Deference / Vanity – Condemned To Repeat EP

The Condemned To Repeat EP brings together two of the UK’s most promising, indeed already exciting metal prospects and across rousing ear gripping tracks shows why both are creating a real buzz.

The release sees South London metallers Deference and Southampton outfit Vanity provide two tracks each of their increasingly individual sounds. It is an encounter springing from the idea of a prospective collaboration between both bands which Deference members, vocalist Rob Lea and vocalist/guitarist Matt Dennison, offered forward late 2017. Vanity guitarist Luke Jervis explains, “We decided against creating a hybrid band between the two but wanted to focus more on the initial project of creating music as a collective.” The four tracks do see the vocalists of each band sharing vocal duties in each other’s offerings though to add to the open adventure of the release.

Deference provides the first pair of songs, starting things off with Sins. The band has seen their melodic metal constantly lure a host of new fans particularly from sharing stages with the likes of Bless The Fall, Miss May I, Fit For A King, Currents, Rolo Tomassi and Napoleon in recent times. Their first track initially coaxes ears with a suggestive melody, a calm but potent lure soon joined by the carnivorous textures of Dennison and Jonathan Prince’s guitars. Rhythms are less eager but resonate with every growl of Shaun Kirtland’s bass and the swinging attack of drummer Mike Hill, until it all boils over in a rousing roar. Even then there is a certain control to the eruption, a creative prowess which perfectly aligns to the growing vocal spread of enterprise. Drama soaks every note unveiled as too rich imagination, the track giving hints as to why the band has been compared to the likes of Architects and Northlane.

Their second track is just as compelling, Burial a voracious slab of discontent and creative fury strapped with hungry grooves and rapier thrusting rhythms. It is a sonic wrath tempered by an atmospheric sigh and turbulence interrupting melodic flames, a song never settling or allowing the listener to before its tempestuous roar and like its companion hits the spot right on but the second unleashes an especially inventive spleen impossible to resist.

It is the same with the two incitements from Vanity, a band which has already excited our appetites as many others through the Perspective//Dread and Perspective//Empathy EPs a couple of years or so back. They too have made their mark on the European live scene, playing with bands such as We Came As Romans, Chelsea Grin, Thy Art Is Murder, Black Tongue and I Killed The Prom Queen. Humane is first up from the quintet, emerging from an atmospheric mist with a rich wiring of grooves and a hellacious web of vocal ire. Swiftly the song expands its sonic lures and suggestive atmosphere, unpredictability joining volatility in the breath and heart of the increasingly enthralling trespass as all the while it preys on ears with growing dexterity, stalking the senses to share fear and pleasure.

Disillusioned is equally predatory as it completes the line-up, the track crawling over the listener with carnal intent whilst equally providing a magnetic blend of vocal adventure and melodic intimation. Again, the invasion never follows expectations, every second and breath bringing fresh challenge borne of real imagination to arouse and captivate.

Condemned To Repeat is an outstanding incursion from two bands which so far are only growing more striking and thrilling by the release and declaring UK metal is in exciting hands.

The Condemned To Repeat EP is available now.

https://www.facebook.com/WeAreDeference   https://www.facebook.com/VANITYUK/

Pete RingMaster 30/04/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Royal – Seven

Photo by: DeanX Photography

The final breath of March saw Dutch metallers The Royal release their sophomore album via Longbranch/SPV, an emotional and technical cauldron of melodic metalcore which is simply hard to ignore. The Eindhoven hailing quintet is being talked of with big expectations for their future and through their second full-length, Seven it is easy to see why.

Formed in 2012, The Royal has proceeded to breed and earn a potent reputation at home and further afield year by year. Their first year saw the release of the Origins EP with the well-received single Blind Eye coming a year later. Debut album Dreamcatchers further pushed the band into broader attention with its unveiling in 2014 whilst live the five-piece has drawn plaudits, the band going on to support the likes of Architects and Breakdown Of Sanity and play events such as Jera On Air and the Impericon Festival. Seven though just might be the wake-up call to bigger and greater opportunities; certainly its eventful and resourceful exploits deserves a moment with the metal world’s attention.

The album opens up with Thunder, a track living up to its title. Stormy clouds gather as the track settles into place, riffs respectfully but menacingly harrying the senses before wiry grooves erupt and vein its increasingly tempestuous climate. Soon the song hits its virulent stride, rhythms an imposing trespassing on the senses as the guitars snarl and weave their creative textures within the ebb and flow of the assault. All the while vocalist Semuel Pisarahu boils with emotional ire and open antipathy, a scowling hue equally striking in the web of enterprise, melodic suggestiveness, and raw aggression getting the album off to a mighty start.

Its mix of flavours is another potent aspect to the song and matched within the following Feeding Wolves. Its first touch is a melodic gentleness though soon joined by the low key but open grumble of Loet Brinkmans’ bass and the meaty jab and roll of Tom Van Ekerschot’s beats. As Pisarahu growls, the track erupts into another hellacious yet inviting tempest speared by a predacious swing and spicy grooves. As in the first song, guitarists JD Liefting and Pim Wesselink reveal themselves as comfortable seducing ears with warm melodies as they are ravaging them with bracing and abrasive hostility, their imagination and craft adding to the inventive unpredictability of the song and indeed album.

The mercurial character of the second track similarly grabs the imagination; a quality all songs have in varying degrees. Next up Wildmind is less changeable, more a persistent blaze of irritable jaundice but also flowing through creative twists and turns. Though not quite matching up to the first pair in igniting the passions, it leaves satisfaction full and appetite hungry for the proposals offered next by Creeds And The Vultures and Counterculture. The first has a mean-spirited air to its attitude and touch but one tempered by the maze of winding grooves and captivating melodies wrapping the vocal tension whilst its successor and the band’s new single rocks with relish while also creating a web of melodic enticement and vitriol lit dynamics, rhythmically and sonically. There is a toxic and intoxicating depth to its body, keys a hug of beauty, guitars a kaleidoscope of intent and endeavour as Pisarahu leads the raw vocal roar.

From the melancholy drenched atmospheric instrumental Interlude, the album’s title track has ears and imagination entwined, instantly too as its opening guitar twang flirts with instincts before they are infested by a glorious net of rapacious grooves. Another song which is rock ‘n’ roll at heart and carnivorous in persona, it crawls into the psyche; colouring its realms with fluttering melodies and animalistic textures. Middle Eastern spices only add to its majesty, the track emerging as quite simply aural captivation.

Life Breaker unleashes its ravenous sinews and creative rancor next, though again beauty is as prevalent in its physical nature as emotional discord while Thalassa is an invasive animus of sound and emotion which, without skimping on sonic light, is a darker, more vindictive enmity. Both tracks hit the spot, the former dead centre, before Draining Veins gives its melody woven volcano a friction of vocal and rhythmic tension which boils to inhospitable crescendos across its ever shifting and provocative soundscape.

The album closes with Viridian, a song epitomising the fluid ability of the band to tap into and blend contrasting emotions and textures whilst simultaneously challenging and stirring the listener. It is also a mighty collusion of sonic flirtation and predacious alienation bringing the album to an impressive end.

There are times when, on the surface, tracks share similar essences and personalities to other songs but attention and time defuses any apparent sameness. What emerges, is a creatively immense and thoroughly enjoyable proposition which, for appetites of bands like August Burns Red, While She Sleeps, and Northlane, of metalcore which wants to push itself, is a definite must check out.

Seven is out now via Longbranch/SPV. All links available @ https://theroyal.lnk.to/Seven

http://www.theroyalofficial.com/   https://www.facebook.com/theroyalofficial/  https://twitter.com/theroyalmetal   https://theroyalofficial.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 05/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Deference – False Awakening

Increasingly compelling, False Awakening is the new EP from British metallers Deference. A maelstrom of ravenous textures and flavours caught in an equally imposing web of emotion, the release not only forcibly pleases ears but also suggests this is a band with the potential to be a big part of the UK metal scene.

Coming from Southampton, Deference weave in inspirations from the likes of Architects, Northlane, Periphery, and Oh Sleeper into their tapestry of melody rich metalcore with djent and progressive metal tendencies. The quintet has been climbing the ladder with a rapid ascent in recent times, the release of 2015 debut EP XXXVII and live successes alongside bands such as Rolo Tomassi, Napoleon, The Hell, and Shields as well as a European Tour with True Lie all increasing their reputation. False Awakening is a creative echo of an outfit ready to break into national recognition, the next unavoidable step for a band beginning to make their potent mark.

The release opens with Scavengers. A steely shimmer initially coaxes ears, senses strapping riffs soon following as rhythms and guitars grumble around the plaintive vocal roar of Rob Lea. That djent styled essence is equally as swift infecting song and satisfaction, the guitars of Matt Dennison and Jonathan Prince creating a spiky attitude and touch in their emerging weave of enterprise. Strapped to the muscular grouch of Shaun Kirtland’s bass and the animosity loaded swings of drummer Mike Hill, the track is a formidable introduction to the EP; not necessarily unique but relentlessly exhilarating.

The might start slips away to be replaced by the instantly ravenous Insomnia; its immediate wall of sonic trespass the bed for melodic and technical dexterity to blossom. It is an intriguing mixture which takes longer to ignite the imagination than its predecessor’s tempest but grows into a rich captivation especially as raw and aggression vocal contemplations are joined by an impressive clean delivery from Lea, Dennison adding his potent vocal backing throughout. Persistently turbulent across its vociferous landscape, a tempestuous climate equally as open in the track’s mellower melancholy thick yet stark moments, the song has the imagination as gripped as ears throughout.

New single Departure follows, growing from another solemn but engaging melody equipped peace with keys colouring its atmospheric questioning before again vocal and sonic volatility takes hold and seize the moment. As another maze of sound and invention descends, Deference reinforce the potency of their  presence and creative dexterity, the song shifting through numerous cycles all capturing the imagination if again with increasing persuasion rather than an immediate one though indeed its first listen or two leaves pleasure alive.

The EP’s title track has an almost carnal air and character as it ravages the senses straight away, an antipathy which rather than diminishes simply expands its scope as clean vocals and melodic endeavour gets involved in the volcanic explosion. The track is superb, unpredictable yet with plenty of familiar spices only adding to its impressive blaze of sound and emotive exploration. Rabid and composed, vicious and seductive, the track is a collision of extremes and imagination breeding a mighty storm again fusing varied metal bred hues in its cataclysmic squall.

The release closes with Become Death Part 2, an initially gentle melodic romancing of the senses around a vocal sample. As destructive elements fall upon the calm, the song is fallout of corroded beauty, an epochal epilogue to the EP’s themes looking at “a man-made apocalyptic world.”

The buzz is that Deference is ready to take their place to the fore of the UK metal scene; whether it is sooner or later it is expected success backed up by False Awakening and its striking contents.

The False Awakening EP is out now.

https://www.facebook.com/WeAreDeference/    https://twitter.com/DeferenceMusic   https://deference.bandcamp.com/releases

Pete RingMaster 05/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Annisokay – Devil May Care

annisokay-devil-may-care_RingMasterReview

With attention increasingly being drawn their way, German metallers Annisokay have just released third album Devil May Care, a release which rumbles and roars in ears demanding attention. The successor to their acclaimed 2015 full-length Enigmatic Smile, a release following an equally well-received debut in the shape of The Lucid Dream[er] a year earlier, Devil May Care is a rousing and tempestuous beast as at home casting ferocious confrontation as it is sharing melodic and harmonic enterprise.

Creating a sound spun from the heart of metalcore and post hardcore with just as rich rock and electronic flavours involved, the Halle/Leipzig hailing quintet has grown from a national roar to an eagerly welcomed European proposal, the success of their albums and tours across the likes of Austria, Switzerland, France, Russia, and the UK proof. Now it is Devil May Care looking at expanding the band’s presence and sound, a result the release certainly achieves with the latter if still driven by their familiar yet persistently unpredictable sound.

The album opens up with Loud, a track which initially shimmers but soon breeds a scuzzy dose of guitar before catching light with primal rhythms, romancing keys, and riffs which infest the senses. There is no escaping a Rammstein edge to the crowd roars and intensive examination but as the growls of Dave Grunewald shares the platform with the clean tones of Christoph Wieczorek, the song soon takes on its own persona and continues to tempt and ignite the senses. The rhythmic animosity of bassist Norbert Rose and drummer Nico Vaeen is as direct and uncompromising as the throat scarring shouts of Grunewald but perfectly tempered by the harmonic caresses of Wieczorek and the melodic enterprise and sonic ferocity escaping his and Philipp Kretzschmar’s guitars.

The following What’s Wrong also makes a gentle entrance which needs little time to catch aflame as keys and grooves collude  within another rhythmic/riff led onslaught. It too is a passing moment as warmer lures wash ears with matching vocals, but it too becomes a relatively fleeting passage in the revolving landscape of the swiftly infectious encounter. The mix and contrasts of vocals is not surprising these days in caustic metal but works a treat and is emulated in the imaginative textures within the ferocious intensity devouring air and listener.

Featuring Northlane vocalist Marcus Bridge, next up Smile quickly commands ears and imagination. Its initial melodic coaxing is as suggestive as the rapier like thrusts of the grouchy rhythms and harmonic union aside the lusty scowls of Grunewald which follows; their tempting sprung within a carnivorous tide of riffs and djent spiced rabidity. Twisting and turning with increasing virulence, the track is superb, a rousing and dementedly addictive affair as prone to melodic seducing as rancorous trespasses.

Through the haunting drama of D.O.M.I.N.A.N.C.E, another thrilling dichotomy of melodic temperance and punishingly inhospitable attitude in sound and intent, band and album devour as they ignite an even greedier appetite for the release while the mellower but still volatile fire of Blind Lane leaves ears more than satisfied. The second of the two does fail to live up to the creative drama and unpredictability of its predecessors but provides plenty to be wholly engaged in before Thumbs Up, Thumbs Down uncages its own maelstrom of mercurial incitement as ravenous as it is melodically tempting. Aggressive and invasive it surely is yet it also shows Annisokay songs to be as catchy as they are challenging and with the guest appearance of Christoph von Freydorf from Emil Bulls, offers another eventful and magnetic proposal.

Both Hourglass and Photographs have body and imagination firmly held, the fierce yet enchanting first with its poetic melodies and angst fuelled vocals and the second through its volcanic nature. Each again only please though the latter is another lacking the more unique essences of others around it to shine as impressively for personal tastes while after them Gold is a maze of twisted grooves and hungry riffs driven by biting rhythms but equally a beacon of harmonic and melodic elegance around an electronic heartbeat.

Concluded by the mercurial theatre and roar of The Last Planet, the initially impressing Devil May Care only grows in stature with every passing listen. You could say there is a similarity between many tracks within the release, a surface familiarity but it is countered by the fresh revelations found within its inventively layered tracks once given closer attention. The enjoyment found with it also leaves any shortcomings, of which there are few, an ever diminishing essence.

Devil May Care will be released through SPV / Longbranch as a Limited Box-Set, CD Digipak, Vinyl Version (incl. CD), and Download.

http://www.annisokay.com/    https://www.facebook.com/annisokay/

Pete RingMaster 30/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

From Rust – Lost Sense Of Life

from-rust-online-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

British metalcore outfit From Rust have just unleashed debut EP Lost Sense Of Life, a release which makes up for what it lacks in real surprises by breeding an attention luring character bound in a ferocious tempest of sound.  Fair to say it is a promising, potential loaded introduction to the Somerset hailing quintet which has installed itself as one of our current persistent listens.

Created in 2014 by long-time friends, vocalist Jake Searle and lead guitarist Camden Gibson, From Rust has taken their time to emerge. With a line-up finally completed by rhythms guitarist Tom Waters, bassist Sam Elswood, and drummer Sam Kellaway, the band spent numerous months creating and honing their sound, its raw and pungent creative roar making a potent impact once the band hit the live stage towards the end of 2015. Since then they have shared stages with the likes of Despite My Deepest Fear, Thrones, Values, and Materia while hitting the studio earlier this year to uncage the fury fuelled Lost Sense Of Life.

Inspirations to the band are said to include bands such as Parkway Drive, Northlane, and All That Remains; essences which do not hide within the EP and opener Whispers but it is fair to say adds to the storm rather than drives it. The first track coaxes with a fiery groove initially as rhythms and riffs collect in the background before consuming the senses and shaping the blossoming assault. They align to rather than devour that initial enterprise, melodic flames and scything sonic spears joining the potent ire and variety in Searle’s vocal trespass. As atmospheric throughout as it is venomously fierce and relentlessly vicious, the track is a strong and engaging start but soon outshone by its successor.

from-rust-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewInside Out is superb, from the sonic web slung out there by the guitars at the start exposing itself as a ravenous beast of raw and inventive temptation which burrows itself into the imagination and psyche. There is a swagger to that initial tapestry of guitar matched in the prowling beats and threat loaded bassline of Elswood; all luring and baiting the senses before entangling in a rabid onslaught. Twisting through those varied attacks and more across its inventive body, suggestive intrigue soaked melodies and varied metal strains circling ears, the track grips and enthrals taking best track honours whilst uncapping the potential of real uniqueness within the band to hopefully emerge ahead.

If the previous track is predatory, Predictable Pain is bestial as it stalks the listener, all the time jabbing away with its salacious rhythms as guitars and bass weave a mercurial tapestry of sound and imposing emotion further shaped by the raw throated intrusions of Searle. With senses wilting breakdowns and rapacious vocal squalls within the net of sonic enterprise, the track is certainly a centre of attention if lacking the final elements which ignites its predecessor and indeed the following Grey World. With Searle using his range of attacks, to great effect, the track is a cancerous yet infectious abuse cast with an invention and imaginative boldness hinting at greater things ahead as the band develops in sound and songwriting.

Final track Gone Forever is just as intensive and enjoyable, epitomising the release in many ways as recognisable essences are embraced by the band own keen invention and readiness to be bold and try to be different. It is that element which really helps Lost Sense Of Life command the senses and suggests that once From Rust really go for it, they could be one of those taking British metal boldly forward.

Lost Sense Of Life is out now on iTunes.

https://twitter.com/fromrustoffical    https://www.facebook.com/fromrust/

Pete RingMaster 29/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Fit For An Autopsy – Absolute Hope Absolute Hell

fitforanautopsy_RingMaster Review

The time between previous album, the 2013 released Hellbound, and its new successor Absolute Hope Absolute Hell, has seen death metallers Fit For An Autopsy become not only more brutal but strikingly bolder in the adventure behind the infusion of melodic imagination and diversity shaping their ferocity. The evidence is all strikingly there in the band’s third album which is also the first with new vocalist Joe Badolato after the departure of Nate Johnson last year. Quite simply Absolute Hope Absolute Hell is a gripping tempest of sound and intensity, of passion and anger, and a new heady bench mark for the New Jersey hailing sextet.

