful.

Danger Dance teased, taunted, and pleasured pretty much our every personal want from music; it may very well do the same for yours. Only one way to find out…

Danger Dance is out now through ChuChuRecords / Harbinger Sound; available @ https://noseholes.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/pg/NoseholesBand/

Pete RingMaster 27/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright