Ninjaspy – Spüken

It is fair to say that Spüken, the new album from Canadian metallers Ninjaspy has been a long time in the making. With its ten tracks spanning a decade and its recording beginning late 2014, the band’s second full-length has had time and attention given its creation and character; it all reflected and more in its thoroughly enjoyable and imaginatively dynamic adventure.

Consisting of a trio of blood brothers in vocalist/guitarist Joel, bassist Tim, and drummer Adam Parent, Ninjaspy has honed a fusion of groove infested metal, reggae, and other heavy natured flavours which now roar mightily within Spüken. It is a web of sound which grabbed attention in the Vancouver threesome’s 2007 debut album Pi Nature and even more so in the following EP, No Kata six years later. Their new offering is the natural and lofty evolution of these earlier successes; a release weaving occasionally familiar but always unpredictable proposals which tease, flirt with, and persistently arouse the senses and imagination.

Linking up once more with producers GGGarth Richardson (Rage Against the Machine, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Mudvayne, Gallows) and Ben Kaplan (Biffy Clyro, Atreyu, Haste the Day), Ninjaspy gets the album under way with the single Speak, a track certainly sparking anticipation of Spüken with its release last August. Its relatively low key Australasian entrance cored by an emerging bait loaded groove soon leaps into a smouldering swinging stroll with more than an air of Dog Fashion Disco meets Faith No More to it. Subsequent raw outbursts come loaded with ferocity and zeal, trespassing with the same catchiness as the song’s mellower teasing where rhythms dance and the bass grumbles.

It is a stirring start swiftly eclipsed by Shuriken Dance. It too shows restraint in its initial coaxing, melodic twang and rumbling rhythms colluding in an understated but bold tempting before a web of sonic and creative espionage binds ears and appetite. A punk roar escapes the throat of Joel, his aggression matched by the punching beats of Adam and both tempered by the melodic exploits of guitar. Their calm is as deceptive as the raw touch they temper, each beckoning ears into a waiting System Of A Down-esque bedlam of psychotic sound and invention. The track is pure virulent infectiousness, drawing body and voice into union with its own twisted exploits.

The following Brother Man warmly grabs ears next like a collusion of Ruts and 12 Stone Toddler; its stalking groove and melodic coaxing a delicious mix soon embracing a reggae and metal induced tempest in turn proceeding to entangle all earlier aspects within its similarly and seriously catchy landscape. The further into its depths the more deranged twists show their voracious enticements as too mellower melodic but no less certifiable essences. Thorough captivation, it is more than matched in aberrant adventure by Dead Duck Dock. The song also follows those before it by making a relatively gentle melody woven entrance but also one soon showing argumentative discord in sound and intensity as its groove metal instincts rise. With hues of Slipknot and Society 1 to its growl, the song is a roar of creative irritability and intrigue never resting for long in one flavour or mood.

The outstanding Become Nothing is a loco romp revelling in a sound and imagination something akin to again SOAD  this time in league with Kontrust while What!! infests ears and satisfaction with a Skindred/American Head Charge scented escapade though as every reference used as a hint, it is a potent hue in a Ninjaspy bred roar.

The sweltering infection fuelled funk of Jump Ya Bones soon spins its own particular tapestry of rich flavours and various styles as it flirtatiously bounds through ears before Grip the Cage provides a more even tempered shuffle though it too expels moments of incendiary emotion and energy. They both equally push the diversity of the album and songs, that ten years of writing and maturing giving birth to Spüken skilfully shaping their varied designs.

The melody rich and increasingly agitated Azaria stretches that variety yet again, the song deceptively straight forward initially, luring ears into its own expectation defeating maze before Slave Vehemence brings it all to a thrilling close with a cauldron of capricious invention and impulsive ideation wrong-footing and exciting ears at every turn.

It is a fine end to an increasingly pleasing album unveiling new nuances and moments with every listen even after double figure plays. It is a release sure to harass global attention the way of Ninjaspy but more so leave new legion of fans lusting for their sound and presence.

Spüken is released April 14th

http://www.ninjaspy.net/    https://www.facebook.com/ninjaspy/    https://twitter.com/ninjaspy

Pete RingMaster 12/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Mountain Man – Bloodlust EP

TMM_RingMasterReview

Like brawling with a bear, the Bloodlust EP leaves concussive destruction and raw mayhem in its wake. It relentlessly ravages and crushes with five tracks of metal ferocity but like an unbridled storm it also leaves the senses energised and hungry for more. The release is the debut assault from Canadian band The Mountain Man; an introduction to a new primal force with potential swinging from every mighty rhythmic blow and sonic tirade.

Hailing from Vancouver,  The Mountain Man draws on inspirations from the likes of The Black Dahlia Murder, Crowbar, Gojira, Lamb of God, and Black Sabbath for their ravenous sound. They are essences easily heard within the band’s first encounter but no more so than the band’s own distinctive and carnivorous imagination and raging intensity. Since forming, the band has earned a potent reputation for a live presence which has seen them play with the likes of 88 Mile Trip, Nylithia, La Chinga, Slaughterhauser, Warrborn, Ninjaspy, Abriosis, Unbeheld, and Dead Asylum. Now it is the Matt Roach produced, Troy Glessner mastered Bloodlust EP ready to spark not only fresh homeland attention but easy to suspect far wider bred spotlights.

Virtually living up to its name from its first breath, the EP opens with the venomous Backhand of God. Its initial touch is a single captivating melody with just a hint of a rapacious edge to it. That background hunger is soon realised as the evocative groove leads into a blistering haze of raw and imposing intensity led by the bestial growl of vocalist Parker.  By now the track is prowling ears, crawling over the senses with a Lamb Of God like predation wrapped in equally intimidating tendrils of guitar enterprise cast by Tyson Tambellini and Jordan Orr. Increasingly invasive and pleasing, the track makes a formidable, attention grabbing start to Bloodlust, though it is quickly eclipsed by the EP’s title track.

Album cover_RingMasterReviewA web of primal rhythms and corrosively roaming grooves instantly ensnare ears  as Parker extends his multi-faceted vocal fury and attack to again direct the tempest. It is an exhilarating and  uncompromising tempest driven by the gloriously thunderous and dynamic beats of Ryan McCreedy, whose hellacious craft is matched in merciless kind by the psyche grinding grooves of bassist Tevyn Pacey. The track is glorious, a torrent of riffs and creative savagery bound in acute melodic enterprise which simply captures the imagination as much as the barbarousness of the track has the body gripped.

Open Graves steps forward next; it also opening with a trespass of a groove impossible to defend against. The song is a dirtier, more muggy proposal than its predecessor but still leaves its all-consuming enveloping of the senses open to ear grabbing imagination and the ever evolving hostility of the rhythms. As the song before, it is maybe hard to say that the track offer s big moments of originality yet every minute provides a collision of fresh violence and creative endeavour which leaves most extreme metal onslaughts heard so far this year, looking a touch pale and uninspired.

Showing greater diversity in their songwriting and ideation, the band opens The Great Decay with a melodic seducing which is as elegant as it is slightly melancholic and certainly laced in devilish intrigue which builds and intensifies into a maelstrom of aggravated emotions and volatile persuasion. There is restraint and unbridled animosity in the song, creative adventure and pure sonic rancor, and numerous other contrasting textures which all unite in an impressive, almost swamp like bellow of provocative suggestiveness. Ending with a brutal predatory charge employing every strain of metal viciousness possible, the track makes way for the closing ferociousness of Ghost.

It too takes to stalking the listener first, but with open barbarism in every aspect of its doom scented and blackened pestilential crawl. Breaking out stoner-esque grooves, if swung by an executioner, the band continues to prove that familiar hues does not mean predictability; the track continuing to weave recognisable yet boldly fresh textures into one mean spirited and fiercely galvanic incitement.

It did not take long to get a lusty appetite for Bloodlust, one which has only increased and got greedier with every outing. We are sure to not be alone in embracing the roar of The Mountain Man, and the recognition that things can only get bigger, better, and more brutal with the band over time. Bring it on!

The self-released Bloodlust EP is out March 25th @ http://mountainmanmetal.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/mountainmanmetal   https://twitter.com/mtnmanmetal

Pete RingMaster 23/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Adrenechrome – Tales From Adrenechrome

Pic Credit Dave Saunders_

Pic Credit Dave Saunders_

Just like a blurring of reality and fantasy, the sound of Canadian metallers Adrenechrome is a muggy fusion of styles and flavours, and just like a drug addled climate, it provides an adventure which devours and permeates every pore of the senses and emotions. Taking their name from the a fictional drug in the film Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas, Adrenechrome cast a kaleidoscope of rigorous and virulent tempting as creatively progressive as it is thunderously rock ‘n’ roll, as predatory thrash bred as it is spatially grooved, and as imaginatively ravenous as it is simply seductive. The evidence is all there within new album Tales From Adrenechrome, a seven track encounter which from its classic comic like cover, created by Clownbaby and Tim Kehoe, through to its final suggestive note, is a compelling exploration of self experiences, fantasy, sci-fi, and classic literature.

Hailing from Ontario, Adrenechrome began in 2010, formed by veterans of the music scene with bands such as Gaswitch, Shimmy Rabbits, and The Doug Trucker Band in their histories. Debut EP Hideous Appetites emerged in 2012, inspirations from artists such as Pantera, Black Sabbath, Thin Lizzy, Metallica, Mastodon, High on Fire, and Children of Bodom colouring a sound which soon lured strong support and attention to the release and equally the band’s adrenaline driven live presence which over the years has included playing with Corrosion of Conformity, Green Jelly, Ninjaspy, and Manahan. It is a reaction and success sure to be matched and overshadowed by Tales From Adrenechrome as it spreads its creative rabidity from hereon; with it the band ready to breach and incite richer and broader spotlights.

Album Cover - Adrenechrome - Tales From Adrenechrome _RingMaster Review   The album opens with A Familiar Face, an immediate tempting of bold rhythms and melodically spun sonic enterprise woven into a warm instrumentally led tapestry. The track swiftly captivates as its hooks and grooves seduce as the bass swings and drums badger, a union which only captures ears and imagination with vocal harmonies adding just one more flavoursome texture to the album’s initial temptation.

Things quickly get rugged and heavy as Lockstep storms in next; its thrash breeding is full rabid evidence as vocalist Chris Friesen rides his own riffs and the raw flames of fellow guitarist Tim Kehoe. As becomes the norm, the track is soon evolving within ears. The fury of more extreme metal hues collude with heavy Mastodon resembling grooves and a Torche likened web of flavours as the licking of thrash seeded and groove metal honed flames continues. It is riveting stuff, the body and emotions involved in the devilment as easily as pleasure and an appetite for more, which the song continues to offer with its persistently twisting proposal and Black Brubeck continues with its superb jazz lit imagination and progressively sculpted inventive waltz. As avant-garde as something from a Trepalium or a Pryapisme, and as heftily compelling rock ‘n’ roll as a predacious roar from an Anthrax or High on Fire, the song is irresistible; a fascination with mischief in its heart and fiery passion in its soul.

As all tracks, God Sized Shadow is nurtured with the same fire of intent and character, it even more rapaciously dirty and intrusive than its predecessor but with, greater degrees, the same kind of cosmic air and aggressive volatility, the blackened shades of the latter especially potent. Bewitching and intrusive, with the excellent dark grouchiness of Mike Van Dyk’s bass and the lethally swung beats of drummer Matt Copeland gripping, the track is a primal yet worldly blaze with the rawness of a Triggerman and dark seduction of a Faith No More.

The Heart and The Feather instantly incites ears and thoughts as clean vocals impress within a hug of spidery grooves and sonic expression, Friesen becoming even more compelling as he mixes up his delivery with dirtier tones and rasping expression. Musically the song matches him, again that bedlamic quality a perpetual enticement of unpredictability and highly persuasive surprises woven in to a mix of fierce and richly spiced metal and heavy rock styles. Hips are soon swinging and imagination entangled in the proposition, a success just as easily inspired by Hideous Appetites, a manic appearing and skilfully conjured smog of ferocious enterprise and dynamic devilment; a ravenous beast of a song with melodic and antagonistic weaponry.

Completed by the cauldron of warmth and hostility that is The Lead Elephant, a track which majestically merges melodic tempting, sonic trespasses, and cantankerous metal ‘n’ roll within its tenacious and often enjoyably bruising tempest, Tales From Adrenechrome is a thrilling beast. There is no moment where emotions and appetite are not inflamed and pleasure thicker than the grooves it unleashes.

Grabbing a dose of Adrenechrome is a no brainer as far as we are concerned, Tales From Adrenechrome the release declaring a new band to challenge if not quite now certainly ahead those ‘giants’ mentioned.

Tales From Adrenechrome is out now @ https://adrenechrome.bandcamp.com/album/tales-from-adrenechrome and through most online stores.

http://adrenechrome.com/    https://www.facebook.com/Adrenechrome   https://twitter.com/adrenechrome

Pete RingMaster 28/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Quartered – Eyes And Ears

Quartered - Press Photo - Credit Tyler Branston

The first thing to say about the Eyes And Ears EP from Canadian band Quartered, is it gives no real evidence to why the band self-describes themselves as progressive metal. Now genres and tags never truly represent the complete sound of a band but unless we have misunderstood what progressive metal is, it is no way the suggestion we would give to the potent sound running through the band’s release. Now call it alternative metal with a metalcore tendency and you are closer to the captivating persuasion fuelling a highly accomplished and satisfying proposition. Though not something rigorously unique, the Vancouver quartet’s sound stands as an individual incitement for ears and thoughts but most of all, it is simply potential soaked and highly enjoyable.

Quartered has earned an acclaimed reputation locally and further afield since its four friends came together around six or so years ago. Taking inspirations from the likes of Deftones, Tool, and Thrice, the band has become accustomed to praise for their live performances which has seen them play with the likes of Lamb of God, Testament , Slapshock, Bif Naked, Kobra and The Lotus, Ninjaspy, and Over The Coals through numerous festivals, tours, and shows. Their 2010 album Walks Like A Ghost equally garnered strongly positive responses and ensured that once news of Eyes And Ears broke, anticipation was fiercely keen.

The release opens with the excellent Blink Blink Flash, a track swiftly stirring up ears and appetite with its raw sonic entrance and coaxing. The guitar of Jeff Wang scorches the small hairs on flesh as it heads to the senses, laying down fine bait before the vocal roar of Greg Williams explodes with energy and passion alongside the rhythmic incitement of drummer Scotty Miller. It is a formidable start which only seems to find greater intensity as Williams explores his excellent clean delivery and the bass of Craig Rudder unveils its throaty drama. Twists in the vocal attack and jabbing hooks increase the intrigue and potency of the song and though it never explodes as it hints it might, the inventiveness and unpredictable tenacity of the song easily ignites imagination and passions. It is easy to feel the Deftones influence even in a song which is distinct to Quartered and it does the impressive protagonist no harm at all.

The following Call Me Crazy is a mellower proposition, melodies instantly wrapping ears within an evocative ambience before post hardcore like vocal and riffery adds its antagonism. It is a pungent beginning which loses some of its lure Album Cover - Quartered - Eyes And Ears - 2014with the strong but not this time as striking smooth and melodic vocals, which in turn inspires a more relaxed pressure around them. When the song rages with nostril flared though, it is a mighty slice of provocation and another aspect to the promise of the band. Its successor Violent Love, like the first track, provides a virulent temptation and pleasure as a harsh caustic assault is merged with respectful and harmonious warmth. It works perfectly, the track at ease and full potency either snarling and gnawing on the senses or seducing them. It is fair to say that the band is not setting new templates with the song and their sound but for a thoroughly exciting and impressive incitement, it is an undeniable treat.

Speak of the Devil similarly provides a riveting and thrilling encounter, its melodic rock charm and more rugged angst fuelled passion a radiant and resourceful flame of craft and enterprise. Its captivation is succeeded by the infectious She Sees Colour, a catchy and emotive caress on ears which enchants and provokes satisfied emotions with Palms like vivacity. It is a song which again does not quite catch fire as it might but easily provides another major highlight on the increasingly impressing release.

Neither Take Me There Tonight nor Echoes can match what comes before, yet with its predacious touch and tone aligned to skilled musical and vocal design, the first of the pair makes for a compelling and persistently pleasing encounter. The second of the two is a flight of emotion and hungry endeavour which evolves from a gentle caress to a raw and caustic emotional rage. It also leaves thoughts and appetite hooked but pales against the qualities of earlier songs and the closing success of Ricochet.

The final song on the EP is the most groove infested encounter on the release, fusing that irresistible spice with the now expected excellently thought out and presented vocals amidst a commanding rhythmic framing courted by superb guitar invention. It is a powerful end to a strong and absorbing encounter. Though it is easy to feel there is more to come and be discovered by Quartered to really forge a unique place in metal, Eyes and Ears is an impressive step on the way and very easy to want to keep coming back to.

The self-released Eyes And Ears is available now @ http://quartered.bandcamp.com/album/eyes-and-ears

http://www.Quartered.ca

RingMaster 09/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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