Self-produced by guitarist Will Putney, who has also previously produced the likes of Thy Art Is Murder, Acacia Strain, and Northlane, Absolute Hope Absolute Hell opens with its title track and a melodic tempting which reflects the first part of its title perfectly. Within a few more deep breaths riffs are crawling through the air and dark grooves binding ears as the quickly impressing delivery of Badolato steers the brewing volcanic tempest. Whereas in previously releases the open barbarism fuelling the new intent would be undiluted, here the opening enticing continues to flirt from within the storm, ebbing away occasionally to return with vocal elegance as the track relentlessly grows into and evolves its furious skin and body.

FitForAnAutopsy_AHAH_RingMaster Review      It is a mighty and thrilling start carried on by the following Wither, its first touch a crunching tide of raw riffs and imposing rhythms again straddled by the excellent tones of the new frontman. Johnson was a mighty force and texture within Fit For An Autopsy but Badolato brings something just as hearty but stirringly different which simply fits the band’s evolution in sound, Saltwound straight after conformation if it was needed. Backing vocals equally seem to have found a new zeal and hue to their roars too, on the third song creating searing harmonics within the sonic smog wrapping the rhythmic trespass of the track. Though not quite living up to the pair before, such their stunning success, the track quickly unveils more melodic enterprise and atmospheric imagination as forcibly alluring as any raw ferocity unleashed across song and album.

Both the Gojira meets Oceano like Murder In The First and Storm Drains exhaust the body and ignite the senses, the first a zealous predatory stalking which bewitches with repetitive hooks and spiralling grooves whilst becoming more barbarous with every passing minute and blast of viciousness. Its successor is a viscous sonic and vocal assault but again a turbulence unafraid to spin magnetic melodic and caustic tempting through the guitars of Putney, Tim Howley, and Pat Sheridan, drummer Josean Orta alongside splintering bone with his often restrained but fierce swings; that reserve emerging with the almost post-rock like ambience which also blows through the track.

Another high is breached with Ghosts In The River, Badolato offering a Jaz Coleman like tone to his cleaner grizzled delivery whilst around him vivaciously shimmering melodies seep from guitar strings and a warm inviting atmosphere leads the listener into the volatility and perpetually animus of the song’s heart. Bassist Shane Slade sculpts bait which borders on bestial but is tempered, almost smothered at times by the mesmeric melodic imagination working away on an already by this point greedy appetite. The track is as enthralling an inventive and fluidly diverse violation as you could hope for and quickly matched by the outstanding and creatively rabid Mask Maker which takes things to even more entangled richer depths. One moment it is scarring the senses with sonic acidity and the next creating a furious anthem which again has a slight Killing Joke scent to it, not to mention that of bands like Thy Art is Murder, though as shown yet again by Hollow Shell straight after, Fit For An Autopsy have created a presence truly distinct to them showing past great efforts were still a sound in the making. Hollow Shell is almost gentle in comparison to the previous track, well for a passing moment or two as sinews become stretched, emotions turn sour, and intensity is uncapped as the track boils over with rancor but without losing any of its creative enterprise and seamless fusion of melody rich ambience and toxic savagery.

Out To Sea is a song which took time to fully persuade, its opening emotive calm and sweeping atmosphere tempered for personal tastes by the vocal delivery choice of Badolato, his rasping tones a dampener on the climate but coming into their own as the short but potent track breeds a cantankerous torrent of hostility around the persistent beauty. It is a great appetiser for the virulent bad-blood of False Positive though, this a maelstrom of creative spite and bedlamic ingenuity as blusteringly unpredictable as it is punishingly hellacious. Every second brings a new chastisement for the senses and inventive tonic for ears and imagination, the album closing on the same lofty heights as it started, a pinnacle reinforced by album closer Swing The Axe and its more controlled and tempered storm flowing with and exposing the new direction and ingenuity in the Fit For An Autopsy songwriting and sound.

To simplify things, Absolute Hope Absolute Hell is technically compelling, brutally impacting rock ‘n’ roll to give your soul to, the roar of a band’s sound coming of age with plenty more still to be explored and experienced. We have another best of year metal contender!

Absolute Hope Absolute Hell is available from October 2nd via eOne / Good Fight Music.

http://www.fitforanautopsy.com   https://www.facebook.com/FitForAnAutopsyOfficial   https://twitter.com/FitForAnAutopsy

Pete RingMaster 02/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Islasorna – E.D.E.N

Islasorna Online Promo_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Band and sound might be tagged as progressive metal, but the best description for both elements and the creative and technical fury of Scottish band Islasorna, is psychotic. The Edinburgh quintet’s debut EP E.D.E.N is a tempest of bedlamic ideation, a deranged onslaught of inventive noise which could be declared a sonic psychosis and should be acclaimed as one intoxicating slab of thrilling turmoil.

Formed at the beginning of 2014, Islasorna create the most unpredictable maelstrom of sound. It is indeed bred in from a progressive seeding, but from second to second comes infused with a diverse array of flavours and psyche twisting imagination. Inspirations for the band are drawn from the likes of The Devil Wears Prada, Northlane, Whitechapel, Sikth, The Dillinger Escape Plan, Animals as Leaders, and Metallica, varied spices adding to a striking proposition in sound matched by a live presence which has increasingly earned acclaim and attention as the band shared stages with bands such as Bleed From Within, Carcer City, Demoraliser, Martyr Defiled, and Continents over the past year or so. E.D.E.N is a fierce nudge on broader awareness and recognition, and though for some it might be a creative turbulence too far such the intensive nature of the EP, Islasorna will surely be a name on a much wider roar from hereon in.

The EP opens with Obliteration and a melodic twang of guitar which alone soaks the air in a sultry yet slightly portentous suggestiveness. It is a hint quickly realised by the forceful beats of Michael Devlin and the vocal roar of Justin Dilworth. At first their presence only brings a small element of imposing urgency with it, a slither of increased intensity but also a stronger and darker apocalyptic hue which toys with and ignites the imagination. At the song’s climax a voice skirts the senses and provokes thoughts, menacingly flirting from the shadows before the following Achluophobia emerges to bring its words to thicker destructive reality.

Islasorna cover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster ReviewThe second track instantly expels a djent spawned predation around a blaze of vocal scowling and sonic intimidation from the guitars of Dean Watson and Jamie McArthur. As the first track, it is more a prowling ravenous predator than a vicious onslaught yet the pathological agitation its title suggests is fuel to the attention gripping enterprise and imagination cast by the band. Simultaneously the track is savage and seductive, extremes entwining and in revolt against each other as the listener is dragged through a landscape of metalcore and grindcore to name two of the open essences sculpted in a progressive and experimental voracity.

Judas in comparison is a calmer incitement on ears and senses, and opens with a thoroughly engaging melodic caress of guitar courted by the darker lures of Mark Brunton’s bass. It is a fascinating start, the equally mellow tones of Dilworth adding to the tantalising proposal. The feeling that something is brewing is never far from the surface though and by midway the brief but potent offering has uncaged a caustic climate of sound and emotion though it is still with restraint as the band reveals more of their diversity in songwriting, sound, and individual prowess. Its magnetic bellow makes way for the harsher but no less inventive Choices. The song continues the melodic and dazzling progressive elements of its predecessor but cages them in a jagged confrontation of riffs and barbarous rhythms, both Devlin and Brunton as carnivorous in their attack as the guitars are melodically riveting. Arguably the encounter fits into the more expected template of progressive metal and the inspirations to the band mentioned earlier, yet it is a perpetual provider of unique twists and senses spearing sonic flirtation again setting the band apart from the crowd.

Creative mania returns in full lung bursting vocal and noise driven devilry next with 4-2-8, the track full warfare on the senses as Dilworth reveals his broadest vocal derangement yet and musically the band twists like a sonic and rhythmic dervish. The track is outstanding, not necessarily better than any other upon E.D.E.N but staking a favourite claim with increasing success over every listen. Its rigorous and rugged turbulence is instantly contrasted by the EP’s closing title track where once more Islasorna pull back the shades on another side of their imagination. An initial breeze of melodic beauty kisses ears and thoughts first, keys colouring a shadowed ambience with elegant charm before evolving into an electro rock seducing around militant rhythms and a union of harsh and harmonic vocals. Post hardcore, scream, post rock, they are all amongst the spices within the encounter, whispering hues within the enthralling finale going towards further proof of the band’s originality.

As outstanding as it is, E.D.E.N still feels like it is only the first big step of the band, one loaded with such promise that it suggests it is merely going to be the springboard for bigger, bolder exploits ahead. This only adds to the excitement of the emergence of potentially a new force in European metal.

The E.D.E.N EP is available from June 1st through all stores.

http://Facebook.com/islasornauk

RingMaster 01/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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ISLASORNA REVEAL THEIR E.D.E.N’ ON 1st JUNE

Islasorna Online Promo shot

SCOTTISH PROGRESSIVE METAL OUTFIT ‘ISLASORNA’ NATIONALLY RELEASE THEIR DEBUT EP ‘E.D.E.N’ ON 1st JUNE, THROUGH ALL STORES.

Spawned from the depths of Edinburgh, and conceived at the start of 2014, Scottish experimental metal crew ‘Islasorna’ have picked up a legion of fans throughout the far North. And through dedicated and rampant gigging, word is beginning to spread about the band’s high octane live shows further afield in the UK. Adding more fuel to their fiery cause, the progressive metallers have supported the likes of Bleed From Within, Carcer City, Demoraliser, Martyr Defiled and Continents.

Consisting of vocalist Justin Dilworth, Guitarists Jamie Mcarthur & Dean Watson, bassist Mark Brunton and drummer Michael Devlin, Islasorna fuse together colossal riffs, tech playability and even hints of jazz to the melting pot. With inspiration coming from everyone from The Devil Wears Prada, Northlane, Whitechapel, Sikth, The Dillinger Escape Plan and Animals as Leaders to Metallica, the band offer a sound that is inherently steeped in metal, but undoubtedly pushes the envelope.

Islasorna are set to break out to the UK with the official release of their earth shattering debut EP, ‘E.D.E.N.’. The opening track ‘Obliteration’ pulls you in with its haunting atmospherics and pummelling drop beats. The five-some then crank it up with the sludgy riff assault of ‘Achluophobia’, which immediately grabs you by the nether regions. The band showcase their astute use of dynamics for the hypnotic track ‘Judas’, while the guttural attack of ‘Choices’ slams your eardrums, and the craft of ‘4-2-8’, framed by blistering guitars and jagged rhythms, is just pure intensity. The metallers draw the record to a close with the EP’s namesake ‘E.D.E.N.’, and it’s an eerie slab of moody heavy electronica which displays the band’s growing maturity. With shows in the can for this Summer, Islasorna are bursting to rise.

-ISLASORNA RELEASE ‘E.D.E.N.’ ON 1st JUNE THROUGH ALL DIGITAL OUTLETS-

Islasorna cover

http://Facebook.com/islasornauk

Skeyes – Empty Mirrors

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Like with post-hardcore, for any emerging band to stand out in metalcore, even in its more progressive state, is a bit of a tall order. US band Skeyes is another coming up against that challenge but with debut EP Empty Mirrors, the band certainly makes a potent introduction and offers plenty of potential that they can rise up from the pack. The four track offering is a very likeable slice of metal voracity with a melodic invention which wakes up the imagination. Whether it has enough to push the band above the crowd time will tell but right now the release sparks the feeling that the Pennsylvanian band can ascend to that spotlight pushing height at some point.

Skeyes was formed in 2013 by Jesse Cease and Tyler Williams, and originally was intended as a studio project. Their first year saw many changes in line-up which led to the becoming a fully functioning band with vocalist Dale Brosious and guitarist Ryan Macaluso alongside guitarist/vocalist Cease. Drawing on inspirations from the likes of Erra, Mureau, Northlane, and For the Fallen Dreams, Skeyes have now arrived at the point of unleashing their presence on a broader landscape. Featuring guest vocals from Garret Rapp of The Color Morale and Jesse Cash of Erra, and released on Imminence Records to whom the band signed last October, Empty Mirrors is a more than solid and pleasing base for the band spring forth from.

Ethereal sets the ball rolling and instantly is a flame of clean vocals amidst a web of sonic enterprise, a coaxing punctuated by thumping rhythms which shows restraint in their attack but not their weight. With Garret Rapp bringing his strong guest tones to the song, it is soon a turbulent storm of an encounter, the caustic roars of Brosious an increasingly enjoyable squall against the warmer colours and harmonies of the song. The guitars also grab attention swiftly, tendrils of sonic imagination aligning with ragged riffs equipped with a djent seeded agitation. It is a strong song which satisfies with ease especially through the ever growing voracity of the rhythms, but elevates its stature with an excellent twist of melodic calm coloured by excellent vocals of Rapp.IR030

The following Myriad also needs a breath before unleashing its maelstrom of imagination and sonic tenacity. In some ways it is a less imposing and intrusive track yet still stirs up an intimidation and creative agitation which keeps expectations at bay. Even so there are plenty of recognisable things about the song, as the EP, but it would be amiss to not say it comes over as fresh and with a hungry passion as it roughs up and seduces the listener’s ears and thoughts. Strangely another thing in its favour and success is the briefness of its presence, at under three minutes the track is a dazzling quick jab to the senses with certainly as the old adage says, ‘leaves them wanting more’, just as the similarly swift offering of the EP’s title track which steps up next.

With Jesse Cash involved, Empty Mirrors is virtually a bedlamic swirl of venomous raw growls and melodic suggestiveness within a cage of aggressive riffery and belligerent rhythms. Holding magnetic calm at moments and unbridled energetic hostility in others, the song seduces with dramatic keys and impressive clean blazes of vocal expression. Easily the best thing on the release, the inventive bellow is as fascinating as it is exhausting and with more songs like this, Skeyes will definitely rise to join the cream of melodic metalcore.

The closing Ars Amatoria revels in the mellower side of the band’s sound and songwriting, initially at least anyway. The voice of we assume Cease shows its strongest and most impressive moments on the EP as the song brews up a tempest of sound and angst round him. It does not take long for Brosious to unleash his thick venom too as guitars paint a reflective sonic picture in the rabid frame of rhythms and riffs. The song is also brief, though this time it feels like an unfinished proposition once it departs, as if there was more to say but instead just walks away.

