LongFallBoots – For The Journey

The clue was there in the EP released soon after their debut album of 2015, a more than strong hint now thickly fuelling the new album from UK outfit LongFallBoots. Quite simply as it has evolved, their sound is becoming dirtier and more primal yet equally it is becoming more compellingly devious and eagerly imaginative, a mix which makes For The Journey one easy to recommend invasion of the senses. It is a release which will not be for everyone but hold an appetite for voracious grooves, dense scuzz soaked riffs, and a heaviness which devours the senses whilst a band spins a web of invigorating enterprise and it is a must investigation.

The Warwickshire band was formed by guitarist Alex Calvert-Caithness (KOSS, Cincinnati Bow Tie) and drummer Ben Holdstock (Paralus, Cincinnati Bow Tie) the night their other members of the band they were in  failed to turn up for rehearsal one night. Two and a half hours later and LongFallBoots emerged with the It Was Duke EP written. A series of further EPs followed, all written in a single night and recorded over a brief weekend. It was debut album Wait For The Echo of 2015 which awoke a great many more to their voracious multi-flavoured sound, the You’ll Know It When It Happens EP a year later cementing their reputation for ear grabbing enterprise and senses devouring sound whilst igniting that fresh feral but inventive breath which makes For The Journey so boldly stand out.

With stoner, space, and heavy rock essences as ripe within their noise borne groove woven sound, it is enjoyable not to easily tag the results but imagine a fusion of Melvins, The Great Sabatini, Mastodon, KEN mode, and Converge and you get a suggestive whiff of For The Journey. Diving into album opener Start offers the character if not the diversity of the album, the song coaxing ears with a melodic invitation before invading ears with a horde of guitar and bass riffs upon the biting beats of Holdstock. His throat scarring roars only add to the impact with the track truly gripping ears through virulent grooves and a combined vocal prowess across the band.

Bullet Cake follows, it too needing mere seconds to entice attention as stoner nurtured lures beckon ears as an increasingly heavier breath soaks every subsequent note and roar. All the while melodic and harmonic enticement work their temptation, the bass and vocal potency of Amy Smith a contrast of dark and light around the sonic weaving of Calvert-Caithness and fellow guitarist Jonathan Martin. The track is a magnet pretty much like all within the already gripping release, next up No Rest confirming the point. Once more a gentle captivating beginning leads to a primal surge of sound and subsequent senses ravishing endeavour, a great sludge rock consumption revolving its persuasion with intricate melodic teasing.

That ability to intrigue and seduce from the very first second of a song is a potent trait in the band’s writing and imagination, the outstanding Good (In Theory) stepping forward next to epitomise that quality, the punk soaked scourge of sound which follows its opening persuasion as captivating in its voracity and discontent while Part of the Plan for one minute and a half relishes the temptation of its Melvins meets Pixies spiced irritability before in turn Devolver shakes things up again with its fusion of sludge thick enmity and gentle melodic reflection.

That diversity within For The Journey continues to flourish as the grunge meets melodic rock of Take It Back demands attention, the volatility in its heart and breath as compelling as its calmer infectiousness while both Nihilust and POWAH welcomingly trespass ears with their respective melodic/garage rock and infernally barbarous proposals. The thrilling latter nags as it drones, seduces as it entices, ears never knowing whether to succumb or escape as the song twists through its kaleidoscope of imagination.

As Megabear teases and taunts with the vocals of Smith pure temptation and To A Man wraps its web of wiry deceit and tenacious enterprise around again fearing but addictive ears, the album just breaches another level of tempting, one cemented by the dense and delicious rock ’n’ roll of The Old Tongue and the drama soaked journey of Sailing Stones.

Concluded by the epic adventure of Palindrome, a track which ensures its length is easily embraced through surprises, enterprise and imagination, For The Journey left us exhausted and hungry for more. LongFallBoots is band which in a way came to be by accident or after the glory of their new album maybe it was simply music fate.

For The Journey is available now @ https://longfallboots.bandcamp.com/album/for-the-journey-2

https://www.facebook.com/LongFallBoots   https://twitter.com/LongFallBoots

Pete RingMaster 26/01/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

The Gaa Gaas – Self Titled

There is no sense of understatement when we say that the debut album from UK outfit The Gaa Gaas has been one long awaited and highly anticipated release, to the band as much as fans, but now finally here there is no sense of an anti-climax in its arrival and triumphant presence.

We admit we have been hooked on The Gaa Gaas sound since discovering the Jersey hailing, often Brighton/ London based outfit over a decade ago, the band itself emerging from the imagination of vocalist/guitarist Gavin Tate and co in 2003 after meeting at a garage punk club night called ‘Bomp’ in St Helier, Jersey. Subsequent singles, EP’s and live shows across the UK and Europe have only brought greater acclaim by the year and richer reputation by the creative escapade but as all artists know it is a perpetual struggle to realise the next step or ignite greater attention. The Gaa Gaas have met all obstacles and hold ups with resistance as the years have sneaked by but the determination to release their album and breach major spotlights has now found its moment with the latter of the two surely to deservedly follow.

The Gaa Gaas sound is as individual in its character and enterprise as it is unique in its voice. It is bred on the nutrients of post punk, punk, psych rock, noise and much more but as suggested emerges as its own senses menacing, imagination seducing sonic virus. From within a drone enlivened nagging, hooks bite with creative rabidity as rhythms tease with serial killer like intent. That alone proves an irresistible trespass but add the infernal melodic toxins which the band just as easily conjure, it all makes for one rapacious addiction which is no more enjoyable and compelling than within their self-titled debut album.

The album opens with Close Your Eyes, a lone strum of guitar providing a lingering scent of sonic jeopardy from within which a rhythmically swinging clamour bursts. Instantaneously it is a contagious affair, the bass of Jamey Exton leading the rhythmic infection further driven by drummer Stewart Brown’s bold strikes. The sonic smog escaping Tate’s guitar smothers as it seduces, his vocals dancing with almost contempt on the wires within that enveloping incitement. Resistance to the track’s bounce is non-existent as the track manipulates limb and spirit alike, a glorious start to the release firmly declared.

In its own Bauhaus hued architectural landscape, Statues proves just as gripping, bass and beats setting a virulent lure as guitar and vocals express their twisted psych breath upon industrial and post punk honed intimation. Tate’s keys are just as invasive and animated as the ravening sounds escaping his guitar, the track as magnificent as its predecessor and indeed the following V.O.L.T.A.I.R.E. A track we devoured years back, it is still as powerful and irrepressible now, from its first citric sighs through the rhythmic stroll which invades every instinct to move, and the tart melodies which wrap its pure contagion, the song devours ears and appetite like a swing loaded creative plague.

The Type Of Mood is just as insistent in its groove and infection, the keys of Peter Hass a tangy sweetness in the more caustic but no less tempting commotion expressed by Tate’s guitar. Again there is a vocal eighties post punk air to the track, a cold nostalgic din given greater depth and adventure by The Gaa Gaas’ senses trespassing imagination while the ever rousing Hypnoti(z)ed provides a less intrusive but equally as overwhelming and manipulative not forgetting delicious incitement. The bass of Ali Cooper is at its core temptingly harassing as beats bite and Tate’s vocals holler, everything off kilter and bewitching like an especially devious cobra before it strikes.

C.U.T.S. is built of the same devilment, every aspect niggling at the senses and each strand of its web crawling under the skin before unleashing its predacious rabidity and sonic fermentation. Drowned in its tide and blissful in its maelstrom, the track just had us lost in our own physical and emotional eruption before The One Eyed Stranger took ears and imagination on a stroll through dark avenues of enterprise and addiction. The sax of Luke Georgiou lights the way with delicious drama, its enterprise echoed in the tones of Tate and the persistently swinging rhythms of Cooper and drummer Matt Maguire. Once more Bauhaus come to mind in many ways across the track and though there is no real comparison to The Gaa Gaas’ sound, Pete Murphy and co are the closest to give some inkling of its identity.

In the 2018 version of Entertainment which graces this release, punk rock is the fuel to its discontent and creative agitation, the track biting back at a landscape as prevalent now as any previous time as the beats of Maguire take lethal pot shot. It is a song which in its early writing hints at the eventual wonderfully nagging quality of the band’s sound which is fully employed by next up Perception within its scuzzy senses haunting, habit forming rapture.

The album concludes with Indian Giver, a beguiling psych rock nurtured instrumental as potent on the imagination as it is the ears. There is a Cure like scenting to the track, especially in its rhythmic saunter, and dour breath which manages to be as radiant in beauty as it is dark in suggestion. It is a fascinating and enslaving end to a release which even with our already in place eager expectations of pleasure left us basking in richer joy, invasively impressed, and expecting the band to finally find deserved recognition in far broader and intense spotlights.

