Jonestown – Aokigahara

Jonestown_RingMasterReview

Beauty and paradise can turn to pain and hell with seeming ease within the hands of mankind; the utopian vision of the charismatic and disturbed central figure in the inspiration to the band’s name a prime example. UK metallers Jonestown seed their sound and lyrical confrontations in such personal and worldly tempests; to borrow words from their bio, “The name Jonestown encapsulates the fragility of our state in nature and in society. We’re oblivious to how fragile we are and how quickly life can turn to death.” Musically, the Brighton band starts in hellish landscapes of sound and emotion too which, as shown by new album, Aokigahara, is then taken to fiercer debilitating states whilst subjecting the listener to one seriously thrilling incitement.

Formed March 2014, Jonestown took little time to impress and lure thick attention. They won the Metal 2 The Masses competition that same year with their first ever gig together being the initial round of the event which they also won. From there they have played with the likes of Soulfly, Monuments, No Consequence, and Black Dahlia Murder , toured with Prolong the Agony, and drew acclaim with performances at festivals such as Bloodstock Open Air in 2014 and in 2015, both Leofest  and Mammothfest. 2016 is going the same successful way as its recent predecessors for the band, starting with the recent release of their stunning debut album Aokighara. Named after the forest at the base of Mount Fuji known as ‘the Suicide Forest’, the release is cauldron of raw and varied metal ferociousness fuelled with a hardcore laced antipathy in sound and tone. It is a creative animus, a web of inventive rabidity and ravenous imagination, and quite irresistible.

Jonestown Artwork_RingMasterReviewIt opens up with Deliverance, a track taking its time to come into view from within a haunting cold ambience. Chilling winds wash provocatively over the senses as a melancholic melody sighs in the background. Soon an imposing wall of intimidating chords and raw intensity looms up though, it in turn erupting into an onslaught of corrosive sonic and rhythmic animosity led by the vocals squalls of Harley Anderson. It takes little time for the technical prowess and unpredictable enterprise of the band to show its impressing nature with guitarist Craig Radford spinning a web of grooves and melodic temptation as a suggestive wrap to his and bassist’s Tony Hardwick predatory riffs and lines, this all without defusing the unbridled rancor of tone and touch of the song.

It is a striking start to the album quickly matched by Cenodoxus and Borderline. The first of the pair is equally as bitter and uncompromising as its predecessor, the senses bruising swings of drummer Rich Owen as virulent as they are punishing. It also pushes the imagination further with a great Korn-esque twist within its Black Dahlia Murder meets Meshuggah meets Murdock like ravishing of ears and emotions. Its successor has its own creative vendetta to share; grooves an infestation as toxic as they are seductive, simultaneously tempering and accentuating the impressive and varied strains of Anderson’s vocal enmity and the carnivorous voice and exploit of the bass.

Mass Extinction Six is a merciless knot of emotional tension and sonic jaundice next, again an assault brought and veined with some richly flavoursome and appetite inciting invention, whilst the album’s title track breeds an emotionally corrupted atmosphere around a whirlpool of virulent riffs and grooves. Without quite matching the earlier pinnacles of Aokigahara, both leave ears resonating and pleasure thick before Aprés Moi shares its own caustic drama. As with all tracks, it is an unrelenting predator, never giving ears a moment’s breath or the imagination time to settle before another raging and contagious outburst of invention and breath-taking hostility erupts to steal attention.

With the mouth-watering emotional discord and physical bedlam of The 33rd Parallel and the sonic terrorism and mesmeric beauty of the equally outstanding Deadweight bringing Aokigahara to a riveting and ferocious close, the album stands as one of the best metal debuts this year and back. At times it almost proves too brutal and invasive to take in one go, but every track brings such a fresh adventure of conflict and emotional friction that tearing away from the album’s grudge proves impossible. Bottom-line is that this is a treat no one should ignore.

Aokigahara is out now @ http://Jonestownbrighton.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/jonestownbanduk   https://twitter.com/jonestownmetal

Pete RingMaster 28/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Bailer – Shaped By The Landscape

BAILER_RingMasterReview

There is a new bruiser in town, a creative bully as at ease turning the senses and ears to mush as it is breeding a dervish like reactions in the body. That uncompromising assailant is Irish quartet Bailer and its choice of irresistible weapon, debut EP, Shaped By The Landscape. The band’s striking introduction is a fiercely irritable groove fest of demands and rewards; a caustic fusion of groove metal and hardcore which leaves body and soul wasted and spirit and emotions ignited.

Formed in the January of 2015, Bailer has been a welcome scourge through its local and Irish underground scene, sharing stages with the likes of Red Enemy, Novelists, The Colour Line, Shields and more as well as playing main support to Murdock on tour. Aidan Cunningham from that fellow Irish band recorded, mixed, and mastered the Shaped By The Landscape, and fair to say if describing the distinct Bailer sound, Murdock would be used as a kind of reference as well as maybe Gacys Threads and The Dillinger Escape Plan. There is no escaping the sonic and vocal, let alone emotional, animosity fuelling and shaping the band’s first poke at the broadest attention, or that it is one of the most punishingly thrilling debuts in the hardcore scene for quite a while.

Artwork_RingMasterReviewThe EP opens with Failsafe and immediately has ears enticed with its spicy guitar coaxing and then under siege by a wall of hungry riffs and barbarous rhythms. It is all conducted by the ferocious tones of vocalist Alex O’Leary, his searing squalls almost visibly scarring his throat as they enjoyably abrase ears. There is equally a swing to his delivery, a devilish catchiness which is even stronger in the web of fiery grooves that entangle ears and appetite amidst the rampant aggression of Paul Cashman’s rhythmic swings. The carnivorous growl of David Cleere’s bass is simply delicious in the mix as too the wonderfully nagging tapestry of metal and punk grooves and riffs cast by guitarist Chris Harte. The track is a glorious start to the release, and maybe the most virulently infectious slab of abuse heard in a long time.

It is not a one off though, being swiftly matched by The Binding. It starts off in the same vein as its predecessor but soon reveals its own nefarious twists and turns as O’Leary again shares rancor with the air. Everything about the song is also ridiculously catchy; the body and imagination is soon caught up in its hostile groove almost unaware of being battered and bruised, sonically and emotionally tossed around. Its sensational onslaught is followed by Anti-Venom and its own animus of spite and infectiousness. Grooves squirm with the tempest of noise and irritability, the snarling lure of the bass as seductive as ever whilst vocals rage and almost gloat over the victim, in the shape of the senses, crippled by the rhythmic battering alone. Not that the listener realises when being manipulated by an infestation of grooves and stirring hooks shared with similar zeal and power.

The Benefit Of Doubt is an even darker and more predatory proposal; venom toning every rhythmic strike and scything flash of guitar while all the time the bass adds a grouchy nag linking it all up. Maybe the least openly catchy song on the EP, though not by much, the track is as bold and majestic in craft and invention as it is in highly persuasive animosity. It is a formidable and stirring end to what is simply a killer and monumental debut from Bailer.

The CD version of Shaped By The Landscape actually comes with bonus tracks Call Of The Unknown and Animosity, and the cause of the only issue with the release; the fact that we were not sent those songs to cover too, though it is easy to assume they will live up to the other quartet. Already we are greedy for the Bailer incitement and it is hard to imagine we will be on our own once it is out there playing havoc with ears and the passions.

The self-released Shaped By The Landscape EP is released 29th April digitally and on CD @ https://bailerofficial.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/bailerofficial/

Pete RingMaster 27/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Incendiary Arousals: Twenty one Metal/Noise/Rock releases which lit up The RingMaster Review in 2015

2015 was a year of creative savagery and rousing, anthemic glories within metal, rock, and noise driven genres. The RingMaster Review picks out those EPs/albums covered by the site which especially sparked ears and passions.

