Hostile Array – Self Titled

With a sound delivering a punch as rich and inescapable as that of the heart and lyrical confrontation it surrounds, the self-titled debut album from US post hardcore outfit Hostile Array s one striking and impressive introduction. That forceful, indeed imposing attack though comes in layers of enterprise and imagination which equally enticed and ignited an always searching appetite for fresh, exciting, and individual.

Emerging in the initial weeks of 2017, Maryland hailing Hostile Array have already hinted at the potential of the album and gave a rich taster of their sound through a couple of singles. Their music is tagged as post hardcore but has real depth and adventure to its character embracing an array of metal and punk spices alongside inspirations cited as including Underoath, Norma Jean, Silent Planet, and Architects. Consisting of Brendan Frey, Garrison Frey, Hector Fernandez, Fredy Menjivar, and Andrew Markle, the band also has a ferocious lyrical intent and touch, songs getting their claws into political and social issues, corruptions, and ill-doings.

The album opens up with the outstanding Herd Instinct, the track one of those first couple of singles luring keen attention. Sonic intrusion and rhythmic baiting opens its tempting, a great grumbling bass soon in tandem with fury fuelled throat rasping vocals. Quickly though there is imaginative hints licking at ears, blossoming with melodic enticement and wicked hooks as the roar continues to harass air and social mentality. It is a cauldron which continues to evolve, metal bred textures coursing hardcore irritability; invention escalated by the potent landscape of clean and raw vocal dexterity.

Bastardized follows with its own ferocious incursion, snarling and blistering the senses from its first breath before sharing a more nu-metal natured breath with a touch of bands like Spineshank to it. Snapping and jabbing at ears, the track springs toxic contagion and intense discontent within an atmospheric melody stranded weave; seducing whilst preying on the listener before Wiretap uncages its own ferocious animus with instinctive catchiness and melodic suggestion at its core. There is a whiff of Deftones meets Architects to its growing body but to be honest as all hints offered to tracks, the Hostile Array sound absorbs and turns all in its own individuality.

Next up Devoid brawls and hollers within atmospheric smog next, it’s calm but portentous climate an emotive glaze to an inner volatile frustration while Migrant Myth is a net of metallic wiring around a blaze of unbridled displeasure. Both tracks invigorate their already resourceful landscapes with tenaciously adventurous twists and turns spun from unpredictable and contrasting textures. The second of the two is immense, too short but a thrilling trespass of persuasive enterprise igniting the passions for the following sonic and melodic fire of Newspeak; a track quickly burying itself in ears with emotional intensity and melodies as descriptive as the words they colour.

New single Warmonger is next, looming up from a distance with the animosity and skilled dexterity its title suggests. The throaty grumble of the bass and the composed bone splitting swings of beats incite the sonic flames and vocal voracity which climbs their irritability; they in turn like accelerant sparking melodic shimmers into senses broiling, emotionally burning flames.

Viciousness and tempting contagion shape up Calloused, it as body inspiring infectious as it is vocally and lyrically scathing with a tapestry of flavours and invention to accentuate both aspects. The song flows straight into the waiting jaws and feuding tendrils of Bluebird, it an equally accomplished and magnetic patchwork of ire led emotions and flavours woven into one fluid and riveting trespass.

Final track Disillusioned is a pyre of punk and metal malcontent and emotional grievance within a skilled bedlam of imagination and ferocity. It is a powerful striking last attack in a charge of nothing but; a truly memorable departure demanding a swift return to the album to face, endure, and thrill at its creative challenge and vendetta on world ills. There have not been too many post hardcore bred releases which have truly fired us up in the past couple of years but Hostile Array have not only provided such a treat but one which deserves to be considered as the best of the lot.

The Hostile Array album is released June 1st, available @ https://hostilearray.bandcamp.com/album/hostile-array

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Pete RingMaster 29/05/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

American Standards – Anti-Melody

Pic Jacob Reynolds

What started as social commentary on the growing divide in our society became very personal when our founding guitarist (Cody Conrad) passed of suicide and then soon after, my father of cancer. We went back in to re-write much of the album and in a lot of ways used it as therapy to cope with the experiences. Although intimate, at its core Anti-Melody is centred around the universal theme of separation on many levels.