The Gaa Gaas album is out now on Movement-2 Records; available @ https://thegaagaas.bandcamp.com/album/self-titled-album

http://www.thegaagaas.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/TheGaaGaas   https://twitter.com/The_Gaa_Gaas

Pete RingMaster 05/12/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Coilguns – Watchwinders

Pic laure gilardhucci

Always seeking proposals that challenge and ignite the senses whilst forging new invasive temptation, Swiss quartet, Coilguns, has always been a rewarding refuge and evolving adventure come trespass of noise and imagination. Unpredictability and creative intensity has as much shaped and fuelled their tracks, EPs and albums as physical intimation and intimidation and new album, Watchwinders is no exception; in fact it is the band’s most compelling, ravenous, and rousing slab of incitement yet.

With both debut album Commuters and its successor of last year, Millennials, we have come away wondering and in regard to the latter maybe doubting whether Coilguns could emulate let alone eclipse their feral majesty. We will not be allow that fruitless thought to arise with Watchwinders despite its magnificence but simply bask in its irresistible provocation and intrusive craft.

Released as all the band’s encounters via Hummus Records, the label founded by guitarist Jona Nido, Watchwinders was written and recorded during one intense month-long session, and as always with the band recorded live, and there is no escaping the instinctiveness of its breath and assault. There are moments when it is as if the band itself does not know what is coming next yet each song is a skilfully woven tapestry of sound, texture, and dissonance as fluid and earnest as it is unscrupulous verging on psychotic.

The album immediately lured unbridled attention with opener Shortcuts. For a minute and a half, Luc Hess manipulates with his galvanic senses poking beats, the vociferously presented tones of vocalist Louis Jucker just as potent in enslaving ears and appetite. In swift time the swipe of noise punk proved enslaving and only enforced its hold and drama before Subculture encryptors forced its thick and also quickly gripping body through speakers. As rhythms fall over themselves to invade, the guitars of Nido and Jucker create a sonic scourge; one only further bracing once embracing the great raw pestering of the latter’s vocals. From the abrasive flurry a just as devious calm emerges, rhythms and sonic threads a virulent nagging matched in prowess and magnetism by the vocals with the synth of Donatien Théivent carrying the same composed yet volatile enterprise, as the track revolves in rapacious noise and intent.

Big writer’s block erupts with its own contagious spite and captivation next, rhythms again at the core of its bold and vigorous creative coercion where punk and hardcore essences entangle in noise and sonic voracity. A breath taking cauldron of untamed and tense captivation it is followed by the album’s title track which eagerly uncages an esurient flood of urgency and compulsive tempestuousness in sound and emotion. The track is superb, managing to eclipse its mighty predecessors even by the brief time it takes its cyclone to slip into a bewitching oasis of magnetic voice and synth. Even so a current of rhythmic badgering escapes the agility of Hess, niggling and inviting as Jucker’s throat provides a similarly rich coaxing.

The prowling doomy presence of The Growing block view follows, the track skirting and courting the senses with its dark, heavy and evocative bait before Manicheans shares it’s twisting and turning, threat carrying drama. It is another drenched in discord bred thought and sound, a track fraught and agitated physically and emotionally with both songs effortlessly adding to the persuasive weight of the release.

Prioress is next up, an encounter haunting and staining the senses with its respective calm intimacy and drama bred turbulence. Locked away in its gripping, slightly suffocating dark defiled rapture, ears and appetite again found themselves defenceless to the band’s invention with eventual escape from the song’s creative confinement only the doorway into insatiable carnal tenacity courtesy of The Morning shower. A rapacious noise punk trespass as psychically catchy as it is emotionally disharmonious it joined its companions in easily luring us to stomp to its tune.

The unpolished, blemish embracing reflection of A Mirror bias beguiled with its singular but potent tenebrous breath with Urban reserves straight after unleashing a hardcore winded cyclone animated tempest to equally enthral and incite. With the keys of Théivent alone a portrait of fateful and predictive suggestion within the track’s tumultuous and unstable expulsion, the second of the two is the kind of infernal uproar that makes Coilguns and indeed Watchwinders so unique and addictive.

The album closes out with firstly the devouring hounding of Broken records and lastly the hypnotic seduction of Periscope. The first simply engulfs and consumes all in its path without suffocating its organic infectiousness while its successor arises upon a sonic line to draw and open up every predatory shadow and caliginous depth of false utopia and together they provide a fearsomely glorious conclusion to an outstandingly impressive release.

Once more Coilguns has left us open mouthed and lustfully devouring an album which leaves the world a better if more soiled place.

Watchwinders is out now via Hummus Records on CD and vinyl; available as a name your price download @ https://coilguns.bandcamp.com/

Full Coilguns tour dates w/ Yautja

08.11 – Paris (F) @ Espace b

09.11 – Sheffield (UK) @ Record Junkee

10.11 – Leeds (UK) @ Temple of Boom

11.11 – London (UK) @ The Macbeth Of Hoxton

12.11 – Glasgow (UK) @ Broadcast

13.11 – Manchester (UK) @ Satan’s Hollow

14.11 – Northampton (UK) @ TBA

15.11 – Utrecht (NL) @ TBA

17.11 – Gdansk (PL) @ Ziemia

18.11 – Warsaw (PL) @ Poglos

19.11 – Krakow (PL) @ Warsztat

20.11 – Wroclaw (PL) @ DK Luksus

21.11 – Berlin (D) @ Zukunft am Ostkreuz

22.11 – Stuttgart (D) @ Ju-Ha West

23.11 – Fribourg (CH) @ Hummus Fest / Fri-Son

24.11 – Lyon (F) @ La Marquise

26.11 – Clermont-Ferrand (F) @ Raymond Bar

27.11 – Angers (F) @ Jokers Pub

28.11 – Oss (NL) @ Lollipop

29.11 – Fontaine l’Evêque (B) @ MCP Apache

30.11 – Liège (B) @ La Zone

https://www.facebook.com/coilguns    https://twitter.com/COILGUNS

Pete RingMaster 04/11/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Embracing the discord: the Matt Finucane Interview

Hi Matt and thank you for sparing time to chat with us.

Glad to. Thanks for asking.

Could you first introduce yourself and tell us how your musical presence came to be?

It’s the old, old story: this never-ending mission to be heard and understood, in other words I’m obsessed and not many people get it, but so what. It was time to move on from making lo-fi electronic-based stuff on my own, playing acoustic guitar in nice clean coffee shops and being called “quirky”…Time to get back on a real stage in unhygienic surroundings and yell at people, so I found a bass player (Stephen Parker) and a drummer (Barney Guy) on the circuit here in Brighton. Luckily, I was able to drag them into my world.

How would you define not only your sound but the creative character of the band?

The sound’s just pure emotional disorder: I can’t make feel-good music. The band’s focused on delivering the songs as tightly and urgently as possible, just keeping it sharp, but there’s a lot of room for personal expression…Which is how it should be… It rocks, but there’s something in there that isn’t… quite… right.

Are there any previous musical experiences for yourself or band members and how have they been embraced in what you do now?

Stephen’s a solo artist himself, used to be in a thrash metal band, can play pop covers; he’s at home anywhere on the music spectrum. This means he comes up with these fantastic basslines, the kind it’s great to listen to just on their own, but really rock in a very direct way. Barney does a lot of session gigs in about 500 bands, as with most drummers, so he’s likewise slick and versatile. This cuts out a lot of flab, we can zero in quick on what works. They bring pop smarts, enhance the actual tunes, but without sacrificing the more out-there elements – it feels quite spontaneous, which is always good. We’re all very into keeping the energy levels high.

Is there a particular process to your songwriting?

I put myself into some kind of self-hypnotic state and rough out the songs, and then write down the chords for Stephen, and away we go – just smash through them until they take a fixed shape. It’s open to any changes the others want to suggest; I’m not sentimental about my own ideas, because I’ve been doing this long enough now to know that you can always create more; I just wait a while for my subconscious to throw something out. It helps to think of song structure in story terms – prologue, opening paragraph, cliff-hanger, that kind of thing.

Would you tell us about your latest release?

“The Seizure” EP is three tracks recorded pretty much as-live by the band, at Church Road Studios with Julian Tardo… plus a final DIY track, featuring Mik Hanscomb of Junkboy on 12-string acoustic. He played drums before Barney then had to drop out and concentrate on making his own album, but we’d also done a few gigs as a duo playing acoustic arrangements of some of my older material. We had one new number, the first thing I wrote after getting out of rehab, which it seemed like a nice idea to include, for contrast to the other songs. They were done loud and raw with the express purpose of showcasing the band. It’s a rock record, brash and nasty, rather than the sort of introverted DIY head music I’d been putting together at home. Also, it was nice to let someone else think about the technical side for once. I’m not exactly hung up on audio quality – I recorded an EP using a mobile phone and some freeware a few years ago – but it was refreshing to work in a good studio with an expert.

What are the major inspirations to its heart and themes?

I keep coming back to addiction, because it directly affects me, and also it seems like practically everyone’s dependent on something, physically or emotionally, to help them through this life. So that’s an underlying thread, even if it’s not spelled out – there’s no preaching or Important Social Message – and it tied in to the idea that it’s hard nowadays to be honest, when there’s so much pressure to present yourself as a viable product for everyone else to consume, while you’re picking them apart in turn. I’m no longer a youth, so it’s also about expressing this discontent in a way that’s age-appropriate and concentrated. That sounds like an ordeal to listen to, but the idea was to put this into really driving, powerful music and make it a cathartic experience, rather than a gloomy slog through My Big Thoughts. So it leads up to a sonic outburst – a seizure, obviously – then ends on a calmer note.

I am always intrigued as to how artists choose track order on albums and EP’s and whether in hindsight they would change that. What has been the deciding factor for you or do songs or the main do that organically?

It varies with each project – the last album had a theme, the stuff before that was more of a patchwork, but in each case I try to have a consistent tone or atmosphere running through the whole thing. As mentioned above, the idea was to vent all this stuff and then torch it. So by the third track, we go abstract, just obliterate it all in a glowing cloud of plasma (I also play with various free improvisation wizards in Brighton, and wanted to apply that method to a rock song)… Then after the seizure, all the discords and harsh sounds, you get the spaced-out calm, which calls for acoustic guitars and deep trenches of weird reverb. It’s meant to be an interesting virtual space to visit, as opposed to just a collection of songs.

What do you find the most enjoyable part of being in a band and similarly the most cathartic?

For context – I used to find getting wasted and stumbling around the stage the most enjoyable part, it’s embarrassing to admit. At first I suspected I couldn’t perform without chemical help then found I could, but chemicals made it so much more fun… then it wasn’t fun anymore, just a flimsy cloak for my own dysfunction. But nowadays, I make a point of enjoying all of it. The whole process – the satisfaction of creating something, shaping it then blasting it out live: the expression of a whole complex of thoughts and emotions. Notice audience approval doesn’t really figure – communication’s the important thing. Also, it’s a way to spend your existence that doesn’t involve chasing around after money or power and then dropping dead in a premature heart explosion of bile and regret – not the way I do it, anyway.

For anyone contemplating checking you out live give some teasers as to what they can expect.

Sarcasm and sudden loud noises… Something that’s unsettling but in a good way, stimulating, like watching a horror movie – but without horror-type lyrics or anything like that.

What has been your most thrilling moment on stage to date?

Hate to burst this bubble, but on the whole it’s difficult to remember, or at least describe, those kinds of peak moments. It’s not like I’m up there sacrificing a live deer with my teeth every night – that, we can agree, would be memorable. It’s easy to describe the fuck-ups and disasters, but very hard to express how it feels when everything really flows and time stands still. Besides, it’s better to think even more thrilling stuff’s yet to come.

Do you have live dates coming up?

Wed 16 Oct, Eight Miles High @ Brunswick Cellar Bar (Brighton) – w/ Seadog & Fane

Wed 6 Nov, Rossi Bar (Brighton) – solo – w/ Junkboy & Jako

Sat 16 Nov, Biddle Bros (London E5)

Sun 24 Nov, Gladstone (London SE1) – solo

Sat 30 Nov, Grub Club @ Global Cafe (Reading) – w/ The Mirror Pictures + Adam & Elvis

Tue 3 Dec, Bloc (Glasgow)

Wed 11 Dec, Green Door Store (Brighton) – w/ Adam & Elvis + tbc

What else can we expect in the near future?

There’s an album’s worth of new songs I’m working through with the band, hopefully to record next year for release in late 2020, with a few guest musicians and a broader palette. More gigs (was hoping to expand into Europe, but now it’s a question of waiting to see how the Brexit fallout’s going to settle). A 24-hour magic ritual in an underground car park…(Not really, but that would be cool.) A fucking nervous breakdown trying to keep all those DIY plates spinning, probably; most of the time, I barely know what to expect myself.

