Thirteen Shots – Self Titled

13 Shots_RingMasterReview

Though the band is no longer active, the hunger and want for Thirteen Shots continues to be vocal. The new release of a self-titled compilation album is a dose of their raw and voracious horror punk sure to be devoured and earn many more belated fans as it treats ears to the best of the band as a free proposal. Bringing together fifteen tracks spanning the band’s releases, one previously unreleased track, and an irresistible live take of the band’s mighty track Graveyard Stomp, the album is an offer no fan or horror punk loving newcomer to the British outfit should and will be able to resist.

Formed by the now Hamburg, Germany residing Johnny Rose and featuring Lewis Manchip, George Chick, Joe Dempster, Chelsea McCammon, and Tom Fenn in its line-ups, the Birmingham hailing Thirteen Shots unleashed a distinct and rousing form of rock ‘n’ roll as seeded in sixties garage rock and blues as horror punk itself. From debut album Vaudeville of 2012, through subsequent releases such as Tales That Start With A Whisper the following year, the 2014 White Noise EP, and their final outing through second album Black Smiles last year Thirteen Shots pushed their boundaries and expanded their sound without losing the incisive rough diamond roar which marked them out from day one. The new compilation brings it all into one thrilling place; all together for one final stomp.

First track is the fiery rock ‘n’ roll of Cobradeer, an encounter which flies from the traps, drops into a predacious prowl before bursting into a rush of fiercely slapping rhythms and ferocious riffs led by the distinct vocals of Rose. It provided a rousing introduction to Black Smiles originally and makes the same attention grabbing impact here before passing ears over to the flesh dropping infections of band classic Zombies From The USSR. Cored by a delicious Caped Crusader like hook, the track expels raptorial grooves and vocal incitement in a battle cry/warning rising up against undead hordes which just gets under the skin and into the psyche.

cover_RingMasterReviewThe variety in the band’s sound has been an open book and illustrated in the garage blues blaze of Nekrosexual and the following drama of Bewitched as well as across the album. The first is a scuzzy roar while the second again uncovering a hook which just fits an eager appetite, uncages predatory basslines and irritable riffs as Rose scowls in the colourful horror punk confines of the excellent encounter.

Within the Thirteen Shots catalogue numerous tracks were like beacons to their presence and sound, arguably the most tempting being Danzig. A tribute to the obvious, the song is a swinging punk brawl wearing its influence clearly but casting is own horror punk ‘n’ roll character with more hooks and temptations than a stripper at a fishing convention.

Punk rock in varying degrees is also an ever present in the band’s sound, Get In My Crypt for example simply fuelled by it in its virulent charge wrapped in metallic flames while other songs like Night Of Sin infuses it into their own individual imaginations, it a liquor soaked blues rock proposal with searing grooves and restrained but heavy rhythms. The outstanding Dead Girls Don’t Scream takes the vital essence into a psychobilly spiced romp, like Misfits meets Resurex while wearing a New York Dolls t-shirt. It is also another of those songs which the band is particularly memorable and noted for, a rock ‘n’ roll stomp to get lustful over.

Through the writhing blues grooved Padded Cell Blues, the scuzzy heavy metal Sabbath-esque riff loaded crawl of Doom, and the severely infectious rockabilly lined stroll of First American Sweetheart, the album does what all good compilations should do; reveal and celebrate the depth and invention of its focus. The last of the trio especially whips up the spirit with its hard rock grooves and garage punk contagion offering something akin to Turbonegro meets The Heartbreakers.

Grooves are equally a major tempting within next up Tales That Start With A Whisper, twisting within ears with salacious intent as the track shares classic/glam rock misbehaviour equipped with the spiciest hooks before Black Eyed Girl enters with a flirtatious and slightly sinister prowl like a dark dusted feline seductress swinging melodic hips to blues bred flames.

There have been a few songs from the band too which have blossomed to greater heights over listens rather than with an instantaneous convincing; the raw shuffle of Black Smiles being one which proves its point perfectly amongst its companions on the album though gaining its first ever outing here, Creak’n The Coffin needs little time to grab ears and the passions. A contagious punk driven slab of rock ‘n’ roll, it stomps and roars with all the flavours the band has consistently shown itself so adept at weaving into their raucous proposals.

The album is completed by the sultry blood red romance of Lost Soul with its mariachi laced smoulder and finally that stomping live roar of Graveyard Stomp, which while drawing eager participation, reminds us what we are all missing from the band at each and every venue they graced.

There are certainly tracks we would have added to the album, This Looks Like A Job For Batman for one, but Thirteen Shots is undoubtedly the life and creative voice of the band to a tee and a certain must for all punk ‘n’ roll fans. Go check it out and grab a rare and free treat @ http://thirteenshots.bandcamp.com/ with a possible very ltd edition CD possible if demand is high and similarly a final UK tour from the band if they are wanted; so go tell them @ https://www.facebook.com/thirteenshotsband

Thirteen Shots is also available for FREE from Google Play and available to stream from Spotify and Deezer from Undead Artists.

Pete RingMaster 09/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Blacklist Union – Back To Momo

blacklistunion_RingMaster Review

A few short weeks back, US rockers Blacklist Union unleashed their single Alive N Well Smack in the Middle of Hell, a magnetic stomp of a song providing an inviting teaser to the band’s new album Back To Momo. If you too took up its enjoyable invitation to rebel rouse let us tell you now, as good as it actually was, it barely touched on the might and enterprise flooding the band’s fourth full-length. It is persistently rivalled and at times just outshine by the thrilling incitements offered by Back To Momo, which tells you just how outstanding the album is.

Formed in 2004 by frontman Tony West, the Los Angeles hailing Blacklist Union was soon stirring up attention, especially from the 2006 release of debut album After The Mourning. The band’s reputation and stature continued to grow as the band emerged on the US rock scene, second album Breakin’ Bread With The Devil two years later luring keener fan and media focus which its well-received successor Til Death Do Us Part in 2012 pushed much further. Now it is the turn of Back To Momo to try and breach the broadest spotlights, a success hard to bet against such its rebellious and anthemic might.

BLU-Momo-Cover-smBlacklist Union - Back To Momo   With guitarist/bassist Todd Youth and drummer Matt Starr alongside West, Blacklist Union opens up Back To Momo with that aforementioned single, Alive-N-Well Smack in the Middle of Hell. A lone guitar stirs the air first, it’s coaxing soon pierced by a vocal shrill and joined by tangy grooving. Part hard rock, part punk ‘n’ roll, the song hits its stride with a swagger and a closet full of irresistible hooks and sonic enterprise from the guitars. Addiction is the order of the day with the song and as it has feet and emotions fully involved, it is easy to think rock ‘n’ roll does not get much better than this, but oh yes it does, and often across Back To Momo.

The following Shake It Off has a more restrained canter to its blues washed hard rock, and a sense of familiarity which is only enriched by the excellent delivery and vocal attitude of West. Expectations are fed a touch by the song, surprises less bold than on tracks around it but again it has ears and enjoyment settling into a keen appetite before the outstanding Mirror, Mirror on the Wall turns the creative heat up. Erupting in a surge of rhythms and sonic flames, the track quickly swings boisterous hips and frees contagious resourcefulness as an equally riveting vocal adventure jumps in. The track is glorious, a rousing blend of The Stooges, Turbo Negro, and Jane’s Addiction with just the right amount of glam metal, and easily the best incitement upon the album, and the next single surely?

Both the actual upcoming single Evil Eye and Superjaded keep things fiercely bubbling. The first is a scintillating swamp of prowling beats, nagging riffs, and blues bred hues with again an irresistible vocal tempting from West whereas its successor merges the infection of rock pop with the tenacity of punk and the revelry of hard rock, it all contained in a vibrant but restrained embrace which only seems to intensify the invention of the song. Both tracks come with a wealth of flavours and styles, another great feature across the rock ‘n’ roll of the album, and maybe it is no surprise they do given inspirations to the band range from Guns N’ Roses to David Bowie, Bad Brains to Bauhaus, T Rex to The Mission and The Ramones, to name a few.

With a title like Rock N Roll Outlaw you pretty much have an idea of the type of sound on offer and true to pleasing form, the song is an enticing blend of southern and classic rock coated in that twang that gets the taste buds grinning. The music itself does not hold the biggest key to the song’s success, as flavoursome as it is, but the invention and mischievous twists the band put into it is what excites the imagination most before the album’s title track uncages some more punk lined rock ‘n’ roll which simply radiates belligerence within a anthemic blaze. With a skeleton of pulsating rhythms within melodic and infection oozing creative flesh, the song entwines echoes of Alice in Chains, New York Dolls, and Shark Tape.

We Are Not Saints, as It’s All About You right after, flirt with some invigorating strains of garage rock for their individual designs, the former twisting it into a predatory prowling of the senses and serious ignition of the instincts to rock ‘n’ roll whilst the latter, taking an even richer dose of sixties/seventies garage ferocity, weaves a tonic for body and soul bristling with sonic tendrils, sparkling hooks, and psych rock breeding. The rhythms from both bass and drums are wicked seduction whilst West again shows he is one of the most magnetic and dynamic frontmen/vocalists in rock right now.

Things remain infectiously hot with the enthralling Meet Me on Zen Street, a song veering on the brink of horror punk at times, and again through the dirty scuzz lined Graveyard Valentine. Rock ‘n’ roll needs a healthy dose of filth and attitude, and there is plenty on show in voice and sound in this irresistible proposal, the grouchy deep throated bass leading the way. Punk again rears its welcome head, and not for the first time on Back To Momo, there is a touch of Canadian duo The Black Frame Spectacle to the thrilling stomp.

The album is completed by firstly the niggling temptation of Wined, Dined, & 69’d, the song simply classic bred, glammed up rock ‘n’ roll, and lastly Read Between the Lines, a track which again prowls the listener with dazzling lures and spicy enticements. It does not quite live up to earlier peaks yet as all songs, only leaves a licking of lips and want for more.

Back to Momo is not bulging with sounds that are unfamiliar yet from start to finish it is commandingly fresh with an insatiable spark sure to ignite any day. The single Alive N Well Smack in the Middle of Hell was and still is a mighty way to join the Blacklist Union, whilst the album shows it has much more to thrill and incite with. . After this if the band has not breached major attention then world rock is a fool.

Back To Momo is available now via BLU Records.

Ringmaster 13/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Lucifer Star Machine – Rock’n’Roll Martyrs

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lsm- pic by-tinakorhonen

Caked in the filth of life and the passion of instinctive rebellion, Rock ‘n’ Roll Martyrs the new album from UK antagonists Lucifer Star Machine is quite simply unbridled, uncompromising punk n roll. From first violent note and lashing syllable through to its last vicious squall on the ear, the twelve track assault is nothing less than dirty hunger driven confrontation, but a fusion of punk and heavy to hard rock which leaves satisfaction greedy and thrills a plenty. With their third album the band is presenting the sound and merciless energy they are renowned for but have taken it up many levels of contagion and impacting persuasion to unleash their most potent and enjoyable moment yet.

Hailing from London, Lucifer Star Machine has left a legacy of destructive pleasure in their wake from live performances and releases. From intimate sweat drenched halls to festival stages across over ten countries the quintet has challenged and ignited audiences alongside the major names of punk rock whilst from debut album Fire In Your Hole in 2005 and its successor Street Value Zero four years later the band has marked out a portion of genre territory for their furious sounds. Released via I Sold My Soul Media and recorded with producer Andy Brook, Rock’n’Roll Martyrs stirs up the air, senses, and appetite with a blaze of corruptive addictive sounds which plays like the anarchist offspring from a union between Generation X, Turbonegro, and  old school Misfits. It is arguably the most accessible album the band has unveiled and certainly the most unforgettable and incendiary.

The riot begins with Hold Me Down, a fire which offloads a crucial groove spiked with intensive hooks from its opening breath. Often leading and never far from the surface of the song, the lure is as insatiable as it is addictive and twists lustfully around the ear as riffs and rhythms flail the atmosphere and tight sonic melody soaked invitations spark into an anthemic chorus and group calls which further capture the imagination. It is a magnetic tempest of a start which breeds real hunger for what is to follow, especially with the charge and inventive flames sculpted by guitarists Dave Malice and Laughing Boy Fernandes.

The following Sulphur & Speed starts with a healthy glam rock teasing which would not be out of place in the seventies but soon chews it1235933_717631201587116_811714221_n up and transforms it with a Misfits/Danzig like intimidation. The vocals of band founder Tor Abyss snarl with contempt and force whilst his clean delivery only adds to a great alluring presence. The merger of all that melodic swagger and feisty intensive rhythmic, riff, and vocal abrasion leaves a potent persuasion which has feet and throat in unison more often than not.

Through the old school bred Hammer Me Dead with a more caustic hardcore delivery from Abyss raging over the excellent cantankerous rhythmic testing of new drummer Txutxo Krueger (formerly of Last Resort and Total Chaos), and the irrepressible fist pumping anthem Death Or Jail, the album continues to ignite the passions and an instinctive fight within thoughts whilst the initially Clash like For Reasons Unknown, where the bass of Crusty Chlamydia coaxes in the imagination with ease, explodes another level of satisfaction and temptation upon Rock’n’Roll Martyrs. Evolving into a virulently catchy and dramatic treat, the song has elements of The Damned and New York Dolls to its stomp adding further adventure and variety to the album and pleasure.

Both Poison Arrows and Dead And Gone leave a pleasing taste on the palate, if without managing to reach the heights of the previous tracks. The first has a more restrained and poised gait though it does not lose any energy and impact in relation to its predecessors whilst its successor is a undefined smog of garage rock with a scuzz lining that intrigues and satisfies yet like the song before lies pale against the stronger elements of the release. Dark Water also lacks the spark which made the first half of the album so magnificently imposing and commanding but nevertheless has attention and appetite eager to consume and join its mission to provide honest ear barracking rock ‘n’ roll.

The malevolent Cancer Daddy pushes things back towards the thrilling peaks of the album, the song another breath stealing storm of anthemic bait and enterprise making way for the sinister charms of The Curse. It is a more than decent encounter which makes a good appetiser for the tempestuous excellence of Rotten To The Core, a furnace of middle finger attitude and punk confrontation which in its one minute twenty lays waste to the senses and emotions showing the emerging young punk bands how it is done. Explosive and bloody-minded, the track is another pinnacle to the album.

The closing I Hate You Forever leaves one final punk infested fight upon the ear, the Sex Pistols tinted riffs and hooks wrapped in a hard rock assault with rapacious sinews. It is a strong end but does not steal memories from the song before and earlier triumphs ultimately. Lucifer Star Machine offers punk ‘n’ roll at its dirtiest accomplished and weighty best, and Rock’n’Roll Martyrs their pugnacious call to arms.

http://www.luciferstarmachine.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 27/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Destroy D.C. : The Pride Of The ASBO Generation

Pointing

    Having just caught our breath after the outstanding recent release of XXIV from UK Subs, British punk has another explosive piece of inventive ferociousness to thrill us with in the formidable and exhilarating form of The Pride Of The ASBO Generation EP from Destroy D.C. The four track release is a stunning intense fire of energy and passion honed into a formidable compelling force, an irresistible inciting fusion of progressive punk and roots and dub.

Destroy D.C. began when Spike T Smith, the drummer for Conflict, wanted a project to bring forth the songs he was writing and had created round the time the legendary punk band went on hiatus in late 2009. Enlisting guitarist Gav King who was also looking for a vehicle for his ideas, and bassist Si Turner, the trio squeezed in writing, rehearsal, and recording between their individual busy touring schedules, Smith on Steve Ignorant’s Last Supper shows, as well as festival appearances with Killing Joke and the New York Dolls, King with Fields of the Nephilim and both men more recently with the return of Conflict, as well as all three members being the backing band for HewhocannotBeNamed (The Dwarves) for his solo UK dates. Destroy D.C. was officially launched on 21st December 2012 with the March 26th released The Pride of The ASBO Generation through DIY label Revenance the first of a procession of EPs.

The release opens with the raucous and uncompromising Road To Redemption, a track which stares eye to eye with the listener Destroy DC EP Cover Finalwhilst teasing and tempting them with brawling vocals, lethal hooks, and a contagious breath. The fiery groove which frequents the song throughout is the first encounter for the ear soon joined by punchy rhythms and a rich growling bassline. As eager as it is hungry, the song rampages through the ear without a much respite from its corrosive riffs and melodic sparks, yet still teases and taunts with a wonderful adventure to its gait and prowl. Within a restrained yet intimidating deep breath in aggression, the band also brings a sensational diversion sculpted by imagination and ingenuity which seduces and eats the passions with equal strength to the marauding sounds elsewhere. Ending as it began with a further hardcore scowl to the vocals and intensity to its punk rock abrasion, the song is an immense first confrontation to band and EP.

The following Those Days Are Gone also strikes its first blow through a magnetic almost insidious groove which captures the imagination before the song fully unleashes its physical and inventive might.  A frantic inferno of attitude, passion, and ravenous agitated drums from start to finish, the song is potently veined with that addict making groove within an insatiable appetite to chew and incite thoughts and emotions. It is caustic rock n roll at its best, a fusion of hardcore and original punk which rewards as dramatically as it accosts the senses.

Whereas elements of the previous songs mildly suggest the roots and dub influences third song Tear It Down is a full on pleasure incorporating both aspects of their main influences for an impossibly compelling and thrilling ride. Like a blend of Dub War, Steel Pulse, and Ruts but with its own individual heart, the song is a simmering yet fiery piece of emotive and provocative majesty. A pulsating crawl through a reggae soaked reflection book ended by punk snarls, the track is a sensational creative declaration which rivals the aforementioned Ruts classic Love In Vain.

The band close up the EP with another striking slab of imagination in the erosive pop punk triumph of the title track. This is no glossy melodic piece of musical candy though but a caustic and raw stomp with loud dub whispers and old school punk aggression. The song shifts and evolves throughout to ignite further lustful ardour for the release especially with the drop into a slow melodic and shadowed prowl midway which recalls the Dirk Wears White Sox era of Adam and the Ants. It is a brilliant ending to an outstanding and invigorating slab of punk at its best.

Knowing that The Pride Of The ASBO Generation is just the opening assault of what creatively is to come ahead from Destroy D.C. it is safe to assume that the anticipation and wait for the next release is going to be very impatient.

https://www.facebook.com/DestroyDc

9/10

RingMaster 25/03/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Popular Giants: Self Titled

Pop Giants

    Whilst arguably not offering anything new in the grand scheme of things the self-titled album from Californian rockers Popular Giants is a quite irresistible riot of rock n roll. Fusing the best varied flavours of punk rock with garage rock and other distinctive flavours, the Los Angeles quartet burst out of the speakers with an energy and hunger which is impossible not to be persuaded and enamoured by. Consisting of thirteen raucous treats of rock music at its dirtiest best the album unleashes a vigorous fun in its boisterous company which you just cannot deny.

The band was formed in 2011 by guitarist/vocalist/songwriter Christopher Peacock with the intent of getting back to playing the old school punk he grew up upon. With the addition of guitarist/vocalist John Fortin, bassist Francis Cyan, and drummer Mike Criddell to the ranks, the sound of the band found its own natural evolution to the bruising, insatiable, and varied sounds which light up this impressive album from start to finish. The four members found an instant and shared vision on how songs and their music should find their most powerful and dynamic stature as well as on how they would sound to escape the ‘sterile’ digital prevalence of today. The band recorded their album using a Stevens two –inch analog tape machine from the seventies to produce the ‘fat steamroller sound of Popular Giants live’, and in fact the machine was the exact same one Pink Floyd used on The Wall.

As soon as the immediate contagion of Pretty Life sets in to start the album off, there is a sense of something exciting in the winds, 309054_505764392782988_2063941150_nthe release soon proving that right with ease with every one of its infectious seconds. The opener lights up the ear with bulging rhythms and coaxing riffs whilst the vocals of Peacock top the riot with expression and passion. With essences of Foo Fighters and Living End to its irresistible anthem, the song flicks all the switches of satisfaction and full pleasure to begin one thrilling cruise down their sonic highway.

So Happy sends the infection up another level with its delicious teasing beckoning within a stormy energy, the song a punk/rock incitement recalling spices of Nirvana and Offspring in a new tasty recipe all Popular Giants. The following On The Road is just the same though for the Seattle trio loud whispers swap an Everclear loud hint for the ear from within another bounty of compelling riffs, teasing hooks, and ear rapping beats.

Song by song the passion and balls of the band fire up their imaginative party, the likes of We Want Your Soul with a Buzzcocks scented hook and pop punk harmonies, the garage rock/grunge coated Devil I Ain’t Done, and the barging old school punk bite It’s Not Your Fault, leaving a warm glow on the heart and a ripe greedy demand for much more. The third of the these songs barely musters 30 seconds in length but in its snapping snarl leaves a giant rapture, a song in all ways seventies punk bands would be proud of.

Amongst nothing but real highs across the whole release the loftiest pinnacles come in the second half of the album starting with the excellent Trepidation. With Fortin taking the lead vocally, the track bristles with the agitation and contagion of Bad Religion across its drive of provocative riffs and jabbing rhythms. It is an addiction forming song backed up with equal potency by the stunning I’m Not The One. With a heavier muscular intensity and force to its predatory stance, the track melds a rich mix of garage rock and punk with a Heartbreakers breath to its fiery voice. It is an instinctive squall for the passions to latch on to and be inspired by, a song which calls to the heart.

The cover of the Turbonegro track Get It On is a very decent encounter with a great punk rawness to its roar whilst its successor Antibody is a delicious attitude spitting poke with a New York Dolls swagger and Richard Hell snarl. It also has a ‘nasty’ Pistols groove which lights the deepest fires and a barrage of riffing that demands and receives willing attention.

With plenty more great tracks including another cover, this time of Unsatisfied by The Godfathers, this is an album which feeds all the wants of a punk rock album with accomplished excellence. Ok it is not going to break down new walls for you to play behind but it is hard to remember too many punk releases recently offering this much energy and fun to unite with.

https://www.facebook.com/PopularGiants

8/10

Ringmaster 02/02/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Thirteen Shots: Vaudeville

Hear that creaking and the scraping of fingernails on wood in the dead of night? That is the sound of UK horror punk band Thirteen Shots rising from the cold earth to unleash their debut album Vaudeville. Consisting of eight crypt borne tunes the album stomps and fiddles with the senses with an eager and infectious lingering charm and mischief. The album might not be flawless but it is fresh, vibrant and thrilling, an attention seeking bundle of fun.

The Birmingham based band creates a sound that combines sixties garage rock, horror punk and rock n roll with occasional infusions of psychobilly. It grabs with an eager bony hand to lead the ear in a gravestone leaping tour through realms of the dead and superheroes, each and every detour either a mesmeric wanton skeletal dance or a dirty riled up roughage of sound. Always fun, often silly and at times leaving one wondering why, the release simply does what it says on the tin, offer a full on varied entertainment that makes no apologies in having fun, this is Vaudeville.

Miss Eerie opens up the casket of Vaudeville, a decomposed love song with throbbing bass and firm rhythms spiked with acidic guitar tones and riffs. Part Misfits, part Thee Exciters, and more Johnny Thunders the song is a solid piece of punk rock. The band do not go hell for leather at any point almost having a slight reserve in their intentions but this allows each to shine and bring a distinct part to the sound, from the crisp attack of guitarists Izzy and Joe with eager backing vocals to match, the sinister basslines of GMT (George), and the bone rapping beats of drummer Chelsea, the band find a clean yet dirty mix that brings a strength to this and each song.  With the keen punk vocals of Johnny Roxx Rose scraping up and bringing forth the lyrics there is a accomplished feel to all songs even if some are more successful than others.

This strong start steps up a gear with Inspector George. A recognisable grooved bass and guitar riffs teases the ear whilst the drums bring a metallic punch to open up the listener before the surge of punk energy. The song switches back and forth keeping things interesting and only the feeling the song wants to explode into something more vigorous at times but never does brings a slight question against it.

     Boogie Man continues in similar vein, again suggesting there is more waiting within to spring out but never realised, still it is a very agreeable track that leaves its swagger behind long after it departs. This point marks the moment the album really kicks up some dust as the next three songs prove what a current great band Thirteen Shots is and the distinct promise they have within them for the future. Danzig, and yes you know its theme without us saying, is a hypnotic slice of horror punk, bringing a flavour of the man without stepping on toes and taking the effect too far. This is rock n roll of the Devil and a thoroughly pleasing thing for us mortals.

This Looks Like A Job For Batman leaps in next with cape flying; the band twisting the legendary theme riff into a Meteors flavoured psychobilly taunting that is delicious. With added ska punk grooves and touch of The Adicts it is a gem that demands instant replay before moving on. The song is a must and sets itself up for best track on Vaudeville until the following Dead Girls Don’t Scream makes its claim. A New York Dolls wrapped rock n roll with essences of Misfits and Resurex pours out of the track, a full rounded flavoursome treat that carries a sing-a-long lure and contagious hook to ensure it cannot be denied.

The release is completed with the easy going temptress that is The Graveyard Stomp and the American Rock Song before it.  The Graveyard Stomp is all about instant bonding with very obvious hooks and riffs you have heard often elsewhere and that many bands have played with to far less fun. American Rock Song is a good garage rock/punk song but does not quite live up to the rest of the songs , its taste a little bland in comparison but taken as a separate entity works very well and is easy to return to.

Vaudeville is great fun, a strong album that sets Thirteen Shots as a band with an impressive future. Maybe right now their own distinct sound is still trying to break out but it will surely come and with this much of a pleasing release that is a promise that breeds a great anticipation.

Ringmaster 02/04/2012

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Thirteen Shots – Danzig

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