The words of American Standards vocalist, Brandon Kellum, reveal the heavy climate and emotion new album Anti-Melody emerged from. Equally though you sense there was a determination in its creation to make it something special in tribute to the two men and there is no doubt that it was an aim the Phoenix hailing band achieved. The eight track is superb, a new plateau in the chaotic hardcore/noise punk sound and invention of the quartet. It is raw with emotion and energy, vocal in heart and aggression but all aligned to the boldest imagination and biggest step forward in sound from the outfit yet.

Since emerging in 2011 and providing the attention grabbing, psyche twisting Still Life EP the following year, American Standards has only increased their reputation through another pair of EPs and an explosive live presence which has seen the band play alongside the likes of Every Time I Die, Norma Jean, The Dillinger Escape Plan amidst plenty more. Each release has seen the band explore new depths and aspects to their sound but maybe no more boldly and certainly impressively than within Anti-Melody.

The album opens with recent single Writers Block Party and instantly stirs up a roar of trouble and temptation. The vocal ferocity of Kellum triggers a tempest of sound, the guitar of Corey Skowronski abrasing the senses with rapacious riffs bound in tendrils of tangy grooves. That alone is a hellacious affair but add the belligerent bassline of Steven Mandell and Mitch Hosier’s vicious beats and it is a full-on accosting of ears. Equally though, it provides a virulent contagion of hungry hooks and inventive twists, all unpredictable and imaginatively leaping around with sonic Saint Vitus Dance.

Something akin to Norwegian band Shevils, the track ensures eager attention is locked in and ready to be plundered by next up Carpe Diem, Tomorrow. Just as keen to ravage the senses, it uses a compelling tangy groove as its lure, winding it around ears as inner attitude boils and festers fuelling the rhythmic antagonism and sonic web shaping the fiercely magnetic track.

Church Burner twists harmonic dexterity into its own fevered clamour, compelling contrasts blending as the track creates an individual tapestry of instinctive challenges and tantalising enterprise to match and at times outshine its predecessors before Bartenders Without Wings steps forward from a less forceful introduction. As Kellum’s heart pours emotion, melodic expression soaks the guitar, that raw energy and emotive power continuing to line every aspect of the powerful encounter. It is a creative and emotional outpouring which captivates in a completely different way to those before it but just as potently with its own open turmoil.

The ferocious untethered turbulence of Danger Music #9 bursts free next, its sonic ire flowing through another tapestry of unpredictability and imagination driven trespasses of the senses while CancerEater boils and vents in its cauldron of punk forged, noise infested animosity. Even when a track is raging within Anti-Melody, it shows a tenacity of invention and devilment, traits the song revels in as much as any around it.

Both imposingly enjoyable encounters are subsequently eclipsed by Broken Culture. With its swinging groove and boisterous percussive bait, the song needs mere seconds to enslave especially when the bass groans with irritable intent. The combined enterprise unveiled unites in a devilish swagger quickly stood astride by Kellum’s vocal confrontation, that irritability infesting all except a delicious breath of melodic and harmonic seduction which steals its own few seconds of major persuasion. With a controlled yet tempestuously volatile nature, the song continues to tease and harass the senses, treating them to a whole new American Standards adventure for the album’s best track.

The release comes to a close with the crabby crawl of Chicago Overcoat, a rapacious consuming of ears with instinctive liveliness to its energy and choleric design. It is a striking end to easily the finest thing to escape American Standards. The band has never been slow in providing memorable and stirring encounters but Anti-Melody is their most complete yet, a hungrily inventive proposal and easy to suggest the key to greater recognition.

Anti-Melody is available now @ https://americanstndrds.bandcamp.com/album/anti-melody

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Pete RingMaster 02/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Gnarwolf – II

Photo credit: Scott W. Coleman

Not to be confused with the equally fine British hardcore band Gnarwolves, Gnarwolf is a primal roar from Texas whose snarl is also hardcore bred and demandingly distinct. The Austin hailing foursome of Andy, Trent, Steven, and Polo are about to release their second EP, II. Like its title, musically the band gets to the point without fuss. There is no beating around the bush in sound and intent, just raw and intensive examinations of the senses and emotions; a trespass which is merciless, abrasive, and increasingly tasty.

There is no mistaking the admitted influence of bands such as Every Time I Die, Norma Jean, and The Chariot in the Gnarwolf sound, essences which fuelled last year’s debut EP. Abandon was a formidable introduction to the band and it seems quickly picked up a whole new flood of fans the way of the quartet. It is success easy to imagine II finding as a bare minimum. There is a new wealth of inventive hostility and unpredictable imagination to their sophomore release without defusing any of the venomous causticity and cacophony of antagonism which enhanced its predecessor, as well as the potential of even bolder things nestling in its stirring body.

