Impulsive Compulsions: Sampler 3

We all have certain things we look forward to whether on a daily, weekly, monthly or whatever time scale basis and for us one is definitely the latest issue of the In the Club Magazine from The Perfect Pop Co-op, the inimitable UK label from St Albans. Recent copies of the online treat have only escalated the pleasure of reading about the label’s creative family and releases by giving away a free MP3 sampler of their sounds; the latest issue, No. 40 to be precise, providing the third of those delicious musical side dishes. It is another eclectic mix of sounds and imagination within The Perfect Pop Co-op embrace and another encounter which just sparks a wish indeed need to explore deeper.

Devious in its intent, the latest Impulsive Compulsions Sampler simply teases attention throughout as epitomised by the Middle Eastern flavoured lures opening up another slice of their electronic rock fuelled enterprise from the ever fascinating Dislocated Flowers going by the name of Saladin. The band has been a regular feature of the samplers so far and again it had the imagination alive with its instrumental’s cosmopolitan intimation just as Scant Regard similarly had it and ears equally involved in its DEFCON 1 invasion of the Edwin Starr classic, War. With samples escalating the instinctive drama of the track, it engulfs the senses with a withering and compelling insurgency, the solo project of Will Crewdson (Rachel Stamp, Adam Ant, Flesh for Lulu, Bow Wow Wow, She Made Me Do It) as striking as ever.

Reverse Family is another stepping up to spark eager attention, the solo project of Dermot Illogical teasing and arousing with Make The Most Of Your Headache. Even with its gentle rise there is an organic swing which truly comes to life as its punk/post punk antics collude with Dermot’s inimitable words and tones.  There is a great Swell Maps-esque whiff to the song’s potent shuffle and enticement, bait matched in strength by that offered by its creator’s other guise/day job within The Tuesday Club. Their contribution is Wow Jazz, a devilish jazz funk clad proposition cast with the band’s unique swing and contagiousness which had the body bouncing as high as an organic appetite for their sound was lusty.

The Venus Overload is just as lively as they bound in with Flying Face, its tenacious garage rock stomp a wild come feral antagonist body and spirit had no protection from, each leaping with nostrils flared into its manipulative fire.  This is a band we only wish would return from well let’s call it a hiatus, songs like this thick reason and this particular one a definite favourite among this fresh batch of nothing less than treats.

As earlier suggested, it is fair to say that all tracks within the sampler left an instinct to explore their creators further, the pair of Creature Of Desire and Time To Say (80’s electro mix) from Andreas and The Wolf and The Scratch respectively no different; the first providing company for an shadow loaded urban electro saunter, danger soaked seduction lurking at every rhythmic and electronic turn while the second dangles indie pop bait within its DIY rock ‘n’ roll adventure with just a tinge of Fad Gadget to its electro shadowing.

Jordan Thomas steps up with We’re Here, the song casting an indie pop jangle over ears soaked in post punk dissonance to easily captivate while 50ft Woman swings in and sets out another inescapable claim on favourite album moment with Strictly Only Swinging. With attitude fuelling every note and syllable, the track is a thrilling slab of virulent punk rock with echoes of a tempting mix of early Blondie and the Mo-dettes as The Raincoats add their delinquent pennyworth but as unique as you could imagine or desire.

The album line-up is completed by Hello Dearies, a newcomer to these ears but sure to be regulars if Song For Disillusioned Man is anything to be persuaded by. Springing from collaboration between Nashville hailing musician Dominic De Lugosi and songwriter Mandy McNeill, the track is a haunting psych rock seduction, a siren of a song drawing the imagination upon its mystical coated rocks.

It is an increasingly enthralling addition to another collection of artists and tracks which deserve the deepest of attention; explorations we can assure you only providing the richest rewards as you simultaneously immerse in another great issue of the In the Club Magazine available now.

https://perfectpopco-op.co.uk/magazine/

https://theperfectpopco-op.bandcamp.com/

https://perfectpopco-op.co.uk   https://www.facebook.com/perfectpopcoop/

https://www.facebook.com/pg/dislocatedflowersmusic

https://www.scantregard.com/

https://www.facebook.com/reversefamily/   https://reversefamily.co.uk

https://www.facebook.com/thisisthetuesdayclub/   http://thisisthetuesdayclub.co.uk/

https://thevenusoverload.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/50ftWomanBand/

https://www.facebook.com/Hello-Dearies-1403067019958358/

Pete RingMaster 02/07/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Orielles – Jobin EP

orielles_RingMasterReview

Following an especially successful 2015, British surf pop trio, The Orielles, are ready to bring the same romancing of ears and imagination to this year with the seriously tantalising Jobin EP. Consisting of three slices of the band’s increasingly acclaimed blend of sultry melodies, bewitching harmonies, and feverish flavours bound in lo-fi beauty, the EP beguiles and inflames the senses whilst hinting that 2016 can be just as big if not greater in the band’s emerging history as its predecessor.

The Orielles began early 2013, the result of a house party and the creative uniting of sisters Esme and Sid Hand-Halford and friend Henry Wade. It was not to be an immediate launch into active duty as the girls only began learning their instruments from that point but with inspirations coming from riot grrrl and California surf bands, the Halifax trio were soon working on songs and honing their creative exploration. Since then, well-received tracks and releases has reinforced their rising reputation as a live proposition with 2015 especially potent as The Orielles drew big doses of acclaim at festivals such as Dot To Dot, Live At Leeds, and Liverpool Sound City as well as their individual shows.

orielles art_RingMasterReviewWith a UK tour in motion and a host of other events lined up, the band is set to be as busy as ever with the strong potential of greater success and praise heading their way just taking Jobin as a cue. It opens with its title track grabbing ears with an instant bait of crisp beats from Sid and the siren-esque lure of Henry’s seductive grooves. Their winding tendrils continue to entice and vein the rhythmic potency of the song, Esme’s bassline as captivating and alluring as her magnetic vocals and the surrounding celestial harmonies. The melodic character of the song has a House Of Love hue to its tempting with a psych rock flavouring only adding to the overall richness and raw yet elegant climate of the spellbinding track.

Twin Freaks is equally as compelling as it settles into a sweltering landscape with thick shadows to its evocative tone and inventive depth. Led by the almost flirtatious stroll of bass, there is an immediate infectiousness which is keenly shared by the vines of surf rock enterprise cast by Henry and the siren-esque quality of the vocals; both resonating in ears and memory as potently as the virulent charm and touch of the song.

The EP closing Sliders is the most feisty and energetic of the three tracks with tenacious beats and a vivacious energy stoking its melodic fire and anthemic gait. There is a punk rock scent to its revelry too, a touch of eighties band the Mo-dettes joining hues reminding of bands like The Raveonettes and Throwing Muses though being organically cultured in surf rock, the song emerges as something openly distinct to The Orielles.

Robed in discord tinged melodies, equipped with vociferous guitar, and basking in soaring harmonies, Jobin is a release which truly lingers in the memory. It is the persistent bringer of great pleasure and a strong nudge to pay close attention to the continuing and enthralling emergence of The Orielles.

The Jobin EP is released April 1st via DIY label Art is Hard. It will be available @ http://artishardrecords.bandcamp.com/album/jobin-ep as a 7″ flexi-disc featuring lead track Jobin, a 20 page colouring book zine illustrated by Alex Gamsu Jenkins and a download code for the full 3 track EP.

https://www.facebook.com/theorielles   https://soundcloud.com/theorielles

The Orielles – Upcoming UK dates:

APRIL

2nd READING Oakford Social Club

3rd BRISTOL Lousiana

9th LONDON Flying Vinyl Festival

MAY

1st LIVERPOOL Festevol

AUGUST

5th TUNBRIDGE WELLS Forgotten Fields Festival

Pete RingMaster 31/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Flowers – Everybody’s Dying To Meet You

Flowers_RingMaster Review

Though debut album Do What You Want To, It’s What You Should Do pleased, for personal tastes, it lacked a certain spark to fulfil its obvious potential. It was an encounter though, which certainly ensured its creators Flowers lured strong and lingering attention. Now the UK trio return with successor Everybody’s Dying To Meet You, a rousing slice of noise infused indie pop that enchants as it enthrals; a release rattling the cage of expectations and all overworked pop offerings around it.

Flowers began in 2012 after vocalist Rachel Kenedy met guitarist Sam Ayres through an advert wanting band mates to help create pop songs which were like “early Madonna through a broken tape machine”. From there a romantic and creative union ensued between them, with drummer Jordan Hockley coming in to complete the band’s line-up. With their first batch of tracks refined by Bernard Butler, debut album Do What You Want To, It’s What You Should Do emerged in 2013 to potent responses and support. It drew keen interest which is surely now set to ignite louder acclaim with Everybody’s Dying To Meet You. Everything about the release, from songwriting and sound to inventive tone has blossomed from its predecessor, emerging an eighties seeded but uniquely current kiss of tenacious indie pop.

Recorded with producer Brian O’Shaughnessey (The Clientele, Primal Scream, My Bloody Valentine), the album opens with Pull My Arm. A slim jangle of guitar with glimpses of ska revelry makes the first contact, strolling beefy rhythms soon joining it before the lively ethereal tone of Kenedy lays evocatively over the dynamically catchy sounds now in full flow. Thoughts are sparked of bands like Mo-dettes and Girls At Their Best by the track, ripe spices adding to its boisterous charm and rousing adventure.

art_RingMaster ReviewThe great start is followed by the mellower caress of Bitter Pill, though its body is all drama and the vocals awash with warm crystalline harmonies that seem to incite an infectious swing to grab the energy of the song. From lapping ears like gentle but eager waves to a fiery expulsion of sizzling sonic rowdiness and back again in a repeating cycle, ears are richly satisfied before Ego Loss takes over with its similarly low key but vibrant dance. The dark hues of bass make a healthy temper to the celestial strains of Kenedy and the imaginative jangle of Ayres’ guitar, the jabbing beats of Hockley bridging the two with their metronomic yet inventive canter. Like The Darling Buds meets The Raincoats, the track is a persistent captivation.

A Weekend like air drifts across next up All at Once; the song as those before it thick seduction, though all have to bow to the outstanding prowess of Intrusive Thoughts. Again a gentler entrance is the lead to richer and heavier deeds. The song never loses its gentile character though, moving with a Young Marble Giants scented saunter through noisy melodic scenery accompanied by hypnotic rhythms. Kenedy once more is as alluring as the sun in the sultry temptation as the album offers its undoubted pinnacle, though the song is challenged for that stature throughout.

How Do You Do smiles at and grumbles in ears next, its scuzzy proposal an irresistibly magnetic affair matched by the fiercer rock ‘n’ roll of Tammy. Ayres’ guitar is a scorching blaze of resourceful endeavour whilst Hockley again lays anthemic bait down around the, at times, slightly overwhelmed voice of Kenedy. Even with that slight issue, the track is a punk lined pop treat to get a healthy appetite for; a hunger quickly satisfied by another Young Marble Giants like seducing under the name Russian Doll. Its true rock ‘n’ roll colours are soon pushed to the fore of its initial minimalistic presence, the initial thick enjoyment only becoming most lusty as the entwining of both textures from thereon in creates another mighty triumph for the album.

The final pair of songs ensures Everybody’s Dying To Meet You ends on the high it started with and for the main maintained up to their appearance. The balmy yet sonically volatile My Only Friend is first with endearing melodic caresses evolving into bordering on cacophonous jangles for a hearty lure whilst closer Bathroom Sink is a provocative romance with a tempestuous air and intrusive flames to its harmonic elegance. Both tracks spellbind with their individual characters; a success brought to broader fruition by the album as a whole.

The Flowers has come of age with Everybody’s Dying to Meet You, though major uniqueness is still a little down the line. All the same with this thoroughly enjoyable and increasingly magnetic album their current bloom, the threesome has shown themselves to be one of Britain’s brightest and most stimulating indie/pop bands.

Everybody’s Dying To Meet You is released February 12th via Fortuna POP! on CD, vinyl and download.

https://www.facebook.com/flowersdomusic/

Pete RingMaster 12/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/