Empty Mirrors as suggested is a strong way to open up their entrance into the ears of the world. It is not going to shake the tree but certainly will do enough to ensure Skeyes and what comes next is given stronger attention, and if the band can really build on songs like the EPs title track, with equally potent rewards in return.

The Empty Mirrors EP is available now via Imminence Records @ http://imminencerecords.bandcamp.com/album/empty-mirrors

https://www.facebook.com/skeyesband

RingMaster 26/02/2015

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

Statues – Together We’re Alone

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Blistering is the best way to describe Together We’re Alone, the debut album from Australian hardcore band Statues, that and thoroughly enjoyable. Hailing from Perth, the band uncages a “chaotic” style of the genre which has a just as keen penchant for acidic noise and caustic punk. Like a voracious merger of Ghost of a Thousand and Shevils with Coilguns and Kabul Golf Club, band and sound is a corrosive and exhilarating proposition, not forgetting one of the most unique.

Formed in 2009, Statues became swiftly recognised and renowned for their high intensity stage performances, shows which has seen them play alongside the likes of Every Time I Die, Northlane, Stray from the Path, Stick to Your Guns, Structures, and La Dispute. Their reputation has gone before them but Together We’re Alone is the band’s first real foray into global attention and it is hard to see the release missing out on awakening an intensive spotlight on the quintet’s presence.

As unafraid to make a searing commentary on social and personal issues as it is in scorching the senses, band and album instantly stirs up attention and imagination with the brief and seriously potent All Fears Are Learned, All Victories Are Earned. The opening song almost swaggers as it casts percussive bait straight away but is soon turning its enticing entrance into a brewing maelstrom of raw grooves and caustic riffs. There is still a teasing lure to the track though, a lighter almost mischievous wink which subsequently turns to a scowl and roars along with the imposing and striking vocals of Jayme Van Keulen. As swiftly realised across the album, how a song starts and tempts is never a consistent narrative, just a moment in a fury of invention shown here by the guitars of Scott Kay and John Overthrow mixing stabbing riffs and hook spilling noise to further colour and ignite the already incendiary proposition.

The following Always Building, Always Breaking similarly opens with an engaging temptation before venting its rage, a bluesy flame of guitar a spicy offering initially. It is soon battling c7e74127-c689-4e43-ad49-1d7a5e203f3cwith and aligning to, a fierce bluster of noise and the rapid fire skills of drummer Daniel Harper as the track explodes with fierce enterprise and magnetic intensity. As its predecessor, there is as much irresistible contagiousness to the encounter as passionate fury, especially through the masterful infectious lures laid down by Matthew Templeman’s bass skills which seem to creatively revel in the tempest. The track is a brawl of an incitement, a torrential outpouring of angst and hostility within a weave of sonic ingenuity. Only two songs in and Together We’re Alone is already announcing that it is one of the most startling and exciting hardcore releases of current times.

Oh Precious Commodity does nothing to defuse that thought and declaration, its hoarse vocal and anthemic barracking accompanied by throaty bass groans and tangy grooves which feverishly scorch and light the senses. There is hailstorm of piercing beats throughout the knee buckling ferocity too which collude with a cascade of just as hellacious vocals and dramatically imaginative inhospitality. Together they make an antagonistic treat matched in its individual way by the mouth-watering sonic hysteria of Forseeing the Cloud and Not the Rain and the hellacious rampage of Affliction Prescription. With a great many hardcore bands similarity seems to creep into any clutch of songs but there is no sign of that across Together We’re Alone, this pair alone steeped in abrasing individuality and unpredictable invention.

The band throws a curve ball from left field next, the simple and bewitching soulful blues croon of I Want Peace stepping forward with just voice against handclaps as its body, before the impassioned hostile delirium of Abide consumes ears and senses. As now expected, the track is a shifting landscape of imposing ideation and eventful sound, ruggedly caressing and forcibly pounding the psyche from start to finish. The thrilling turbulence makes way for Burning the Truth At Both Ends with its spiralling acrid grooves of and the concussive might of The Wanderer; both a crippling net of rhythms and scalding vat of sonic exploration bound in emotional ferocity.

Between the slower melodic almost post hardcore tinged Hard Words, Softly Spoken and the closing Within Arm’s Reach, another unexpected twist comes with the blues instrumental twang of Hope Is. Its minute plus lure is an intriguing and pleasing respite ready for the final creative furor of the album, Within Arm’s Reach arguably the most intensive and painfully invigorating track on the album, though all songs truthfully leave senses sore and emotions elated.

Statues have set down a benchmark not only for themselves but hardcore with Together We’re Alone, the first of many you imagine if this release is anything to go by.

Together We’re Alone is available now via https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/together-were-alone/id944791123

https://www.facebook.com/statuesau

RingMaster 14/01/2015

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