Dewaere – Slot Logic

Pic by titouan massé

With a sound something akin to a mutated fusion of Big Black, Fatima Mansions, and Melvins but openly distinct in its own roar and skin, Dewaere is a French band unleashing a rousing noise punk incitement very hard for us not to get excited over. Their music is a contagiously imposing trespass rich in imagination and enterprise and found in full devilment within recently released debut album Slot Logic. It is a cauldron of noise and raw temptation which harried, ravaged and seduced the senses from start to finish.

Hailing from Saint-Brieuc, Dewaere create an inescapably manipulative senses searing holler bred from the combined creative antics of vocalist Maxwell Farrington, guitarist Julien Henry, bassist Marc Aumont, and drummer Hugues Le Corre. As immediately revealed by album opener Get Down, the band’s music is nurtured in noise rock and punk flavours and inspirations but equally has an appetite for post punk and an additional array of sonic trespasses present and past. It all makes for a riveting insurgence of sound and adventure revelling the opportunity to infest ears. The first track initially teases with a guitar jangle which is swiftly joined by the commandingly and increasingly magnetic tones of Farrington. Almost as quickly the thumping beats of Le Corre descend as Aumont’s bass enticingly grumbles; it all coming together for a ferocious encounter but one with fluid moments of relative calm and composure. As an introduction to the band, the track is raw and majestic, and as a taste of things to come across Slot Logic quite delicious.

The following Budapest is similarly immediately compelling. The gnarly bass alone made an already keen appetite greedier as too the senses scything swings of Le Corre. The guitar insurgency of Henry is equally as invasive as it is hungrily seductive; corruptive hooks and grooves aligning with rhythmic predation to corrode and inflame ears and senses. The catchiness of the song is as powerful as its character of invention and matched within next up Happy Hour, another proposition which forces itself upon the listener before dancing with their rock ‘n’ roll instincts. A predatory affair led by the ever alluring vocals of Farrington, his presence as dynamic and devilish is in many ways akin to the likes of Cathal Coughlan (Fatima Mansions/Microdisney) and Guy McKnight (The Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster), while the track itself is its own snarling contagion in the album’s continuing revelation.

Through the likes of Garden, a primal irrepressible serenade of a treat, and The Vase with its almost carnal incitement around rapier swung beats, Slot Logic only further blossoms in sound and imagination, both tracks feral but sublimely crafted predators before the band next up delivers a cover of The Korgis’ song Everybody’s Got To Learn Sometime. Whilst embracing the original’s pop breath, Dewaere unleash their own corrosive power pop like bent alongside their never diminishing sonic causticity; unleashing an adrenaline fuelled gear never envisaged in the track originally. It is a spicing further developed within the outstanding St-Tropez In Summer which follows. There is at times a certain Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster meets Engerica flavouring to the band’s distinctly individual sound but a twist in the wonderful bedlam here which again also hints at a Fatima Mansions influence or coincidence.

The thumping stomp of Aye Aye within a sonic cyclone keeps release and pleasure flying before October casts a web of scorched and scorching sonic discontent around a darkly intimating vocal croon. The track hurts and seduces in equally measure, leaving ears sore and the imagination alive before Wot U Lyk completes the release with its pop hungry garage punk ‘n’ roll; the body swiftly bouncing to its own fevered energy and catchiness.

It is a fine close to an album which just impresses more and more by the listen much as Dewaere themselves with every passing creative exploit and invasion.

Slot Logic is out now via Phantom Records and BiGout Records; available @ https://phantomrecords.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/dewaereband   https://dewaereband.bandcamp.com

Pete RingMaster 04/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dead Retinas – Divine EP

Though they made a pretty instant splash in the pool of attention and praise with their debut, the Dead Retinas vs. The World EP back in 2012, it is fair to say that the UK band has simply grown in strength, sound, and in luring praise ever since. Each subsequent release from that potent first has provided a rousing proposition with the Manchester band’s most striking yet coming in the shape of their new creative offensive, the Divine EP.

Without doubt there has been a fresh attack and imagination in the band’s writing and hardcore/punk bred sound with every release but now real maturity and a deviously manipulative essence has emerged. It was intriguingly hinted at within the 2017 released Coup De Grâce and now has become an uncompromisingly stirring force within its successor, Divine. An unscrupulous fusion of hardcore and noise punk, the new Dead Retinas offering provides three tracks which stalk the senses and bait the spirit whilst revelling in that new breath of adventure in the band’s sound. The EP is also the first release with the band’s new line-up in full antagonistic roar, a creative holler seeing Dead Retinas stalking the reputation of punk’s heavyweights.

The Laurie Morbey produced Divine opens up with Gold in Monochrome and immediately descends on the senses and nerves with a predatory rhythmically prowling groove. The vocals of CJ Smith are just as swift, bawling almost brawling in ears with his usual potent presence. The guitar of Jack Thompson springs his scything lures and nagging hooks soon after as the swinging beats of Chris Heath batter already beleaguered but devouring senses. With the bass of Chris Gaduzo continuing its almost guttural tempting, the track writhes and twists as it rages; raw flirtation and invasive invention fuelling it’s unpredictable and seriously enjoyable enterprise.

The following You Go Glen Coco is just as compelling and insatiable in its antics. It too moves with the lust of a whirling dervish but with a composure which just accentuates its carnivorous intent. Again the band casts grooves which easily and quickly got under the skin, rhythms voracious with their own infectious animosity and all combined creating an increasingly expanding and imaginative infestation of sound and dissension.

By no means left behind in creative prowess, final song An Exercise in Bad Taste erupts in ears with immediate hostility, Smith again leading the trespass as rhythms malevolently dance and the sonic toxicity of Thompson’s strings blazes. Once more imagination soaked unpredictability infests the track, its movements often bordering on the spasmodic but with a fluidity which makes for an unrelenting molestation and pleasure.

As seems to be the trend with Dead Retinas releases, Divine reveals new growth in their sound and creative adventure but one which easily overshadows anything before it and so much so that the band might struggle to eclipse it next time but then again this is Dead Retinas…

The Divine EP is out November 30th, available @ https://deadretinas.bandcamp.com/album/divine as well as Spotify, Apple Music etc.

https://www.facebook.com/DeadRetinas/   https://twitter.com/DeadRetinas

Pete RingMaster 30/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Feral Young – I Haven’t Seen Myself in a While

Untamed, wild, and aggressive to the point of bloodthirsty at times…you would expect little else from a proposition called The Feral Young. Theirs is a sound within their new offering which ferociously devours the senses yet equally a predator adept at prowling the listener like a sonic wolf waiting to move in for the kill. It is a character and intent which goes to make the I Haven’t Seen Myself in a While EP one menacingly striking encounter and The Feral Young a band very hard to ignore.

Hailing from Finland’s oldest city, Turku, The Feral Young unleash a voracious fusion of punk and noise rock also embracing rich scuzzy essences from the likes of garage and stoner rock. Formed in 2017, the band has drawn references to the likes of Every Time I Die, Metz, Whores, and Queens of the Stone Age but as I Haven’t Seen Myself in a While reveals theirs is a sound already discovering its particular individuality, a uniqueness already growing since its predecessor, last year’s Failures EP.

I Haven’t Seen Myself in a While swiftly trespasses the senses with opener The Beat, its initial guitar graze of sound an enticing lure into a thick wall of temptation driven by primal beats as a raw sonic ‘hum’ escorts their predation. The equally nagging threat of the heavy bass throb adds to the intoxicating menace ears and appetite quickly fell too, earnest vocal squalls completing the rich bait making a delicious intrusion. Like a call to arms, a piper to primal instincts, the track sets the EP off on a major high.

It is a lofty perch which Amnesia Alibi cements; its raucous noise punk mixing with psych shimmers and surf ripples in an undulating eddy of snarling incitement. Again rhythms simply ensnare as melodic toxicity and vocal incitement bait, the track mercurial if always invasive in its attack but relentless in its creative and inventive savagery. It is another major temptation to The Feral Young sound so easy to succumb to.

The EP’s title track completes the encounter, the song a relatively kinder assault but as fiery and drenched in unbroken spirit and attitude as its companions. The band’s more garage rock instincts come to the fore in a roar sharing the same kind of punk instincts as artists such as The Punks and The Stooges mixed with the ferocious enterprise of others like Whores and Pigs. Though not quite matching the massive heights of its predecessors, the track is a rousing blaze escalating the impressive and thrilling outcry of the release.

With new music in our ears almost without breaks being excited is a regular treat, finding ourselves lustily animated a far rarer occurrence but one The Feral Young inspired with ease. Roll on the album the band is said to be currently unleashing from their undomesticated hearts.

I Haven’t Seen Myself in a While is out now digitally and on Ltd Ed 7” vinyl via Kaos Kontrol; available @ https://kaoskontrol.bandcamp.com/album/i-havent-seen-myself-in-a-whilehttp://www.kaos-kontrol.org/shop/the-feral-young-i-havent-seen-myself-in-a-while-7-inch

https://www.facebook.com/theferalyoung   https://www.instagram.com/theferalyoungsucks/

Pete RingMaster 03/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Parasitic Twins – All That’s Left To Do Now Is Sleep With Each Other

A charnel house of sonic destruction and corruption, All That’s Left To Do Now Is Sleep With Each Other is the debut EP from British hardcore duo Parasitic Twins. Offering three tracks of raw noise infested dissonance, the release is an inhospitable animus of sound and intent which as it charred the senses had them keenly captivated.

Hailing from Hull, Parasitic Twins is the union of guitarist/vocalist Max Watt (Rotting Monarchs) and drummer Dom Smith (Mary and The Ram). Having previously worked together as part of Seep Away, the pair bred their new project within a “desire to create the most abrasive sound they could.” Caustically lo-fi and mercilessly intrusive, an encounter recorded live and raw, All That’s Left To Do Now Is Sleep With Each Other is the first result of that intent,.

It opens with Massive and instantly challenges ears with gnarly rabid riffs soaked in doom bred venom. The track uncages a predacious doom nurtured stroll upon the imposing rhythms of Smith, desolation and toxicity oozing from every psyche ravishing note as pestilential animosity coats every syllable out of Watt’s scarred throat. Yet there is an instinctive swing to the track which easily gets under the skin.

It is a template of sorts which breeds all tracks even with their true and open individuality as shown by Flipswitch. Its hardcore breeding ravages the senses from its first breath, riffs snarling as they abrase while the dual attack of vocals is similarly a fierce grazing to challenge and incite.

Final track, End, is a consumptive plague of noise but again springing an infectious noise punk incurred sway which soon settled within ears and body. Barely exposing a minute and a half to its carnivorous dealings, the track is feral pleasure; the EP the same times three.

All That’s Left To Do Now Is Sleep With Each Other will be a scourge too far for many and erosive manna for others as it announces the outbreak of one striking aural trespass going by the name of Parasitic Twins.

All That’s Left To Do Now Is Sleep With Each Other is released October 26th.

https://www.facebook.com/ParasiticTwinsBand   https://twitter.com/TwinsParasitic

Pete RingMaster 17/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

U-Foes – No More No More

Live @ Fru Lundgreen, Trondheim, Norway

It may say No More No More but ears swiftly demanded the opposite once falling under the sonic hail and brimstone of the new single from Norwegian outfit U-Foes. The track is an insatiable slice of noise punk infested hardcore which batters and tempts with increasing rigour; nagging, harassing, and pleasing in equal measure.

Rising from the ashes of hardcore outfit Silence the Foe, Oslo hailing U-Foes is the trio of made up of guitarist Marcus Forsgren (The Lionheart Brothers, Jaga Jazzist, Bror Forsgren), drummer Peter Rudolfsen (The Lionheart Brothers), and long-time friend of The RR, vocalist Anders Voldrønning (Shevils). Embracing aspects of their earlier work together and on-going projects, the threesome have twisted all elements into a whole new trespass of sound with plenty more fresh and creative animosity loaded craft involved.

A teaser of the band’s debut album due for release in November, No More No More is a carnal assault of sound; a track as primal and feral as it is skilfully manipulated and manipulative. It scowls with contempt from the first caustic surge of guitar, its sound a scuzzy yet precise blur inciting just as irritable intent from senses harrying rhythms. Voldrønning’s familiar roar intensifies the antipathy of sound and emotion, sharing greater toxicity to the wounds already incurred from the band’s raucous enterprise. Even so there is an infectious side to it all which quickly had hips swinging and limbs punching with zeal.

However you drape the track, it is rock ‘n’ roll rock at its primal best; punk rock to arouse the senses and spirit and the sign of big exciting thing to come from that impending album and we suspect for the band itself in its wake.

Check out the video for No More No More on our Video Selector page, the single available now on Marw Melodee Music.

https://www.facebook.com/ufoesofficial/   http://u-foes.com/

Pete RingMaster 24/09/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

KEN mode – Loved

We cannot say that the artwork surrounding releases particularly guides or influences our thoughts going into a new encounter but it has to be admitted that the art wrapping the new KEN mode album made a striking impression whilst sparking intrigue and imagination long before a note was heard. Created by the band’s long-time collaborator Randy Ortiz, it is a piece which also inspired the band itself in regards to Loved, their seventh full-length. Vocalist/guitarist Jesse Matthewson ahead of its release revealed that “We entered writing for this album with one goal in mind – to please the smile” referring to the cover’s protagonist.

He also said “We wanted to make an album that represented a thinking person’s reaction to the political/technological climate we are existing in today. We wanted to make the perfect album to put on repeat while pushing your physical limits to their maximum, if only to silence the noise that is constantly whirring around inside of your own head, even for a brief moment.” Listening to Loved, it is not hard to feel they succeeded in both, certainly in satisfying the smile and though whether you can create perfection can be debated but it is a release which stands on the frontline of their most stirring and striking proposals yet.

From the grungier and expansive indie rock inspired endeavour of its highly enjoyable predecessor, Success, KEN mode has in many ways returned to the sonic viscera and noise punk/hardcore toxicity of the likes of Venerable (2011) and Entrench (2013) for Loved. In saying that, the album equally pushes the bold adventure hinted at in Success to far more magnetic, feral, and maybe for some divisive heights. It is unapologetically invasive, a cauldron of sonic violence, and their most invasively dark offering yet and for us more than possibly their finest moment yet.

Doesn’t Feel Pain Like He Should is the first venomous treat from Loved, the track instantly lancing the senses with a sonic incision before the fierce rapier swings of drummer Shane Matthewson descend closely aligned to the ravenous grumble of Scott Hamilton’s bass. The caustic wires cast from Jesse’s guitar equally infest song and listener making a nagging cradle for the raw throated squall of his vocals all the time rhythms breeding greater virulence in their trespass. It is a glorious nagging of sound taking swipes and bites with every elevation of animosity and twist of enterprise resulting in a deliciously corrosive start to the release.

The Illusion Of Dignity teases with its initial lure before swinging on rapacious rhythms next, Shane’s hits a bone shuddering impact matched in carnal attraction by the resonance of Scott’s bass. Post punk hues add to the noise rock antics bred within the cavernous yet threateningly intimate breath of the track, vocals a toxic animus across the revolving spiral and searing flare up of guitar. As with its predecessor, new intensities fuel and fresh ideation inspires the course of the irresistible intrusion before Feathers & Lips steps forward to prey on senses and psyche. From its first breath it is a challenging threat but quickly springing its own infectious violation as seductively flirtatious as it is menacingly inhospitable. With a web of sonic dissonance and enticement at its heart, it is another which easily got under the skin and infringed upon the senses for rich pleasure.

It there was vague concord in the last track, Learning To Be Too Cold is sheer ill-will and needs a mere breath to invade and suffocate the senses in its corrosive wash and vocal feud as beats again barely labour to punish and incite attention. The vile lure of bass is a treat whilst the sonic scathing from the guitar is a mercilessly nagging breach as magnetic as everything piercing its scarring waves. It is not a song with the same instinctive contagion of those before it but one as memorable while Not Soulmates sets another unforgettable marker with its untamed but skilfully bred cacophony led by vocal discontent.

Very Small Men rears up to share its unique character and proposal swiftly after, dancing in on nimble dynamics driven by Shane’s inimitable rhythmic dexterity. It is soon though blowing a storm of aural animation hell-bent on igniting muscles and addictiveness to flex their instincts as the song’s holler enslaves. It is a thrill of an infestation, discord increasing by every turn of sonic entanglement and emotive dissonance.

From one of the album’s momentous moments to another as the calm swing of This Is A Love Test brings its own array of creative altercation. A jazz nurtured intimating caress is brought by the sax of Kathryn Kerr, its emotive and mellow seducing aligned to vocal reflection but both soon inspiring and joining a rancorous expulsion of frictious inharmony in a schism of enterprise which further inflames ears and thoughts as rhythms permeate the body.

The final pair of Fractures In Adults and No Gentle Art are equally as riveting and argumentative. The first is a senses hassling, evolving drone of disharmony which fingers and violates psyche and self-peace, each wave of creative quarrel intensifying in weight, ferocity, and conflict to disarm and inhumanely seduce while its successor rises up from a connecting rhythmic pulsation, emerging through shadow thick, portentously drenched serenity into almost salacious sonic warfare It stalks the listener from the off, every note and breath bringing a slight elevation in threat and intensity leading to crescendos of visceral expulsions and ravenous corrosion laden discordance again with Kerr’s breath casting creative arson within the gorgeous enmity.

The track is a bewitching, at times bewildering and relentlessly breath-taking conclusion to an album proving so hard to escape and move on to new adventure from. If you are looking for life affirming calm and beauty, Loved is not for you yet in many ways it does feed those desires whilst focusing the senses and thoughts on the reality of the world we are inescapably part of. Self-harm has never been more fun and invigorating than with KEN mode’s latest monster of a gem.

Loved is available now via Season of Mist and @ https://kenmode.bandcamp.com/album/loved

Check out their website for news and dates of their Canadian dates with Shallow in September, US/Canadian tour alongside Birds In Row in October, and European tour with Coilguns and Birds In Row this Nov/Dec.

http://www.ken-mode.com    http://www.facebook.com/kenmode    http://www.twitter.com/kenmodenoise

Pete RingMaster 31/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Wood Chickens – Must Die

Pic Courtesy of Madylen Photography

True uniqueness is a rarity in modern times though you can certainly get very individual takes on the familiar to feed the insatiable appetite for something new. It is fair to say that Wood Chickens have a handle on the former more than most, their sound within new EP, Must Die, a sonic scourge which simultaneously defies the breeding bearing its rapacious presence. It makes for a hellacious infestation of noise which had ears joyous and the imagination spiralling.

Hailing from Madison, Wisconsin, Wood Chickens descends on the senses through the scurrilous antics and prowess of Alex Wiley Coyote, Griff Chickens, and Justin J. Johnson. Their new EP is our introduction to the trio but hindsight has found that across a host of releases their sound has boldly evolved from its country/cowpunk breeding. Must Die is their most extreme offering yet; a cauldron of feral noise and imagination gloriously spoiled with the toxins of punk and metal as well as psych and noise rock.

Five tracks barely touching five minutes in length, the EP immediately has ears cowering and thoughts disoriented with Sados. Its corrupted entrance eventually bursts into a rabid onslaught as guitars and rhythms join vocals in scarring the senses. It is a maelstrom of dissonance yet has an instinctive undercurrent of catchiness bred from its punk natured seeding.

We Skate in Boots swings in next, psych sighs accompanying its brewing contagion loaded garage punk tainted punk ‘n’ roll. Primal and anthemic, the track roars and incites participation as easily as it savages the senses surging through ears with rabidity to the fore before Return of Skunk Ape unleashes its own untamed caustic virulence across 46 seconds of subversive temptation and creative devilry embracing similar choleric hues to its predecessor.

The EP closes up with the psychotic animus that is Y2k Pt. 2, undiluted ravenous noise and intent corroding the speakers, though there is also an untitled unannounced track after that which is, well just bewildering and indeed magnetic.

There has been little if anything which comes close to the sound and invention of Must Die, indeed it seems nothing in the Wood Chickens discography previously like it either. If it is a new turn in the band’s music we for one will be overjoyed though their previous encounters are nothing to ignore, and if just a one off certainly something to be greedily devoured by all with an appetite for the contagion of noise.

Must Die is out now via Crush Grove Records; available digitally and on cassette @ https://crushgroverecords.bandcamp.com/album/must-die

https://www.facebook.com/woodchickensband/   https://woodchickens.bandcamp.com/

 Pete RingMaster 14/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright