MountainJam – Waiting

image1_RingMasterReview

Following the success of recent single Lemon and Lime, which itself cemented the prowess and potency of MountainJam as first discovered within the band’s debut EP and its singles of last year, the UK band now have its successor Waiting in line to please ears. The new single reveals another shade to the band’s persistently enticing sound, an emotively sculpted landscape of melodic rock with just a tinge of Americana to its alternative bred rock ‘n’ roll.

There also seems a broader depth to the flavouring building the sultry climate of sound and atmospheric enterprise and climate embracing ears. It is nothing overwhelming but as suggested a new shade of melodic and sonic colour to intrigue, fascinate, and as it proves again, excite. Influences to the Midlands hailing quartet of vocalist/rhythm guitarist Dean Dovey, lead guitarist Andy Varden, bassist Nick Roberts, and drummer Pez include the likes of The Rolling Stones, The Doors, Neil Young, Small Faces, Cream, The Verve, The Stone Roses, and The Who. Many are influences which arguably make a stronger showing within Waiting than some of the band’s previous songs to date, aiding the new hue to the becoming renowned MountainJam sound.

Emerging on the warm ambience of keys, the song soon strolls through ears with a melodic smoulder to its trails of sultry guitar and a feisty edge to its rhythmic tempting. Dovey as so often in songs becomes a potent focal point upon his entrance, but as usual too, his expressive voice is soon hugged by the strength of the sounds which here reveal a touch of psyche rock lacing and an almost sweltering atmosphere through guitar and keys.

With it all, also comes an infectiousness which, especially in the rousing roar of the chorus, has body and imagination as involved as the sonic swathes of sound which seduce in the track’s mellowest moments.

It is fair to say that Waiting does not infest the psyche as immediately as other MountainJam songs, though ears are thoroughly contented in moments, but with its magnetic layers and almost epic structure of emotion and sonic enterprise, the single is another richly and increasingly enticing lure to a band which just seems to grow with each and every track written.

Waiting is out now through most online stores.

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Pete RingMaster 29/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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MountainJam – Lemon and Lime

MJ_RingMaster Review

Having lured attention with their first pair of singles last year and even more when those tracks came together with further new offerings to form a debut EP, UK rock band MountainJam has more than suggested they are an emerging talent to keep a close eye and ear upon. The release of the Tamworth/Hinckley quartet’s new single Lemon & Lime only adds weight to that intimation and the sizeable potential already showing its potency within the band’s captivating sound.

A boisterous rock ‘n’ roll stroll bred with the spicy strains of alternative and indie rock aligned to fiery blues flames, Lemon & Lime shows another shade to the colourful tenacious weave of melody, harmony, and rousing energy which predominantly shapes a MountainJam song. Inspirations to the band comes through the likes of The Rolling Stones, The Who, Small Faces, The Doors, Cream, The Verve, The Stone Roses, and Neil Young, and as in previous songs here they are spices which, if not openly fuelling the encounter, reveal some of the sources to its imagination and invention. Formed early 2015, the foursome of Dean Dovey (vocals, rhythm guitar), Andy Varden (lead guitar), Nick Roberts (bass), and Pez (drums) soon caught ears and appetite with their double A-sided single debut Jealous Of Me/Lust last July and its quickly following successor Lord of My Hours. They subsequently became part of the release simply called EP which ignited even stronger awareness of MountainJam, an awareness which Lemon & Lime can only successfully reinforce.

The song cups ears in a sonic mist initially, intriguingly holding the senses as a pungent union of sonic tendrils from the guitars and resonance fitted bass tempting gets involved. With firm beats in the mix too, the track soon blossoms a heated mesh of enterprise against which the potent vocals of Dovey begin sharing the lyrical persuasion. In turn catchy hooks and a swinging groove join in the sweltering fun, bringing greater blues essences into the flowing and evolving landscape of a track. Such the resourcefulness of the songwriting and imagination, every roaming riff and twist of that evocative bait loaded groove seems to find another dimension within the song’s design, a shimmering psyche rock breath and pop rock tenacity further aspects breaking out within the festivity to prove the point.

