Chasing Ghosts – These Hollow Gods

Since forming late 2014, UK outfit Chasing Ghosts has increasingly impressed year by year, release by release. Their first year brought well-received single Everything Changes, attention upon the band swiftly nudged and further stoked last year through the Fearless EP. Now we have new single These Hollow Gods, another slice of the band’s fusion of rock and metal, and another step forward in their potent songwriting and compelling sound.

Formed by bassist/keyboardist Lee Brueton, the Chasing Ghosts line-up is completed by vocalist Nelson Cancini, lead guitarist Harry Mitten, and rhythm guitarist Ashley Clark. The Milton Keynes based band draw on the influences of bands such as Paradise Lost, Anathema, and Moonspell for their sound and the past year has been a big one for it and the band, culminating in their signing with Danish label Mighty Music for the release of their first album next year but before then this new single.

These Hollow Gods is about “our role models, idols and those that we ultimately view as gods in family, religion, music and celebrity. Those that we worship and devote our lives to, but then reveal themselves to be nothing more than false hope, disappointment and betrayal”. Straight away it entangles ears in a spidery groove; it’s tempting web soon joined by Cancini’s potent emotive tones and the restrained yet powerful touch of the rhythms. It is a slow saunter of a stroll which continues to entice and captivate ears but one with a volatility which, though it never quire ignites, is a constant threat and alluring shadow to the gothic melodies which almost seep through ears into the psyche.

The track simply grows note by note, going put on a blaze of intensity leaving a lingering appetite for more.  If a sign of things to come, Chasing Ghosts’ upcoming album should feed that want and will be very much anticipated after These Hollow Gods.

These Hollow Gods is out now.

http://www.chasingghosts.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/Cghostsmusic   https://twitter.com/chasingghosts_

Pete RingMaster

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Devil In Faust – Come Apart

Grabbing ears straightaway is not the easiest thing to achieve as numerous music fans can testify but to truly and swiftly catch the imagination is a rare success but something Brit goth rockers The Devil In Faust have done with their debut EP, Come Apart. It is not necessarily the most unique encounter though its web of enterprise and temptation is certainly individual to the Shrewsbury hailing trio, but it has open freshness to its creative drama and virulent adventure which just clicked with our ears and appetites.

Formed late 2014 by old school friends in vocalist/guitarist Al Pritchard and drummer Ben Codd, The Devil In Faust soon made a strong impression on their local live scene whilst their debut video single, Dark Places, found potent online success. Subsequent sharing of stages with the likes of Dani Filth’s Devilment and Sinnergod only furthered their growing reputation as too following singles, all a spark to the band receiving an invitation to record in Aarhus, Denmark with Tue Madsen (Moonspell, Meshuggah, Sick of it All) where they demoed twelve tracks then whittled down to the four making up band’s first EP. With a stable line-up now in place with the addition of bassist Jess Lomas, the trio are ready to impose on bigger spotlights with Come Apart leading the way.

The EP opens with the outstanding Cross Your Heart, a slice of virulent temptation working away at ears and imagination from its first breath. Swiftly, there is a familiarity to the band’s sound yet as suggested earlier, it is woven into a boldness of invention belonging to The Devil In Faust. Like a blend of Flesh For Lulu and Clan of Xymox with a touch of Southern Death Cult and 1919, the track strolls in with a seductive shimmer around rhythmic incitement. Pritchard’s potent voice is soon in the midst of the compelling bait, directing the virulence with his distinctive tones as his guitar spins a web of chords and hooks. Quickly infectious and increasingly virulent, the track has attention in its creative palms in no time, physical participation enticed soon after.

The excellent start is backed by the equally alluring presence of Soulmate. Dark melancholic strings and gothic keys caress the imagination initially; from within their theatre a tenacious dance of energy and infection simmers and boils sparking a rousing rock ‘n’ roll stroll part Psychedelic Furs, part The Lords of the New Church, and just a little Alice In Chains but again boisterously The Devil In Faust in nature and devilment. Its fluid flow through lively and mellower moments comes drenched in catchy contagion, the calmer passages emulated and expanded in next up In My Eyes, an acoustic led slice of captivating balladry cast in a hug of emotive shadows which soon has the body rocking and passions entangled in its inventive landscape. There is a whiff of The Only Ones to the song and not for the first time a thought arises that if The Devil In Faust had arisen three or so decades back their success would be guaranteed.

Those dark shadows cloak next up Seed, its instinctive growl lining another increasingly contagious escapade coloured with sultry psychedelic rock hues. Adding essences not too far removed from a fusion of The Doors and The Birthday Party, the song simply and swiftly beguiles ears with again familiarity and new enterprise entangling for a thoroughly gripping adventure.

If The Devil In Faust never realises the potential rich within Come Apart, more of the same will go down a treat next time around but growth there will be and that is something we are eagerly anticipating; something hard to imagine we will be alone in.

Come Apart is out now on all major platforms.

http://www.thedevilinfaust.com/   https://www.facebook.com/TheDevilInFaustOnline   https://twitter.com/@Thedevilinfaust

Pete RingMaster 03/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Nemaind – Eclipsi EP

cover_RingMaster Review

There is not a great deal we can tell you about Spanish melodic death metallers Nemaind though the most important bit of information you need anyway is that their debut EP, Eclipsi, is one heavily flavoursome and magnetically alluring incitement. Its three tracks do not break down boundaries or re-invent existing landscapes within the death metal scene, but it undoubtedly provides one potential fuelled, richly enjoyable sonic tempest to eagerly immerse within.

Formed early 2014, Nemaind hails from Barcelona inspired by bands such as Moonspell, Opeth, Death, Gojira, Insomnium, Caladan Brood, Sylosis, Emperor, and Amon Amarth. Created by vocalist/bassist Ferran C, previously of thrashers Rotten, the band’s line-up was soon enriched by guitarists David C and Gerard B, subsequently followed by drummer Martí F. Recorded in February this year, Eclipsi gives the first introduction to a broader expanse of ears of Nemaind, in turn offering a strong persuasion of their craft and potential.

Eclipsi opens with its title track and instantly has attention and appetite wide awake with a swarm of waspish riffery and fierce rhythmic intimidation. It is a masterfully magnetic start which continues to tempt and work on the psyche as the track breaks into and begins exploring a malevolent landscape of portentous grooves and sonic rapacity. The vocals are varied causticity, their diversity never merging major differences between tones and delivery but enough to ensure more fresh textures in the tempest of sound and the increasing adventure emerging within the outstanding and increasingly impressive encounter. The guitars especially spin an evolving web of intrigue and imagination within the volatile atmosphere and confrontation of the song, adding captivating hues and ideation in the face of barbarous intent.

The following Pareidoniria is similarly sculpted within its own individual character and ravenous air, addiction loaded riffs stalking with unrelenting persistence alongside rapier beats and a throaty bass groove. Musically the track conjures a soundscape Gojira like in rousing dexterity and technical imagination, Insomnium seeded in hostile and ravishing emotional trespassing whilst its melodic ferocity is Corbeaux like. It does not quite match up to its predecessor’s heights yet only leaves a want for more and helps build the intent to keep the band on the personal radar.

The EP is brought to an end with Les últimes llums de tardor, another predatory protagonist this time emerging from a primal sonic mist bristling with thickly flavoursome flavours and ear pleasing enterprise. Initially there is an almost eighties like gothic spicing colluding with broadening winds of sonic and extreme metal drama rippling with creative expression and highly provocative aural colour. It is the least physically corrosive of the three songs, though still showing no emotional mercy, weaving a fascinating design of warm and barren scenery which is always emotively lively and boldly adventurous as it scars the senses.

As the final song’s cold climate dissipates, Nemaind leaves only richly positive thoughts and full pleasure behind. As suggested, it is not the most original release yet every listen brings something fresh and individual against other encounters you may come across with a similar canvas of sound. We suggest taking note of the name and enjoying their debut with the promise of increasingly impressive explorations with the band another lingering aftermath.

The Eclipsi EP is available digitally now on Nemaind’s bandcamp profile.

Pete RingMaster 31/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Chasing Ghosts – Everything Changes

Chasing Ghosts cover

Not even touching six months as a band, Chasing Ghosts is already stirring up the UK rock scene and online radio interest with their epic sounds and now new single Everything Changes. London based, the quartet create a melodic rock propositions which certainly on the evidence of their latest song is as imposing as it is seductive and as atmospherically provocative as it is creatively intensive. The buzz around is that Chasing Ghosts is a band on the march and there is nothing about Everything Changes to bring doubt to that claim.

