VNDTA – Pale Glow

The moments of being truly bowled over by a release or ‘new’ band, introduction wise, seem to be far and few between right now but leave us on our backs with jaw wide open with exhilarated awe is just what British metallers VNDTA did with their debut EP, Pale Glow. With a sound which manages to caress and seduce whilst ripping out and feasting on the senses, the Hertfordshire quartet have just announced themselves as a real big deal.

Though formed in 2015, it was 2017 which saw the band really worry attention and acclaim as they shared stages with the likes of Aghast, Vanity, King Leviathan, and Confessions of a Traitor as well as a host of their own headlining shows. To be honest, Pale Glow is actually our introduction to the band and there could be no better a way to meet them and form a lustful union between music and ears.

Like a fusion of the raw aggression and spiteful trespasses of Iwrestledabearonce and Otep with the virulent catchiness of No Doubt and The Cardigans, the VNDTA (pronounced as vendetta) sound swiftly reveals itself within their latest encounter to be as unique to the band as you would wish. Tagged as alternative metal it embraces a host of other metal and punk flavours in its cauldron of intimation and intimidation. The recording of Pale Glow came within a turbulent time, vocalist Megan Targett admitting that “Recording the EP was probably the most difficult week of my life. We were broke, spent weeks living in my car; I ended an abusive relationship and lost a family member. But it didn’t stop me. We used the pain to fuel raw passion into the vocals and the music.” That passion is clear to hear as the EP’s tracks devour and arouse second by second.

From the moment the EP’s title track looms right up from its distant entrance attention was not only hooked but chained to what was to follow. Wiry tendrils of guitar wrap around ears immediately, senses slapping beats alongside and once the first track hits its voracious stride and the vocals of Targett unleash their incitement, the deal between lust and the devil’s music roaring from the speakers was done. Swiftly the singer impresses with a throat abrasing attack and venomous delivery but it is when she breaks into a glorious clean delivery that realisation at her talent is inescapable. Before then guitarists Callan Hughes and Jay Bacon gnaw at and chew on the senses, twisting and turning with grooves as their hooks pierce with imagination as the swinging rhythms of drummer Willem Mason-Geraghty infest body and spirit just as potently. The track is immense and no better way to succumb to the first abusive seduction of VNDTA.

Well we say that but the highlights just flood ears thereon in, the following Excuses a feral yet skilfully honed temptation as contagiously infectious as it is violently manipulative. Targett croons first this time, harmonically enticing as the band spin their creative web. There is of course a constant growl in the throat of singer and song, one subsequently erupting with carnal designs though still with melodic veining and atmospheric suggestion for inventive company. Involvement in voice and attitude is unavoidable as too with next up Swine, a tempest of contrasts and intensity amidst the drama of the imagination. Another as wickedly catchy as it is uncompromisingly gladiatorial, the song is another which just stirs body and spirit.

The visceral and physically twisted enterprise of Martyr is a sonic virus, getting under the skin and into the psyche within a few insidious breaths from where it burns and seduces with toxicity and beauty, again pretty much simultaneously as the sounds abound the senses with antipathy and infectiousness as Targett again simply exhilarates. The suggestive calm which bridges it and successor Rare Breed is magnetic yet soon in the past as the following creative escapade erupts. Again a tapestry of flavours and intrusion descends on ears and once more pleasure is swift and continuous. From voice to sound, melody to rhythm the song is a mercurial adventure rewarding at every twist and tempting at every turn imagination, unpredictability fuelling every moment.

Emotion and passion equally soak every breath and note, the final pair of Leeches and Virus blossoming with both. The first is carnivorous from the off, music and voice an intrusive animus but instantly as catchy as the lighter harmonics which intersperse the tempest of technical, extreme, and grooved endeavour with a fine line in progressive intuition. The track is yet one more immense moment within Pale Glow, a predator of the finest incitement pretty much matched by Virus. Straight away it gets under the skin though maybe no more than its other striking companions, but by the twist and turn it digs deeper and becomes more toxic and intoxicating but similarly graceful as it revolves its attack.

The excellent encounter completes the outstanding release, a nationwide introduction surely leading to bigger, broader, and richer things much as their sound blossoms across its length. Once in a while a band really excites, at the time and for things ahead. VNDTA has us drooling and we can only say go see why.

Pale Glow is out now, available @ http://vndtashop.bigcartel.com/

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Pete RingMaster 17/04/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Bad Mary – Glitter Bomb

These past three years has seen a greedily enjoyable annual expulsion of attitude and fun in the shape of a new EP from US rockers Bad Mary. This year’s riot comes in the shape of Glitter Bomb, an upcoming six track stomp of punk ‘n’ roll which knows all the right spots to tease, seduce, and turn into feverish submission.

Straightaway we can announce Glitter Bomb to be the Long Island, New York based quartet’s most infectious and belligerent offering yet embracing an array of styles and creative devilry which just sets the imagination and appetite aflame. Equally it is their most accomplished outing yet basking in another fresh step in maturity in writing and its realisation as well as even bolder adventure. Like the illegitimate offspring of an illicit affair between The Ramones and No Doubt as The Objex share their riotous juices, to simplify the bold confrontation, Bad Mary and Glitter Bomb explode on the senses with unbridled and fiercely enjoyable mischief.

The beginnings of Bad Mary came in 2009 with Hofstra University professor and guitarist David Henderson linking up with students for a covers band; something he regularly did. That year’s line-up included vocalist Amanda Mac and bassist/vocalist Mike Staub. As personnel changed the three remained with the current line-up eventually completed with the addition of Amanda’s father Bill Mac on drums. The quartet then began writing their own songs from 2012 with debut release Better Days drawing swift praise the following year.  The band has simply gone from strength to strength in all ways ever since, an ascent potently marked by their previous two EPs in the 2015 Killing Dinosaurs and last year’s We Could Have Saved the World. Both established the foursome as one of the truly exciting propositions on the pop/punk ‘n’ roll scene, a declaration confirmed and pushed forcibly on by Glitter Bomb.

Recorded with Brian Crowe at Kreischer Mansion Studios, their new release opens up with Motor Mouth needing little time to have the body bouncing and instincts to rock uncaged. Commandingly infectious from the off as riffs and rhythms frame the potent vocal presence and hooks of Amanda, the song is a punk rock bred pop infested persuasion soaked in attitude and rascality. There is nothing majorly remarkable about the track yet every second is instinctive temptation laying the grounds for a lusty adventure continued by next up Still Love Me. The outstanding second song swiftly shows more of the magnetically powerful tones of Amanda, her alluring roar superbly backed by those of Mike as riffs and hooks dance within the early No Doubt/hard rock spiced punk stroll. As its predecessor, the song infests ears and imagination with viral like efficiency, raising the temperature and involvement of the listener by the second while a roving bassline is the icing on the contagious cake.

The EP’s title track brings a riveting surge of raw rock ‘n’ roll which is something akin to Penetration meets Sharkmuffin before Hybrid Moments delves into Misfits like territory with its devious antics. Both tracks leave a grin on the face and lustful energy in the body and passions, the second of the pair especially appealing with the vocal union of Mike and Amanda. Their triumphs are soon more than matched by the hungry punk ‘n’ roll call of Soul Mate, a song oozing with the band’s organic creative attitude and an infectious virulence most bands can only dream of.

The EP concludes with Japan, an irresistible collusion of Ramones inspired riffs and Plastic Letters era Blondie pop contagion twisted with Bad Mary’s own individual devilry for a storming end to the band’s finest moment to date. Glitter Bomb is insatiable pop, irritable punk rock, and ferocious rock ‘n’ roll rolled into a proposal which quite simply is the business.

Glitter Bomb is out September 29th with pre-ordering available now @ https://badmary.com/shop/

https://badmary.com    https://www.facebook.com/badmaryband   https://twitter.com/BadMaryBand

Pete RingMaster 01/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Hostiles – Last Call

The Hostiles Promo Shot_RingMasterReview

Giving the most glorious workout to swinging hips and inexhaustible feet, as well as instinctive pleasure, Scottish Ska-punks The Hostiles recently released new album Last Call. It offers thirteen tracks of melody thick, brass clad, and feverishly delivered punk ‘n’ roll as raw and snarling as they are inescapably irresistible.

Formed in 2001, The Hostiles began with brothers Josh (guitar/vocals), and Chris Barron (bass/vocals). Growing up in the US, the pair was seduced by the sounds of west coast ska and the likes of Reel Big Fish, NOFX, and No Doubt. In their teens, the pair moved to Scotland, soon discovering the rawer energy and sounds of bands such as Capdown, Lightyear, and King Prawn. Linking up with Callum Douglas (drums) and Steve Bruce (trombone), The Hostiles was soon rousing the local live scene with in time Joe Stainke (trombone) completing the current line-up. Quickly renowned for their energetic live performances, the band’s reputation swiftly grew and spread, helped in turn by the release of debut album Always Looking Forward in 2009. Proceeding to share stages with bands such as Reel Big Fish, Less Than Jake, Zebrahead, The Mad Caddies, Strike Anywhere, and many more, The Hostiles followed up their attention luring first album with the Late Nights… And Early Hours EP in 2012 and the single/video For A Good Time Call 07946058526 two years later.

Now it is Last Call drawing attention and from its first minute arousing body and spirit. From the opening intro, the album leaps upon the listener with opener Ed Knows. An attitude laden bassline stalks the initial vocal draw, both leading into a fiery lure of guitar and rapier like swings from Douglas. Quickly as the trombones share their melodic flames, the track is a contagious blaze of infectious sound with a funk infused swing and punk ingrained fuel to its roar. There is little time before the listener is adding their full contribution in voice and movement, a success matched in the following Inconsiderate. A lighter stomp of a song with Hammond flavoured keys courting its instantly open catchiness, it carries a familiar air which only adds to its thrilling appeal.

The Hostiles Cover Artwork_RingMasterReviewThe band’s inspirations are never far from the surface at times, the second song evidence but spices used to shape songs which undoubtedly have The Hostiles character, as shown again in the prowling You Liar. Swaggering alone with mischief in its creative glands, the song is confrontational but an epidemic  of big hooks and intimidating attitude, and quite superb. It reveals the great mix of pop honed and punk rock driven sounds which have sparked the band’s passions over time, all woven into another distinctive proposition before things calm a touch with I’ll Assume. It is just a touch too as the song soon shows its teeth and melodic prowess in a King Prawn like canter with exotic melodies and moody basslines entangling the ever potent vocals and swathes of mariachi hued trombone.

Both Night Out with its dirty tone and ridiculously infectious enterprise and its successor Wish You All The Best has body and soul leaping. The first is ska punk at its most creatively virulent and indeed addictive while the second is a boisterous romp shaped with smart hooks and persuasive melodies as well cast in imaginative drama coloured by rock guitar and theatrical brass.

The album continues to keep the listener on their toes with a broad grin on their face as the punk brawl of Spend My Life, the gentler sway of So, I Wonder, and the blazing exploits of Late Nights come, go, and leave ears and appetite aroused. The third of the trio especially adds another pinnacle to Last Call, all offering undeniable reasons to embrace The Hostiles adventure, with To Err Is Human providing another major highlight. The band’s latest single, it also has a hint of Mariachi El Bronx to its melodic and trombone nurtured side, a great flavour mixing with heavier punk rock attitude.

Released From Captivity uncages another addictive tempting, guitars and bass alone creating a web of hooks which snare body and heart with ease. Familiar essences come to the surface of the song but flavours simply used to shade its own individual devilment before the closing pair of encounters starting with Nobody Else. The song does not make the same impact as others within Last Call, yet has mutual participation with ease so does little wrong before the album’s title track brings it all to a cantankerous close. It is a ska infested hardcore brawl of a proposal, vocals a throated scraping challenge as brass bring a tonic to the imposingly grouchy touch of guitar and rhythms.

It makes for an unexpected and pleasing end to a release which sees ears and fingers itching to go again within seconds of its close. There are a few rather special ska flavoured punksters around right now and as proven by Last Call, The Hostiles stand by their side.

Last Call is out now on Bubble Tea Records @ http://thehostiles.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/thehostiles/   http://www.thehostiles.co.uk/

Pete RingMaster 05/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Indya – Harder Faster

Indya_RingMasterReview

Need something to put some spirit rousing energy and vitality into your day? Then we suggest checking out the new single from UK band Indya for a swift and highly agreeable shot. Harder Faster is a virulent stomp of rock ‘n’ roll with the anthemic prowess of Andrew W.K., the pop infectiousness of Gwen Stefani and No Doubt, and the inventive dexterity of Pryti; a rebel rousing, thigh slapping slice of devilment just as happy to add some flavoursome glam to its hard rock bred adventure too.

Indya is led by vocalist Natalie Indya West, a songwriter/musician who was in the arms of music from an early age through her Mother’s keen and eclectic taste for artists such as Free, Bad Company, David Bowie, Rainbow and many others. From school, Natalie went on to study music at the Performing Arts & Technology school in Croydon before going on to study at the Colin’s Performing Arts College in Essex. Having to fund a large part of her schooling herself, she eventually took up a job as a pole dancer in a Gentleman’s Club, an experience which saw her fall in with the wrong crowd and into a subsequent debilitating habit. It is a time though which gave a spark to her songwriting and the often raw lyrical themes explored within that cathartic release.

Indya art_RingMasterReviewPerforming as a singer and professional dancer over recent years, Natalie eventually pulled together the band which is Indya last year, recruiting the talents of guitarist Daniel Baune, bassist Raymond Tagnola, and drummer Tobias Miorin to help bring her life bred songs to life. Combining inspirations from the likes of Rainbow, Deep Purple, Bowie, Madonna, and Amy Winehouse into their hard rock seeded rock ‘n’ roll, the band is looking to make a potent impact on ears and attention in 2016, and if Harder Faster is a sign of things to come, it is hard to see them failing.

The song opens on a great blues meets glam rock groove, beats badgering its lure with their own feisty bait. Things soon settle into an infectious canter as Natalie’s vocals flirt with and dance on ears and the imagination. The virulence of its energy and rousing bounce alone has hips and appetite gripped, the dexterity of vocals and melodic enterprise only adding to the easy going yet heavily dynamic proposal. The song is pure rock ‘n’ roll, but equally prime pop with a touch of punk to it too and quite irresistible.

Providing the thrilling lead to Strip Me Down, their new EP, Harder Faster has all the temptation to bring the UK music scene to the point of no return with the name Indya on its lustful lips.

Harder Faster is out now.

http://www.indya-band-official.rocks/      https://www.facebook.com/Indyaukmusic   https://twitter.com/IndyaOfficial

Pete RingMaster 25/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Heel – The Parts We Save

Heel_RingMasterReview

Amongst many eagerly anticipated offerings this year has to be the debut album from UK alternative rock quartet Heel. Having impressed with their first EP and even more so with subsequent releases as well as a striking stage presence, Heel has been one of the bands enveloped by increasing acclaim over recent times. It has put some strong expectations of The Parts We Save upon them which the London band has appeased with ease. Maybe at times the album does not quite fulfil all the potential within it but for rousing, imagination sculpted rock/pop contagiousness, the album persistently hits the spot with adventure and charm.

Formed in the winter of 2011 from guitarist Daniel and vocalist Margarita’s songwriting sessions, Heel quickly began working on their first EP once its line-up was completed by bassist Fred and drummer Nick. Produced by Justin Hill (Sikth), their opening release quickly grabbed attention and praise. Its success was subsequently pushed further by its successor Stranger Just The Same in 2014, an encounter also recorded with Hill. With video/singles luring play on the likes of Scuzz TV and Kerrang, the band set about working on an album, flying out to Japan`s legendary Geimori studio in Sapporo to record The Parts We Save with Daniel and Margarita producing.

Mixed by Ben Grosse and Paul Pavao (Marilyn Manson, Disturbed, Depeche Mode, Ben Folds, Thirty Seconds to Mars, etc.) and mastered by Tom Baker (Beastie Boys, Deftones, David Bowie, B.B. King), the album swiftly shows the growth in the band’s magnetic sound and its maturity in songwriting as opener An Apology sets to work stirring up ears. The first single from the release when uncaged last December, the song immediately consumes the senses in a sonic lure from which a bass led swagger within sultry caresses of guitar bounds. Its catchiness is instant and only strengthened by Margarita’s alluring vocals. Carrying thick drama to its rhythmic design and exotically seductive grooves, the track also develops an infectious No Doubt like charm which lies agreeably upon Heel’s own web of melody and imagination fuelled tenacity.

'The Parts We Save' Cover Artwork_RingMasterReviewThe excellent opening to the album continues with Selfish Burn which again has that Gwen Stefani and co spicing to its feisty pop ‘n’ roll. Throaty funk infused bait from Fred’s bass provides a potent spine to the song, an agitated smoulder of sonic and melodic resourcefulness laying upon it whilst Margarita’s tones again add a lusty freshness with a tinge of mischief to the temptation. Though seemingly crafted from the same template as the first and next up Yellow & Bliss, each song reveals its own individual and forcibly enticing character. The third track, and the band’s brand new video/single, is a lively shuffle with skittish rhythms and an animated gallop of chords and hooks beneath a breeze of warm harmonies and psych rock tinged enterprise, and quite irresistible.

Nothing New strolls in next with a melodic smile on its face and a devilish bassline at its heart for another inviting slice of impassioned pop rock whilst Shatter is a tender flirtation initially, which brews up into a spirited canter of jangling guitar and animated vocals aligned to mesmeric harmonies. By its close, the gentleness of the song is a near on surge of energy and passion, and increasingly bewitching.

The mellow croon of Cool allows body and emotions to settle; well at first as soon it also raises its enthusiastic agility and creative zeal to lead feet and hips on a merry dance egged on by virulent rhythms. A vibrant and catchy mix of textures and energies, the song has pleasure flowing, running right into the path of the outstanding Keep Running Back To Me. A tapestry of dynamic rock ‘n’ roll as punkish as it is bluesy, as feverishly tenacious as it is rapaciously heavy; the track is like a mix of My Baby and Spinnerette with a touch of Throwing Muses to it and quickly ignites appetite and emotions.

The dark drama of Live This Forever takes over, the track also a heavier proposal with a punk/grunge breeding to its invention and a fiery attitude to its emotive heart. It prowls, almost stalks ears as it unveils its shadow rich theatre, again grabbing eager involvement in its proposal before Fake Love twists and turns with its pop punk infused 4 Non Blondes like rock ‘n’ roll to great success.

Finishing with the tantalising melodic breeze of Streets Full Of You, a final harmonic and emotive kiss on ears with its own line in imaginative shadows, The Parts We Save is an encounter with plenty of eagerly lingering moments. Some songs are a more instant and imposing arousal than others, but each only provides rich enjoyment and an appetite for more from a band still growing into its skin of originality but establishing itself as one of Britain’s brightest propositions.

The Parts We Save is released March 4th via iTunes and Amazon.

http://www.heelband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Heellondon   https://twitter.com/heellondon

Pete RingMaster 04/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Bad Mary – We Could Have Saved The World EP

BM_RingMaster Review

With the Killing Dinosaurs EP still regularly toying with ears, US rockers Bad Mary are poised to release its successor in the tasty shape of We Could Have Saved The World. Providing another half dozen slices of seventies pop punk merged with the broader adventure of alternative rock, the EP is a stirring roar for ears and emotions whilst continuing the band’s emergence as one highly flavoursome rock ‘n’ roll band.

From their early days as a band brought together by Hofstra University’s professor of drama and guitarist David Henderson, Bad Mary has grown into an attention grabbing proposal. In a regular process every semester, Henderson put together a band with students to play a bunch of covers. It was 2010 when vocalist Amanda Mac and bassist/vocalist Mike Staub were those invited to be part, a trio which has stayed together since. Madame X, as it was called then, did see a few changes before Amanda’s father, veteran drummer Bill Mac, linked up to swing sticks. Inspired by bands such as Blondie, The Ramones, Green Day, and No Doubt amongst others, the band then began working on its own material. A name change led to Bad Mary being officially launched in 2012 with debut album Better Days coming two years later to strong acclaim. Its release turned keen local attention into something embracing a broader landscape not only across the US but further afield. Last year’s Killing Dinosaurs EP only cemented and pushed on their breakthrough which We Could Have Saved The World can only ignite further.

art_RingMaster ReviewThe rock ‘n’ roll frenzy starts with Creeper, the track a feisty and energetic burst of punk ‘n’ roll with Amanda’s vocals as direct and alluring as ever. With punchy beats and fiery guitar, the song continues to stomp with attitude loaded feet and a hard rock like aggressiveness; perpetually involving body and appetite whilst setting the listener eagerly up for the excellent roar of Marz Attaqx. Like The Rezillos meets The Objex, it is a contagiously irresistible slab of pop punk, quickly getting full involvement from hips and voice as Amanda again rules the speakers whilst rhythms jab and riffs get under the skin, the track’s hooks digging even deeper to complete the virulent slavery.

The rhythmic coaxing opening up the following Trouble is equally irresistible, its lures leading into the fiery heavy rock throes of winy grooves courted by the melodic caresses of Amanda’s mischievous vocals. As it broadens its lively stroll and magnetic landscape, a rich No Doubt spicing tempts without defusing the Bad Mary character of the song. Again there is a lining of attitude which demands attention whilst the flames of classic rock guitar bring extra flavour before the rapacious rocker makes way for the gentler hug of Cloud 9. Shadow wrapped pulses of bass tempers enticing vocals, whilst firm yet respectful beats align to the sultry glaze of guitar, all uniting for an enjoyable if low key, in comparison to its rowdier companions, proposal.

Meanwhile is back snarling and creating a riotous time with its raw punk air and nature though hooks and rhythms again collude to create the catchiest of times led by the rebellious vocals of Amanda and Mike. Brief and to the point as it continues the bracing potency of the EP, the excellent encounter swaps places with the similarly anthemic and antagonistic When You Think of Me. It is a final punk rock roaring to beat chests and defy the world with, bringing We Could Have Saved The World to a tenacious and galvanic end.

Bad Mary continues to get stronger, bolder, and more essential in the modern realm of punk ‘n’ roll; the evidence is all there within We Could Have Saved The World.

The We Could Have Saved The World EP is released 1st February.

http://badmary.com/   https://twitter.com/BadMaryBand    https://www.facebook.com/badmaryband

Pete RingMaster 26/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Dark Sky Park – Follow Me

Dark Sky Park Promo shot_RingMaster Review

Formed by a rooftop pool in Tenerife, UK alternative rockers Dark Sky Park are now gearing up to make 2016 their year to grab attention and it all starts with their new EP Follow Me getting its national release January 8th. The five track encounter is an enjoyable and increasingly captivating fusion of rock and pop ‘n’ roll with a healthy dose of classic metal to spice things up further. Already a keenly supported proposition on their local and Northern rock scene, Sheffield hailing quartet have those wider spotlights in their sights and with more offerings like Follow Me, it is easy to suggest they will court the rewards they seek.

Made up of vocalist Debbie Bilson, guitarist Ainsley Stones, drummer Hannah Jasper, and bassist Aidan Hall, Dark Sky Park has a sound which toys with any attempts to pin it down. As the EP shows, at times it is stoner-esque, in other moments rock pop or punky, and always carrying a heavy metal spicing to keep things unpredictable. Follow Me is also an encounter which persistently works away on ears and appetite; not a release setting a fire right away but a proposition in varying degrees getting under the skin with its energetically vibrant songs. References have been made to the likes of Royal Blood, Queens of the Stone Age, Black Sabbath, and Ziggy Stardust era Bowie in regard to the band’s sound but this too only reveals part of the picture.

Dark Sky Park Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review  Follow Me opens with its title track, the song striding in on thickly boned rhythms and winy sonic enticing. Quickly it sets down a familiar but inviting canvas to which Bilson adds her potent vocals as the guitars weave a tapestry of melodic enterprise. Early Blondie immediately comes to mind as the song blossoms with open infectiousness and warm harmonies, these aligned to increasingly steely textures from Stones. It is contagious stuff, a song using recognisable essences to fine effect against its darker more cantankerous aspects.

A No Doubt meets Dirty Youth feel grabs ears in the magnetic lure of Lonely Girl next, the second song a sultry temptress with voluptuous rhythmic hips swinging within a smouldering glaze of vocal and melodic seduction. There is a seventies flavoured vocal croon to the song too which only adds to the compelling drama which steals major attention first time around and only strengthens its hold with each play.

Dark Sky Park digs into their classic and hard rock passions for the following Stand My Ground, its tenaciously muscular character the spring board for fiery grooves with matching vocal attack. Fair to say the song lacks the spark of its predecessors yet leaves satisfaction full and participation keen before attention gathers around next up Marty Feldman’s Eyes. With a title like this the song was already half way there to sparking eager intrigue, completing the job with its Animal Alpha/Kate Bush like dance with ears and imagination. As other times within Follow Me, there is a want for a more forceful and aggressive attack from the rhythmic side of the song, but it is a small want in something which continually demands body and voice get involved, completing its persuasion by closing with a touch of The Adverts to its punkish exploits.

Things come to a fine end with Suicide FM and its rock ‘n’ roll swagger cloaked in again familiar but appealing hues and sound. When a track has feet bouncing and emotions smiling there is much to praise and certainly the final offering finds that success with ease whilst hinting at bigger and bolder exploits lurking within Dark Sky Park.

Follow Me is a great introduction to national awareness, one bursting with potential that ensures that Dark Sky Park are going to be watched by a great many hereon in.

The Follow Me EP is released January 8th through most stores.

http://www.wearedarkskypark.com/ https://www.facebook.com/darkskypark

Pete RingMaster 06/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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