For personal tastes Lemon & Lime does not quite match up to previous tracks The Lord of My Hours or Lust yet as all offerings from MountainJam to date, it leaves pleasure full and anticipation of more rife. If you are yet to explore the rock escapades of MountainJam then Lemon & Lime is the perfect tonic to get enticed by.

Lemon & Lime is available now

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Pete RingMaster 13/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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MountainJam – EP

MJ_RingMaster Review

UK rockers MountainJam first got in touch with their double A-sided debut single around a month ago, the release just one moment in a busy time since the band emerged in March of this year. Since then the Hinckley based band has released another track, those three subsequently making up part of a self-titled EP released just a matter of days ago. All songs have introduced to ears a band with experience in their blood, craft in their hands, and passion in their hearts, and also some rather juicy songs.

The seeds of MountainJam pretty much began when vocalist/rhythm guitarist Dean Dovey met lead guitarist Andy Varden and bassist Nick Roberts as part of Midlands rock band The Silent Union in late 2013. Early 2015 the trio left that band, linked up with drummer Pez, a long-time friend of Varden and Roberts, and stepped forward as MountainJam. In no time a clutch of demos were written and recorded, with live shows just as rapid a move with their first being at The Soundhouse in Leicester. July saw the Jealous Of Me/Lust single unveiled to eager responses with third track The Lord of My Hours revealed soon after to more positive responses. As August closes its eyes, the band have now released their first EP made up of those three songs and two more quietly but firmly imposing incitements.

cover_RingMaster Review     Musically the band finds hues in the inspirations of bands such as The Who, The Doors, Cream, Small Faces, The Charlatans, and Stone Roses to colour and inflame a sound which has a potent air of nostalgia but equally a real freshness and vitality to its energy and invention. Lust is a perfect example, its romps with ears and appetite with a blend of sixties and nineties guitar rock yet creates a presence which if not quite unique is recognisably individual. Its early caresses of guitar are soon veined by a spicy melodic acidity cast by Varden, this in turn leading to the addition of crisp rhythms and the mellow but fiery tones of Dovey. The stroll of the track is controlled and at times reserved but the sultry lacing of melodies are bewitching and the middle section when its chorus is as inescapable a hook as you could wish, magnetism.

Jealous Of Me has an even stronger feel of sixties/seventies rock, its first breath and spread of riffs carrying hints of bands like Small Faces and occasionally Bad Company. Continuing to swing more rigorous rhythmic hips and flirtatious riffs and grooves, the track has body and appetite fully involved in no time. Again it has a familiarity to it which only works in its favour and a tenacity which just rouses the energies of the listener and a want for more.

The Lord of My Hours is cut from the same feisty cloth, a healthily energetic encounter infusing even richer bluesy spices into its winding grooves, dancing melodies, and engaging vocals. Rhythmically the song is a festival, Pez never quite uncaging a full-on stomp of beats and percussion but providing an addictive shuffle which the thick bass lures of Roberts court with relish and enterprise. The track is irresistible to feet and appetite, rich enjoyment which is found again in the emotively and resourcefully lively Maybe Next Time. One of the other two songs making up the EP, it has a grip which is more of a nineties guitar escapade but again comes thick with essences and textures bred in earlier decades to grab the imagination and further keen involvement.

MountainJam also show they are adept at serenading the senses with the sultry shimmer that is Shadows of your Mind. The guitars glow with melodic, almost surf rock like charm whilst Dovey provides a similarly enticing croon to the gentle canter of a song, whilst the additional keys adding the cream to the flavoursome treat. The influences of psych rock come through vibrantly across the song and though, as the last one mentioned, it fails to quite match up to the success of the other three songs for personal tastes, it leaves a warm glow and oozing satisfaction in its place.

Looking at songs in the order we came across them instead of the track order on the EP, they all unite to provide a very pleasing potential loaded introduction to MountainJam. They are a band hard not to see luring greater spotlights and success upon them as they evolve and simply gets more time and experience under their young belts as a band.

The MountainJam EP is available now at the band’s Bandcamp profile.

Pete Ringmaster 02/09/2015

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