It starts with Harold: The Hero where straight away beats rap at the door before ravenous metal seeded riffs and senses slamming beats join throat scarring spite flavoured vocals in breaking through the defences. It is an instant punk roar to get off on, the technical dance of the guitars enhancing rather than distracting from the instinctive belligerent holler. That unpredictability is already at play, adding an almost schizophrenic hue to the dirty frenzy gripping ears and a quickly awoken appetite.

Its persuasive challenge is followed by that of Jessie: The Sheriff, an even more agitated and concussive affair veined by toxically spicy grooves and mixed vocal uproar. For a minute and a half it bullies, ravages, and invigorates body and satisfaction, hitting the sweet spot in noisy discontent and ferocity before Mr. And Mrs Jenkins: The Mayor And His Wife unleashes its own infectiously irritable clamour of sound and heart where sonic ire twists and turns with increasing corrosive seduction.

Anne: The Widow entwines ears in its own intoxicating but fearsome hooks next; the flirtation of a citric melody quickly accompanied by vocal exasperation and in turn a gloriously predatory bassline. It all merges into something harsher and filthier within a few more seconds, a brawling cloud of ill-content eventually losing its shape as that first sonic lure frees itself again with vocal harmonics as raw as they are warmly enticing in tow. The song is pure captivation eventually leaving lingering wounds on emotionally and sonically scoured flesh and senses.

From there Hector: The Foreigner simply throws its mordant might at the listener, guitars and vocals a scalding scourge as rhythms prowl with their own dark intent. For personal tastes, some of the twists do not come off as well as elsewhere within the release but are fleeting moments in another highly bracing and pleasurable assault.

The EP concludes with The Dodge Brothers: The Cowboys, a maelstrom of spiralling guitar incitement, rhythmic blitzing, and vocal acrimony but also a theatre of melody woven drama as keys court thoughts and emotions from within the turmoil to brew a haunting epilogue.

There seems to be an exciting wave of noise-mongers emerging right now, new and those finally seeing some attention from their place within the underground. Gnarwolf seal their place to the fore of that outbreak with II, a release as punk and metal as it is noise and hardcore, and more and more one thrilling invasion of the psyche.

The II EP is released April 8th.

For more info check out…

https://www.facebook.com/gnarlywerewolf   https://twitter.com/gnarlywerewolf   https://gnarlywerewolf.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 31/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Eight Days – More To Life

eight-days-band-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

Seemingly tagged as melodic hardcore more often than not but showing a hefty side in hook laden punk rock in their new proposition, British trio Eight Days is one of those bands knocking on the door of broader attention. Since emerging on the first breath of 2014, the London based outfit has earned a reputation of being one of the more potent forces within the underground scene. Evidence of that strength linked with a generous invention for ears and imagination to embrace can be found in the More To Life EP, a release suggesting that Eight Days might soon be going above ground to tap into national attention.

With inspirations said to come from the likes of Norma Jean, Black Peaks, Blink 182, and Yellowcard, Eight days released their debut at the end of their first year. The well-received No Idols EP was followed by the band rampaging across the UK on numerous tours before sophomore EP, Surrounded By The Ones Who Want Me To Fail, was unveiled to greater acclaim, proving that the months had also seen the band’s songwriting and sound blossoming.

More to Life is another step forward in all aspects by Eight days, a quartet of songs as raw and emotionally intrusive as they are fiercely infectious with dramatic hooks and surprising twists to the fore. There are still areas where uniqueness is a less obvious proposal but continuing as they are, that is something easy to suspect being remedied in the future.

eight-days-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewThe EP opens up with Was It All Worth It and straight away the track has attention hooked as a melody, with a mix of warmth and shadow in its character, wraps enticingly around ears. A rising storm of rhythms led by the feisty beats of  Lewis Fife with the brooding rumble of James Carty’s bass alongside soon join the invitation, it all taking the listener into the turbulent yet catchy heart of the song where the guitar of Ben Brazier casts suggestive melodies and inventive hooks around his emotion flushed vocal squalls. It is a potent mix captivating from start to finish, melodic and post hardcore textures engaging each other in an arguably less than original but certainly potent way for a strong start to the release.

The band’s imagination kicks up a gear from hereon in starting with Unclear as the threesome bring some stronger punk rock elements into their bruising dramatic roar. Carrying a touch of Cancer Bats to its bellow, the second song bounds through ears with venom and animosity though again the instinctive catchiness of their song’s gaits and swinging rhythms make it all very enticing. Spicy hooks and unexpected twist and turns in the imagination of the song makes it stand out in no time, group shouts and the predatory growl of the bass adding to a creative drama not as obvious in its predecessor.

It is a fresh invention and boldness even more persuasive in the following Counterweight. From its first breath, the song is throwing tangy grooves and virulent hooks at the listener while Brazier’s throat is raw through ire fuelled confrontation. The track is irritable rock ‘n’ roll, an irrepressible trespass on the senses and the biggest highlight of the already impressing release.

A growling grouchy bassline opens up final track Walls; hard and melodic rock spiced flavours mixing with the band’s instinctive aggressive enterprise. At times a twist away from taking best song honours from its predecessor, the song is a fine end to a very satisfying release.

More To Life is proof that Eight Days are something fresh in a crowded melodic hardcore scene and once they find that real uniqueness there may be no stopping them.

The More To Life EP is out in stores on Friday 14th October and @ https://eightdaysuk.bandcamp.com/album/more-to-life and http://eightdaysuk.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/EightDaysUK  https://twitter.com/eightdaysuk

Pete RingMaster 13/10/2016
Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

34 – Self Titled EP

34 Promo Pic  _RingMasterReview

Grouchier than a stoked up hornet nest and just as damaging, the sound of Kansas City hailing 34 leaves no hiding place for the senses and imagination on the band’s debut EP. The five-track self-titled offering is a rabid and ravenous fusion of hardcore, noise, and metal, all honed into an assault with a sonic sting just as merciless as its rhythmic and vocal bite, and both incidentally constantly veering towards irresistible.

Formed in 2015, 34 features current and former members of bands such as Sisters Of…, Eighteen Visions, At The Left Hand of God, David Hasselhoff On Acid, and Maps For Travelers. It has taken little time for the band to make a potent mark, their live ferocity acclaimed and devoured with shows alongside the likes of Black Breath, Motograder, 68, and Norma Jean adding to the quintet’s rising reputation. Now it is the EP preparing to stir things up further, a success hard to see failing with its impressive and seriously solid introduction to a wider landscape to the band.

The release leaves a lingering and memorable mark with its first two confrontations alone; the EP’s best tracks setting the tone and creative stature of the release with Alpha Blade starting things off. Fair to say we were hooked straight away by the dulled yet anthemic lure of drums which opens up the track. Their flat and compelling resonance easily has ears and appetite attentive, both further gripped as the wiry grooves and sonic animosity of the guitars winds around the senses before allowing the pulsating bassline of Erich Thomas and Jason Shrout’s increasingly addictive beats to lay their magnetic bait. With the throat raw snarls escaping vocalist Brett Carter taking their share of attention too, in no time the song shares a raw magnetism, showing itself a belligerent and aggressive beast with sinews sculpted in virulent noise and biting hooks. Like Unsane meets Pigs with the caustic catchiness of a Coilguns or Shevils, the tracks seduces as it corrodes the senses, every twist and turn within its unpredictable body enjoyably toxic.

34band_LOGO _RingMasterReviewThe following Stick Em Up is just as imposing and thrilling. It opens with chunky scarred riffs which need little time to persuade, their hint of repetitive temptation soon revealed to be one riveting texture in the grooved and rhythmic provocation of the track. As with the first though, things are soon evolving and shifting as melodically fiery and sonically scathing passages entwine with adventurously bruising endeavour within the track’s rock ‘n’ roll. The guitars of Phil Wolf and RL Brooks persistently nag and entice, stirring up the imagination and psyche as Carter vocally and lyrically savages with the backing of the similarly aggressive and potent tones of Brooks.

The final trio of tracks within the EP do not quite live up to the first pair, such their might, but with T.S.Y.T first, all only add to a thickly enjoyable and striking introduction to 34. The third track is as irritable and uncompromising as those before; bullying and arousing the senses with spiky grooves and predacious rhythms as vocals blaze while its successor, Flatliners, springs a Quicksand spicing across its scorched canvas and in its sonic causticity. The song is probably the most adventurous of the five, exploring different creative scenery which swiftly comes and goes, then returns with greater dexterity and imagination as new ear exciting twists become involved.

