Medusa – In Bed with Medusa

 

Having found ourselves taken with sound and invention of UK trio Medusa with their 2011 released second album, Can’t Fucking Win, it quickly became apparent that there was nothing predictable about the band’s music but as confirmed by its successor Headcase’s Handbook three years later it has persistently proved a thickly compelling affair. Both albums were rich in the band’s punk fired rock sound and bold in their intrigue loaded magnetism, traits again just as fertile within the band’s new album, In Bed with Medusa.

The new release though is a whole new beast to be tempted by, one which still bears the inimitable breath and touch of the London based outfit but as its title suggests has an unwrapped intimacy which challenges as much as it fascinates. It is a far darker and rawer involvement with Medusa, one which startled from the off and has persistently caught us off guard with its almost feral emotions and untamed enterprise but fair to say with every listen has left us thickly hooked.

Emerging in 2006, Medusa is the creation of vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Julian Molinero, the band’s line-up on the new release completed by bassist Kotaro Suzuki and Towers of London drummer Snell, the latter recruited barely eight weeks before recording which took place with Steve Albini at his studio, Electrical Audio, in Chicago across the first four days of  December 2019. You can only imagine this intense recording time has added to the raw energy and heart of a release though equally such its resourceful drama and touch you can only feel it was always meant and going to be such a soul bearing proposition.

Oblivion opens up the album, a song which instantly unravels an instinctive infectiousness in voice and sound even before hitting its more aggressive and energetic punk ‘n’ roll stride. Molinero’s tones are as bare breathed and provocative as the melodic wiring escaping his guitar between punk bred chords, rhythms a potent anthemic incitement beneath it all.

*love not included seamlessly springs up from the closing straits of its predecessor, the track another with a persistent, indeed voracious catchiness to its punk ‘n’ roll incitement. Hooks and sonic wiring lured and gripped ears as boldly as rhythms and vocals, the track provoking and inviting keen involvement in its naked heart and touch before River Phoenix, inspired by a biography on the actor, lays a calm hand on ears before erupting in a tempestuous rock ‘n’ roll squall again embroiled in emotional turbulence.

There is an open richness to Medusa sound which is entangled in a host of rock flavours, alternative and hard rock textures among them involved within the melodically woven, deviously contagious reflection of The Girlfriend Experience while Lost in Dystopia shares more classic hues in its virulent canter; a grunge lining to both tracks as well as others within the album accentuating the wonderfully unvarnished feel of its presence and heart. Indeed Ride the Styx bears Nirvana-esque shading to its greedy nagging of the senses, the first of our favourite moment considerations within the album swiftly set.

The pair of No Such Thing and Inverse Paradise offer up quick challenges to that choice though, the first with something of an Everclear air around a classic metal wired holler another pinnacle of the release with the second eclipsing both through its almost XTC like setting bound in blues nurtured wiring as Molinero muses proving irresistible. The latter is also one of a pair of acoustic tracks which were recorded in a hotel room overlooking Bran Castle, known as Dracula’s Castle, in Transylvania.

Lenore provides a fiery enticement for ears, maybe one which lacks the sparks of its predecessors for us but still held eager attention before that final slice of acoustic enterprise in the shape of Distress Signal brought In Bed with Medusa to a fine close. Whether bred on intimate experiences of its creator or through observation, it is a potent engagement with ears and thoughts alike; one epitomising the stripped and exposed fertility of the album.

A release which grew in presence and enjoyment by the listen, In Bed with Medusa simply backs up its predecessors in suggesting Medusa is one of Britain’s brightest and unique propositions and with its own openly individual endeavour a band all should at least consider checking out.

In Bed with Medusa is out now and available @ https://medusaworld.bandcamp.com/

http://www.medusaworld.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/medusauk   https://twitter.com/medusaworld

Pete RingMaster 26/03/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

The Krueggers – Hysterical Cold Side and Dark Memories

If you are going to unapologetically wear your influences on your musical sleeve you are going to need plenty more to tempt to step out from the crowd. Brazilian outfit The Krueggers have and do just that, it all in compelling evidence within new album Hysterical Cold Side and Dark Memories. It offers a collection of tracks which proudly blossom from the seeds of their easy to hear inspirations but swiftly stamp down their own identity and uniqueness with relish.

Emerging back in 2011, The Krueggers drew on firm influences which surrounded its founders, vocalist/rhythms guitarist Randy Fiora and bassist Rikke Galla, as they grew up for their fusion of grunge and nu metal. The likes of Nirvana, Sepultura, Alice in Chains, Korn, Soundgarden, Marilyn Manson, and Stone Temple Pilots are all listed amongst their inspirations, a diverse mix which you can firmly feel within their broadly flavoured new release. Though the band released On Your Hands back in 2013, the impressive Hysterical Cold Side and Dark Memories, following their signing with Eclipse Records, is their first official full-length and a seriously striking introduction to the Guarulhos hailing band it is.

It is no lie to say, that the album had us eagerly attentive in quick time through opener Lying Machine. The track just gripped from its first breath, sirens drawing its intrigue to ears as Galla’s bass raised its throbbing growl. The guitars of Randy Fiora and lead Rafael Fiora quickly offer their bait before dirty riffs accentuated the threat and tempting, Anthony Juno’s swinging beats only increasing the manipulation as the band reveals its Korn-esque instincts with the bass continuing to share a delicious throbbing groove as the track almost taunted ears with its prowling seduction.

It is an outstanding start to the album and remained our favourite moment though fair to say the likes of the following Freak Out certainly hit the spot. A gravelly hard rock spicing brings the track forward; a touch of Gruntruck meets Seether adding to its initial lure and the subsequent infectious stroll it offers for ears and vocal chords to jump upon.  With its dirty breath and spiralling guitar enterprise, the song easily got under the skin, that earthy tone of the bass again a magnetic essence before Dark Parade engages the imagination in its heavy, steely trespass. Like a fusion of early Mudvayne and Skinyard, it crawls across the senses as rhythms take their bite before uncaging a truly virulent chorus which just accentuates another irresistible moment within the release.

A definite Nirvana seeding shapes the enthralling body of next up Someday, the song maybe not unique but highly captivating as its reveals its breeding and invention while Overreaction uncages a garage punk/ grunge bred irritability which infests word and metal nurtured enterprise. Both had ears and appetite gripped but still found themselves eclipsed by the magnificent Bullshit, it too grouchy and uncompromising but around a waspish groove which nagged as it seared the senses to offer abuse and flirtation in equal measure; another major highlight of Hysterical Cold Side and Dark Memories stamped down.

In some ways the latter part of the album did not quite ignite the passions as what came before had yet as the Stone Temple Pilots tinted heavy metal coated and increasingly addictive I Set Myself and Wrong with its grunge croon upon an intimation soaked melodic web as well as the album’s heavily weighted and skilfully fiery title track proved, all left a lingering impact and lure to go again and again.

Bring Me Shine completes Hysterical Cold Side and Dark Memories, its acoustically set and melodically woven body a tapestry of adventure and temptation within an emotionally and physically volatile body. It is a fine end to an album which immediately impressed and has only made a greater impact by the listen; a triumph which surely will wake up the world outside of Brazil to The Krueggers.

Hysterical Cold Side and Dark Memories is out now via Eclipse Records.

http://krueggers.com   https://www.facebook.com/the.krueggers   https://twitter.com/thekrueggers

Pete RingMaster 27/01/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Intimacy and the Roar: talking with Jack And Sally

Hi and thank you for sparing time to chat with us.

Could you first introduce yourself/the band and tell us how it came to be?

