The Five Hundred – Winters

TFH_RingMaster Review

Every now and then, without any debate, lustful pleasure is ignited by a release; by a band exploding on the sweet spot of ears and instincts with something which just seems to know what the passions like. Such an encounter for us is Winters, the debut EP from UK metallers The Five Hundred. It is hard to say what particularly incites such enthused reactions and appetite, the release weaving its fierce tempting with a host of familiar flavours and styles, but every one of its four incendiary tracks is hellacious manna to the ear and imagination; something we suspect to not be alone in feeling.

The Five Hundred emerged in 2014, a Nottingham quintet previously known as DAOR. In no time their fusion of brutal and melodic metal was whipping up ears and thick attention, every strain of extreme metal and numerous other styles seemingly entangled into a compelling maelstrom of enterprise and confrontation which now fuels Winters and already an acclaimed live presence which has seen the band share stages with the likes of Napalm Death, Fear Factory, All Shall Perish, Architects, and TesseracT. Recorded with Justin Hill (Sikth, Heart of a Coward), Winters is the band’s first fearsome roar at national spotlights, and if our ears are anything to go by, heading to rich success in awakening that broader focus.

Winters EP Front Cover_RingMaster Review    The press release suggests that the band switching to 8 string guitars has been a new spark to their sound and invention; whether it has or not, all that matters is that Winters is a full-on tempest of persuasion from first breath to last. The EP starts with its title track and straight away is grumbling in ears through the predatory bass of Andy Crawford, it a grouchy provocateur within a surge of wiry guitar. The hefty swings of drummer Liam Perez show no light in their nature either with each beat a shuddering impact as guitarists Mark Byrne and Paul Doughty weave more compelling bait for vocalist John Eley to spring from with great diversity. Just as musically the release ticks all the boxes so does the attack of the frontman, his fluid mix of clean, punkish, and outright raw hostility equally accomplished and perfectly measured in the split of all his strains of potency.

Death and heavy metal collude with metalcore and post hardcore ferocity though that is a simplifying of the hues creating the first and each track within Winters, as Come Closer swiftly proves. The lead track with a great video in tow, it emerges from a misty sonic atmosphere with military rhythms and emotive vocals, they still more in the background until a ravenous stomp of belligerent rhythms and caustic riffs is triggered. It in turn breeds a sonic blaze which is not so much mellow as less vicious than the surrounding and perpetually prowling ferocity soaking the walls of the incitement. Again at times as punk as it is metal and a constant exploit of seriously enticing elements amidst slithers of unpredictable ingenuity, the track is a ravenous treat but outshone within seconds.

The barbarous majesty of the first two tracks carries on in the outstanding Shutter to the Light, its immediate swagger as seductive as it is venomously violent. Like an anthem for the derailment of all that is hopeful, the track bellows at and trespasses the senses and imagination with enthralling enterprise, yet within its despoiling character harmonies and melodies are unleashed to wrong-foot and seize the passions even tighter. Everything about the track whips up a greedy appetite and pleasure; from the irresistible prime hook to the increasingly formidable vocals and the raging invention culturing the creatively rabid storm.

The EP is closed by The Cannibal Hordes, it also a quite thrilling and blistering arousal of ears and satisfaction. Melodically acoustic in its first caress, defiantly cantankerous from the second onwards, the track spits hostile intent and roars melodic understanding; vocally and musically entwining both with a skilled volatility that ensures expectations never gets proven. As suggested earlier, many elements and flavours are recognisable, bands like Fear Factory, Lamb of God, In Flames, and Hatebreed coming to mind, yet no song utters anything other than something unique to The Five Hundred.

The Winters EP is a crushing and scintillating introduction to The Five Hundred, band you should expect to hear a lot more of in sound and acclaim ahead, if only from our enraptured lips.

The Winters EP is out now digitally and on CD via

Pete RingMaster 24/11/2015

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Enemo J – Miley Virus

promo picture - enemo j_RingMaster Review

Listening to Enemo J is like being submerged in a swarm of African honeybees running amok, their sound a nagging and ferocious irritant that never desists in aggression and rage once provoked into creation by the band’s inspirations and imagination. As proven by new album Miley Virus, it also produces raw sonic nectar that ignites the appetite and through an unpredictable tempest, leaves the senses wrung out but with a real greed for more. The UK metaller’s fifth album is arguably their most adventurous and diverse yet, as again the band weaves an agitated expanse of styles and flavours into their storms, equally though it is possibly their most testing, but as that only results in being amongst their most fiercely enjoyable, it is a definite asset.

Hailing from Burton On Trent and emerging at the beginning of the new millennium, Enemo J has gone on to unleash a quartet of successful and increasingly acclaimed full-lengths and earned a potent stature for a live presence which has seen the band play with the likes of Napalm Death, (Hed) PE, Sylosis, Black Light Burns, and Korn, create a stir with performances at Download in 2010 and more recently 2014, and play with similar reactions fests such as Bloodstock. Now the core line-up of vocalist Craig Hartwell, guitarist Haydn Edwards, and bassist Mikey Wyke are ready to nudge and punch the broadest spotlights with Miley Virus, expectations after many listens to the beast leaning towards a highly positive outcome in that intent.

Miley Virus Artwork_RingMaster Review     After the vocal led Intro, band and album explode into tempestuous life with This Is Not A Toy, immediately spinning web of steely grooves and predatory rhythms led by the distinctive and as always swiftly engaging roars of Hartwell. His attack though comes with great variety from his throat and within the band, an adventure matching the winding lures of guitar and more controlled but no less imposing prowl of bass. Aligning ferocious metalcore influences with a groove metal tantalising, and subsequently cleaner textures in sound and voice, the track is a gripping and dynamic incitement to set things off and highly addictive, especially the more it evolves its rapacious body.

The album’s title track steps forward next, Miley Virus from an electronic coaxing flexing rhythmic muscles and cantankerous grooves from the already impressing prowess of Edwards. Spilling rap metal tenacity and enterprise in vocals and thick initial temptation, the track creates a kaleidoscope of uncompromising intensity and melodic tempting which at different times hints at the like of Skindred, Stone Sour, and American Head Charge across a thoroughly magnetic persuasion. Unfortunately our promo did not come with any details of guests and full personnel on the album but amongst many things, female vocals add a great siren-esque lure to the track’s robust adventure.

Five Percent slips in next, Hartwell’s voice offering its hip hop prowess as the track begins its growth into a fiery protagonist stalking ears and inciting with lyrical and physical confrontation. As bestial as it is harmoniously alluring within a volatile and climactic ambience, the outstanding track is a gripping proposal matched by This Stops Today. Carnivorous riffs court a sonic imagination straight away, vocals leaning towards a rancorous toning as they provoke and excite with the track perpetually twisting and embracing a wealth of attacks and formidable flavouring. As its predecessor, it too marks another lofty peak within the album with its Slipknot meets Stuck Mojo like voracity, a pinnacle almost emulated by the death/metalcore lined savaging of Ides Of March. The song is a predator of ears and emotions, virtually everything about it an insidious prowl led by the great malevolence fuelling Wyke’s bass but then tempered by the acidic strands spewed by Edward’s guitar and again impressive vocals.

The boldest adventure within Miley Virus starts emerging from Majora, the song a roar of rap lined metalcore which suddenly turns, with more impressive female vocals at its centre, into a melodically honed gothic proposal. This is Enemo J, so things never stay in one direction for long though; a swarming tenacity of riffs blossomed from the savaging fury and in turn swinging back into the gothic coated seducing. To be honest the track caught our ears by surprise and took a while to totally convince but overtime it wins out, as too Throughout which takes a similarly longer route in succeeding with its convincing. A thick tapestry of flavours extreme and melodic which at times flirts with post hardcore tendencies too, the song casts more great female vocals alongside the caustic squalls of Hartwell as melodies from keys and guitar provide an evocative drama. Admittedly, it fails to spark the same richest of reactions as earlier tracks but in fascination and invention, the song is absorbing and easy to repeatedly explore.

Both the volcanically intensive Sufferance and the drama fuelled radiance of Time sear the senses and light the imagination respectively, the first with its blackened wind over a swirling sonic canvas of endeavour. Its successor spins a low-key but potent acidic hook repetition within a sonically and emotionally turbulent post hardcore landscape, vocals as expected as strong as the music in revealing the depth of diversity and invention within their grasp.

Miley Virus is concluded by Drunk Lions At The Wolf Party, a ravenous ferocity of sound and presence veined by melodic and harmonic ingenuity. The song truly comes alive once all the extreme contrasts within it collude to create an engrossing flight of ire and emotive elegance, in turn providing a fine and big close to a riveting and thoroughly enjoyable encounter. Enemo J just goes from strength to strength with each release, and though for personal tastes it is a little bit a proposition of two halves, each song thrills and enthrals in their own inventive way to make Miley Virus an easy recommendation to make.

Miley Virus is out from November 1st through Digital Media Records across most online stores.

Pete RingMaster 31/10/2105

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Kastasyde – Gnosis

Kastasyde Promo Photo 2015 BW_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

If there has been another album this year as startlingly diverse and adventurous within its confines, providing a truly coherent passage from start to finish than Gnosis, it has so far been hiding away. The new creative incitement from Chicago metallers Kastasyde, the release is a fascination on first listen, a captivation after more eager plays, and an eventual obsession over time. Some offerings hit you straight between the eyes and others make a smouldering proposal leading to the same success. Gnosis is both persuasions at the same time and a release destined for best of year nominations.

Formed in 2001, Kastasyde has released a couple of demos, a pair of well-received albums, and a similarly successful EP. Their ever evolving sound has also lured in comparisons to the diverse likes of Mastodon, Acid Bath, Napalm Death, and Machine Head, suggestions sure to expand as Gnosis continually unveils its inventive persuasion and colossal depths. Inviting a guest guitar solo from Black Dahlia Murder guitarist Ryan Knight as well as lap steel guitar contributions by Justin Spring within the album, the quintet of vocalist Jarrett Roberts, guitarists Eric Kornfeind and Jerome Marshall, bassist Dustin Roberts, and drummer Garry Naples (Novembers Doom) take little time to rile up and bewitch the imagination with their highly anticipated album, quickly giving progressive extreme metal and metal in general, a new protagonist to get excited over.

Gnosis opens with Natural State and instantly has attention enthused as a thumping of beats match the roaming exploits of guitar and bass. It is a tenacious and fiercely inviting start luring the listener into a subsequent inferno of vocal hostility, ferocious rhythms, and hungry intensity. Death metal, hardcore, and groove metal unite in the maelstrom of ideation already badgering ears and lighting thoughts, the gripping onslaught providing an increasingly more expansive landscape of sound with each passing twist and moment. As the track spins through essences of noise and progressive rock as well as a blackened malevolence, things continue to enthral and excite. It is an impressive and seriously busy opening to the album but one which never piles on the invention and thickness of its creative tapestry so that things are smothered or missed, or indeed under appreciative. In saying that though, as song and album prove over time, each listen only reveals new and fresh nuances which only increase the pull of its presence.

Kastasyde Gnosis Album Cover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   The following Buried in the Sky continues in the same vein but with a distinctly individual character. Jarrett Roberts’ vocals once more squall with expression and magnetic persuasion as the guitars of Kornfeind and Marshall simultaneously scorch and dance over the senses. Their union alone ensures a hungry appetite but with the throbbing bass adventure offered by Dustin Roberts a prowling enticing alongside the rapier swings of Naples, greed becomes involves, especially once the song slips into a flowing passage of melodic rock deeded imagination. It is calm in the storm and more, a Stone Sour-esque crooning laying out an evocative tempting to get fully involved with before the drums raise their energies and enterprise to lead song and ears into a ruggedly tempestuous roar.

The album’s epic title track is next, ten minutes which alone provides an intensive exploration of sound and emotion as extremes and contrasts again collaborate in a mouth-watering landscape of craft and ingenuity. A gamut of provocative atmospheres and flavours are woven into the turbulent flight, the suggestion that there is something for everyone in a song never a truer claim.

The melodic beauty of In the Spiral with its sultry ambience and crooning vocal incitement comes next, the song a seductive ballad as powerful in its creative voice and feeling as the blazing fury of Blackheart which follows. As its predecessor, the song is outstanding, a hellacious rage of rock ‘n’ roll sculpted with the richest armoury of fierce metal textures. It too, and as now expected is equally a web of uniquely different and seamlessly aligned flavours and ideation; ears and imagination once more being constantly challenged and rewarded.

Never At Peace is the next gloriously inventive brawl on Gnosis, a fusion of hardcore and metal which twists and rampages like a dervish but equally creates a melodic and contagious roar which is as predatory as it is warmly bracing. With its brilliance and adversarial invention just outshining the peaks already making up the album, the track takes best of honours before being almost matched by the mesmeric radiance of Empyrean. Opening guitar enterprise and its subsequent endeavour has a Steely Dan feel to it whilst the sultry and mystique lined melodies and imagination which veins another powerful song, seduce like a mix of Motherjane, In Flames, and KingBathmat.

Both tracks are breath-taking in their unique ways leaving the closing Tiamat a formidable task to ensure the album ends on a similar high. Bedlam is not quite the right word for the might and tempest of the thrilling finale, but best describes the whirlpool of adventure, ingenuity, and sounds colliding and colluding fluidly in the inimical emprise. In many ways the song sums up everything about the album and indeed the creative intent of Kastasyde, and yes it leaves Gnosis in as impressive a state and stature as it started and indeed further climbed to.

Kastasyde was a new introduction to us with Gnosis but leave with the words best of year challenger and major breakthrough release on the lips.

The self-released Gnosis is available now @

RingMaster 05/06/2015

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Sassy Kraimspri – Cock Fight


Bringing the band’s trilogy of Cock Fight EPs in one riotous slab of essential rock ‘n’ roll, multinational rockers Sassy Kraimspri have unleashed a must have punk ‘n’ rock album of 2015 for all those yet to lay their destined to be lustful paws on the band’s previous releases. Consisting of musicians hailing from Norway, America, and Australia, the Stavanger hailing quartet have a sound to turn a party into a riot and a riot into unbridled debauchery, as evidenced in full explosive might by Cock Fight.

Sassy Kraimspri now consists of vocalist/guitarist Ida Collett Belle, guitarist Richard Belle, bassist Linda Pedersen, and Etienne on drums, the band itself emerging in 2006 with a sound which is part heavy rock, part punk, part rock pop, and all merciless seduction on body and soul. 2008 saw the release of debut album Dirty White Lies, the band just a duo back then of Ida Collett and drummer Tash Adams, who found success in Australian band SheRex. Three years later The Pussy Magnet EP was uncaged from the foursome, a well-received encounter recorded, as the Cock Fight EPs with producer Russ Russell (Napalm Death, The Wildhearts, Dimmu Borgir). Alongside these and the subsequent releases now making up the album, the band’s live presence has only grown and drawn continual acclaim, Sassy Kraimspri sharing stages with the likes of Skambankt, Melissa Auf der Maur, Casiokids, and Djerv along the way whilst playing in countries such as Canada, Norway, Australia, China, Germany, and the UK. The Cock Fight EPs awoke a new blaze of support and recognition in 2014, but together as Riot they forge one inescapable persuasion breeding full pleasure and in turn anticipation for the band’s sophomore album they are currently working on.

Looking at the songs in the order of the promo sent over (the actual order may differ on the release), the energies are ignited straight away with opener When It Rains, It Pours. Instantly gripping beats set ears and appetite off, their bait swiftly reinforced and matched by a heavily throated bassline. They alone set the tone for the enjoyment to be found across the release, but are a mere teaser for the rest of the track, and its subsequent companions, as guitars and vocals engage in magnetic enterprise and invigorating incitement. The song is a contagious affair, relatively restrained compared to some but an unrelenting weave of grooves and hooks that takes a firm hold of ears and appetite before making way for the outstanding Like a Drug. A spicy bass groove sets the lustful fun in motion, its gravelly twang the spark to a rhythmic swagger and similarly striding riffs. Like a blend of L7 and Breeders with the virulence of Spinnerette and punkish unpredictability of The Raincoats included, band and track bounce through ears like a sonic epidemic, infecting senses and psyche with its ferocious devilry.

COCK FIGHT coverReputation Radio/RingMaster Review     Current single Riot brings its riveting brawl forth next, again grooves and hooks an almost salacious flirtation as fiercely enticing beats and a grizzly bassline set down a primal lure. As its predecessor, the track has its claws in body and vocal chords quickly, it’s anthemic drive and roar a puppeteer under the influence of Ida Collett’s bellowing voice. The exceptional incitement is followed by the punk rock tenacity of Bad Disease, a track expelling antagonistic beauty like a mix of Bikini Kill and The Donnas with a little touch of The Slits to it. Submission is immediate and long term as it is with the punchier and more predatory Clay Pigeons. Again it is an offering with a virulent swing as it heads towards a delicious crescendo posing as a chorus where an excellent mix of raw vocals burst from across the band.

Addiction is a full flooding by this point of the release and only intensifies as the song Cock Fight snarls and launches its predacious provocation on ears. With harmonically seductive vocals glancing off its muscular stroll, the track roams ears and emotions with a hard rock adventure to its tempestuously hued landscape. It does feel like it is ready to swing aggressive rhythmic punches and sonic causticity at the drop of a note or syllable but stays in check for another prowling infection, which also best describes the spicier lure of its successor Dig It. A bluesy tinge adds to the drama and resourceful adventure of the song, and though it does not quite match up to the plateau of those before it, a meaty bassline and rumbling rhythms beneath that ever enthralling vocal temptation, ensures it is another unmissable stomp.

Say What is pure rock ‘n’ roll manna, sonic endeavour from the guitars winding around ears as a sultry air hugs smouldering vocals to seduce senses and passions. The song is aural eroticism; a reason to immerse in Sassy Kraimspri all on its own, though that is something you can lay at the romping feet of most encounters within Cock Fight.

There is one last blaze of rebellious revelry on the release, a storming cover of Great Balls Of Fire which lives up to its name in heat and energy whilst taking the punk of Jerry lee Lewis to a new and modern ferocity. It is simply a great end to an outstanding rock ‘n’ roll uproar. If you have the previous EPs making up Cock Fight, you will have to wait a little longer for a new thrill whilst enjoying the encounters you already have but for newcomers to Sassy Kraimspri  or part owners of their last trio of offerings, this is all your birthdays for the next decade in one exhausting and thrilling rampage.

Cock Fight is available from June 1st via Lady Luck Records digitally, on CD, and on vinyl.

RingMaster 01/06/2015

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Left For Red Online Promo Shot

‘Pantera-influenced metallers Left For Red are loud, heavy and will make you wanna throw your super-size Coke over someone.’ -Jennyfer J. Walker, Kerrang!

‘This is metal as it ought to be, from a band with great potential’ – Rocksound, 8/10.

Oozing gargantuan riffs and imposing melodies, Midland metallers ‘Left For Red’ step up with their enthralling debut album All Things Known and Buried, out through Burning Halo Records on 27th April.

Hailing from the same fertile region that bred metal kings such as Black Sabbath, Napalm Death, Diamond Head and Judas Priest, Left for Red were spawned in 2010 and soon soaked up the records of Sabbath and Judas Priest before spreading their wings to help form their own blend of modern heavy metal.

The past four years have been very productive for the midlanders; they have built up an army of followers and are well renowned for delivering stunning live performances. Sharing stages with the likes of Chimaira, Crowbar, Beholder and Breed 77, and winning Kerrang!’s TNA competition, have all contributed to the band’s growing stock. Added to that, the metal monkeyshave nationally released two killer EP’s: ‘Vol 001 – Empty Shell’ and ‘Vol 002 – Mercy Flight’, which both picked up considerable national and widespread online praise including rave reviews from Kerrang!, Big Cheese and Rock Sound.

The five-some surge forward with their first full-length debut album, entitled ‘All Things Known and Buried’, which is unleashed in April. This record etches a line in the sand and it’s poised to mark the band as a true force within the UK metal scene. Stacked with pounding riffery, immersing vocal passages and intricately woven layers, the album offers up nine beefy slabs of cutting edge modern metal. Current single ‘Master Of The Game‘
( is a true statement of intent; so too is the magnificent ‘Reborn’ with its Tool-esque hook that will leave you pining for more. Look out for the raucous metal-heads when they bring the party to your town, as they plan a flurry of shows and festivals this year.

LEFT FOR RED LIVE:28th February – Album Launch – 02 Academy, Birmingham; 28th March – The Unicorn, Camden, London; 25th April – The Old Sal, Nottingham; 15th May – Mosh Against Cancer Festival – The Lomax, Liverpool; 16th May – Lower George Inn, Gloucester; 30th May – Midlands Metal Crusade – Slade Rooms, Wolverhampton; 20th June – Hard ‘N’ Hevy Fest – The Dollhouse, Abertillery.

Left For Red


Stoneghost – Faceless Ghost


As Faceless Ghost, the new single from UK metallers Stoneghost furiously and creatively bellows in the ears, there is no escaping offering a hearty thank goodness. The reason being that the song and album it comes from, was written at a moment it is fair to say which was pointing to the demise of the band. This had come about because, in the words of vocalist Jason Smith; “I was having a kid and I couldn’t cope with it, I didn’t think I would be able to carry on with the band too, I wasn’t in a good place.” Deciding to go out with a bang and show the world the most potent essence and fury of what was Stoneghost, the South East London quartet created debut album New Age of Old Ways. Thankfully the band’s sound and new offerings found their way to the attention of the Mascot Label Group (Black Label Society, Volbeat, Gojira, Joe Bonamassa), and here we now are with the album scheduled for release in April, its lead single poised to stir up the European metal scene, and Stoneghost seemingly back on compelling course.

The Bromley band began in 2007 and swiftly made a potent impression on the London live scene. Forging a ferocious blaze of rock ‘n’ roll bred from varying strains of metal and a hardcore voracity, the foursome of Cris Finniss (drums), Jamie Nash (bass), Andrew Matthews (guitar), and Smith continued to grip attention and increasingly so across the UK, making highly successful appearances at Bloodstock in 2009 and 2010 with equally impressive performances at the Wacken Open Air festival and Metal Hammer’s Hammerfest IV in their wake over the next couple of years. It was 2013 when the band’s frontman had his ‘crisis’ and turmoil reached the band. Fighting through it though to subsequently record New Age of Old Ways with Russ Russell (Napalm Death, Evile, Dimmu Borgir, Sikth, New Model Army), Stoneghost is now ready to take their place at the forth of British metal and again we can only give thanks.

As the majority of songs gracing the album, Faceless Ghost was bred in that troubled time for band and Smith, the singer talking about the song recently saying, “It’s about my daughter, she was on the way, I was feeling apprehensive and scared about the responsibility and seeing a therapist at the time, I was having some really low points, but because I had a daughter on the way it gave me the reason to sort myself out.” There is a definite personal angst and passion behind the song which echoes that moment, an intimacy to its tempest which rages as potently as the ravenous sounds.

The song opens with a dazzling weave of guitar enterprise, a spicy melodic colour which captivates from around just as swiftly established and equally compelling rhythmic predation. Things only intensify and grip tighter as Smith’s punkish roar spills emotion across the thrash toned canvas. Grooves and hooks add different and fascinating flavours and textures to the song next, the proposition already transcending various metal subgenres whilst brawling with its own aggressive individuality.

Matthews’s superb sonic and melodic designs continue to ignite the imagination as does the lyrical force of the song, whilst bass and drums are predators within the magnetically spiced triumph. Across track there are glimpses of bands like Pantera, Bloodsimple, and Overkill, but only whispers in a sound which leaps out like a beast and incites body and emotions with tempestuous majesty.

Roll on New Age of Old Ways

Faceless Ghost is available from March 2nd and New Age of Old Ways on April 27th via Mascot

RingMaster 02/03/2015

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Golers – In ‘n’ Outlaws


Originally out as a limited edition CD in 2013, In ‘n’ Outlaws is now digitally poised to pounce on the world and a tremendous assault it is too. The fourth album from Canadian punk metallers Golers, the release is a furious and ridiculously contagious slab of crossover ferocity throwing thrash, hardcore, and crust punk voracity into one bruising and belligerent treat. Every mention of the Vancouver quartet seems to draw comparisons to Slayer and DRI, and it is hard to be any different here, though there are plenty of other extreme provocateurs hinting in the spicing of the ultimately fresh fourteen track brawl.

Golers first uncaged their belligerent and sonic fury on ears in 1998, forming after the end of the band they were all playing in, Subversion. The following year saw debut album South Mountain Style uncaged, it establishing the core Golers sound which has snarled and rampaged ever since. 2nd Generation followed in 2004, offering a honed and more impacting flavouring which again was intensified and broadened a touch more with Backwoods Messages five years later. Sparking the keenest attention on the band yet, its well-received arrival was more than emulated by the appearance of In ‘n’ Outlaws with easy to expect greater success coming with its digital unveiling. Recorded with producer/engineer/manager Rob Shallcross (Gene Hoglan, Strapping Young Lad, West Of Hell), the album commandingly and tenaciously shows why Golers has been so greedily devoured on records an live across North America and Europe alike, a presence taking in shows and tours with bands such as Toxic Holocaust, Kreator, The Accused, Napalm Death, Suicidal Tendencies, Dayglo Abortions, Destruction, Ghoul, and Prong. The ultimate step of recognition has yet to be breached though; something In ‘n’ Outlaws definitely has the potential to trigger given the opportunity.

The album’s title track roars in ears first, riffs and rhythms an instant bombardment, gripping attention and an early appetite with force. The great blend of vocals led by Walter ‘Chainsaw Charlie’ Mason, straight away ignite an already contagious offering whilst the sonic craft of Derek ‘Henry the 1st‘ Rockall squeals with appeal against the caustic scrub of riffery from Mason. In 'n' Outlaws_fullCatching the anthemic essences of thrash and punk in one almighty invitation, it is a thrilling start potently backed straight away by the even more hostile Lemon Eyed Devil and the following irritability of Angle Disruption. The first of the two is sheer primal virulence, vocals and grooves a spiteful bait against the fiercely provocative muscles of Jason ‘Cranswick’ Mosdell’s swings and Stuart ’Jonny Goler’ Carruthers predatory bass lines. Its punk rabidity is matched by that of its successor, a song with a bee in its bonnet and malevolence in its breath. Again though, every hook and rhythmic swipe seems to have a devious contagion matched by grooves and riffs, an enslavement of ears and imagination upon which the vocal squalls impressively vent.

Behind the Sun embraces a heavy metal spicing in its corrosive turbulence of sound and aggression next, the track as addictive as those before but finding a rawer, nastier nature to seduce and scar simultaneously. It is a bracing and abrasive quality which is just as vocal in Inbred Militia and soon after Kamikaze. Both tracks brawl with the senses and ignite emotions, the first blessed with a delicious crunchy growling bassline amidst a tempest of guitar and vocal inhospitality. It is pure addiction; the bands thrash intent the raging force of the compelling intrusion. The latter of the pair savages with every syllable and note expelled but again has a catchy enticement to its grooves which leave ears basking.

It is fair to say that there is no weak moment across the whole of In ‘n’ Outlaws; some songs might have a surface similarity at times but each reveals its own distinct character in time, as proven by the sonically inflamed Paradise Entrails, with its bewitching niggling and repetitive grooving, and the vicious When Shit Goes Down. This track scowls and abuses with every rhythmic flex and vocal glare, it’s brief but inescapable ire undiluted intimidation with, as in the previous track, a melodic toxicity to share.

The more composed and melodically fuelled Scratch steps forward next, it’s sonic enterprise a riveting tonic which as you might rightly assume, is soon smothered by an unfriendly vocal confrontation still impressing in its multi prong attack, and a more classic metal coloured voracity. It is another slight twist in the album and nature of songs, one turned a few degrees more in the hellacious storm of Quickshit McGraw with its exhausting intensity and melody induced trespass of the senses, and again in the rabid punk flirtation of Country Blumpkin, this another heady peak in the album.

The album ends as welcomingly riotously and adversarial as it began, Alcoholics Unanimous coming first and bellowing with rancor and rhythmic violence; a malice tempered again by irresistible and unrelenting grooves. It is a tremendous onslaught from the start but finds a new ground of addictiveness with its slip into a punk bred anthem towards the end. The Path is equally as incendiary and persuasive with its concussive charge and vocal causticity, whilst the closing Riff Cult / Relations just stands before ears and growls them out in sound, vocals, and attitude to provide a mouth-watering, energy sapping end to a thoroughly invigorating and rigorously enjoyable album.

Golers will be a secret to a great many no more, new hungry appetites sparked once In ‘n’ Outlaws hits the webby place. The album might not be quite announced as the very best thrash/punk metal offering in history but it is destined to be one of the favourites.

In ‘n’ Outlaws is digitally available from February 6th via Bandcamp. Check for details.

RingMaster 05/02/2015

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