Formed as 2014 became its successor, Chasing Ghosts draw on inspirations from the likes of Paradise Lost, Therapy, Metallica, Alice In Chains, Moonspell and more for their dark and adventurous evocative sounds. Bassist/keyboardist Lee Brueton and guitarist Harry Mitten had already played together for four years in the band Embersfire and once united again they proceeded to write a trio of songs before booking Chapel Studios in Lincolnshire to record them. Next step was to find the rest of the band, an unusual way round of doing things but with the addition of vocalist James Marsh and drummer John Watt, plus the impressive adventure of Everything Changes alone, the band obviously knew best. A three track demo recorded with Enter Shikari engineer Tim Morris resulted from the session and brings us the band’s new single, whilst the other songs This Fear and From Depravity show themselves to be both similarly impressive explorations.

The single opens on a dawning wave of dark shadows and sounds, their invitation swiftly erupting into a thick wave of melodic persuasion and earthy rhythms as immersive as they are imposing. You sense some of the essences of those earlier mentions influences as the song expands and evolves, but the one band which really comes forward as the rich endeavour of song and sound engulfs ears and imagination, is Johnny Wore Black. Both he and Chasing Ghosts are openly adept at aligning dark emotive shadows and fiery beauty into physically and mentally stimulating propositions. The flowering provocative sounds of the keys and guitars back this up, almost entwining around each other across the song with fluid and impacting enterprise whilst the vocals of Marsh become as transfixing as the emotionally tempestuous sounds around him.

    Everything Changes is an exciting introduction to Chasing Ghosts, a striking doorway into their sound and potential soaked presence. It is a promise already coming to fruition across the three songs making up their demo and most potently revealed in the single, but one hinting at even greater adventures ahead.

Everything Changes is out now.

http://www.chasingghosts.co.uk/     https://www.facebook.com/Cghostsmusic

RingMaster 20/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Fleshdoll – Feeding The Pigs

Fleshdoll pic

If you like your death metal voraciously brutal and old school bred but with the balls to twist that template to its own devious ends, oh also with a tongue firmly in someone’s cheek at times, then Feeding The Pigs from French metallers Fleshdoll is one recommendation to definitely check up on. The third album from the Toulouse quintet is not a proposition sculpting something new or scarcely trodden before but for uncompromising yet mischievously adventurous extreme hostility, it is a thoroughly contagious and satisfyingly exhausting protagonist.

Formed in 2001, it was the band’s debut album [w.o.a.r.g] five years later which really awoke the French underground metal scene to the arising presence and force of Fleshdoll. Released via French label Thundering Records/Manitou Music, the album was well- received and lauded as the band spent their energies playing show after show on the way sharing stages with the likes of Svart Crown, END, Blockheads, and Zubrowska. In 2006 Fleshdoll became the first death metal band to play in Casablanca, bringing their raw spice to the Moroccan scene treading in the line set already by Kreator and Moonspell. The following year second album Animal Factory is uncaged and again the band is garnered in acclaim and attention as they take it on the road, playing with bands such as Malevolent Creation and Loudblast. A line-up change stepped up next before Fleshdoll stepped into the studio with Gorod drummer Samuel Santiago to record Feeding The Pigs. Its triumph has thrust the band into another soaking of eager plaudits and focus, a new spotlight enhanced already this year as they went on tour across France with Loudblast and Benighted, Europe with Resurrection and Cremation, and before that Japan with Vomitory, Beyond Creation, and Defeated Sanity.

The album launches at the listener with its title track, an instantly vicious and ridiculously compelling maelstrom of annihilatory rhythms, Fleshdoll coverguitar violations, and vocal predation. Into that delicious hellish mix sharp and short acid spewing grooves infest the psyche to further spawn eager rapture. It is an immediate enslavement as the rhythms settle into a controlled prowl whilst still making the most intensive demands and threats alongside a devilish swagger which drives the vocals and guitar enterprise. It is an extraordinary track, one as suggested in regard to the album, not necessarily breaking boundaries but certainly caging the essence of the genre in a virulently infectious and explosively incendiary design.