Prav-Like Fez from That 70s Show, I was given the name Prav by the band and yes, like Fez I am also an International student. I moved to London to play Rock ‘n Roll and met Ben and Josh in the winter of 2018. We formed the band shortly after.

Josh -I’m Josh, I’m play guitar for the band. I was originally going to join Ben’s old band but before I could, they fell apart! I went ahead and met Ben anyway, and we eventually found Prav from the musicians network group and as they say, the rest is history.

How would you define not only your sound but the creative character of the band?

Prav -The sound is probably best described as Green Day meets Rise Against. If the band had an alter ego, it would be a boy/girl in their early 20s who are at a critical point in their life. He/she would be experiencing feelings of love and loss, discovering how messed up and complex the modern world is and also finding their own passion for the good and genuine things in life.

Ben –Like Prav said, our song writing revolves around issues in real-life that regular people deal with on a regular basis –and just like everyone else, we do too.

Josh -Creatively I think we draw from a lot of disparate places but it blends well. I listen to a lot of harder stuff and I bring that into the songs we write. Ben’s vocals are mainstream sounding but he writes them into punk riffs, and Prav brings in his influences from grunge and hard rock into the drums.

You touched on previous musical experiences for band members, would you elaborate and suggest how have they been embraced in what you do now?

Prav -I used to play in a Funk Rock band back in India and played with another Hard Rock act in London for just over a year. I would definitely say that those experiences shaped what I play now for Jack and Sally.

Ben –I’ve played in bands in college. I was in a band in 2009 that was called Aisle Riot –we played one gig but my time in that band had a major influence on my life and showed me that I could be in a band –that I could actually do it.

Josh -I’ve been in bands since school but my last serious band was at university -Chance Encounter. We tracked a few songs, it was a pretty fun experience especially it was my first few times ever playing live in the U.K.

Is there a particular process to the band’s songwriting?

Prav-Ben or I write a song and bring it to the studio where we then fiddle around with our parts and start adding in ideas. Slowly but surely, the song starts taking shape as each of our styles pour in. Once we feel confident that this is how we want our audiences to listen to the song, we make a demo.

Ben -I write lyrics first, based on ideas I have in my head. The idea for our second single Macy came to me when I was on a train in Finland -from a graffiti image sprayed on a wall. It actually took me 6 years to write Tomorrow’s Revolution! Based on my influences in life, I’ve carried a lot of anger –and all of that inspired me write about a whole new world -that world is called ‘Nevernia’ –it’s what the EP is based around. Once I have finished writing the lyrics to a song, I’ll put some basic chords around it and then take it to the studio to work on, like Prav said.

Josh -We continually fiddle with our songs as well to improve it for live situations –Tomorrow’s Revolution for example sounds much different today than when we originally played it live, and it’s much better (in my opinion at least!)

Would you tell us about your latest release?

Ben –Our latest release is our EP, Who We Become!

Josh -It’s out everywhere to stream and buy from 11th November. We’ve also released two music videos for the singles on it, so check it out!

What are the major inspirations to its heart and themes?

Ben –Our EP is based on a concept, which follows the life of its protagonist ‘Macy’ who has grown up into a world plagued by issues like racism, corporate greed, austerity and oppression. It deals with how Macy stands up to these issues of modern day society.

I am always intrigued as to how artists choose track order on albums and EP’s and whether in hindsight they would change that. What has been the deciding factor for you?

Prav -The EP’s track order follows Macy’s journey. Superstar is her Father’s message to her that she doesn’t have to try too hard to make the world see that she is good. Nevernia is essentially a metaphor to describe the messed up world we live in and how Macy tries to traverse it. Tomorrow’s Revolution is about Macy’s rebellion after she realises that she needs to take drastic measures to bring about change. Long Way Home is about her feeling homesick and how she longs to go back to the people she loves. Macy is ultimately the story of how Macy’s loved ones mourn her loss.

What do you find the most enjoyable part of being in a band and similarly the most cathartic?

Prav -playing original songs that we made from the ground up on stage, touring and when people come and tell you that they had a sick time watching us play.

Ben –Being able to play our songs to people that they sing back at us is one of the most underrated achievements anyone could ever have. It’s beautiful, and seeing people believe in words that I wrote in my bedroom is truly unreal.

Josh -I’ll never get used to hearing people say they like our songs, but it’s definitely one of the best things about being in a band. Playing shows live as well -the adrenaline rush is unreal.

For anyone contemplating checking you out live give some teasers as to what they can expect.

Prav-thumping grooves, sick riffs and yes, be ready to sing with us!

Ben –We are loud, yes we are Pop Rock to the core, but you will hear Metal, you will hear Punk Rock and you will also want to dance to our tracks.

Josh -Riffs, solos, and some meaningful lyrics.

What has been your most thrilling moment on stage to date?

Prav -Probably at The Cavern, Exeter a few weeks ago. The place seemed so packed all of a sudden when we played All The Small Things. We couldn’t believe our eyes!

Josh -Yeah I’d agree with Prav -the Cavern show was mental.

Do you have live dates coming up?

Ben –We do, yes. We are booking our tour for April 2020, and some shows have already been confirmed.

What else can we expect in the near future?

Prav -More releases, probably some collaborations with other artists as well.

Ben –Definitely new music, but for now we’re focussing on our debut EP and getting a tour or two together.

What are the major inspirations to you sound wise and as a musician?

Prav -Green Day’s American Idiot, Audioslave, Velvet Revolver and Switchfoot.

Ben –Green Day is my favourite band, Linkin Park and Nirvana.

Josh -Soundwise -Blink-182, Paramore. Musician wise -Metallica, Enter Shikari.

And finally what song or release would you say was the spark to your passion for music?

Prav -Superunknown (Soundgarden)

Ben –Jesus of Suburbia (Green Day)

Josh -Master of Puppets (Metallica)

Many thanks guys once again!

Check out the review of Who We Become @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2019/10/09/jack-sally-who-we-become/

 

https://www.jackandsally.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/jackandsallyuk   https://twitter.com/jackandsallyuk

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 12/12/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Elizabeth The Second – Two Margaritas at the Fifty Five

photo by Filippo Galvanelli

A handful or so weeks back Italy based outfit, Elizabeth The Second, unveiled their debut single ahead of their first EP. It was a rousing introduction to the trio and a flirty teaser for Two Margaritas at the Fifty Five, which now here equally suggests this is a band to keep a close eye and eager ear upon.

Consisting of Ben Moro (guitar and vocals), Michele Venturini (bass guitar) and Luca Gallato (drums), Padova hailing Elizabeth The Second spring a sound upon ears which is part garage rock, part punk, and an infectious amount of dirtily edged pop rock. Inspirations come through the likes of by The Clash, Blur, The Libertines, Artic Monkeys, Nirvana, and The Stone Roses; all hues which certainly flavour the band’s sound as too the breath of seventies nurtured power pop and nineties Brit pop.  For all that though, the band’s music escapes speakers with open individuality casting a great mix of familiarity and undisguised freshness.

Two Margaritas at the Fifty Five opens with that previous single and fair to say that No One Cares instantly grabbed ears with its first lure of guitar, its melodic clang equipped with a swing which is soon equally embraced by rhythms and vocals as the track hits its catchy stride. The fuzzy grumble of Venturini’s bass in turn takes over the virulence, its lone coaxing delicious before Moro’s guitar returns with its own shade of the contagion as Gallato’s beats bounce. The song is an irresistible slice of garage pop ‘n roll, its repeated cycle all the more addictive, and itself as a whole as potent as when it graced ears alone to provide a great start to the release.

Its persuasive traits are keenly embraced and built upon across the following tracks too, Mickey weaving its own infectious blend of pop and rock in a boisterous proposition blessed with lively rhythms and a spicy hook. With its body woven from an array of flavours and Moro’s vocals further great persuasion the song effortlessly hit the spot before Yesterday I Was 20 stepped forward with matching prowess. A sixties hue teases from its melodic grace as that power pop essence fuels its shuffle, the song in some ways reminding of bands such as Purple Hearts and The Chords and though it did not quite raise the passions as those around it, there was only pleasure and an appetite to indulge again in its infection.

As its companions the following Soho revels in its catchiness and playful enterprise, melodies and enticing hooks as manipulative as the roar in Moro’s voice and the dexterity of the rhythms driving the song, let alone the imagination gluing it all together. Again an array of styles make up its character and voice before it leaves the just as potent Gimme One Euro to bring the EP to a spirited close with its own recipe of just as varied ingredients and flavours. As with every song on the EP, pop, punk, and rock essences meld perfectly with the classic rock wiring which escapes Moro’s guitar especially in his spice rich solos and in all tracks there is nothing which allows attention to be cast elsewhere.

One superb single and one addictive EP, there could be a rather rosy reign for Elizabeth The Second ahead.

Two Margaritas at the Fifty Five is available now digitally and on CD @ https://elizabeththesecond.bandcamp.com/album/two-margaritas-at-the-fifty-five

https://www.facebook.com/elizabeth.the.second.band   https://twitter.com/Elizabethe2nd

Pete RingMaster 28/11/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

NoYz? – Tinnitus

Ever since being introduced to Noyz? years back through their ear grabbing track Happy Hour In A Junkyard, a song persistently played upon the internet shows we were involved with, The RR has been patiently waiting for the first album from the Serbian band. Finally it is here and there is no let down for hopes and anticipation by Tinnitus and its collection of multi-flavoured rock bred tracks.

Formed in 2004, the Belgrade outfit lacked a truly stable period line-up wise and went on a hiatus in 2012. Three years later founder and vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Stevan ‘Sharkey’ Radoičić brought the band back and set about creating that long promised first album. Their sound is a fusion of grunge, hard rock, metal, and punk; a mix embracing unpredictability and prone to ear grabbing hooks and bold enterprise. Inspirations to the band include the likes of Nirvana, Alice In Chains, Soundgarden, Metallica, Megadeth, System Of A Down, The Offspring, and Bad Religion; a list giving a good hint to that blend in their music.

Tinnitus opens with Introbytes, a slice of metal infused punk nurtured rock immediately presenting the type of ear catching hooks the band specialises in. Despite its title it is far more than an intro, the predominately instrumental encounter a stomping invitation into the weave of sound, design, and textures shaping the album ahead with the following Pure Fucking Metal Pwnage skilfully exploiting all. The second track’s first breath is thrash like, its second a thicker mix of metallic flavouring before the band’s rock ‘n’ roll instincts emerge in the blossoming song. Sharkey’s vocals are as keen as the sounds around them, the rhythms of drummer Milan Jejina Yeqy a swinging and rousing trespass while the bass of Anja Tvrtković is a heavy throaty lure with the song itself not holding back on the imaginative twists which again provide persistent temptation across the release.

Blow Joe is next up and straight away drums tease and tempt, their beats an infectious coaxing matched by the glorious lure of the bass. Swiftly the guitar casts melodic strokes across their irresistible dark bait before the track opens up a web of hooks and grooves, a hard rock infusion erupting upon the compelling landscape.

Similarly Cold Turkey enters on appetite pleasing bait, bass and guitar entangling around vocals before the track exposes its dirtier grunge nurtured side. Grooves soon expose greater lures in the track as vocals reflect with irritability and angst. Magnetic from start to finish, the track easily hit the spot before Ein Neues Leid steps forward with its classic punk breeding. That in turn gives birth to a broader punk ‘n’’ roll roar lined with grunge and melodic rock enterprise.

The senses became entwined by guitar wires as What You May Call It rises up straight after, infectious dexterity a rich wash in its imaginative tapestry of sound and invention. Again manipulative hooks are freely sprung and greedily devoured, Noyz? sharing their dextrous conjuring of such tempting with ears grabbing unpredictability and keenly echoed in Diarrhea and in turn Dream. The first of the pair is a catchy and swiftly satisfying offering if not quite matching up to those before it for personal tastes whilst its bolder successor bears its Nirvana inspirations proudly before immersing them in Noyz? individuality, one drawing on a palette of rock.

The melodic caresses of Cherished Leader easily seduced, the relatively calm yet fiery song casting its own uncomplicated but potent hooks within melodic metal scenery, while Happy Hour In A Junkyard once more simply hit the spot with greedy accuracy. Once its familiar opening hook leaps forward there was no denying its command, bass and guitar making a potent force within the lively swings of Milan, and once that effortlessly persuasive chorus erupted , old instincts flared. Every band has a moment or a few which is their calling card and this is still easily the one for the Serbian outfit.

With the final trio of the feral punk ‘n’ roll driven, diversely flavoured and sculpted Boy/Girl, the equally untamed hard rock reared Pissoff and another host of an inimitable Noyz? hook in The Gootch leaving ears bursting with satisfaction, Tinnitus is easy to fully recommend.

There are moments which simply stole the passions and others which had us boisterously bouncing so fair to say that from start to finish the long awaited Tinnitus hit the spot.

Wrapped in the great artwork of Anja Tvrtković, Tinnitus is out now and available @ https://noyzband.bandcamp.com/album/tinnitus

https://www.facebook.com/noyzgrunge

Pete RingMaster 07/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Rat Face Lewey – The Fall Of Man

Their new album might just declare The Fall Of Man but with eight slices of inventively rousing rock ‘n’ roll it also announces the rise of Rat Face Lewey.

The London based alt-rockers have certainly felt praise and support since emerging nine years back but with their latest offering it is easy to suggest that the British trio could now spark major attention. East Midlands hailing, Rat Face Lewey was formed by brothers, vocalist/guitarist Jonny and bassist Mav with Gregg on drums. Their sound rose on the inspirations of bands such as Nirvana, Red Hot Chilli Peppers, and The Manic Street Preachers and in 2013 formed a well-received debut album in the shape of Wonder Before Mess, a number of its tracks finding a place and longevity on playlists throughout the globe. A couple of Matthew Hyde produced singles in Dead in the Ground and Digital Prison two years later only enhanced the band’s reputation and rise up the ranks of the British rock scene, a position under the threat of far loftier heights through the ear gripping holler of The Fall Of Man.

The album opens up with Tell Your Friends About Me and a combined vocal introduction which had ears on keen alert before earthy riffs and punchy rhythms took a firm hold. Swiftly a hard rock scented amble breaks free as vocals continue to impress, eager catchiness soaking every wire from the guitar and each controlled yet boisterous rhythm. Imagination equally is at potent play as the song twists and turns with magnetic enterprise revealing that the band’s sound has moved far away from those early influences to find its own predominate identity though at times there is a great Terrorvision like whiff to it.

As strong and stirring as it is, the first track is quickly eclipsed by its successor. Comfortable entices with an engaging guitar beckoning which soon sparks a bouncing punk ‘n’ roll stroll with a Green Day-esque hue to its infection. Contagious in every essence, the track incited mutual spirit and bounce before The Pirate Song washed up on the shores of temptation, a guitar shimmer springing a shapely melody which in turn ignites a rapacious hook equipped rock canter. Continued animation in that hookery combined with anthemic vocal calls singular and united shape our favourite moment within the album, its shanty like swing the froth to its creative ale.

Replaced is next up, another calm but resourceful thread of guitar ensuring close attention confirmed by Jonny’s voice before being surrounded by a larger web of stirring sound. Mav’s bass again provides a delicious gnarly tone to its throaty lines whilst all the while the song shares unpredictable twists and tenacious turns to prove a rival for that best moment choice as too does its successor, Fight My Noose, thanks to the best opening to a track on the album. Straight away it nagged at the senses, guitar and bass stirring instincts with their united persistence. As the song continued to expand there is no lessening of its potency and manipulation, a punk breeding firing up song and passions alike.

The album’s title track follows, prowling with feral breath even as harmonies and melodies wrap its untamed heart. Defiance and angst soak its every note and syllable, its enraged roars as gripping as its melodic and sonic adventure.

The final pair of This Turtle and Belong to Yourself equally reveals additional shades to the band’s sound. The first is a contagious slab of punk ‘n’ roll bordering on pop virulent but hungrily muscular with the second a fire of melodic and infectious energy as composed as it is impassioned and imaginatively crafted. While maybe not as commanding as those before it, it makes for a fine end to a richly enjoyable and accomplished release which should put Rat Face Lewey firmly on the map.

The Fall of Man is released Sept 6th.

http://www.ratfacelewey.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/Ratfacelewey/

Pete RingMaster 06/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Stolen Dead Music – Penny Drop

UK based ScreamLite Records is one of those labels which you just have to keep a close ear on. Their hunger for fresh and exciting new music is the match to that of a fan meaning attention for their releases is certainly a given here. This month sees the label release the new EP from Newcastle outfit Stolen Dead Music which ScreamLite announced was “the first band to really get our feet tapping in 2019” though what the rest of their bodies were up to we don’t know because the three tracks making up the Penny Drop EP just had us bouncing from head to toe.

Formed in 2017, Stolen Dead Music take the inspiration of bands such as Nirvana, Alice in Chains, Smashing Pumpkins, Weezer, Black Flag, Pixies, QOTSA, and NiN into a sound which stands distinctly aside of what expectations assume going by that list. It is a blend of alternative and noise rock with numerous other flavours involved sitting uniquely amongst the equally striking enterprise of bands like Japanese Fighting Fish, Houdini, Damn Vandals, and Max Raptor and providing so much to get excited over.

The EP opens up with its title track, Penny Drop initially stroking ears with fuzz loaded riffs before the same guitar begins deviously scything across the senses as the tones of vocalist/guitarist Jimi Trimmer break. Simultaneously the tenaciously strolling beats of drummer Aidan McGill erupt alongside the just as sturdy bassline of Lewis Patterson, guitarist Issak Patternson continuing to tease and tempt alongside the lures of Trimmer. Just as you think you have a handle on the song, it twists into a whole new channel of virulence to manipulate and seduce, never once taking its foot off its imagination and feverish enterprise.

It is an outstanding track and start to the release more than matched by next up Shunt. Rhythms straight away toy with ears and appetite, the guitars getting in on the act with their web of teasing melodic wires. Loaded with hooks and grooves, the band’s rock ‘n’ roll is a devious persuasion and in full lustfulness within the second song. There is a great Pere Ubu-esque whiff to the track at times too which only escalates its call on instincts and sure allegiance to its feral like energy and imagination.

Gallows Humour completes the release, the instrumental simply an irresistible shuffle of salacious melodic hooks and boisterous rhythms casting intimation and addiction with ease.

The Penny Drop EP is in many ways just a teaser to the Stolen Dead Music songbook, the three tracks picked out from their repertoire to mark their link up with ScreamLite Records but a wake up to all of us previously unaware of their potential and thrilling adventure. Anticipation for more is already drooling here.

The Penny Drop EP is out now on ScreamLite Records across numerous stores and @ https://screamliterecords.bandcamp.com/album/stolen-dead-music-penny-drop

https://www.facebook.com/StolenDeadMusic/   https://twitter.com/StolenDeadMusic   https://stolendeadmusic.bandcamp.com

Pete RingMaster 13/06/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright