The Dropper’s Neck – Nineteen|Sixteen

The Droppers Neck Promo shot_RingMaster Review

To date there has always been a licking of lips in anticipation of any new encounter with The Dropper’s Neck and each time so far they have rewarded with dark rock ’n’ roll which simply infests body and imagination. True to form the UK quintet has done it again with their Nineteen|Sixteen EP, the dirtiest, sludgiest, most aggressively provocative offering from the band yet, an aural proposal perfectly suited to and reflective of its lyrical theme. The EP is inspired by The Great War and takes the listener along with its protagonist into the initial ‘glamour’ and lure of conflict, through its fierce pestilence before leaving them in the stark aftermath which follows. This all comes with the familiar but ever evolving fusion of psych and noise rock, punk and psychobilly brewed by the band, and quite simply it is another ravishing treat from The Dropper’s Neck.

Formed in 2011, The Essex band quickly pricked attention and appetites with early songs and releases but it was debut album Second Coming which lit an acclaiming and hungry spotlight. Drawing on influences such as Gallows, Blood Brothers, Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster, Cancer Bats, Every Time I Die, and Dead Kennedys, band and album unleashed something familiar yet powerfully unique, a distinctiveness which has festered and blossomed through the incendiary single Line Me Up For The Firing Squad and now to stronger depths with Nineteen|Sixteen. The single was certainly a potent teaser for the EP, though in hindsight just one glimpse of the dark throes and adventures now uncaged.

The Dropper's neck Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review   The release opens with the scene setting 57,470, an intro thrusting ears and imagination right into the landscape of rifle fire, thunderous artillery, and fear soaked horses. It’s violently portentous hue leads into King & Country, a sonic bridge to the incoming bruising beats and ravenous riffs entangled in an invitingly spicy groove. Rousing and anthemic, the track is a sign up of ears and emotions as potent as the bait enticing the young men of the narrative. Already though there is a snarl and corrosive edge to the music, expulsions of vocal hostility from Lloyd Mathews aligning with his expected and great monotone laced delivery. Hard rock ‘n roll stirring up air and body, the track is a forceful incitement setting things in compelling motion.

Somme comes next, the rhythmic and anthemic overtones of its predecessor veining its initial coaxing whilst hooks and grooves are soaked in even sharper, almost venomous incitement. Striding with an Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster meets Engerica like warped swing and brawling with a caustic Cancer Bats/KEN mode like ferocity, the latter becoming more intensive in ears as the reality of the horror of war is opened up, the track is little less than deranged bestial contagion.

Its increasing hellacious presence makes way for the even more psychotic Line Me Up For The Firing Squad, the track a maelstrom of rabid sounds, scarring vocals, and blistering viciousness. Within its raw and merciless tempest though, grooves and rhythms create the addictive shuffle of bait and infectiousness renowned from the band, the bass of Jack Turner especially seductive at times within the muddy and humid atmosphere of the unforgiving blaze. Production across the release is raw and very often as cold as the soundscape being explored; an aspect some have offered as a slight flaw but it only adds to and represents the physical effect and filthy ambience of the ground the EP’s context is inspired by.

The thumping beats of drummer Jamie Abela trap and push ears into the scuzzy punk ‘n’ roll of 200 Volts next, the guitars of Chris Blake and George Barrows creating a creative antagonism of defiant riffs and provocative grooves respectively. The predatory spine of the song is a virulent enticing which sends searing flames of sonic fire and expels hardcore spawned vocal hostility from its sobering bait with increasing tenacity and rage. It is an abrasive storm exciting and scarring already bruised and tender senses, no respite coming with the outstanding contagiously toxic and inventively addictive Monster. The track swarms through ears and over the psyche with its rhythmic emprise and sonic nagging, its body as the previous encounter, a garage punk spawned dynamo of bracing angst and violent intoxication, and the best track on the release, though there are so many rivals such as the closing Stutter which rampages straight after. Everything about the song, from jabbing and military seeded beats to erosive riffs, vocal diversity to scything grooves, is sheer inventive and hostile virulence, rock ‘n’ roll to honour the dead and incite the darkness of horrors past.

With a bugle announcing the end of hostilities in hidden track The Eleventh Hour, the Nineteen | Sixteen EP comes to a haunting close leaving thoughts rife and satisfaction full. The release is not a history lesson but certainly it makes a provocative and striking proposal with its pungent theme whilst musically revealing another thrilling exploit from one of the UK’s most exciting bands.

The Nineteen | Sixteen EP is available from 13th July @ https://thedroppersneck.bandcamp.com/album/nineteen-sixteen

https://www.facebook.com/thedroppersneck

RingMaster 10/07/205

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Watertank – Destination Unknown

SLF019 - hi-res cover_RingMaster Review

After ten years of existence, French rockers Watertank released debut album Sleepwalk in 2013 to heavy and deserved acclaim. Like for so many, it took our ears and appetites to hungry heights; in the words of our review the release was “an instigator of the purest temptation.” Now the band unleashes its successor Destination Unknown and lures even lustier responses with its irresistible concoction of sludge, stoner, and various other compelling styles. Taking the essential essences with made the first album so potent; Destination Unknown emerges as a fuller, more gripping proposal of sound and invention which in turn shows that its predecessor was just the appetiser to greater Watertank alchemy.

The Nantes band began in 2013, swiftly forging a strong fan base and reputation for their sound and stage presence with increasing success over the years. A couple of well-received EPs earned strong attention and praise before the release of Sleepwalk, whilst on stage the band proceeded to play with the likes of Torche, Kylesa, Baroness, Capricorns, Lair Of The Minotaur, and The Ocean amongst a great many. The band’s first album certainly sparked new spotlights upon Watertank though not to the level now expected to be aroused by Destination Unknown.

The album opens with Automatic Reset and straight away transfixes ears with its opening mist of guitar; the sonic shimmer quickly followed by a bulging blast of heavy riffs and rhythms. With them a groove also joins the tempting, its lure relaxing as the song settles into its stroll and welcomes the dusty tones of vocalist Thomas Boutet before returning with even spicier toning to its sultry tendril. Just as quickly a contagious air floods the encounter, a persuasion which never loses its potency as the song shuffles up its gait and intensity across the rest of the magnetic offering. The guitars of Rémy Bellin and Bojan Anicic continue to wrap ears and song in resourceful and gripping enterprise, greater colour added to the excellent start to the album all the time.

Straight away it and the following Fever reveal a more rounded and deeper depth to the band’s music, a less raw and caustic sound which still retains the growl and intensive weighty hues which fuelled the previous release. The second song is a far more aggressive offering than the first, punkish in its attitude and energy with wiry hooks to match. The bass of Maxime Coste is a grumbling potency whilst drummer Jocelyn Liorzou lashes skin and senses with adventurous and antagonistic scythes. It is a glorious riot bringing a mix of Torche, eighties band Skyscraper, and a touch of Motorgrator to entice before making way for the gentler smouldering charm of Contrails. It is still a heavyweight proposal though which seems to grow and loom over the senses with every passing second. Once more hooks and grooves grace a dynamic web of imagination and primal temptation, the latter at times as intimidating as the swings of Liorzou and the predatory riffs.

The song closes with similar reflection soaked calm to how it started, drifting away so the heavy resonance of Coste’s bass can lure attention ready for an intensive crawl of riffs and grooves. DCVR is another swift inescapable persuasion equipped with a sonic tang and commanding stature, not forgetting an addictive swagger even with it is on the prowl. It is also another track showing the greater expanse and imagination in the band’s songwriting and sound, and their ability to perfectly entangle rugged terrains with highly provocative ambiences of sound and emotion.

   The bubbling electronic start to Last/Lost Hope instantly catches expectations unawares and by surprise, though they are barely given a nibble to feast on within Destination Unknown anyway. Its enslaving coaxing soon evolves into a thrilling and lively shuffle of sonic and melodic festivity guided by the ever appealing tones of Boutet. At times elements of post punk and new wave, as well as noise rock, seem to add their spice to the infectious tapestry of the rock popper, a strong catchiness emulated again in the dirtier but just as contagious Surrender. As much as you can find hints in varying degrees of bands such as Torche and Queens Of The Stone Age to the song, there is an older hue to the outstanding stomp, elements across its kinetic two minutes recalling eighties and nineties seeded ingenuity.

Doomed Drifters explores the darkest shadows and corners of the band’s sound but again tempers it with a sonic and melodic resourcefulness which energetically and brightly smoulders as it masterfully fuse contrasts and flavours. Seducing with greater and more experimental suggestiveness for an emotionally provocative and atmospheric climax, the song leaves ears enthralled and primed for the bewitchment of the similarly expansive landscape of Scheme. Growing bigger and bolder with every passing harmonious whisper and melodic enticement, the song dances and flirts with ears and imagination, recalling a strong if coincidental feel of Comsat Angels to its exceptional and thrilling adventure.

The album ends with its just and adventurous title track, Destination Unknown a thick provocative embrace which evolves and then revolves through a soundscape of sonic and emotional intensity. It is a fine finish to an exhilarating proposition. Watertank certainly thrilled with their first album but leave it looking a touch pale against the creative vivacity and explosive drama of Destination Unknown, one of the most exciting encounters this year so far.

Destination Unknown is out now via Solar Flare Records @ http://shop.solarflarerds.com/categories/pre-orders and http://music.solarflarerds.com/album/destination-unknown

https://www.facebook.com/wtrtnk

Ringmaster 30/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

 

Heyrocco – Teenage Movie Soundtrack

Screen-Shot-2015-06-04-_RingMaster Review

With the release of recent single Elsewhere a sparkling lure to its impending arrival, Teenage Movie Soundtrack has answered the suggestiveness of its lead song and shows itself as an even greater enticement of the promise soaking that lone song of a few weeks back. The debut album from US angst poppers Heyrocco, the ten track encounter is a diverse and magnetic party for ears which weaves the teen angst sounds and emotions of the nineties, the guitar jangle of early Cure, and the dirtier tones of grunge into something unique from the imagination of the band. This still only scratches the surface really but the ultimate result is a release which sounds familiar, nostalgic, and thoroughly fresh, not forgetting highly enjoyable.

Hailing from Charleston, N. Carolina, Heyrocco consists of vocalist/guitarist Nate Merli, bassist Chris Cool, and drummer Tanner Cooper, a trio who has been constantly and increasingly stirring up attention on both sides of the pond since forming around five years ago. Teenage Movie Soundtrack is the band’s largest and strongest nudge on ears and appetites since forming and it starts with a bang through opener Loser Denial.

Guitar and vocals immediately pour their rich expression on ears, the pairing already hinting at the hues of a Weezer which only gets intensified as the song slips into a ripe stroll of rumbling bass, eager beats, and a spicy guitar clang. It is also instantly wrapped in pure infectiousness, a trait invading the whole of the album from hereon in. Virulently increasing in energy and captivating endeavour as it heads towards its riotous finale, the track is an exhilarating start to the release, leaving the listener in an agitated state eager for more, which comes courtesy of the heavier but no less compelling Melt. The air and presence of the song is thicker in emotional intensity but still retains the alluring catchiness of its predecessor, and indeed that same seeding of alternative rock/power pop for its own tempestuously inventive and at times perfectly imposing presence.

Heyroccocover_RingMaster Review     The grunge fuelled Virgin comes next, its opening minimalistic croon leading to thick and voracious Nirvana-esque explosions. It is an alluring cycle which is on repeat across a track which dramatically seduces and enslaves ears and emotions. There is no escaping the decade and bands inspiring the invention of Heyrocco or the ability of the threesome to twist them into ravenous incitements of raw and incendiary pop, as proven again by the lighter revelry of Elsewhere. Its opening jangle of hooks and invitational vocals is irresistible bait especially with its whisper of discord, a success eclipsed once the dark tones of bass and subsequent scythes of guitar court the potent variety of vocals across the band. Spiralling melodies and welcoming harmonies continue to exploit the submission given to the song’s charms, even as the outstanding encounter stirs up its creative intensity and volatile shadows to grow into an even bolder and muscular proposal.

A calm of sorts arrives next with the warm caress and enterprise of Mom Jeans, its rhythmic tempting and swinging pop gait a reserved but energetic festival of smouldering reflection and vivacious light locking ears and thoughts into eager attention. The almost sultry embrace of the song is replicated in many ways by First Song, though its tenacious balladry made up with livelier energy and melodies has more of a Costello/Petty-esque feel to it. Compared to previous tracks it takes longer to tempt and never quite manages to spark the same thrills whilst casting its pleasurable persuasion, but it certainly reveals more to the potential soaked depth and diversity in songwriting and sound within Heyrocco.

Alison brings a fiery blaze to ears next; its fuzzy textures and sizzling air colouring a cauldron of angst laden expression and melodic infectiousness bound in searing psych pop enterprise which in turn is equipped with pleasure gripping hooks. The track sizzles on the senses but is soon outshine by the even greater temptation of Jake Miller’s House Party. From its initial blast of spicy grooves and anthemic rhythms aligned to a thick lure of a bassline, imagination casts images of being bound in the throes of heaving bodies bouncing to the song’s puppeteer like tempting. You can picture a video for it straight away, energies and limbs moving in tandem even as the song relaxes a touch from its kinetic start for the great tones of Merli. A stomp of grunge hued rock ‘n’ roll, the song’s seamless flow through controlled and frantic crescendos is as magnetic as the web of invention and flavoursome hooks running incessantly through what proves to be the best track on the album.

The skilful Cure like hug of Santa Fe (Stupid Lovesong) is another which takes it’s time to convince, but eventually its laid back melody cast serenade simply leaves ears smiling whilst closing track Happy with its heavier rock croon ensures the release closes as potently as it began.

As so many, the band’s last single was our introduction to Heyrocco and there is no doubting they thrilled. Now Teenage Movie Soundtrack shows that it was no a flash in the pan but even more that it was just one strong essence in the band’s full sound and inventive presence. The additional excitement bred by the album is that you get the feeling this it only the beginning in their creative journey, just a scratching of the surface.

Teenage Movie Soundtrack is released on July 10th via Vital Music Group

https://www.facebook.com/Heyrocco    http://www.heyrocco.co.uk/

RingMaster 01/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Tvivler – Negativ Psykologi #1

photo by Mads Ogstrup Nielsen

photo by Mads Ogstrup Nielsen

A rousing of the passions like no other; that is probably the best description of the effect the debut EP from Danish noise punks Tvivler had on our tender ears. Bristling with four tracks of something between post hardcore, noise rock, and sonic ferocity, Negativ Psykologi #1 is a blistering trespass of rabid virulence, an addiction in the making for fans of anyone from At The Drive-In and KEN mode to Kabul Golf Club and Coilguns. Band and release has a sound and presence though which is equally unique from those suggestions, a personality and freshness of its own which translates as one of the most exciting debuts in recent times.

Formed last year, Tvivler (Danish for doubter) hails from Copenhagen and comprises the united talent from numerous other Scandinavian bands. Vocalist Thomas Burø is a member of Lack whilst bassist Morten Ogstrup Nielsen is part of instrumental progressive metallers Town Portal. Completing the line is guitarist Thomas Feltheim from Obstacles and drummer Morten Clausen, the pair also part of hardcore band Children Of Fall. The quartet bring an eclectic mix of styles from their other projects into Tvivler but yet again the band emerges with something wholly distinct from those spices and other propositions breeding a similar assault of sound.

front coverReputation Radio/RingMaster Review   The first instalment in a 7″ trilogy, Negativ Psykologi #1 simply explodes in ears with the first breath of opener Almanak, guitars spreading a sonic rub quickly joined by raw and catchy riffs amidst scything rhythms as well as the scorching tones of Burø. There is an immediate contagion to the encounter, hooks and grooves uniting in a web of irresistible sonic flirtation whilst vocals squall with a just as gripping persuasion. UK band The Gaa Gaas spring to mind at times as the tones of Burø climb over the wiry strands of guitar, his magnetic pull the perfect temper to the carnivorous enticing from the throat of the bass and the emerging dance of surf and post punk imagination.

At two minutes it is far too short but in its brief presence an inescapable slavery of ears and emotions making it easy for the following Tænder to turn up the heat and passions. It too has no interest in offering a gentle entrance, bundling itself through ears in a ball of antagonistic bass and jangly guitar temptation courted by Clausen’s concussive beats. It is a thick assault of busy sound but with a clear centre from which Burø unveils the narrative with acidic prowess. Living up to its title, the song switches around with striking invention and rhythmic agitation, guitars and drum sticks a maelstrom of unpredictability to which the bass provides its own twisted grudge. With a whiff of bands like The Mai Shi to it, the tempest is an anthem to the primal and disorientated amongst us and quite scintillating.

Træfælder opens on a portentous ambience wrapping church bells, but an atmosphere taking less than a second to become a cauldron of unsettling suggestiveness leading to a furnace of guitar causticity and raw vocal bewitchment. As imposing and abrasive as the delivery of Burø and in turn the backing of the band are, they expel a ringing harmonious lure which is as seductive and disturbing as the kaleidoscope of psyche sucking adventure around them. The song’s title means traps and there is indeed no escaping the addictive hold of the song, another living up to its name and keeping ears with a greedy appetite chained.

The EP finishes with Tyndhudet, the harshest, most disorientating fury on the release. Each track within Negativ Psykologi #1 gets progressively rawer and violent, the closer bringing the release to a hellacious and abrasing finale. It is not all raw confrontation though, Tvivler again spinning a weave of infectious hooks and addictive grooves which just light body and imagination. Drums and bass are bestial it is fair to say against that alluring tempting but even they have moments where lust gets the best of them and they ease off a whisper to add fresh flirtation.

The track is a glorious end to a stunning encounter. Tvivler and their sound is not going to be for everyone of course but if those hints earlier get the juices bubbling and indeed post and neat hardcore as well as noise and punk rock too, then Negativ Psykologi #1 is going to bring some ecstasy to your lives.

Negativ Psykologi #1 is out now @ http://tvivler.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/tvivler

RingMaster 23/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

KEN mode – Success

photo Brenna Faris

photo Brenna Faris

Predictability has never had a presence in the sounds and imagination of Canadian noise wreckers KEN mode, though that in itself is something to be expected. Their caustic and furious brews of post-rock, hardcore, metal, and noise, to mention just some of their flavours employed, have ignited ears and imaginations with a tempestuous almost petulant creativity ensuring the band’s propositions are some of the most persistently and highly anticipated treats. The Winnipeg trio’s new album Success is no exception but this time it has taken a detour which definitely takes assumptions by surprise.

The band has gone back to explore the sounds and invention which were fermenting and fuelling the late 80s/early 90s when KEN mode began to sow its own sonic explorations. The album’s press release lists the album as paying homage to “both their Canadian Prairie roots, and a time when they first started to care about making music; the burgeoning grunge; and Touch Go/Dischord scenes of, with bands like Nirvana, Big Black, Cop Shoot Cop, The Cows, Circus Lupus, and Drive Like Jehu warping their teenage minds.” Listening to Success though you can go back further and find the seeds in predominantly post and noise punk with the album persistently sounding like a primal version of Gang of 4 on steroids. It is the band as raw and aggressive as ever, probably even more so at times, and still lyrically stirring up thoughts and emotional involvement, but it shows a new character and new compelling designs from the band which might not quite work for all but here is being greedily devoured.

KMSuccessCover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     Recorded with Steve Albini (Nirvana, the Jesus Lizard, PJ Harvey) and recorded as a fully live and analog session, KEN mode’s sixth album opens with Blessed, a track which from its initial sonic whistle turns into a heavy bestial prowl. Simultaneously a swagger emerges in the grizzly tones of Scott Hamilton’s bass as magnetic jabbing lines the beats of drummer Shane Matthewson. Intimidating restraint replaces their predacious aggression at this point, the vocals of guitarist Jesse Matthewson crawling syllable by syllable with open ire over the addiction igniting web now in place. The song’s volatile instincts soon return to take rein though, almost insidious discord and hostility invading whilst binding excited senses in inventive and mischievous rancor.

The outstanding start kicks up another notch with These Tight Jeans, a song which roars and excites like an illicit union of Nirvana, Black Flag, and Pretty Girls Make Graves. Of course that is a mere hint to something unique to KEN mode, the track a rumbling, grumbling contagion of wiry hooks, spicy grooves, and rhythmic badgering. As ever the song is driven by fury loaded vocals but this time assisted by the excellent punk lures of guest Jill Clapham who just adds richer colour to the slimline unbridled furnace on the senses.

The Owl… follows the brilliance of its predecessor with its own gripping dark beauty. A sinister noir lit intrigue escapes the growling bass groove, its drama escorted by the similarly potent landing of drum sticks as vocals dangle their raw tone and narrative over the imagination. An air of Bauhaus wraps the absorbing lure and agitated swing of the song as guitars and bass spring an inescapable menace of a flirtation which only gets darker and more imposing as the emotive intimacy of cello from Natanielle Felicitas returns after first gracing the opener. The solemn gentle passage hugging her enterprise is soon a brawl of noise and intensity again before regaining control in a mesmeric finale which leaves ears and emotions in lustful bliss

The grungy turmoil of I Just Liked Fire explodes next, it too a rebellious blaze for ears and appetite to get lustful over as twisted discord and carnal noise collude to abrase and infest the senses whilst its successor Management Control, with greater restraint crowds ears with a thick resonating bassline and a tangy vining of guitar endeavour. The beats of Shane once again provide disorientating yet anthemic bait aligned to the predatory and contagious groans of bass but sonically the song is more involved and less instant with its catchy hooks and grooves. This is not to say the track is any less virulent than the previous songs, just a more intensive exploration with layers of waiting rewards.

There is a feel of Psychic TV to the following A Passive Disaster as its carnivorous basslines and caustic bellow gets right under the skin and into the psyche whilst Failing At Fun Since 1981 straight after, is punk belligerence at its blisteringly sonic and primitively rhythmic best. Both songs are a jungle of menace and bracing invention, individual noise riots to thrill and linger though they get outshone a touch by A Catalog Of Small Disappointments and in turn closing song Dead Actors. The first of the final pair is an uncompromising persuasion, its stalking rhythms and vocal angst entwined in the rabid theatre of guitar and lyrics. The track enslaves body and emptions with ease, threatening and seducing with every snarl and raw fingering of the senses before its successor takes over with a psychotic and darkly elegant Gang of 4 meets Wire like meander of sound and distress lined emotional reflection. The song is spellbinding, a long term journey taking itself and the listener on a traumatic and turbulently fascinating adventure.

It is hard to say yet if Success is KEN mode’s finest hour such its big enough departure to previous encounters reveals something openly and strikingly different but the seriously thrilling encounter is definitely a contender.

Success is available via Season Of Mist now @ http://shop.season-of-mist.com/predefined-search?id_list=102, http://kenmode.bigcartel.com/, or https://kenmode.bandcamp.com/album/success

http://www.ken-mode.com/

Upcoming KEN mode dates with Fight Amp

June 16, 2015 – Toronto, ON @ The Shop (Parts & Labour) w/The Great Sabatini

June 17, 2015 – Montreal, QC @ Turbo Haus w/The Great Sabatini

June 18, 2015 – Brooklyn, NY @ St. Vitus w/Pyrrhon, Couch Slut

June 19, 2015 – Philadelphia, PA @ Kung Fu Necktie

June 20, 2015 – Columbus, OH @ Ace of Cups w/Lo-Pan

June 21, 2015 – Chicago, IL @ The Burlington w/GOBO’S CVIT

June 26, 2015 – Winnipeg, MB @ The Goodwill w/Pop Crimes, Teethmarks *no Fight Amp

RingMaster 16/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Fight Amp – Constantly Off

Pic Freddie Ross

Pic Freddie Ross

Whether they call themselves Fight Amp or Fight Amputation, Philadelphia’s keg of noise rock ferocity have returned with a blistering roar of an album in the shape of Constantly Off. Imposing and at times bordering on carnivorous, the release is the band’s first new recordings in over three years and their heaviest most virulently cantankerous offering yet.

Once more the trio pour grunge tenacity, sludge oppressiveness, and punk predation into their creative vat for the album, twisting and honing it into a tempest of irresistible and rousing noise rock. Equally though Fight Amp has cultivated their most infectious and seductive melodic tempting too. It has resulted in songs which rhythmically stalk, sonically abrase, and melodically romance the senses whilst creating an infestation which as suggested earlier sees the band at a new plateau of invention and sound. Think early Melvins and Torche meets KEN mode with rigorous incitement from the likes of Nirvana, Black Flag, and Dope Body, then think of that being something original again, and you have the addictive might of the Steve Poponi (American Heritage, Ladder Devils) recorded Constantly Off.

Ex Everything sets things in contagious motion, the opener stepping forward in a breeze of portentously predacious sound with the guitar of Mike McGinnis creating sonic smog. A whisper of a relaxation follows before rugged bass and guitar riffs collude with punchy beats in casting a more intensive examination of ears. The vocals of McGinnis and bassist Jon DeHart, whilst being just as imposing, offer a more harmonic temper to the heavy weight of the song, simultaneously sculpting prowling grooves through their individual string craft as hostile as they are magnetic. It is a beast of an encounter, a flirtatious predator which shares its traits with the following Survival Is Strange.

CO_COVER_WEB_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review The second song is a much more lively and volatile proposal from its first breath. The guitar spins a web of scathing riffs and enticing grooves around vocals which again come with an infectious swing and raw attitude. The contagious essence of the song is emulated just as resourcefully, amidst the resonating lures of bass, in the swinging sticks of drummer Dan Smith too. The encounter is noise addiction for ears and appetite matched quickly after by Leveling In A Dream. Its initial bluesy coaxing is liquor to the senses, a minute plus of suggestive toxicity which eventually spawns a rhythmic and vocal stroll of forthright attitude. Subsequently a reserved but antagonistic wind of sound with rhythmic punches fill ears, the closing minute of the track a bracing bellow which still never catches fire but smoulders perfectly for potent success.

Smith with his rhythmic and rapacious enterprise sets You Don’t Wanna Live Forever rolling next, his jabs increasing in pace and virulence until guitar and bass cannot hold back any longer and jump in with dirty riffs and boozy grooves, which are matched in turn by the raw and catchy variety of the vocals. Agitation and discord add to the captivating revelry, the song a perpetual eruption of off kilter tenacity and bouncing energy, not forgetting ingenuity.

Contrasting the leaping persuasion of its predecessor, I Perceive Reptoids employs another threatening prowl in its proposal. It comes with a post punk shadowing, a solemn toning which continues to cloud the corrosive expulsions of vocal and sonic ire aligned to another riveting and intrusive rhythmic enticement. Once more the song is an incitement bred from colluding contrasts and opposing textures, and again ears and imagination are twisted into subservience.

Final track Happy Joyful Life brings a last tempest to devour greedily. The bass of DeHart is almost bestial in its voice and addictively savage basslines, the beats of Smith rapier like, whilst McGinnis’ guitar breeds a maelstrom of senses tearing hooks and toxic grooves. Together it is a tempestuous and ridiculously infectious affair driven by scowling vocals and just outstanding.

The track makes an absorbing end to an incendiary release on ears and emotions, Constantly Off brewing its own terrain of noise rock which explores all the essences making up its DNA with such imagination that it ensures its appeal will go far beyond one or two specific genres. Quite simply Fight Amp creates irresistible noisy rock ‘n’ roll and in their new offering one of the real treats of 2015.

Constantly Off is available now via Brutal Panda Records digitally and on vinyl @ http://www.brutalpandarecords.com/products/fight-amp-constantly-off-12 or https://fightamp.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/FightAmp   http://www.fightamp.com/

RingMaster 10/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Noise-A-Tron – Vast Arcane

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There is a video going around and hitting news stations over strange unearthly noises invading ears and psyche from around the globe. Is it terrestrial bred, alien spawned, or the earth groaning? No one knows but I would suggest the cause just might originate from the practise rooms of US duo Noise-A-Tron, because their new instrumental EP Vast Arcane is a doom spawned confrontation casting similarly portentous and haunting roars of sonic disturbance and apocalyptic seduction. It is also seriously compelling, an irresistible experiment of drone fuelled noise rock which magnificently challenges and ignites everything from ears to imagination.

Noise-A-Tron consists of drummer Jason Bledsoe and his wife Lea on synths and bass. The seeds of the band began with Florida band Bullhead in which Indiana bred Jason played. They released two EPs and in 2000 recruited Michigan born Lea Rudko into the line-up. Previously she had played in experimental noise project Terror Organ, a two piece with Angel Corpse singer/bassist Pete Helmkamp. Early 2002 saw the demise of those bands and the beginning of The Human Echo which went on to release a couple of well-received albums and undertake several tours. In 2005 Jason and Lea married and four years later the end of the band was the springboard for the rising of Noise-A-Tron. The pair released a well-received self-titled EP in 2010, its impacting presence and invention continuing through Vast Arcane in the same heavy imposing way but exploring even darker ravenous realms of sound and emotional menace through an invasive sonic bleeding of noise. It is a ravaging trespass of the senses and emotions but at times equally as anthemic and seductively potent in its enterprise and temptation.

The release opens with Intro, the track as its title suggests setting up the oppressive and suffocating atmosphere of the release but featuring as an individual proposal in its own formidable right too. Keys spin a haunting ambience from its first breath, an emerging spatial atmosphere punctuated by heftily swung beats from Jason. The imagination is swiftly alive with ideas and adventures sparked by the piece, thick sonic bellows and slow laboured roars alone enough bait to dark cinematic flights of fancy.

Vast Arcane cover   Following track Six, all songs consecutively numbered, has a lighter air, well in relation to its predecessor, but one again permeating the senses with creeping shadows of sound and intent. The 8-string bass flirtation from Lea is as transfixing as her skills on keys, a fascinating tangle of textures mixed live whilst mesmerising ears and air with startling invention. The track as the album is contagiously meditative, every sonic yawn and piercing intrusion as hypnotic as it is fearsome, and often equipped with infectious virulence. Even in its caustic and harshly aired finale there is a gripping essence which simply enthrals. Like a sub note to the stark narrative of the track, the brief inescapable lure of Six Point Five takes over next, bass and drums a riotous anthem of epidemic agitation and addictive enterprise. It is a festival compared to the dark climate of the previous sounds but still only offering a menacing tone and enticement at its heart.

Seven slips back into a lumbering gait and intensive examination of noise and listener, though its gaping sonic voice and physical consumption wraps around another lively incitement of rhythms. There is vastness to the piece of sound, though courted by the more intimate touches of drums, an exploration of depths which from the EP artwork hint is celestial but can just as easily be a flight into the unknown depths of earth and sea, or the darkest inescapable nightmares of the mind.

The erosive invasive beauty of the track continues into the epic closer Eight, near on fourteen minutes of rhythmic provocation immersed in a bracing sonic swamp thick in noise and intensity but breath-taking in its ever evolving scenery. As in all tracks, the textures crafted and spun out to startling impact are beautifully layered, each element given a clarity which defies the overall sweltering climate of the increasingly dark and imposing but always seriously giving soundscape.

The quite brilliant Vast Arcane and indeed Noise-A-Tron themselves are not going to be for everyone, the intensity and raw essence of their sound a challenge too far for many, but if any mix of bands like Morkobot, Dope Body, Godflesh, or Sunn O))) sounds like a great appetiser then the Seattle pair have an extraordinary treat in store for you.

Vast Arcane is available now via Bleeding Light Records digitally @ http://bleedinglightrecords.bigcartel.com/product/noise-a-tron-vast-arcane-download and on limited to 250 black vinyl.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Noise-A-Tron/164982910181009     https://twitter.com/noiseatron

RingMaster 29/04/2015

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