The opener is such a stunning song that certainly for a while the album struggles to match up to its strengths and toxicity though right away both Collateral Murder and A Feast For The Rats give very worthy shots. The first of the two virtually stalks down senses and imagination, its bestial provocation sizing up and crawling all over the ears and emotions whilst rhythms juggle skilfully with their bait whilst the guitars in league with the bass swarm over the listener in horde like fashion but with enough sonic endeavour and creative invention to cast a constantly intriguing premise. Its successor sits back on the tail of urgency initially before twisting its gait and body through persistently changing and unpredictable turns of direction and pace. It also is loaded with impressive craft from guitars and brutality from Santiago but like its predecessor lacks the explosive spark of the first song as well as the vaunt and open smile. Nevertheless the pair healthily feed an already greedy want from the album bred by the title track as too does the following song, The Wolf.

The album’s fourth song lives up to whatever the imagination can conjure for the song name, its vocal roars and the unrelenting jaws of the riffs worrying and tearing at the senses whilst the heavy paws of the bass and crippling swipes of the drums only compound the mouthwatering attack. Spiteful grooves latch onto the charge of the song soon after before its body switches between prowls and all out assaults again and again ensuring expectations have nothing to latch on to and full attention is taken on a feisty captivating ride. The track gets closer to bridging the gap between the starting pinnacle and the rest of the album especially with its fiery hues of the guitar and solos.

Dead Monochrome is a demonic pestilential fury which sears and consumes from its first malevolent breath, a dark venomous scourge complete with deceitful melodic tempting and addiction sculpting grooves which offer respite knowing the rest of the ruinous intent of the protagonist will suffocate any hope. From this point in many ways the album goes through a slight evolution starting with the sinister breathing instrumental The Hollow Men. It is not a big twist in the premise of the release more a stronger investigation of the melodic and adventurous hints shown in A Feast For The Rats but it does bring a slight movement from animalistic intensity to inventive exploration. The Shadow Of A Man right away certainly shows no signs of diminishing its carnivorous appetite, riffs and rhythms uniting for a tunnel of grievous chastisement, but that is subsequently joined by a flood of melodically seeded flumes. As its mass continues to fill ears, the song brings in a rhythmic enticement which in turn moves into an oppressive swamp within which acid running veins expel sonic tempting.

The pair of Ecstatic Random Carnage and King Of Patusan more dramatically bring something distinctly new to the tortuous fun, the first wrapping its savage and imposing weight around the senses before unveiling a weave of furnace bred melodies and psychotic patterns around the gutturally spawned vocals. Imagination is lit right away but given a greater thrill as the song sweeps into a heavyweight passage of invention which is jazzy in its colour and funky in its energy before returning to a keen ravaging of ears and beyond. The second is technical/progressive flavoured metal imagination within a severe and tempestuous domain and again as the previous song easily seduces thoughts, both songs stepping forward to not equal but definitely rival the first peak in the album.

Completed by the excellent North Sentinel Island, an absorbing encounter which can be onerous at one moment and within a single lung’s expulsion seduce with entrancing ambience and beauty, Feeding The Pigs is a thoroughly satisfying and enjoyable intrusion. Certainly Fleshdoll can be compared in varying degrees to the likes of Cannibal Corpse, Napalm Death, Carcass, Bolt Thrower, and Kreator as a reason to check out their album but it shows that the French band is working on forging their own unique path and it is coming along very nicely.

Feeding The Pigs is available via Great Dane Records now!

http://www.fleshdollband.com

8.5/10

RingMaster 23/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Milton Incident – Innocence Lost

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French alternative metal band The Milton Incident has built a strong following and reputation in their homeland with their resourcefully potent and rigorously impacting sound whilst also making initial inroads further afield and with the release of their debut album Innocence Lost, it is not too adventurous to suspect that they will be making a similar mark on the attention and passions of the rest of the melodic metal world. Consisting of eleven tracks which are as dramatically contagious as they are skilfully crafted with a fusion of groove and alternative metal with plenty more spicery involved, the album is a thrillingly imaginative proposition. It is not exactly ground-breaking, songs holding a familiarity at times to previously trodden exploits, but with an incendiary passion and distinctly inventive sculpting to the individual premises, it is a release to capture emotions and spark greedy appetites.

Hailing from Paris, The Milton Incident since forming in 2010 has laid down a more than solid presence with a similar strong fanbase through their sound and live performances. Shows with the likes of Kreator, Moonspell, Dagoba, Vulcain, Mass Hysteria, KlogR, and Eyes Set To Kill has only increased the spotlight upon them whilst their music has been played on numerous radio shows worldwide. Recorded with Steeves Hostin (Beyond the Dust) and mixed/mastered by Shawn Zuzek (Daughters of Mara), the Dooweet Records released Innocence Lost makes a stirring full introduction to the band, one destined to leave a lingering mark on the widest attention.

From the opening title track, a short disturbing intro of intimidating sound clips and melodic intrigue, the album launches into a fiery and Covermuscular persuasion with Deadset. Its initial coaxing is a menacing almost predatory incitement but it is not long before strong vocal harmonies and melodic entwining wraps engagingly around the ears. That heavier threat is never far from the surface though; expelling bursts of cantankerous grooves and rhythmic antagonism throughout, stalking and gnawing the senses alternatively with the melody rich embrace of the track. It is a striking encounter soon exceeded by the riveting Torn Down, grooves and rhythms again bordering on carnivorous but the perfect complement to the expressive vocals and sonic endeavour which soaks the imagination as rewardingly as the melodic flames. There is a Stone Sour essence to the track in many ways though the song ventures in areas which could be compared to others like Three Days Grace and Tool as well as later Mudvayne too, yet the result is definitely particular to The Milton Incident.

The snarling Deus Ex Machina featuring Shawn Zuzek, rampages across the senses next, again the band merging dark rapacious elements within its elegant and exploratory melodic adventure. It is a magnetic slice of metal which evolves and explores before the ear, an invigorating provocation as contagious as it is intense. Its fluid drama is succeeded by the absorbing Dearest Enemy. From a cyber, almost starkly harsh ambience, the song immerses thoughts in an emotive reflection musically and lyrically whilst aligning them with more cryptically savage elements to its suasion. Like its successor Split Second, the song does not ignite the same heat of passion as other tracks but still leaves thoughts impressed and hungry for more, both tracks skilfully crafted and enjoyably presented with the second of the two holding a Poets Of The Fall like potency before its incendiary climax.

The thrills are turned right up yet again with Dopamine, a virulently infectious confrontation of bruising rhythms, rigidly barbed riffing, and passion drenched vocals. It is a masterful storm of uncompromising aggression and respectful melodic enticement ensnared and driven by ridiculously addictive grooves and unbridled enterprise. A major moment on the continuing to impress release, it is soon matched after the enjoyable emotive breather Irukandji, by Pyromaniac, another growl of senses stripping riffs and inflammatory rhythms courted by a deliciously acidic and caustic groove. With a range and depth of vocals to match the fire and intensity of its intent, the song prowls and sways with primal seduction and thoughtfully lit rapaciousness; like the sinewed assault of an American Head Charge fused with the emotional melodic waltz of an Alter Bridge.

The lofty heights are continued with the outstanding and voracious Conspiracy of Silence, the track an almost pestilential provocation with synapse spearing riffery and sonically drenched bait which infects ears through to passions. Its tremendous outpouring leaves a slight shadow over the following Memento, though the song only adds further coals to the pleasing fire and power of the album, whilst the closing 10-56 provides a classically seeded canvas for the imagination, one coloured by thick melodic hues and epically dramatic emotion. It is an imposing and compelling encounter from The Milton Incident concluding an equally bruising and irrepressibly seducing experience.

    Innocence Lost is an excellent full debut from a band you can expect to be hearing much more of. The Milton Incident has the potential to be a major instigator in melodic metal as their sound explores its brewing individuality for greater uniqueness and impact, something to eagerly anticipate.

http://themiltonincident.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 26/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Sweet dances and psychotic episodes: an interview with Fede of Destrage

fede2

Difficult to describe but very easy to enthuse vociferously over,  Are You Kidding Me? No. the new album from Italian metallers Destrage is easily one of the most thrilling and innovative albums to come along not only this year so far but over a long time. It is a fever of invention and imagination which confronts and seduces the senses through a maze flavours, styles, and experimentation. It is sonic and noise anarchy at its best, a psyche teasing triumph which declares its creators as the exhilarating maelstrom of adventure metal and music is always crying out for. To find out more about band and release we had the pleasure to explore the depths of Destrage with drummer Federico Paulovich, venturing into the creation of the album, Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal, tomato juice, audience sex and plenty more…

Hi Fede and thank you for talking with us.

Before we look at your new album would you tell us about the beginning of Destrage?

The current line-up has been consistent since 2007 and after their first demo, Self Id Generator, Destrage signed a deal with Howling Bull Records, Japan, and released their first full length, Urban Being, which also saw a worldwide release by Coroner Records in 2009.The second full length The King Is Fat’n’Old was released in 2010 by Coroner Records and Howling Bull, supported by European and Japanese tours and international festivals such as Heineken Jammin’ Festival, Euroblast and Mair1 Festival, The Bad Side Festival, MetalItalia Festival, MAV Festival and more. The eclectic festival run afforded Destrage the opportunity to share the stage with Red Hot Chili Peppers, Parkway Drive, Hatebreed, Unearth, Municipal Waste, Sick Of It All, Freak Kitchen, Monuments, Jeff Loomis, Penny Wise, After the Burial, Puddle of Mudd, August Burns Red, Enter Shikari, Caliban, Every Time I Die, Lordi, Moonspell and many more. In 2012, we wrote and recorded our third album. The result, the band’s most focused and dynamic effort yet, Are You Kidding Me? No. led to a worldwide deal with Metal Blade Records.

What was the spark and intent of the band at the beginning and does that still drive the band just as potently today?

We simply LOVE to spend time together, playing together, laughing and making jokes or just hanging. If “millions $$$” are not involved in a musical project (like in our case) every member needs to enjoy every single moment of the “band life”, form the sound check to the time spent on the van. It’s about alchemy in my opinion.

Of course conflicts, like in every relationship, are part of the game. But that was intent at the beginning and nothing is changed at the moment 🙂

How would you say the band has evolved over the years musically and emotionally?

We believe that our evolution as musicians and composers fully reflects our personal growth in real life. You gotta experience something before you can say something; that’s the main reason why we are always evolving, and we’ll always be. So, expect something really different from the albums to come… About how we changed through the three albums, there are a couple reasons that can explain the process. At the time we were composing and recording Urban Being, there was a big change of line up, and all the songs were composed mostly by Matteo; only with The King Is Fat’n’Old we started working all together on the songs, so the main difference from Urban Being is the result that came out from a combined work. We had the same approach in composing Are You Kidding Me? No., but a few years passed, so we were more close-knit as a team, and above all, our music influences had really changed in the meanwhile, as well as we grew up as persons.

Italy seems to have a rather rich and expansive metal scene, how have you found it on the inside and has it becomes easier for a

 Photo by Michael Gardenia Photography


Photo by Michael Gardenia Photography

band from your country to break into a wider audience over recent years?

In Italy, being in a metal band is definitely not easy. Italian scene, especially on rock and metal music, can’t be compared to the German, UK, Scandinavian or American ones. Our scene is based on pop-folk authors. We have to face a pop and hip hop mainstream market which dominates our local music market, and you have to fight a lot to find, not only a good label deal or an honest booking agent, but also a decent place to play. I have to say that Destrage always met great guys on the road, who contributed to support local bands and this was a great luck for us. Nowadays for the first time we can see a metal scene growing in our country and that’s incredible.

You have just released your third album as you mentioned, the quite brilliant, and I am not just saying that because we are talking, Are You Kidding Me? No. Because of the album we described the band as ‘a ten-legged groove machine with just as many schizophrenic characters posing as songs within its latest temptation.’ The album must be your proudest moment to date recording wise, even over the achievement of making your very first release?

I think this album is what makes us really proud at the moment. The first Urban Being wasn’t even a team work, the whole band wasn’t even there. As much as it can be uplifting to see your first record see the light, we believe it’s much more precious to wait a few years and deliver something that really reflects what you are.

If Urban Being was modern metal with a touch of Destrage, The King was Destrage with some modern metal dressing, Kidding is finally the essence of Destrage.

Your sound as clearly shown on the release employs a maelstrom of styles and flavours crossing fields of genres. How would you describe it in context to Are You Kidding Me? No. for newcomers to the band?

We destroy, create, transform, sublimate. We worship enthusiasm and venerate the shake that it gives.

I think Destrage sound’s is spontaneously various and weird. It’s like we learned how to speak the “metal” language as kids, and then growing up we opened our ears to the world and learned so much more, and the process is still going.

Everything that inspires us, from movies to fine art to haute cuisine to love and sex, can be easily translated into hard music as it is our native language.

This said if you take a look to our Spotify profiles you’ll be surprised. Or disgusted ahahah…

I’d love to tell these newcomers: we’d love you to take what the album is actually giving, with a clear and naive point of view, not expecting this record to be something that is going in the direction you already have in your mind. We are not saying the album is a unique piece of music that doesn’t resemble anything else you’ve heard before, no, but it definitely has its degree of originality.

It comes to my mind a story: the first time i tried tomato juice I almost puked, since it is a fruit juice and I was expecting a fruit juice-like taste. My brain was ready to enjoy a semi-definite, predictable experience and was already projecting it in my mind as the glass got to my lips. By the time the liquid touched my tongue I was disappointed, disgusted. The contrast with what I imagined was just bad.

Now tomato juice is my favorite.

Let’s not expect cats to bark.

Simply listen, enjoy or not.

1978605_10153840599710104_1863836033_nThe songs on the album are almost exhausting in their imagination and ever evolving inventive anarchy, they border schizophrenic at times haha. They sound like a puzzle to excitingly decipher and it is easy to assume they are constructed in a similar way so how do you approach the writing and creation of your songs?

Ahahah you’re right. It’s a giant puzzle made by post-it! We love to use them to keep always in mind the structure of every song, and be able to get an overview on the whole album structure as well.

A Destrage song can start from a riff, a melody, or a drum pattern coming out from any member. Then we work on it all together…in the name of post-it !

!We just try to make music that makes us happy and that is fun for others. If this means diverse people will come to our shows then be it! Can’t ask for more. We believe a band is like a person. No human being is always angry, happy or introspective all the time and a project of five different people should naturally deliver many feelings and states of mind at once.

!Also it is easier to swallow a bitter pill if before and after you eat a spoonful of sugar, that’s why complex parts are inscribed in a creamy song with melody and apparently simple rhythm. It is then choice of the listener to enjoy the surface or dig to the nerdy core, it is our business to make both levels as enjoyable as possible.

We don’t want people to come to our gigs and take notes, we want them to come and jump.

Do songs organically grow from those initial seeds or is there a stronger element of deliberate sculpting in their creation from you?

It really depends on the song, but usually what we try to do is to start from an idea or concept that has its own soul and then decorate it with our craftsmanship, instead of putting together many different elements, that most of the times wouldn’t match very well. It is way easier to write very complex stuff for the sake of being technical, so we try to make it enjoyable by anybody. Once I’ve been told by a wise person that we should put sex in every single thing we do, so we put a lot of effort in doing so because we believe that having sex with your audience is way better than masturbating on your own. So even if our technique may result impressive sometimes, we think that music must come before sport in any case.

Did you approach the recording of the album in any different way to your previous releases?

I think every time is different because we change, we evolve as persons and musicians. It’s really a big mixture of feelings, emotions and thoughts. For AYKM?N. after a long period of composition and pre-production, everybody was really focused and motivated to give his best. Somebody was excited, but still worried about some parts here and there, because we didn’t have that much time to rehearse every song properly, so the trickiest parts were kind of scary. Obviously everybody wanted to have fun as well, so jokes and funny moments happened all the time; that’s the way we like doing things together. Every time we enter the studio we realize how much we love making records, and how stressful it is at the same time. Everyone wants the record to be “perfect”, so sometimes somebody loses his mind or goes crazy. Fortunately we have five very different personalities, and we know each other very well, so everything usually sorts out very quickly.

Tell us about the recording of Are You Kidding Me? No. Did the songs evolve further in that environment and did you learn anything this time to take into your next adventure?

The recordings were a bit messy, definitely a non-linear path. Even in the final phase of the production we were having new ideas and insights. Probably hiking in nature, getting lost in an unknown city, visit art galleries, alternate your perception are good ways to get inspired in the beginning of the process and recording is the best way to get inspired in the end of it. Even in its half dark, closed, silent spaces the studio itself is a huge source of inspiration. You are there, but you are not what matters. The album is all and you disappear.

Many of the songs made it to the record the way they were written, other didn’t and we kept changing them until the very end.

We made a documentary of the whole recording process, it will be published soon.

As the album teased, seduced, and thrilled us we laid numerous comparisons at its feet; moments in the eclectic alchemy which Destrage 1reminded us of bands such as Jane’s Addiction, Red Hot Chili Peppers, American Head Charge, Mr. Bungle, Dillinger Escape Plan, Faith No More Kontrust and French bands Mucho Tapioca and Toumai, even at one brief point Ugly Kid Joe. It shows the diversity and expanse of your sound. Are there any specific inspirations which have really influenced you if not for the band as a musician?

All those that you mentioned played a crucial role in our inspirational feast, but not more than Michel Gondry, Quay Brothers or Paolo Barnard did. And they don’t release albums.! !

Are You Kidding Me? No. sees a guest appearance by Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal of Guns’N’Roses on its title track, How did that union come about?

We all are Ron’s big fans. When we finished the track Are You Kidding Me? No. we felt something was missing in the end. In fact, a Bumblefoot solo was missing. Since we had no connection with him, Mat emailed Mattias “Ia” Eklundh, who played on Jade’s Place (in our previous record The King Is Fat’N’Old) and became our friend (he’s such a cool guy!). He asked him for an address, a number, some contact to get in touch with Ron. Mattias as usual answered very politely, but didn’t give Mat what he wanted (he’s a very respectful person). So Mat was left with no choice other than going on Bumblefoot’s website and write to the general mail address. And surprize, Ron answered immediately telling us the song was super good and he’d do the collaboration. He told Mat he was touring with GnR in that period, so we should wait for a month or so. We thought it was his way to refuse. Instead he actually wrote back when the tour was over, asking what we wanted exactly, and we answered “we want you to do whatever you want for 32 bars”.

Few funny private messages followed and we got our perfect solo in 3 days. Smooth. The song seemed to be made for him, as he also said later in an interview. So, good experiment, and when we got to meet the guy in person we liked him even more. Ron is rad.

That track is also the most, can we say creatively and thrillingly psychotic on the album, probably our favourite song though it is hard to choose just one. Can you give us some insight into its creation?

Are You Kidding Me? No. is one of our favourite tracks too, for two main reasons: its origin and its content. The song was born randomly, as Mat sang what became the trumpet melody while going around on his red Vespa.

So, in the beginning we only expanded what comes after the trumpet, all that gipsy-sounding part. We wanted to make it a bonus track and leave it as it was. Then with no reason or precise plan, we wrote all the rest around it, putting no limits and setting no borders, following the lyric concept “Everybody does all kind of shit, I’m sorry that I’m sorry, I had to do this”.

The content came along in exceptional short time, and surprisingly our mindless creation gave birth to some of the most cerebral and psychotic parts of the whole album. !

As you said earlier the album is also your first with Metal Blade Records. How has the link up impacted on the album so far?

Being signed with such a great label is a dream come true for us! Definitely it’s giving us way bigger exposure, and much more people are listening to the new album because of this. But on the artistic point of view it didn’t have any impact, simply because we could sign the deal with MB because we already had the new album finished and ready to go.

Destrage is a band never slow in hitting the road and stages, the same again for 2014 I can assume? Any details you can reveal?

Absolutely yes! Everything is “work in progress”, our goal is to play these songs live, touring as much as we can, bringing our music everywhere…we’ll see what happens! 🙂

We can’t wait to be on the road again!

Once more thank you for sharing time to chat with us. Anything you would like to add?

Thanks for your attention! Our new album Are you Kidding Me? No. will be release on March 3 in Europe through Metal Blade Records. More music and videos will be released soon, so stay tuned though our official pages http://www.facebook.com/destrage, http://www.youtube.com/destrage andwww.twitter.com/destrage!

Thank you so much for this interview guys! 🙂

Read the review of Are you Kidding Me? No. @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/03/06/destrage-are-you-kidding-me-no/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 19/03/2014