What are the major inspirations to you sound wise and as a musician?

I was ruined by listening to Lou Reed and The Fall at an early age. Whatever it is in me that’s distressed, that’s not at rest, responded instinctively to stuff like that… found a way of making sense out of the world in it… and soon enough I was compelled to try and pass that on. I like the sound of raw electricity, loud guitars or acid synths, whatever – doesn’t matter how it’s conveyed.

And finally what song or release would you say was the spark to your passion for music?

It probably started with some silly pop song that injured my brain in childhood, but it’s not clear. Most musicians, deep down, are started off by the most random, silly stuff that they probably can’t recall or wouldn’t acknowledge (so even if I knew, I’m not sure I’d tell you).

Many thanks once again; anything else you would like to add?

Thanks for listening – it’s good when somebody makes the effort. I guess people just have to be willing to meet me halfway.

Check Matt out further @ https://mattfinucane.net/ and  https://www.facebook.com/Matt.x.Finucane/

Pete RingMaster 11/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Wizard Rifle – Self Titled

Like a sonic devil they tempt your pigeonholing and defining of their sound and with the same Mephistophelian glee side step every attempt with their infernal webs of sound. They are Oregon rockers Wizard Rifle and their latest album epitomises their devilish conjuring of creative deception. Their self-titled offering also provides one of the most rousing and thrilling encounters of the year. Their sound is punk, sludge rock, psych and thrash punk, noise rock, metal and much more besides in one cacophonous temptation; quite simply it is feral rock ‘n’ roll and across forty four minutes pure contagion.

Emerging in Portland in 2009, Wizard Rifle are no newcomers to high praise as their electric live presence, which has seen them share stages with the likes of The Melvins, High On Fire, YOB, Lightning Bolt, Bongzilla, Buzzov*en, Black Cobra, and Church of Misery, over time has been accompanied by two well-received full-lengths in Speak Loud Say of 2012 and Here in the Deadlight two years later. Now the duo of guitarist/vocalist Max Dameron and drummer/vocalist Sam Ford are ready to take on the world with a release which embraces the building blocks of its predecessors and shapes a proposition which defies convention, relishes devouring expectations, and sets out its own unique agenda in virulent noise.

Rocket to Hell ignites the babel of sound devouring the senses from with the album though there is no confusion in its creation and enterprise. The opener teases from its first breath with the plucking of guitar strings, the gentle lure the persuasive deceit before the ferocious babble of sound momentarily waiting to erupt. And break out it does with ravenous intent; the pair’s united vocals as harmonious as they are untamed as around them sonic squalls casts melodic and sonic temptation as raw as it is virulent. The track continues to infectiously nag as it rapaciously ravages, that tempest of flavours previously mentioned blended into a predacious trespass strapped with the keenest of hooks and salacious grooves.

As discord and melody craftily entangle it is a glorious incitement and matched by that within the following Cevaman Waltz. Rhythms prowl as a chugging guitar goes eye to eye with instincts, a devious grin lining rapid grooves and an epidemic of infection while equally compelling vocals ride its hungry currents. Again it is a mix which nags and harries but with less voracity than its predecessor though that is replaced by a pressure of urgency which only accelerates by the minute until erupting in a cyclone of wild and fertile commotion with those original grooves still steering the greed for the band’s invention.

A Celtic spicing infects the compelling landscape of next up Beneath the Spider, its emprise a tapestry of rabid intent and collected melodic dexterity spun with craft and imagination. There is a great manipulation to the Wizard Rifle sound, its hooks and grooves an infestation of the body as melodic irreverence grip the imagination and no more inescapable and powerful than within the eight minutes making up this slice of potent incitement.

The next twelve minutes plus comes in the shape of Funeral of the Sun, the closing cyclonic tempest of the previous track reaped of its incessant sonic persecution by the opening bait of its successor. Dangling acidic guitar lures it entices and then devours in swirls and expulsions of creative ruthlessness and barbarity but an assault which is pure untamed catchiness. Similarly vocals harmoniously invite and venomously bite before the progressive heart of the track emerges to just as potently seduce. The tide of noise cannot be abated for long and it returns but with a much more melodic breath. Pure fascination exudes the track, which never suffers in its length, as pleasure floods ears before it.

