Motel Transylvania – Self Titled

We have not been alone in brewing eager anticipation for the debut album of Italian horrorbillies Motel Transylvania having been infected by the sounds of their They Dig After Midnight EP of 2015 as well as the numerous appearances the band has made on various compilations. Four years or so in the making finally that first full-length has crawled from the corridors of the band’s darkest corners and we can tell you it has been well worth the wait.

Formed in 2013 as a solo project of stand-up drummer/vocalist Toxi Ghoul, Motel Transylvania swiftly became a trio which unleashed a well-received debut single in the ghoulish romance of It’s not so bad. The release of They Dig After Midnight in turn established the Savona trio as a band with a potent sound and creative character equipped with the potential of bigger bolder things ahead. Their self-titled debut album realises plenty of that intimation without exhausting all the possibilities of even greater exploits ahead. Across thirteen views from the mausoleum, the album presents a multi-flavoured proposal embracing everything from horror punk and psychobilly to vintage rock ‘n’ roll, punk rock, and other death strewn hues.

It opens up with the portentously atmospheric Called, an invitation into the album’s crypt as intimidating as it is cinematically irresistible. The piece enticingly opens the gateway to the carnal goodness to come starting with Destination. The gorgeous rockabilly groove which harkens its trespass was enough to enslave attention, a submission swiftly rewarded by Toxi’s senses clipping beats and the dark upright bass grumble cast by Fish “The Scarecrow”. The guitar of Taison Gore continues to spin a web of temptation throughout only dropping its raised adrenaline for a breath to be taken before striking up again with salacious intent before the drummer’s lead vocals share their raw scowls. It is an excellent full start to the release and taster of the band’s richly flavoured and varied sound.

The following track shares the band and the album’s name, Motel Transylvania a rousing slice of horror punk with an early Misfits lilt within a labyrinth of psycho and rockabilly taunting. The predacious trespass of the rhythms and vocal causticity steals the show within a track which quickly left its indelible mark before Her Last Boogie launched its raw rock ‘n’ roll stomp on ears with zeal and increasing enterprise. A blend of the feral and the melodically precise, the track is a slice of death boogie needing little time to get punk hips whipped up.

The outstanding Drowning gives warning enough with its bass bred jaws lure before breaking upon the rocks with its blood tainted surf rock groove and barbarous intent while The Night of the Living Dead speeds rather than lumbers through ears with its The Order Of The Fly-esque stalking though the result is still an inescapable rock ‘n’ roll nagging of ears and the imagination. Both tracks add new shades to the album’s adventure and to the unfolding tales of terror; each new pleasure to devour though both are outshone by 4 and its Mad Sin meets Tiger Army like psychobilly shimmer, the albums best track.

The ghostly plains of Beyond The Lights comes next, its unearthly throes psych rock kissed seduction evolving a carnival of fevered temptation before slipping back into its ethereal decay, while its successor, It’s Not So Bad, coaxes ears with its puckered rockabilly lures before erupting in a punk nurtured hostility, repeating the cycle with greater imagination and psychosis. At every turn the track twists into unexpected escapades increasing its magnetism every step of the way.

Continuing the great multi-textured web of sounds within the album, A Place To End embraces Latin/mariachi hues to its Koffin Kats spiced uproar while the following Dead N’ Proud howls like a psychobilly inspired Frankenstein Drag Queens From Planet 13. In turn the simply superb STOMP! Cockroaches stamps around with a great Demented Are Go inspired irritability, these three alone showing the broad landscape of sound within the Motel Transylvania bloodlust.

I Wanna Be Your Ghoul completes the release, the song another psychobilly nurtured tempting under sweltering skies; gallows rock which has the body swinging as firmly as the cadaverous romance it shares.

It is a fine end to a record which certainly pleased and had praise leaving lips on the first listen but has blossomed to far greater heights and persuasion with every subsequent venture through its sonic charnel house.

The Motel Transylvania album is out now through Undead Artists and Archetype Records.

 https://www.facebook.com/moteltransylvania/    https://twitter.com/MotelTransylvan

 Pete RingMaster 15/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Horror Vision – Final Broadcast

As anyone, we have certain regular cravings here at The RR, one being for rabidly ravenous horrorpunk. It is a hunger that has to date been richly satisfied through Germany based label Undead Artists and continues through its latest offering. Founded by Johnny Rose, also the frontman of the formidable Blast Bomb, the label has unleashed the debut album from fellow country ghouls Horror Vision. Offering up ten tracks which prey on the senses as they arouse the spirit, Final Broadcast is an appetite filling anthology of punk infested horror rock ‘n’ roll.

Hailing from Ulm and consisting of vocalist/guitarist Evelyn van Bytingale, vocalist/bassist Andrew Lycanhead, and drummer Dr. Combat, Horror Vision lure ears and imagination into their cinematically inspired first full-length through an Intro setting the listener at the melodic heart of a brewing bedlam. Its sonic drifting eventually leads to the vintage invitation of the Godzilla feature King Of The Monsters. The track is an adrenaline driven punk roar, grooves and aggression entangled in a combative stomp where everything from riffs and bass grooving to predatory vocals and venomously swinging rhythms unite in a raucous trespass.

The following Ghosts Of Mars is just as tenacious and thickly enjoyable, its opening bass groove alone enough to have ears gripped. The subsequent lustful prowl of riffs and rhythms only added to the temptation as too the sonic wiring which veins the combined nagging. It is a raw yet seductive mix escalated by the rousing vocals embracing the same aspects.

Critters gnawed away at the passions next; again grooves getting under the skin before its more primal instincts expose the punk hunger of the track accompanied by an early Misfits meets Frankenstein Drag Queens from Planet 13 flavouring before Need For Meat reveals its fifties rock ‘n’ roll penchant. That is soon consumed by the ferocious punk nature and intent of a song though which is as infectiously catchy as it is persistently hostile.

Through the feral Balzac-esque holler of The Thing and the rockabilly nurtured Vampire Waltz, new shades in the Horror Vision creative psychosis uncage their taunting, each leaving the appetite hungry for more while Bathory lets its own individual hard rock laced bloodlust loose to equally persuasive and ferocious effect.

The punk ‘n’ roll harassment of We’re Gonna Get You is untamed catchiness which had the body bouncing and vocal chords roaring with ease, individual prowess uniting for an anthemic scourge before Calling Me Monster closes things up with its carnivorously predacious sounds and character. As all tracks, it demanded and received mutual participation whilst inflaming our instinctive horrorpunk urges.

There is definitely something of the familiar and the individual about Final Broadcast but a mix which left us beyond content and already greedy for much more from the bedevilment going under the name of Horror Vision.

Final Broadcast is out now via Undead Artists @ https://horrorvision.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/horrorvision.horrorpunk/

Pete RingMaster 02/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dead Cross- Self Titled

Pic SAWA

As the world seemingly surges rather than drifts into bedlam it is maybe not surprising that a sound is rising to echo it’s chaotic and discord fuelled order. It resonates from the creative union within Dead Cross, a project said to have emerged “out of a series of impractical schemes, fallen-through plans, and last-minute musical experimentation.” Featuring the combined acclaimed talent and creative ingenuity of Dave Lombardo (ex-Slayer, Suicidal Tendencies, Misfits), Mike Patton (Faith No More, Tomahawk, Mr. Bungle, Fantômas….), Justin Pearson (The Locust, Retox), and Michael Crain (Retox, Festival of Dead Deer), Dead Cross has just released their self-titled debut album; a deviously manipulative and skilfully conjured tempest of noise and intent, simply manic manna for the senses and imagination.

There really is no need to provide background to the members of Dead Cross, each individually and within a mass of bands having set down incitements and inspirations so many have fed upon and blossomed their own ventures with. So it is straight to the first breath of the foursome’s first release we go and the initial sonic mist of Seizure and Desist. From its midst surging raw riffs and rampaging rhythms burst, their assault soon joined by the distinctive and ever rapaciously mercurial vocals of Patton. Just as recognisable are the dynamically imaginative and textile swings of Lombardo; his anthemically biting incitement entangled in the sonic rapacity of Crain and the grumbling bestial tones of Pearson’s bass. A senses crumbling assault of hardcore, he track is as multi-flavoured as it is uncompromisingly furious and a hint of the developing web of noise and varied rock ‘n’ roll infesting the punk heart of the release.

The following Idiopathic even further harries and bullies the senses, its rhythms fuelling a barbarous catchiness which spreads to the united vocal attack and raw tone and causticity of the outstanding track. Unpredictability is as rampant as animosity, mischievous craft and fun equally as bold within the senses ravishing, body inciting maelstrom. Every passing second brings a fresh breath of bold and devilish adventure, the track a dancing predator by the time it makes way for the waspish nagging and unrelenting beating of Obedience School. It is glorious stuff, barbarous and harmonically bewitching leaving a tapestry of punk, alternative metal, and gothic rock suggestion.

Shillelagh is simply punk rock yet hardcore unafraid to embrace the spices of other pungent flavours to its infectious animus; the result a venomous contagion which has the body bouncing and appetite drooling before the imagination is enslaved all over again by a riveting cover of the Bauhaus classic Bela Lugosi’s Dead. Infesting it with the kind of energy and boisterousness felt at the Batcave venue back in the day, Dead Cross ensure the shadows and haunting atmosphere of the original are still an invasive temptation; Crain casting veins of melodic acidity which alone beguiles the senses.

The caustic invasion of Divine Filth hits the spot dead centre right after too, Patton and co vocally swinging from imagination’s rafters as the music around them throws itself around like an imaginatively manic dervish, again every passing second bringing new twists and expectations destroying adventure. Grave Slave is equally as tenacious in tone and intent, the Suicidal Tendencies exploits of Lombardo seemingly inspiring the whole of Dead Cross as they funk out with raw intensity and rancorous resourcefulness whilst equally embracing a Melvins meets early Therapy? like friction. It is a highly addictive proposal within an album similarly growing drug like in its temptation.

The persistent creative harassment of The Future Has Been Cancelled matches the lure and entrapment of its predecessor with its own individual and increasingly ravenous quicksand of sound and invention, at one point sinking into a quagmire of heavy seduction before bursting out with its instinctive rabid virulence of energy and sound to head towards the waiting heavy set jaws of Gag Reflex. It too meanders and dashes through a landscape of evolving gaits and twisted manhandling of the listener; each turn increasing its magnetism and our subservience to its manipulation.

The industrially lined shadows of Church of the Motherfuckers brings the album to a mighty conclusion, the track lumbering along with a primal swagger as resonating beauty glistens in its atmosphere. On the ground irritability guides the tempestuous exploits of the track, its climate remaining relatively clam but around a volatile heart which beats with combustibility. Through it all Lombardo springs a rhythmic trap which enslaves body and spirit, his creative mastery the last word in persuasion as the album comes to a thrilling close.

The tag super-group is bound to accompany many references to Dead Cross but ignore them. The band is a real and potent new force in its own right, yes embracing the previous experiences and exploits of its creators but offering something very different and exciting to rival and outshine most hardcore/punk noise exploits around them.

The Dead Cross album is out now via Ipecac Recordings through most stores.

https://www.facebook.com/deadcrossofficial/

Pete RingMaster 08/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Loom – Self Titled

Photo by Kurt Fairbairn

With quite simply raw rock ‘n’ roll nurturing its heart, the debut album from UK band Loom takes ears through every shade of punk rock you can imagine within its ten track confines. It is an adventure which has the imagination fired up, ears burning with ardour, and aggressive tendencies bubbling to the surface in a striking and rousing incitement of a self-titled proposal. Each song as suggested reveals a new aspect in its furious landscape yet brews a united character distinct to a band and release which just commands attention.

Leamington Spa hailing, the trio of Tarik Badwan, Matt Marsh, and Joshua Fitzgerald took little time in attracting ears and praise with their early releases including a pair of well-received EPs within their first year. The second of 2013 featured six covers of songs from the strongest inspirations for the band in its early days, The Jesus Lizard, Bad Brains, Pixies, GG Allin, Misfits, and Warsaw. Alongside the other encounters, it sparked support from the likes of Zane Lowe and Daniel P Carter at BBC Radio 1as well as laying the first steps in a springboard for Loom live to support The Rolling Stones at Hyde Park and tour the UK and Germany with artists such as Frank Carter & The Rattlesnakes, Queen Kwong, and Turbowolf.

The band’s first album is not slow in suggesting those influences in its multi-flavoured roar, as mentioned each song distinct from the next but there is a vein of unique Loom-ness running through all which we would suggest goes beyond the cohesion of aggression suggested by its press release. It opens up with Lice, a sonic itch you just cannot scratch enough to escape from. Its initial glaze to an instantly robust sound has a gothic/indie rock spicing, coming over like a blend of Leitmotiv and The Victorian English Gentlemens Club before its grouchy rock ‘n’ roll instincts burst free. It is a glorious nagging of the senses and imagination taking magnetic twists along its contagious enmity of sound and attitude.

The great start continues as firstly Hate imposingly shimmers with electronic radiance upon grunge bred antipathy to be followed by the rousing exploits of Get A Taste. There is a whiff of Pere Ubu for these ears to the first song but a thicker Nirvana like causticity to its nature and again niggling potency. Embracing garage punk confrontation too, the track stirs ears and appetite with ease, a triumph matched by its successor with its old school punk meets seventies garage rock growl as demandingly catchy as it is openly crotchety.

Grunge colludes with post punk for the feistily prowling Leopard, guitars winding spicy tendrils lined with delicious discord around ears as rhythms reveal a rapacious nature to their drive before Salt entangles the imagination in a fusion of Joy Division post punk and the irritable punk rock of The Stooges with just a tang of psych rock bewitchment. It is an enthralling mix opening new aspects with each passing flick of a chord and sonic detour yet throughout a fluid tart snarl never deviating from its quarrel.

Seasick bawls as its stalks ears with predacious intent straight after; indie rock merging with raw hardcore ill-temper in a track which steals the passions within seconds. Vocals are as unpredictable and instinctively volatile as the sonic flames cast by the guitar and indeed the rhythmic jabbing around them. With the bass a brooding threat within the tempestuous joy crowding and seducing ears, the track makes a big play for best track glory but is quickly challenged by the muggy grunge venting of Bleed On Me and eclipsed by the glorious dark deeds of the band’s latest single, Nailbender. The latter is a compelling caliginous seduction of gothic and punk metal; like Type O Negative fused with Descendents and 1919 yet still emerging as something unique and gripping to Loom.

The punk grouse of Barbed Wire grabs something from all decades of punk since the sixties whilst in finishing up the album Slowly Freezing Heart crawls across the senses in a kaleidoscope of sonic toxicity and shadow loaded rhythms united with vocal psychosis. Both tracks are treats greed gets the better of composure over while bringing one superb album to a memorable and rousing end. Listening to Loom you get the feeling that the band creates on instinct, not searching for a sound but letting it find them and infusing their music with its own unique character. The album reminds of numerous artists across its riveting body but never comes over as anything other than the offspring of Loom, the first of many more belligerently sculpted and physically visceral gems we hope and suspect.

The Loom album is released May 19th via Silent Cult across most stores.

https://www.facebook.com/Loomband/    https://twitter.com/loomband

Pete RingMaster 17/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Cavaverman – Women, Monsters & Cazzottis

After the acclaim lured by their album Tales From Cavafistool around Europe, Italian horror punks Cavaverman release their new EP, Women, Monsters & Cazzottis. Offering three tracks as a name your own price download, their latest encounter is equally as irresistible with the band stretching their sound to embrace an even richer array of flavours in its rock ‘n’ roll stomp. It builds on the last album with relish and enterprise with suggestive hints of where the band is going next.

Hailing from Monza, the trio of guitarist/vocalist Sal Champion, bassist Apocalypse Giò, and drummer Doktor Hell draw on the inspiration of bands such as The Ramones, Misfits, Alkaline Trio, and Entombed for their own enjoyably raw yet adventurous sound. A trio of albums in Dead Brains For Brain Dead, James Dead, and the aforementioned Tales From Cavafistool have more than marked Cavaverman out from the crowd and the Undead Artists released Women, Monsters & Cazzottis is no different.

It opens with Deadly Touch, a track featuring the potent vocals of Irene from Milan punks Viboras. The song itself is the punks inside Cavaverman coming to the fore; its horror punk ’n’ roll mixing with punk metal tendencies to unleash something akin to UK’s Trioxin Cherry meeting US bands Mongrel and Calabrese. From its first breath, the track stomps with attitude and an infectious lilt, the vocal union of Sal and Irene ear grabbing with the latter just as potent when tempting alone. Instinctive grooves and nagging hooks only add to the thick lure of the antagonism soaked song before Jamie Sommers steps forward.

The second song has a calmer persona, its psychobilly nurtured stroll and hearty croon showing a new maturity in the Cavaverman songwriting. Of course there is a snarl in the belly but one restrained as guitars weave their sultry serenade within a coarser tide of riffs and swinging rhythms. As the first, it is a richly magnetic affair captivating ears and imagination with swift ease before King of Cazzottis concludes the EP with its hard rock meets horror punk stomp. There is a healthy spice of pop punk to the chorus of the song too, another flavour in its bold mix needing little time to have body and vocal involvement from the listener on board.

Women, Monsters & Cazzottis is a band doing what they do best, unleashing instinctive rock ‘n’ roll whilst involving sound and creativity in new textures and explorations. There are surprises and plenty of familiar essences colluding in a slice of Cavaverman goodness which gets better and more tempting with every listen.

Women, Monsters & Cazzottis is out now through Undead Artists as a name your price download @ https://undeadartists.bandcamp.com/album/women-monsters-cazzottis  or https://cavaverman.bandcamp.com/album/women-monsters-and-cazzottis

https://www.facebook.com/Cavaverman/

Pete RingMaster 09/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Deadite – The Damned

cover_RingMasterReview

After a fine year for the label, Hamburg based Undead Artists have got its successor off in fine style with the release of The Damned by Belgian horror punks Deadite. The album is a multi-flavoured roar blending strains of psychobilly, rock ‘n’ roll, and other ravenous textures into horror fuelled punk rock. It makes for a tantalising and captivating proposal becoming more compelling with every listen.

Hailing from Hamme, the quartet of Scarecrow, Wolfben, EvilOnly, and Von Nekromance have persistently stirred attention and eager support at home and further afield but for a great many The Damned will be an introduction; one sure to keep their ‘secrecy’ no longer.

From the cinematic Intro, the release roars into view with The Shadows and a surge of classic rock ‘n’ roll chords. It is the lead into a stomping charge of senses whipping rhythms and toxic grooves as vocals melodically growl. Psychobilly and horror punk collude as the track throws its lustful energy and sounds around, making for a potent start to the album though soon eclipsed by the outstanding Age Of Violence. With belligerence oozing from every note and vocal breath, the track’s nagging riffs and attitude loaded bassline alone seizes the passions, raw vocal antagonism and rhythmic trespasses reinforcing its punk rock lure as spicy grooves ignite.

The album’s title track steps forward next, its brooding climate and Tiger Army like air quickly seducing ears and imagination. Vocals too have a calmer presence and resonance which just adds to the haunting charm and atmosphere of the encounter resulting in the release stepping up another notch in impressiveness again.

Cored by a tangy hook, Collector grabs the appetite straight away next, its Rezurex/Plan 9 like stroll simultaneously menacing and infectious and the swinging relentless beats a greed inducing pressure while the following Show Me Some Love has a touch of Batmobile meets Misfits to it. The song is an equally predacious and virulent persuasion to the former with rhythms once more an irresistible infestation of body and instincts.

Pussywhipped shares its fifties breeding with relish after them; country seeds open within the excellent old school stomp before Empty Heart romances the senses with its sultry melodies and vocal croon. Rhythms and riffs insert the tenacious energy which instinctively flows from the band with Calabrese spiced enterprise playing around their eagerness throughout. The pair alone shows the variety in the Deadite sound, a diversity not always making big steps but certainly providing a broad and flavoursome adventure to get hooked on.

That bait continues through the feistier muscular throes of Damnation and the predatory prowl of The Taker, another track sparking references to the likes of Calabrese and Tiger Army within its own bold character. The Mark Of Cain after them though is proud to wear its inspirations boldly, the song a mix of Misfits and Samhain and also easy to breed greed for.