The EP closes with Machines, a furious tempest and web of emotional and sonic tempestuousness riding on the whiplash effect of Shrout’s and Thomas’ predatory rhythms. It is a forceful and fiercely satisfying end to a great first look at 34. It is easy to see and hear why the band has made such a potent impact already, and to expect, as their sound and imagination grow bolder, they are going to be a potent force in the driving of hardcore/noise ahead.

The 34 EP is released digitally and on limited edition clear red vinyl May 20th via Fountain City Records @ https://34kcmo.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/34kcmo    https://www.instagram.com/34kcmo/

Pete RingMaster 20/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Filth In My Garage – Songs From The Lowest Floor

FIMG_RingMasterReview

Dripping melancholic animosity as physical and emotional dissonance invades ears and the imagination at every turn, Songs From The Lowest Floor makes a potent excuse for keeping creators, Filth In My Garage under close attention. The band’s debut album is an invasive slice of post hardcore driven incitement which is going to be hard to ignore, no matter to what degree its bracing and abrasive enterprise persuades individual tastes. With the unpredictability of noise and punk rock adding to its increasingly fascinating character, Songs From The Lowest Floor is certainly a striking ravishment, with a further potent line in hooks and daring inventiveness sure to grab plenty of eager appetites.

Filth In My Garage was formed in 2007, founded by guitarist Matteo, vocalist Stefano, and drummer Luca. As their sound grew and was honed, the band found it developing a post hardcore heart which went to subsequently flavour a trio of EPs, all catching local support which itself expanded with each encounter. Now with drummer Mauro, guitarist Jack, and bassist Simone alongside Matteo and Stefano, the Bergamo quintet looks ready to lure bigger spotlights their way with Songs From The Lowest Floor.

Released via Argonauta Records, the album opens up with Stampede and immediately ears feel like they are facing a gunslinger within a sultry western set sky. The instrumental slowly rises to its full height as sonic tendrils offer a smouldering tempting against portentous shadows which court the emotionally thick character of the opening. A spark for ears and imagination, the track slips seamlessly into the bruising rock ‘n’ roll of Black and Blue. It is a quickly persuasive incitement cantering along with an infectious gait and energy as Stefano’s hardcore seeded squalls uncage lyrical and emotional ire. As the song expands its sonic volatility, a veining of expressive melodies emerges to blend with a harmonic caress of vocals. It is a recurring moment in the tempest of the track, never hanging round but seeming to spark new adventure to the maelstrom of intensity around it.

FIMG_COVER_RingMasterReviewDevil’s Shape is as antagonistic and predacious at its start as the last was by its close, though it quickly shows, even if at times with subtlety, imaginative twists and turns within the tide of riffs and sonic discord. Rhythmically the track is an anthemic protagonist, stirring up eager attention even as things slow a touch as hostility rises. A calmer passage provides an oasis in the storm, it’s emotionally charged melodic calm drifting over the senses to beguile thoughts midway before its surroundings begin to bristle again and crowd in on the lure of clean vocals and warm melodies.

Grouchy riffs and gripping bass hues line the emergence of the following instrumental Greenwitch, though its air and charm is seeded in the album’s opening track. That predacious coaxing soon steers the piece through a mercurial landscape of sonic antipathy persistently skirted by the anthemic enticement of drums and bestially toned bass. As mentioned previously, the band’s sound is post hardcore spawned yet this song alone shows the great variety and weave of flavours the band skilfully employs and takes tenaciously into the prickly attitude of the invasively enveloping The Awful Path. The track is compelling stuff, impressing most, as does the album, when it without hint but coherently slips into seemingly unconnected detours of imagination and gripping adventurous sound; something personal tastes hope the band boldly explores more in the future.

Red Door is another swaying and slipping into the psyche with a spaghetti western scented melodic climate. Its sweltering air is more inviting than oppressive, and a rich embracing of ears and thoughts which paves the way for, in this case, a bullying of vocals and raw intensity. The track keeps its reins on its animus though, even as Stefano spills the lyrical discontent from within the magnetic endeavours of Matteo and Jack. Of course in time, the track frees itself into a fierce blaze but still retains rock ‘n roll contagiousness to its irritated animosity. Understandably references to bands like Poison The Well and Norma Jean come up around Filth In My Garage but here alone, you can find great reasons to mention the likes of Coilguns or Sofy Major as further clues to that moment in time.

The forceful and enthralling adventure is completed by firstly the truculent and increasingly addictive escapade of The Lowest Floor and finally the riveting drama of Owl Feather Band. The first bounds through ears leaving bruises and concussive residues in its wake; though it too has plenty of great contrasts through unexpected moments whilst its successor is a journey through a tapestry of textures and flavours within an equally evolving wind of intensity and aggression. Arguably the most imaginative and exploratory song on the album, it provides a fine end to an impressive first look, for us, at Filth In My Garage.

No album should be assessed fully on one or two listens and that certainly applies to Songs From The Lowest Floor. It is over time that it reveals an imagination and adventure which allows the band to intrigue and grab keen interest right now but will ensure, as it develops, they stand right out in a crowded post hardcore landscape ahead. Filth In My Garage is a band, as suggested earlier, it is going to be hard to ignore.

Songs from the Lowest Floor is out now via Argonauta Records and @ http://filthinmygarage.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/filthinmygarage

Pete RingMaster 08/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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This Is Shark Country – Chances

This Is Shark Country - Promo Photo_RingMaster Review

As you would imagine from a band name like This Is Shark Country, there is a real bite and unbridled tenacity to their sound; voracity bred in the fusion of technical metal and hardcore which the Berkshire quintet is increasingly becoming more and more acclaimed for. New EP, Chances, is further evidence to that fact and of the growing potency and potential the band embraces in their striking creativity; it a roar of four tracks fuelled by ire and sculpted with imagination seeded craft.

Formed in 2011, This Is Shark Country has also become renowned for their live hunger and prowess, a presence taking in most of the UK whilst sharing stages with the likes of ‘68 (ex-Norma Jean), Nexilva, Palm Reader, Exist Immortal and many more. Their debut album Saviour was uncaged in 2013 to keen fan and in some quarters, potent media attention. Taking a year to make, the Newbury band now unleashes Chances, an encounter revealing greater strength and invention in the band’s sound and songwriting which suggests that This Is Shark Country is a band bringing new adventure and striking promise to the UK hardcore scene.

This Is Shark Country - Chances Artwork_RingMaster ReviewThe EP opens with Sitting Pretty and within a breath the guitars of Ben Mercer and Nick Blair are spinning a web of technical prowess and enticing expression, the bass of Jamie Holmes no slouch in gripping attention either with his lure of dark strings. Swiftly the song is a climatic affair, emotion and sound colluding as vocalist Oli Cole lays down an antagonism of voice and narrative within the blossoming tempest. Calm and elegant moments also add to the temptation of the song, their shining passages still prowled by the predatory tones of the bass within a constant rhythmic web swung by drummer Chris Sheen. The track is a potent and welcomingly unpredictable start to the EP but soon eclipsed by its successor.

Ghosting is reeled in on a punk infused hook, a bait of rock ‘n’ roll seared in gripping sonic endeavour. Continuing to entice, its lead in grows into a noise/alternative rock turbulence with rhythms a carnal attraction as the guitars create a virulently caustic rain of riveting enterprise. Though no lightweight when it comes to skills, the song is a more out and out rocker than the technical compulsion crafted by its predecessor, and in many ways, it is that impressively crafted punk ‘n’ roll fury which sees the release breach another plateau.

The EP’s title track is a similarly cultured blaze of hardcore contagion, though this time the djent sparked zeal of the band is entangled in the tendrils of melodic acidity and sonic imagination shaping the track. Of course Cole is straddling all with his undiluted bellow, his angst soaked delivery unafraid to tweak its attack to ensure even there some level of variety adds to the drama of the lively incitement. Becoming more antagonistic and bruising with every minute, its metal seeds gnawing at the senses as its punk heart roars, the song fiercely impresses before flowing into closing track Forever In Waiting.

Instantly an intimidating theatre lines the bait of riffs and bass, and almost as swiftly the guitars are wrapping it in a weave of rapacious invention and challenging intensity. More of a grower than the previous pair of offerings within Chances, the song blooms into another impressive provocation if one lacking that final decisive spark of others.

To go along with the press release for Chances, the EP is something fans of bands like Periphery, Every Time I Die, and Sikth will get a kick out of but there is plenty more to This Is Shark Country and their sound, some realised here and some as potential for their future maelstroms of imagination. What is very clear though is that the British hardcore/rock scene has another seriously stirring protagonist in the making.

The Chances EP is released November 13th through all stores and digital platforms.

https://www.facebook.com/ThisIsSharkCountry    https://twitter.com/tisharkcountry

Pete RingMaster 13/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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