V concludes the release, psychedelic seducing radiating from within its intrepid venture of sound and ambition. Seductive and fierce, subtle and bold, the track provides an unpredictable multi-textured furnace of flavour and captivation.

Wizard Rifle’s album is a glorious contradiction; it is animatingly wild yet cleverly composed, boldly untethered but chained to distinct imagination and craft. It is also another of the year’s major pleasures which should see the band burst beyond previous boundaries of attention.

The Wizard Rifle album is out now via Svart Records; available @ https://wizardrifle.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/wizardrifle/

Pete RingMaster 06/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Eva Bartok – Self Titled EP

Clamorous, aggressive, and unapologetically abrasive, the sound of Welsh outfit Eva Bartok is a tempest of intensity and emotion yet an unapologetically contagious assault which makes their self-titled debut EP one impressive trespass. Offering four tracks which infest their surroundings like a primal storm, the release is a punk, metal, and noise bred cauldron of enterprise as virulent as it is cacophonous.

Eva Bartok breeds their tracks from the dissonance which shapes the world today, personal and broader issues from mental health to politics sparks to themes explored. It makes for a breath alone which takes no prisoner, defiance and resolve echoed in the tempest of sound joining the creative emprise.

The EP opens up with Lies and Trickery, the song almost taunting attention as Chris Hampson’s guitar wraps sonic wires around the waiting to erupt but still potent rhythmic presence of bassist Rob Pascoe and drummer Mikey Brown. Within another breath they do, a rousing and concussive mix as skilfully induced as the web of sonic discord and imagination around their forceful incitement. Hampson’s vocals are just as invasive and rousing, the track a swiftly tempestuous harassment of the senses as unpredictable and inventive as it is an ear crowding predator.

Chess Club is next up and immediately ensnared the appetite in its mesh of guitar borne threads and unscrupulous rhythmic manipulation. There is order in its disorder, vocals again a voracious antagonist within similarly bred sounds and all together making for an invasion of temptation and feral catchiness.

There is no escaping thinking of bands such as Converge, Every Time I Die, Refused and at times At the Drive-In across the EP but as shown by Mexico, Eva Bartok’s sound is unmistakably distinct and individual to them. The third track lingers back slightly as it brews its textures and sounds, subsequently launching at the listener in a rapacious clamour again craftily composed and venomously unleashed. Twists and turns come with relish and pass with lingering impact, the whole bullish storm a rousing incitement and as all tracks revealing the depth of the invention behind it by the listen.

Concluded by the caustic but welcomingly flirtatious squall that is Houses, another song which dances with the senses as it devours them and ignites the imagination with its entanglement of almost spiteful ideation and fevered enterprise, the Eva Bartok EP more than realises the promise of the band’s previous songs and sets a whole new agenda in reputation and spiky adventure.

The Eva Bartok EP is self-released on August 23rd.

https://www.facebook.com/evabartokband    https://twitter.com/EvaBartokBand

 Pete RingMaster 20/08/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The RingMaster Review picks its favourite metal, rock and noise releases of 2018

Across its busy year 2018 unleashed a horde of gripping and rousing metal, rock, and noise driven releases. Here we pluck out those covered by The RingMaster Review which had the juices flowing most lustfully of all…

1. Black Space Riders – Amoretum Vol. 2

2. Coilguns – Millennials

3. KEN mode – Loved

4. VNDTA – Pale Glow

5. Mammüth – Outlander

6. Black Space Riders – Amoretum Vol. 1

7. Eryn Non Dae. – Abandon Of The Self 

8. The Great Sabatini – Goodbye Audio

9. U-Foes – No More No More

10. Dead Register – Captive

11. Naberus – Hollow

12. Bailer – Self Titled

13. Hostile Array – Self Titled 

14. In Vain – Currents

15. Vantablack Warship – Abrasive Pulmonic Speak

16. Skulk, The Hulking – Afterbirth Of A Nation

17. The Ugly Kings – Darkness Is My Home

18. Spookshow Inc. – Visions Of The Blinded World pt I & II

19. The Castor Troys – Legends Never Die

20. Owl Company – Iris

21. Deville – Pigs with Gods

22. Arcaeon – Balance EP

23. Maudlin – Sassuma Arnaa

24. The Senton Bombs – Outsiders

25. Verni – Barricade