Siberian Meat Grinder – Metal Bear Stomp

A big rabid beast has loomed on our horizons, a hungry carnivore of a proposition ready to devour the senses on the way to the top of the metal landscape. It is Russian fury Siberian Meat Grinder; a band which has been laying the foundations for major attention for the past half dozen years but poised to mercilessly seize it through new album Metal Bear Stomp. A ferocious and virulent fusion of thrash, hardcore, hip hop, and plenty more, sound and release has everything desired to arouse the passions and set the body off on one brutal slam dance.

As suggested Moscow based Siberian Meat Grinder had given notice of their presence and intent through mini-albums Hail To The Tsar and Vs The World which were originally self-released before seeing a reboot upon Destiny Records in 2015. Last year the label gave warning of Metal Bear Stomp with the Face The Clan EP which featured a couple of tracks from the new album; hints more than realised and surpassed by Siberian Meat Grinder’s new irresistible assault.

In many ways there is plenty familiar about the album yet everything is woven into a combination and threat as fresh and individual as anything around. It all begins with the intrusive shenanigans of Ruder Than Thou, vocals and guitars instantly in the face with group shouts swiftly in league with their raucous invitation as rhythms bite. In no time surging thrash bred riffs drive through ears, the insatiable beats of drummer Egor herding the aggression directly upon the senses. The punk assault of vocalist Vladimir becomes the ringleader, the rest of the band’s throats anthemic incitement before the unpredictability of the band shines as the song twists into a just as potent Biting Elbows meets Agnostic Front like incitement before exploding with its thrash instincts once again.

It is a start to arouse the passions swiftly supported by the similarly insatiable antics of Hunt the Steel. Guitarists Maxim and Mihail drive riffs through ears, vocals swinging from their bait as band collusion waits to free an anthemic roar with addictive success. In the midst of the charge the bass of Andrei magnetically grumbles, its brooding presence a thick lure within the growing web of sonic enterprise of the guitars.

The album’s title track stomps around next, the Bear-Tsar of a proposal prowling and striking with the ferocity of an Exodus and spite of a Municipal Waste. Again there is no escaping the addictive prowess of the band calls; physical involvement with that and the neck muscle stretching throb of the track swift as the track tightens the already firm grip of the album.

The predatory stalking of Can’t Stop Won’t Stop is just as compelling, that initial prowling threat the lead into carnal rabidity which in turn blends bestial intent with predacious restraint as the song continues to ebb and flow in creative vindictiveness. Its instinctive rapacity is matched and intensified in successor No Way Back, the song a ravenous tempest of speed and irritability veined by sonic toxicity. Its thrash nurtured, multi-flavoured body is again an unpredictable proposal which twists and turns as tenaciously as the vocal attack, keeping expectations guessing and imagination gripped.

Enter Bearface brings a web of bold rhythms and sonic espionage to bear on the imagination next, its brief but commanding punk rock trespass a sinister infestation before things get all rock ‘n’ roll with the trash thrash roar of No Sleep Till Hell. Its infectious subterfuge is a contagious wrapping to its quarrelsome heart, a merger which ensures a blaze of incendiary rock impossible not to leap on board with.

Through the hellacious escapades of Style, a bracing cauldron of fevered metallic crossover, and the nagging bruising stomp of Get Busy, ears get fully battered and richly pleasured as recognisable traits get a unique Siberian Meat Grinder working over while Face the Clan raids the senses with nostrils flared and unbridled combative contagion. All three bring body and spirit to boiling point, the third especially viral with its mercilessly catchy dispute.

A horde of flavours collude in the outstanding pugnacious punk metal of Eternal Crusade, a track which epitomises the rich diverse sound of the band and its epidemic persuasion, before the album closes on the   adversarial roar of Walking Tall where everything from guitars and vocals to emotion and energy are ablaze.

It is a stirring end to an album which gets more potent and irresistible with every venture into its instinctive devilry. It is technically captivating, infectiously addictive, and a hearty punk infused thrash metal onslaught with a legion of extra goodness which is sure to stomp over all resistance to its glorious might.

Metal Bear Stomp is out now CD, LP and Digital Download through Destiny Records.

https://www.facebook.com/SIBERIANMEATGRINDER/    https://www.instagram.com/siberianmeatgrinder

Pete RingMaster 25/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Black Sachbak – No Pay No Gain

no pay no gain cover

Strapping on a tank full of punk to their trash fuelled juggernaut of sound, Israeli metallers Black Sachbak is one of those wonderfully intrusive treats which it is impossible not to develop a lustful hunger for. Theirs is thrash metal at its most mischievous and antagonistic, a sound which most likely along with the band’s antics and attitude has led them to earn the title of or make a self-declaration that they are “the most hated band in Israel!”

Imagine the devilish thrash ferocity of Municipal Waste with the hardcore flavoured metal viciousness of Suicidal Tendencies and the punk hostility of Biohazard, and you get somewhere around the uncompromising onslaughts of Black Sachbak. The Petah Tiqua hailing and 2010 formed quartet offers a warped uniqueness which given the chance is a seriously rewarding and impressive bitch slap to ears and senses. Though originally released last year, No Pay No Gain, the band’s debut album was re-released recently through Stormspell Records on CD and Tridroid Records on cassette. It has given the world another opportunity to discover a thoroughly compelling band, one certainly all thrash fans should seize with both hands.

No Pay No Gain takes barely seconds to induce full attention with an extra lick of the lips as the opening rock ‘n’ roll fanfare of Haircut I Never Got sets the fury in motion. Swiftly heavy handed thumps of beats from drummer Noam Chizo Salingre descend on the senses alongside the gruff vocal resourcefulness of vocalist Eliran Balely. Their potent bait is enhanced by the sonic endeavour from the guitar of Dor HaShamen Plaut and the meaty bass prods of Lidor Sharaby. It is a demanding entrance which just as forcibly twists into a heavy striding ferocity, riffs and rhythms almost goading ears and vocals. It is a glorious rage which is unafraid to juggle the pace of its attack and throw some wrong-footing twists into its tempestuous presence.

The outstanding start is followed by the slightly less astounding force of The IMF. It is only a dip because of the brilliance of its predecessor, the track a raucous brawl of compelling riffs and antagonistic beats speared by a virulently contagious groove. Also loaded with excellent guitar craft and enterprise with a sweet solo, the track provides another rugged inescapable trap for the passions before making way for the brief punk assault of Dubstep Sucks. Picking on the target in its title, the track roars and snarls with sonic hostility and vocal unpredictability to provide three highlights out of three for the album.

Both Marx Was Right and Beer Law keep the levels high and appetite greedy, the first flying from the traps with voracious riffs and similarly greedy rhythms ridden by the lyrically caustic and vocally savage tones of Balely. As anthemic as they come on the album, the song flirts with and barracks ears from start to finish with prime thrash ferocity equipped with a healthy strain of punk and heavy metal tenacity. Its successor provides more of the same but also takes a slower, at times stalking approach to ears. Riffs gnaw feverishly on the senses throughout whilst rhythms swing with unbridled sinews but in other moments both shift almost 180 degrees in their attack to again bring an intriguing turn of events.

     Next comes a cover of a song by an Israeli artist called Tamir Gal. Having no idea of its creator or the original, it is still safe to say that Black Sachbak has pillaged, maimed, and reinvented Soher in their own chaotic likeness. The track is pure bedlam, vocals deranged and sound disturbed into a sonic haze so that it is hard to know how to take the track. Yet it brings a broad satisfied smile before the excellent Capitalist Zombies goes for the jugular. It is a wonderful irritant, riffs and beats a hellacious ravaging whilst singular and group vocals rouse and graze the passions eagerly. Punk thrash at its best, the track is another insatiable slab of irresistible toxic and thrilling creative rabidity.

A matching blaze of voracity drives Fuck Your Law, a torrent of anger drenched vocals and riffs emulated in spite by the hostile swing of beats. Short and to the point, the track blisters ears and psyche before TV unleashes its infectious and malicious frenzy. Spiked with stabs of delicious grooves and hordes of addictive riffs, the track is a stormy treat which seduces as it batters, leaving the listener sore but blissful. Its certain triumph leads to the closing Smoke Hash, a final blitz which evolves into a scorching haze of heavy metal prowess and thrash savagery.

It is a great end to No Pay No Gain, which itself is the entrance into an exciting proposition in Black Sachbak, who surely will not be for much longer a secret to the thrash scene. The band and associated labels have given us all another chance to get in at the ground floor on their rise with No Pay No Gain; it would be rude not to take a look.

No Pay No Gain is available now via Stormspell and Tridroid Records, and @ https://blacksachbak1.bandcamp.com/album/no-pay-no-gain-3

https://www.facebook.com/BlackSachbak

RingMaster 19/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Expain – Just The Tip

EXPAIN - Promo Photo

With rich flavour to every unpredictable twist and imaginative exploit within feverishly inventive designs, Just The Tip, the debut album from Canadian band Expain, is one ruggedly captivating proposition. As evidenced by the release, Expain cast a sound which is a mouthwatering web of thrash cultured melodic death metal infused with everything from jazz to progressive metal. It makes for a gripping and compelling capture of the imagination though for the moment the band falls slightly short of igniting a lustful blaze of passion for its persuasion, especially when placed against recent releases from the likes of Destrage, Hardcore Anal Hydrogen, and Toumaï. Nevertheless band and album are fuelled by a potential and technical craft which simply bewitches and ensures Expain is smack bang in the middle of attention’s radar.

Hailing from Vancouver, the band has earned a strong reputation back home for their melodic ingenuity within that virulently aggressive thrash bred voracity, a blend bursting across every second of Expain’s first merciless onslaught. Their full-length actually follows an EP released under the name The Almighty Excruciating Pain in 2012, the seeds to the impressive incitement of Just The Tip. Produced by Matthew Roach, the release is a potent starting block for a suspected highly promising and fruitful horizon for the five-piece.

The instrumental Bacchus opens up the creative adventure, its melodic colour and enticing within a subdued but evident snarl a hint of EXPAIN - Just The Tip - Album Coverwhat is to come, a suggestion swiftly unleashed with the following Aggressions Progression. From its opening firm rhythmic framing around progressive hues and sonic enterprise, the song has ears and thoughts fascinated. The coarse vocal squalls of Daniel Brand entwine their venomous yet welcoming hues amongst the spellbinding weave of guitar play from Pat Peeve and Eric Morrison, a captivating emprise matched by the throaty string craft of bassist Nikko Whitworth. The track is a mighty full opening, showing everything you need and wish to know about the band’s intent and ingenuity of songwriting and performance. It is a constant evolution of ideation and at times mischievous unpredictability which is emulated almost as scintillatingly in the next up Phoenix Writhing. The core charge of thrash inspire riffery and rhythmic antagonism is a powerful bait around which guitar imagination steals the show, though its shares the honours ultimately as a jazzy breather allows the bass to be just as spellbinding.

Both tracks irresistibly impress as does The King which comes in straight after upon an elegant cast of melodies before the irrepressible rhythms of drummer Ryan Idris lead the senses into a sinewed sculpted blaze of acidic short grooves and barbed persuasion. The song slips from its exciting opening into a more expectations feeding thrust but still provides a network of inventive twists and melodic metal flaming to stir up attention and appetite. It is a strong and extremely pleasing track yet lacks the spark of its predecessors as does Don’t Worry The Worst Is Yet To Come. Again the individual invention and skill is breath-taking whilst the small turns and imagination foraging tenacity of guitars and bass are enslaving but it is the thrash spine which offers little new to chew over and lessens the impact of the songs.

The singular attack of the vocals is another element in which more variation is wished, to join the diverse creativity colouring songs, though admittedly Brand is excellent in his delivery and passionate provocation. It does mean though that at times he loses out to the sparkling and potent endeavour elsewhere, as shown with the excellent Idol Worship where guitars seize attention resourcefully supported by great bass and drum incitement. The track and its successor Allegiance To Pain also avoid providing something which is equally never offered by songs and album, and that is to really explore an avant-garde territory which certainly the second of this pair does pleasingly hints at. Song and release does flirt with that bold diversity and adventure across its impressive body but never quite goes into the heart of inventive ‘mania’ which those bands previously mentioned embrace. It is still one of the pinnacles of the album though and gives another reason to suspect that the band is going to become a big force.

Both the seductively prowling Manatee and the predacious Headbang Your Head Off keep ears and emotions employed, the first a blackened waltz of melodic revelry and rhythmic barracking whilst the second is a torrent of disorientating beats and dazzling sonic lures which never standstill or allow a breath to be taken. Vocally too the song sees Brand at his strongest and most gripping, if again diversity is scare whilst the bass of Whitworth shows its presence to be potently inspiring within the thicker mesh of beats and grooved invention.

Completed by A.T.M. with its spicy acidic veining and the contagiously rapacious Eating A Beating Heart, the album leaves a lingering and contented hunger entrenched in thoughts and emotions. Some of the songs certainly need close attention to separate them within the context of the album but singularly all present a magnetic and riveting evocation of sound and craft. Just The Tip is an easy recommendation with plenty for fans of everyone from Megadeth to Municipal Waste, Revoker to Death, as well as those more experimental propositions previously talked of to be excited by. Expain will be a major thrill in our ears and using the reasoning of their great debut, it is expected to be sooner rather than later.

The self-released Just The Tip is available now @ https://expainband.bandcamp.com/album/just-the-tip

https://www.facebook.com/Expainmetal

8/10

RingMaster 24/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Axegressor – Last

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Thrash metal with the hostility and ravenous jaws of a rabid horde is the bestial sound which roars away in the hands and skills of Finnish metallers Axegressor, epitomised and taken to its strongest level to date on new album Last. The nine-track fury is an exhausting and thrilling onslaught of passion and thrash rabidity, maybe an encounter so well seeded in its inspirations to lack a strong vein of originality but holding an invention and craft to its contagious ferocity which easily make the band stand apart from the rest and pushes them towards the frontline of the genre.

Formed in 2006, the Turku quartet of vocalist Johnny Nuclear Winter, guitarist Seba Forma, bassist/backing vocalist Aki Paulamäki, and drummer Atte Mäkelä took influences from authentic thrash metal into their own ideas, impacted upon by bands and sounds they had been listening to since their teens. Alongside that flavouring, experiences from ten to fifteen years playing in various metal bands adds to a mix which is impressively accomplished and exciting as evidenced by the new album. Over the early years the band grew a potent and increasingly growing fanbase and reputation in their homeland, helped by shows supporting the likes of Dark Tranquillity, Legion of the Damned, Onslaught, Soilwork, and Municipal Waste. At festivals too the band has only done themselves good whilst previous albums, debut Command and its successor Next in 2007 and 2011 respectively, after first EP Axecution a year into its life, confirmed and accentuated the impact of the emerging Axegressor. The Listenable Records released Last is the band’s greatest moment so far and the expected trigger for the band to much bigger things.

From the opening Freedom Illusion, band and album has attention and thoughts engrossed and eager to explore the voracious cover_lenticements ahead. Heavily striding riffs and sinew swung rhythms engulf ears first within which for the first and definitely not the last time the great savage predatory sound of the bass thrills and bewitches. It is a formidable and commanding start, nothing flash or explosive but everything that is compelling and anthemic for appetite and passions. Once the vicious rasping vocals leap from the shadows a switch is flicked and energy and tenacity is lit up as the track charges with teeth bared and aimed for the jugular of the senses. It is a seamless and captivating move, accompanying group shouts and the sonic invention of the guitars irresistible. The song continues to mix up its gait, at times swamping the body like a swarm of insidious hornets in sonic flight and at other moments prowling around with a bear like intent weighing up its next move.

Lead Justice rips at flesh next, in top gear from the first second scything through air and bone with its rhythms and searing flesh with guitar rapaciousness. As the first, the track is an incessant persuasion badgering and impressing for an early submission with its tremendously gripping bait. A certain drama also walks the edge of the narrative, primarily sculpted by the exciting bass sound and the vocal causticity, the result with all combined a continuation of the striking presence of the album and ignition of an even keener hunger in the listener, a greed soon satisfied by the blistering Mind Castration. Riffs and rhythms as expected, shape the fury of the song from the first moments, carving out their temptation from within the sonic flume marking the first surge of the track. Once more there is an insatiable thirst to the elements of the song which simply nags from start to finish with repetitious and contagious efficiency, a suasion upon which vocals and melodic enterprise wrap their toxic exploits. It is a riveting adventure, a constant aggressor clad in sonic finery and creative distinction from those around, as all songs on the album to be fair.

Things are kept ticking over very nicely by Merciless Reality Check, a track which is nastier and more intensive than those before but lacks some of the spark. Nevertheless it is a pleasing and exciting incitement before the furnace of spite that is 15 unleashes its venom on the senses. Rhythms and riffs collude in a maelstrom of antagonistic and malicious endeavour from the off before aligning into another single minded but unique rampage. Malicious and hypnotic, and wholly infectious, the track is an invention clad predator which surges and twists throughout its tempestuous presence, a roaring proposition and soundscape for which battlefields and nightmares were invented.

Intensive examination is the order of the day once Social Pressure unleashes its punk infused tsunami of incitement and beleaguering enterprise. The track tunnels deep within ears and skin, hooks and grooves as pestilential in their epidemic contagion as they are malevolently seductive. Axegressor have mastered the art of creating repetition fuelled beauty with no finer an example than this monster of a track soon matched in its own unique character by A Fistful Of Ignorance. Delivered in a more predacious crawl than the outright onslaught of the previous track, it massages the senses with heavy handed riffs and that carnivorous bass persuasion to impressive effect before inserting its own transfixing and determined urgency.

The closing pair of Command To Last and Determinator ensure brakes are untouched in their tumultuous and varied deliveries, the first a constantly belligerent gallop with moments of unbridled aggression and the last an uncompromising heavy metal stomp around a thrash cored ferocity which may not match earlier successes but leaves the album in a thrillingly healthy state.

Last is an exhilarating encounter and though as mentioned it arguably uses well wore seeds, there has been few bands producing a sound anywhere near this good and uncaging releases as enjoyable within thrash metal over recent months and longer. A must check out release for all thrash and punk metal fans.

Last is available via Listenable Records in Europe now and in North America on June 24th.

http://www.axegressor.net

9/10

RingMaster 10/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Sweet dances and psychotic episodes: an interview with Fede of Destrage

fede2

Difficult to describe but very easy to enthuse vociferously over,  Are You Kidding Me? No. the new album from Italian metallers Destrage is easily one of the most thrilling and innovative albums to come along not only this year so far but over a long time. It is a fever of invention and imagination which confronts and seduces the senses through a maze flavours, styles, and experimentation. It is sonic and noise anarchy at its best, a psyche teasing triumph which declares its creators as the exhilarating maelstrom of adventure metal and music is always crying out for. To find out more about band and release we had the pleasure to explore the depths of Destrage with drummer Federico Paulovich, venturing into the creation of the album, Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal, tomato juice, audience sex and plenty more…

Hi Fede and thank you for talking with us.

Before we look at your new album would you tell us about the beginning of Destrage?

The current line-up has been consistent since 2007 and after their first demo, Self Id Generator, Destrage signed a deal with Howling Bull Records, Japan, and released their first full length, Urban Being, which also saw a worldwide release by Coroner Records in 2009.The second full length The King Is Fat’n’Old was released in 2010 by Coroner Records and Howling Bull, supported by European and Japanese tours and international festivals such as Heineken Jammin’ Festival, Euroblast and Mair1 Festival, The Bad Side Festival, MetalItalia Festival, MAV Festival and more. The eclectic festival run afforded Destrage the opportunity to share the stage with Red Hot Chili Peppers, Parkway Drive, Hatebreed, Unearth, Municipal Waste, Sick Of It All, Freak Kitchen, Monuments, Jeff Loomis, Penny Wise, After the Burial, Puddle of Mudd, August Burns Red, Enter Shikari, Caliban, Every Time I Die, Lordi, Moonspell and many more. In 2012, we wrote and recorded our third album. The result, the band’s most focused and dynamic effort yet, Are You Kidding Me? No. led to a worldwide deal with Metal Blade Records.

What was the spark and intent of the band at the beginning and does that still drive the band just as potently today?

We simply LOVE to spend time together, playing together, laughing and making jokes or just hanging. If “millions $$$” are not involved in a musical project (like in our case) every member needs to enjoy every single moment of the “band life”, form the sound check to the time spent on the van. It’s about alchemy in my opinion.

Of course conflicts, like in every relationship, are part of the game. But that was intent at the beginning and nothing is changed at the moment 🙂

How would you say the band has evolved over the years musically and emotionally?

We believe that our evolution as musicians and composers fully reflects our personal growth in real life. You gotta experience something before you can say something; that’s the main reason why we are always evolving, and we’ll always be. So, expect something really different from the albums to come… About how we changed through the three albums, there are a couple reasons that can explain the process. At the time we were composing and recording Urban Being, there was a big change of line up, and all the songs were composed mostly by Matteo; only with The King Is Fat’n’Old we started working all together on the songs, so the main difference from Urban Being is the result that came out from a combined work. We had the same approach in composing Are You Kidding Me? No., but a few years passed, so we were more close-knit as a team, and above all, our music influences had really changed in the meanwhile, as well as we grew up as persons.

Italy seems to have a rather rich and expansive metal scene, how have you found it on the inside and has it becomes easier for a

 Photo by Michael Gardenia Photography


Photo by Michael Gardenia Photography

band from your country to break into a wider audience over recent years?

In Italy, being in a metal band is definitely not easy. Italian scene, especially on rock and metal music, can’t be compared to the German, UK, Scandinavian or American ones. Our scene is based on pop-folk authors. We have to face a pop and hip hop mainstream market which dominates our local music market, and you have to fight a lot to find, not only a good label deal or an honest booking agent, but also a decent place to play. I have to say that Destrage always met great guys on the road, who contributed to support local bands and this was a great luck for us. Nowadays for the first time we can see a metal scene growing in our country and that’s incredible.

You have just released your third album as you mentioned, the quite brilliant, and I am not just saying that because we are talking, Are You Kidding Me? No. Because of the album we described the band as ‘a ten-legged groove machine with just as many schizophrenic characters posing as songs within its latest temptation.’ The album must be your proudest moment to date recording wise, even over the achievement of making your very first release?

I think this album is what makes us really proud at the moment. The first Urban Being wasn’t even a team work, the whole band wasn’t even there. As much as it can be uplifting to see your first record see the light, we believe it’s much more precious to wait a few years and deliver something that really reflects what you are.

If Urban Being was modern metal with a touch of Destrage, The King was Destrage with some modern metal dressing, Kidding is finally the essence of Destrage.

Your sound as clearly shown on the release employs a maelstrom of styles and flavours crossing fields of genres. How would you describe it in context to Are You Kidding Me? No. for newcomers to the band?

We destroy, create, transform, sublimate. We worship enthusiasm and venerate the shake that it gives.

I think Destrage sound’s is spontaneously various and weird. It’s like we learned how to speak the “metal” language as kids, and then growing up we opened our ears to the world and learned so much more, and the process is still going.

Everything that inspires us, from movies to fine art to haute cuisine to love and sex, can be easily translated into hard music as it is our native language.

This said if you take a look to our Spotify profiles you’ll be surprised. Or disgusted ahahah…

I’d love to tell these newcomers: we’d love you to take what the album is actually giving, with a clear and naive point of view, not expecting this record to be something that is going in the direction you already have in your mind. We are not saying the album is a unique piece of music that doesn’t resemble anything else you’ve heard before, no, but it definitely has its degree of originality.

It comes to my mind a story: the first time i tried tomato juice I almost puked, since it is a fruit juice and I was expecting a fruit juice-like taste. My brain was ready to enjoy a semi-definite, predictable experience and was already projecting it in my mind as the glass got to my lips. By the time the liquid touched my tongue I was disappointed, disgusted. The contrast with what I imagined was just bad.

Now tomato juice is my favorite.

Let’s not expect cats to bark.

Simply listen, enjoy or not.

1978605_10153840599710104_1863836033_nThe songs on the album are almost exhausting in their imagination and ever evolving inventive anarchy, they border schizophrenic at times haha. They sound like a puzzle to excitingly decipher and it is easy to assume they are constructed in a similar way so how do you approach the writing and creation of your songs?

Ahahah you’re right. It’s a giant puzzle made by post-it! We love to use them to keep always in mind the structure of every song, and be able to get an overview on the whole album structure as well.

A Destrage song can start from a riff, a melody, or a drum pattern coming out from any member. Then we work on it all together…in the name of post-it !

!We just try to make music that makes us happy and that is fun for others. If this means diverse people will come to our shows then be it! Can’t ask for more. We believe a band is like a person. No human being is always angry, happy or introspective all the time and a project of five different people should naturally deliver many feelings and states of mind at once.

!Also it is easier to swallow a bitter pill if before and after you eat a spoonful of sugar, that’s why complex parts are inscribed in a creamy song with melody and apparently simple rhythm. It is then choice of the listener to enjoy the surface or dig to the nerdy core, it is our business to make both levels as enjoyable as possible.

We don’t want people to come to our gigs and take notes, we want them to come and jump.

Do songs organically grow from those initial seeds or is there a stronger element of deliberate sculpting in their creation from you?

It really depends on the song, but usually what we try to do is to start from an idea or concept that has its own soul and then decorate it with our craftsmanship, instead of putting together many different elements, that most of the times wouldn’t match very well. It is way easier to write very complex stuff for the sake of being technical, so we try to make it enjoyable by anybody. Once I’ve been told by a wise person that we should put sex in every single thing we do, so we put a lot of effort in doing so because we believe that having sex with your audience is way better than masturbating on your own. So even if our technique may result impressive sometimes, we think that music must come before sport in any case.

Did you approach the recording of the album in any different way to your previous releases?

I think every time is different because we change, we evolve as persons and musicians. It’s really a big mixture of feelings, emotions and thoughts. For AYKM?N. after a long period of composition and pre-production, everybody was really focused and motivated to give his best. Somebody was excited, but still worried about some parts here and there, because we didn’t have that much time to rehearse every song properly, so the trickiest parts were kind of scary. Obviously everybody wanted to have fun as well, so jokes and funny moments happened all the time; that’s the way we like doing things together. Every time we enter the studio we realize how much we love making records, and how stressful it is at the same time. Everyone wants the record to be “perfect”, so sometimes somebody loses his mind or goes crazy. Fortunately we have five very different personalities, and we know each other very well, so everything usually sorts out very quickly.

Tell us about the recording of Are You Kidding Me? No. Did the songs evolve further in that environment and did you learn anything this time to take into your next adventure?

The recordings were a bit messy, definitely a non-linear path. Even in the final phase of the production we were having new ideas and insights. Probably hiking in nature, getting lost in an unknown city, visit art galleries, alternate your perception are good ways to get inspired in the beginning of the process and recording is the best way to get inspired in the end of it. Even in its half dark, closed, silent spaces the studio itself is a huge source of inspiration. You are there, but you are not what matters. The album is all and you disappear.

Many of the songs made it to the record the way they were written, other didn’t and we kept changing them until the very end.

We made a documentary of the whole recording process, it will be published soon.

As the album teased, seduced, and thrilled us we laid numerous comparisons at its feet; moments in the eclectic alchemy which Destrage 1reminded us of bands such as Jane’s Addiction, Red Hot Chili Peppers, American Head Charge, Mr. Bungle, Dillinger Escape Plan, Faith No More Kontrust and French bands Mucho Tapioca and Toumai, even at one brief point Ugly Kid Joe. It shows the diversity and expanse of your sound. Are there any specific inspirations which have really influenced you if not for the band as a musician?

All those that you mentioned played a crucial role in our inspirational feast, but not more than Michel Gondry, Quay Brothers or Paolo Barnard did. And they don’t release albums.! !

Are You Kidding Me? No. sees a guest appearance by Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal of Guns’N’Roses on its title track, How did that union come about?

We all are Ron’s big fans. When we finished the track Are You Kidding Me? No. we felt something was missing in the end. In fact, a Bumblefoot solo was missing. Since we had no connection with him, Mat emailed Mattias “Ia” Eklundh, who played on Jade’s Place (in our previous record The King Is Fat’N’Old) and became our friend (he’s such a cool guy!). He asked him for an address, a number, some contact to get in touch with Ron. Mattias as usual answered very politely, but didn’t give Mat what he wanted (he’s a very respectful person). So Mat was left with no choice other than going on Bumblefoot’s website and write to the general mail address. And surprize, Ron answered immediately telling us the song was super good and he’d do the collaboration. He told Mat he was touring with GnR in that period, so we should wait for a month or so. We thought it was his way to refuse. Instead he actually wrote back when the tour was over, asking what we wanted exactly, and we answered “we want you to do whatever you want for 32 bars”.

Few funny private messages followed and we got our perfect solo in 3 days. Smooth. The song seemed to be made for him, as he also said later in an interview. So, good experiment, and when we got to meet the guy in person we liked him even more. Ron is rad.

That track is also the most, can we say creatively and thrillingly psychotic on the album, probably our favourite song though it is hard to choose just one. Can you give us some insight into its creation?

Are You Kidding Me? No. is one of our favourite tracks too, for two main reasons: its origin and its content. The song was born randomly, as Mat sang what became the trumpet melody while going around on his red Vespa.

So, in the beginning we only expanded what comes after the trumpet, all that gipsy-sounding part. We wanted to make it a bonus track and leave it as it was. Then with no reason or precise plan, we wrote all the rest around it, putting no limits and setting no borders, following the lyric concept “Everybody does all kind of shit, I’m sorry that I’m sorry, I had to do this”.

The content came along in exceptional short time, and surprisingly our mindless creation gave birth to some of the most cerebral and psychotic parts of the whole album. !

As you said earlier the album is also your first with Metal Blade Records. How has the link up impacted on the album so far?

Being signed with such a great label is a dream come true for us! Definitely it’s giving us way bigger exposure, and much more people are listening to the new album because of this. But on the artistic point of view it didn’t have any impact, simply because we could sign the deal with MB because we already had the new album finished and ready to go.

Destrage is a band never slow in hitting the road and stages, the same again for 2014 I can assume? Any details you can reveal?

Absolutely yes! Everything is “work in progress”, our goal is to play these songs live, touring as much as we can, bringing our music everywhere…we’ll see what happens! 🙂

We can’t wait to be on the road again!