 

OMNISCIENT_FC_RingMaster Review

Desert Storm – Omniscient
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/01/22/desert-storm-omniscient/

Skindred – Volume
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/10/29/skindred-volume/

William English – Basic Human Error
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/07/01/william-english-basic-human-error/

Arcade Messiah – II
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/11/23/arcade-messiah-ii/

Arcade-Messiah-II-Cover_RingMaster Review

Tirades – Lifetime of Wars
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/01/08/tirades-lifetime-of-wars/

Raketkanon – Rktkn#2
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/04/15/raketkanon-rktkn2/

Show of Bedlam – Roont
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/05/08/show-of-bedlam-roont/

XII Boar – Pitworthy
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/03/10/xii-boar-pitworthy/

Cover_RingMaster Review

Jess & The Ancient Ones – Second Psychedelic Coming: The Aquarius Tapes
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/12/08/jess-the-ancient-ones-second-psychedelic-coming-the-aquarius-tapes/

Shevils – The White Sea
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/11/04/shevils-the-white-sea/

Shattered Skies – The World We Used To Know
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/01/15/shattered-skies-the-world-we-used-to-know/

Possessor – Stay Dead
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/04/02/possessor-stay-dead/

cover_RingMaster Review

Grumpynators – Wonderland
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/05/21/grumpynators-wonderland/

Shaving The Werewolf – The Pissing Link
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/12/09/shaving-the-werewolf-the-pissing-link/

Sofy Major – Waste
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/10/14/sofy-major-waste/

6:33 – Deadly Scenes
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/01/12/633-deadly-scenes/

art6:33_RingMaster Review

Murdock – Dead Lung
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/04/17/murdock-dead-lung/

Grenouer – Unwanted Today
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/03/20/grenouer-unwanted-today/

Markradonn – The Serpentine Deception
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/12/15/markradonn-the-serpentine-deception/

We’ll Go Machete – Smile Club
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/08/27/well-go-machete-smile-club/

 

cover_RingMaster Review

TesseracT – Polaris

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/09/27/tesseract-polaris/

The RingMaster Review 01/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

No Consequence – Vimana

No Consequence press shot

It is probably not too far from the mark to suggest that Vimana, the new album from UK progressive/tech metallers No Consequence has been one highly anticipated offering, and right on the money to say it is one strapping beast of sound and creative attitude. The release takes an already highly flavoursome and attention grabbing sound to new pastures of imagination and voracious intensity, aligning the established technical and aggression of the band to a more concentrated brew of melodic and expressive adventure. It is their most rounded and gripping proposition yet with just the hint that they and we are still nowhere near the finished article of their potential and sound.

Renowned as one of the most impressive live acts on the European metal scene, listing the sharing of tours and stages with the likes of TesseracT, Chimp Spanner, Carcer City and just recently Monuments and Murdock on their CV, No Consequence follow up their previous acclaimed albums In the Shadow of Gods and IO, of 2009 and 2013 respectively, with an incitement which seduces as it tears strips of the senses and relentlessly fascinates as it casts a roar of uncompromising aggressiveness.

NC-Vimana-packshot   Vimana begins with the short persuasion of Acala and an immediate hint of dramatic climates and textures within a harmonic embrace. An intro come scene setter, the appealing opening is soon departing for the more rugged and emotionally intensive Our Time Has Come. Restrained yet rich grooves wind around ravenous riffs and a sonic turbulence as the rawer aspect of vocalist Kaan Tasan comes to the fore. He too though is soon showing an adept range as a cleaner presence entwines with his dustier snarls. As the guitars of Dan Reid and Harry Edwards flirt and abrase ears with craft and enterprise, the song’s tempest provides a persistent challenge and enticement of progressive and technical tenacity. It is equally a weave of varied metal and melodic toxicity, it all colluding in one magnetic lure holding attention and appetite firmly in its hands alongside enjoyment.

The following Is This A Way To Live has a calmer if no less energetic presence, though vocal squalls and cantankerous riffs as well as a grooved taunting offer disagreement. Subsequently the song slips into a mellow reflective passage within a still tempestuous atmosphere, the bass of Tom Parkinson a prowling shadow in the growing web of wiry grooves and hooks whilst the rhythmic animosity of drummer Colin Bentham is barbarous in the norm and bestial, like the bass, in the track’s most agitated state. With a Middle Eastern suggestiveness emerging in its thick ambience and unpredictability driving every twist and turn, the track has ears and thoughts thoroughly captivated before making way for the more rigorous examination of Resistance and in turn the cyclonic energy of The Turning Point. There is a carnal essence to the savage riffs and technical predation of the first of the two, but countered by and aligned to a constantly evolving landscape of immersive melodies, heart driven vocals, and a blustery fury. Virulently contagious and intrusively dynamic, the track is the first major pinnacle within an already seriously impressing album and quickly matched by the inventive theatre and hostile temptation of its successor. It is another song which merges contrasts and contradictions in sound and energy in a riveting emotional and breath-taking physical turmoil. Though arguably not as technically busy as previous releases but certainly as skilfully dynamic and inventive it, as all the songs within Vimana, reveals new corners and depths with every listen, ensuring every flight of the album’s raging adventure is increasingly rewarding.

The elegant caress of brief instrumental Half Light comes next, its evocative beauty courted by a vocal sample before Citizen with a similarly warm charm and presence takes over. Of course things get more heated and agitated soon after, guitars spinning a trap of sonic predation matched by heavy rhythms though almost as quickly, a melodic tempting returns to seduce once again. The vocal variety of Tasan leads an eventual merger of both aspects as the song becomes a bewitching trespass on ears and passions.

There is something familiar about the following Speechless especially when vocals and song are in full roar but ultimately it casts a uniquely inflamed presence rife with emotional ire and sonic adventure. The lead track from the album and another highly satisfying encounter, it still does not quite take ears and emotions on the same thrilling ride as other tracks upon the album or indeed Disconnect which straight after unveils a worldly melodic emprise within a creative bellow and an imposing persistently evolving incitement.

Vimana is drawn to a close by firstly the cauldron of diversity and extremes that is Signs and finally its title track and its mellow croon on ears. Also equipped with a rhythmic stalking, the last song increasingly spawns brighter and bolder voracious flames throughout but without ever catching ablaze; a restraint which you have to say superbly works.

Both tracks bring Vimana a fine and absorbing finale, the album ending as potently as it began. There are moments where personally there was a wish for the band to go further with its melodic explorations or inhospitable endeavour but no moment when No Consequence just do not seriously impress. Bottom-line is that Vimana is an unbridled recommendation for not only technical/progressive metal fans but for the broad attention of metal itself.

Vimana is available now via Basick Records digitally and on CD @ http://music.basickrecords.com/album/vimana and http://basick.supplies/collections/no-consequence

https://www.facebook.com/noconsequenceband   http://www.basickrecords.com/bands/no-consequence

RingMaster 09/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Murdock – Dead Lung

MURDOCK-Promo1

How to describe Dead Lung, the new album from Dublin trio Murdock? Well quite simply it is a BEAST! In sheer power, ferocity, and primal instincts the album is a devourer of senses and psyche. Similarly though it has all the creative wile and lithe characteristics of a predator and once it has its claws in there is no escaping the savaging of hardcore, noise, or the technical trespass assaulting ears and igniting the imagination. Dead Lung is just immense.

Since emerging Murdock has earned an increasing and devoted following to go along with the reputation bred of being one incendiary device live. It is a devastating experience which in the words of the band has the attitude, “If you are not bleeding or exhausted, what is the point?” The band has ignited stages alongside the likes of Every Time I Die, The Dillinger Escape Plan, Unearth, Sick Of It All, Lower Than Atlantis, Coilguns and numerous more, either on tour or at individual shows but now it is their debut album Dead Lung, released via Basick Records, that is poised to be the detonator to greater intensive climes, and with little to surely stand in their way such its might and hellacious alchemy.

The album opens with the first single taken from it, Deer Noises. It is a track going for the jugular from its first breath, riffs gnawing the senses whilst rhythms venomously batter them, and it is fair to say that the sonic spicing wrapping both is up to no good either. It is a magnetic entrance enhanced further by the raw vocals of guitarist Aidan and the contagious elements flaring up in the tempest of sound and emotion. It is not just an infectious essence emerging either, an inventive unpredictable flurry of fierce and melodic twists adds to the gripping turmoil too. Coilguns comes to mind listening to the song but equally spices of bands like The Ghost of a Thousand and Kunz tease thoughts, all mere whispers in the roar though as the album gets off to a thumping irresistible start.

Albumcover   The band has so many weapons that impress, that unpredictability a major one outside of the sound itself and it continues to seduce across the album starting with I Am Not A Continent next. This also has the listener’s throat in its sonic jaws from the first second, guitars and bass snarling and ravaging the senses whilst the beats of Ronan show more restraint yet still unload with a punishing intent. Slips into mellow scenery equipped with sultry harmonies and progressive beauty virtually flirt with the listener inside the encounter too but always they have to submit for the similarly riveting fury fuelling the proposition.

A lustful appetite is already brewing by the time What You Don’t Like takes over; its psychotic character and agitated rhythmic bait a swift proposal to be feared and embraced. It is even angrier than the rages before it but also in some ways lacking the same addictive quality, though this is more to do with personal preferences across Dead Lung. The track seems to lean deeper in the hardcore side of the band compared to its more evenly sculpted predecessors but also arguably more experimental ideation with its Deftones like detours. It provides another fascinating incitement though but one soon surpassed by the band’s latest outstanding single Erk. An avalanche of rhythms bruise and inflame ears first, riffs and sonic ferocity just as toxic from within the storm. The bass of Rob lays down a mean throaty lure throughout the increasingly anthemic and volatile brute of a triumph also, but the song is a success again unafraid to slip into melodic beauty and evocative caresses. Its hooks are sheer addiction on top of it all and the band gets more accomplished in ability and imagination in three and a half minutes than most others will across a whole album.

Narrowcasting finds a post punk coldness and monotone elegance to its prowling presence next, the song managing to sound like a hybrid of Palms meets late seventies band Artery. It is just as intimidating in its doom lined mellowness as it is in the outbursts of pent up vocal and sonic vitriol and takes album and listener on a completely new direction to what came before whilst continuing in the same vein as the previous provocations. The track is mouth-watering stuff matched by Brainface which explodes in the face after the brief jazzy and progressive instrumental seduction of 51 West 95th St. This leads straight into the sonic windstorm and blistering inhospitality of Brainface, a relatively short punk brawl clad in noise rock devilry and furious dissonance.

Neither The Signal In The Noise nor Leave Me Here For The Crows take any prisoners, the first a scorching and scarring sonic consumption speared by magnetic rhythm invention, warped slithers of unconnected styles, and rabid vocals. Once feeling in the senses returns, there is only pleasure for the might and thrilling violation of the track, the same applying to its successor. This takes a more controlled assault to the senses yet is still a volcanic maliciousness which intensifies its potency and weight with every passing swipe and grazing riffs, whilst its core groove just makes the tongue pass over lips.

Juices spill again with the cyclonic Old Blood Dead Lung, a glorious beating with convulsive rhythms and a bass sound you can only describe as demonic. The guitar enterprise and vocal vehemence of Aidan strip ears of their stability magnificently and in no time the track is locked in as a favourite across the increasingly impressing album.

It should be noted that every glimpse of the song we are trying to portray is as just that, choice moments in the ever evolving and twisted landscape of the tracks, each conflicts you can make assumptions and have expectations over but will never get a full handle on until heard, as Vebalectomy next. It is hardcore and punk in its heart but a broad and constantly shifting diversity of sound and ideation in presence, and arguably this is one of the more straight forward tracks in its make-up.

      Dead Lung comes to a close through firstly the portentous doom seeded Nineteeneightyfive, a sinister and almost meditative soundscape as hypnotic as it is threatening and lastly Monographia which blooms from within its predecessor and returns to the post punk hued atmosphere and persuasion glanced over previously in the album. The vocals of Aidan and Rob are smouldering caresses within the raw and caustic but similarly reserved sounds, though in time it all becomes a turbulent and bracing proposition.

It is a superb end to an engrossing and simply thrilling album. Even the pair of singles put out just before Dead Lung barely gave a true picture of the variety and scintillating depths of songwriting and adventure of sound to be found within it. The list already is getting long for possible album of the year contenders but there is no other option than to add Murdock’s name to it.

Dead Lung is available now via Basick Records @ http://music.basickrecords.com/album/dead-lung

https://www.facebook.com/murdocknoise

RingMaster 17/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net