Once more thank you for sharing time to chat with us. Anything you would like to add?

Thanks for your attention! Our new album Are you Kidding Me? No. will be release on March 3 in Europe through Metal Blade Records. More music and videos will be released soon, so stay tuned though our official pages http://www.facebook.com/destrage, http://www.youtube.com/destrage andwww.twitter.com/destrage!

Thank you so much for this interview guys! 🙂

Read the review of Are you Kidding Me? No. @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/03/06/destrage-are-you-kidding-me-no/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 19/03/2014

Destrage – Are You Kidding Me? No.

 

byMichaelGardenia_04

     Destrage is a force which confronts and seduces the imagination with such an exhaustive vivacity of sound and adventure that it becomes a proposition which has you simultaneously confused, bewildered, and thrillingly basking in a maelstrom of sonic alchemy. Hailing from Italy, the band has forged an impressive and unforgettable once bitten presence which is ascending into more fevered attention release by release, but it is the release of new album Are You Kidding Me? No. which feels like the trigger into worldwide recognition and ardour with its Metal Blade Records release. With more flavours, styles, and imagination than a carnival in Rio, the release turns a band which was still waiting to explode around the globe into an exhilarating infection of the psyche and passions with that target in its sights. With words like unpredictable and intriguing the weakest descriptions of the inventive anarchy teasing and ravishing the senses, Destrage is a ten-legged groove machine with just as many schizophrenic characters posing as songs within its latest temptation.

     Formed in 2005, the Milan quintet has been on a charge of persuading and recruiting hearts at home and further afield since their first days, the current line-up in place since 2007 especially stoking those the fires. From their first demo Self Id Generator, Destrage has continued to evolve into a aurally spectacular provocation, the albums Urban Being of 2009 and The King Is Fat’n’Old the following year potent bait greedily devoured by more and more willing souls, though you suspect it will be nothing compared to the awakening sparked by Are You Kidding Me? No. Live too the band has left wasted bodies and hungry bodies in their wake, the undertaking of tours across Europe, Japan, and numerous festivals and shows where they have shared spaces with the likes of Every Time I Die, Parkway Drive, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Parkway Drive, Hatebreed, Unearth, Municipal Waste, Sick Of It All, Freak Kitchen, Monuments, Jeff Loomis, Penny Wise, After the Burial, Puddle of Mudd, August Burns Red, Enter Shikari, Caliban, Lordi, Moonspell and many more, increasing their stock. The new album though feels and sounds like their time to lead the pack has now come and it is not a moment too soon.

     You may be wondering what the band sound like, which we will endeavour to reveal song by song, but suffice to say it is Coverwonderfully something quite impossible to label. Opener Destroy Create Transform Sublimate tells you all you need to know about Destrage and whether to unreservedly embrace or stand scratching your head over their voracious experimentation and invention. The track opens with a spiral of sonic enterprise courted by aggressive riffs and combative rhythms, the mix alluring and intimidating in equal measure. It is not long before the song is throwing off any restraint to stomp with entwining essences of groove and funk veining a still voracious assault of technical and carnivorous metal. The impressive vocals of Paolo Colavolpe are just as eager to tempt and savage as the music with a delivery as wide as the range of sounds around him. The song aggressively dances like a fusion of Jane’s Addiction, Red Hot Chili Peppers, American Head Charge, and French band Mucho Tapioca, but even with its gait it switches and shuffles its suasion without notice or care.

   With a climactic finale which simply thrills and enthrals, dub and techno added to the spice cupboard of the song, the towering opener is swiftly matched in quality and psyche twisting grandeur by Purania. From a charged entrance of rapacious riffing and similarly hungry rhythms, the song settles into a melodic bordering mellow stroll which lasts just the length of the impatience the band has to light the touch paper to another maze of eclectic sonic fascination. Imagine a hybrid of Mr. Bungle, Dillinger Escape Plan, 6:33, and System Of A Down and you get a glimpse of the beauty and schizophrenic glory of the song, a triumph within which the guitars of Matteo Di Gioia and Ralph Salati craft a narrative and web which bewitches and challenges, their hypnotic mix of creative frenzy and skilful acidic elegance spellbinding within the predatory frame built by bassist Gabriel Pignata and drummer Federico Paulovich.

    My Green Neighbour rifles ears next, its first breath a frantic tsunami of beats and riffs courting a bedlamic mind-set. Forcing its agitated psyche and attack into a smoother flowing blaze of heavy and melodic metal, the song takes little effort in replicating the temptation of its predecessors, merging varied flames of sound and persistently captivating detours into a brawling riot of invention and insatiable metal manipulation. The stunning tempest then has to step aside for the more primal bordering bestial presence of Hosts, Rifles & Coke, its heavy throated savagery magnetic and even more tantalising when it shares time with a contagion of melodic prowess and mouth-wateringly catchy choruses, all seared by a scotching solo to top things off.

    Both the discordant and masterful mayhem of G.O.D. and the smoother voiced mesmeric Where the Things Have No Colour unveil new scenic aspects of the Destrage’s songwriting and imagination; the first a riot of Faith No More meets Ugly Kid Joe voraciousness aligned to a mind tripping sensibility and the second a progressively honed melodic venture through rapturous harmonies and exotic melodies within an irresistible toxin of craft and infectiousness. Arguably the track is the band at its most restrained artistically but certainly no less potent and imaginative as well as exciting.

     Waterpark Bachelorette has the band squalling and rioting over the senses, grooves and lethal rhythms a blistering endeavour matched by the predacious expulsions of vocals and sound which litter the rampant torrent of rock ‘n’ roll. Guitar doodling veins the song for only the most satisfying results whilst the addictive anthemic call of vocals and hooks make a lingering bait which seeps into the breather of melodic caresses and sonic entanglement. Its excellence is soon equalled by firstly the dramatically textured Before, After and All Around and the almost hysterical invention of – (Obedience), the track verging on maniacal with its avant-garde/melodic metal ants nest of busy yet ordered chaos.

    To prove that the song is still not the deranged imagination of the band exhausted the closing title track takes all honours on the Are You Kidding Me? No. Featuring a guest appearance by Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal (Guns’N’Roses), the track is an inventive meshuga but one which knows exactly what it is doing. Fusing experimentation, jazz, funk, and pure dementia into its unrelenting crazed waltz, the track is a triumph of insanity which disorientates and seduces with perfect touch and irreverence. Ending on a sensational emotive stomp of gypsy punk with swing desires and reminding very much of Kontrust and another French band Toumai, the track is a magnificent concluding revelry to a quite brilliant and monumental release.  Quite simply Destrage has provided your probable album of the year.

www.facebook.com/destrage

10/10

Ringmaster 06/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Nuclear Omnicide – Bringers Of Disease

Nuclear_Omnicide_Band_2

Not just going for the jugular but ripping it out and violating it like a whirling dervish, Finnish thrashers Nuclear Omnicide uncages their new EP Bringers Of Disease. Six tracks of unbridled and rapacious old school thrash metal which rampages with a speed and voraciousness which cannot be denied, the release is an uncompromising assault on the senses easily giving healthy satisfaction whilst sparking an eager appetite for its antagonistic riot.

Consisting of bassist/vocalist Benny Raivio, guitarists Igi Ignatius and Kappe Koutonen, and drummer Alex Anttila, the 2010 formed Kirkkonummi quartet first made their mark with the Unleash Yourself EP of 2012, though it was debut album The Presence Of Evil in March of last year which brought the band to wider attention. Forging a rich death metal essence to their thrash aggression the band now has Bringers Of Disease poised to leap at the world on January 3rd via Violent Journey Records, an EP which gives the band’s sound a boost of raging adrenaline and intensive weight. There is nothing particularly new within the release and sound of the band, it drawing on well-trod genre toxicity and anthemic potency but equally it has a presence and contagion which is quite irresistible.

Opener We Came to Thrash! says it all for song and release, the track careering through the ear with riffs breaking sinew and Nuclear_Omnicide_-_Bringers_Of_Disease_Front_600cartilage whilst rhythms splinter bone under the infectious grooving and anthemic group vocal calls. Just exceeding one minute in length the song is the perfect introduction and indication of what is to come and what to expect from the EP, expectations soon rabidly fed by the next up Curse of the Undead. Rhythms venomously tumble down upon the senses within a scathing blaze of fiery and predacious riffery, the start instantly magnetic and raising a hunger in the passions which is reinforced by the savage progress of the track. The vocals of Raivio spread the lyrical poison with a raw growling lilt as raucous and merciless as the sounds around him, it all adding to a thrash assault which may not be original but knows how to utilise existing invention to its full potential and power.

Ruler with the Iron Fist stirs up the imagination with a tempest of imaginative endeavour and sonic twisting. Not as dramatically forceful as its predecessors but with a similarly intensive presence littered with melody crafted grooves and shifting changes of gait and enterprise, the track is an outstanding encounter taking the EP to another level alone. The guitar teasing and sculpting of Ignatius and Koutonen merge cute adventure with brutal riffery across the track whilst the rhythmic side of the band punish and coax throughout with an equally compelling temptation.

The opening slow dawning entrance of Institution (Execution) offers a doom clad bait which wraps its lingering suasion around the imagination before from within its dark heavy breath riffs spark into life and spear the air with fiery infectiousness alongside crisp rhythmic provocation. Once the vocals start their scarring squall the music kicks up a gear in pace and venom to score and ignite the senses all over again, the track like the one just before forging a presence which feeds and treats the instinctive thrasher in us all.

Both Merciless Butcher and Bringer Of Disease bring the EP to a pleasing end, the first immediately recruiting feet and neck muscles with its vicious chugging before exploding into an even more violent fury of riffs and rhythms, a Municipal Waste like element feeling its way through certainly the vocal and punkish essences within the maelstrom. Its successor is simply ravenous thrash at its nasty merciless best, every aspect gnawing upon and stirring up senses and passions.

As mentioned you will not find anything brand new on Bringers Of Disease but for thrilling use of existing invention and unbridled enjoyment which makes you overlook that lack of originality, Nuclear Omnicide gets the job done with skill and ease. The EP is a great way to set thrash metal on its way in 2014 and a release easy to be drawn back to time and time again.

https://www.facebook.com/NuclearOmnicide

8/10

RingMaster 01/01/2014

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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