Roadkill is a grouchy assault of punk and hard rock whipping up rich satisfaction next, its success matched by the similarly punk driven Same Shit Different Day offering a minute and half of intrusively catchy rock ‘n’ roll before Cursed brings the whole pleasurable time to a close with its smouldering psychobilly serenade.

It is a great end to an impressive and richly enjoyable release; not quite a classic but not far off from a band with the potential for such a genre igniting proposal in their growing imagination.

The Damned is out now through Undead Artists @ https://undeadartists.bandcamp.com/album/the-damned

https://www.facebook.com/pg/deadite138   http://www.deadite.be/

Pete RingMaster 02/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dearly Beloved – Admission

 

beloved-12_RingMasterReview

It would have been hard to imagine Canadian band, Dearly Beloved majorly outdoing their last album Enduro at the time of its release, it one glorious slice of garage rock inspired sound built on instinctive and striking imagination, but they have done just that with its successor Admission. If there is such a thing as the perfect record, Dearly Beloved come so close with their new offering. Yet again the band recruits and manipulates the imagination with their sonic tapestries, embracing even greater adventure and variety whilst fully uncaging their rock ‘n’ roll instincts. If the last album was glorious, Admission is majestic; quite simply a primal and ingeniously conjured, addiction sparking roar.

As with its predecessor, the Toronto based band leapt upon and recorded fifth full-length Admission in quick time, using up fourteen days at Dave Grohl’s Studio 666. As ever centered around the vocal pairing of bassist Rob Higgins and Niva Chow, the quartet linked up with produced Daniel Rey (Ramones and Misfits) to record the album, using the famed, 70s era Neve 8028 analogue console that spawned Nirvana’s Nevermind. The result is a proposition which grips ears with vice like tempting while taking feet, hips, and rock ‘n’ roll instincts on a ride of their life.

RIP kicks things off, instantly chaining attention and an eager appetite because of previous successes with a grumbling yet vibrant bassline matched by senses rapping beats. A momentary breath uncages a torrent of hungry riffs and antagonistic rhythms, that in turn the prelude for a controlled yet ferocious rock roar. It is a fiery incitement perfectly contrasted rather than tempered by the warm inviting tones of Higgins and Chow, together a riveting lure in the creative storm. More virulent than the common cold, the track is pure dominance, irresistibly enslaving hips and feet as easily as ears and emotions.

The sensational start is more than matched by These Data, it too fleecing the passions with an opening lure of bass, a swinging groove woven coaxing infesting the psyche as a sonic shimmer sizzles around it. Beats dance with creative tenacity around that prime draw, Higgins again vocally captivating with Chow a similarly magnetic support as the track rumbles and grumbles. It is riveting stuff with guitars adding a great sour spicing to the mix as punk and grunge essences join the garage rock natured proposal.

admission1_RingMasterReviewI Tried To Leave brings a lighter poppier tone next though bass and drums still have that enjoyable crankiness as the pair explores a more Jane’s Addiction flavoured adventure. Every twist and turn in its intoxicating blaze brings fresh ingredients to devour, a psych rock invention only adding to a mouth-watering stomp before Who Wants to Know turns the album’s charge into a prowling, dark toned trespass. Vocally Higgins and Chow conjure a bewitching union whilst sonically the song sears the senses as rhythms dance on the debris with ridiculously infectious wantonness. A subsequent passage of relative calm enables a blues laced groan to emerge, its restrained air remaining as the track expands again until its volatility surges through ears as Chow’s harmonic lures beckon like a siren.

Through the kinetic punk ‘n’ roll of Strobe-Dosing and the abrasive funk of Currents, band and release use the listener like a puppeteer, the first as much pop natured as punk belligerent as it courses relentlessly like blood through veins into the psyche and passions. Its successor holds back its instinctive urge to career through ears, allowing its rhythmic heart and harmonic beauty to entice the senses like a raw blend of Shriekback and Ex Norwegian though as ever, a Dearly Beloved song is never slow in developing new detours and twists to enjoy.

The garage punk devilry of Blood In The Water provides the next major highlight of Admission, its dark heart and tantalising slow rhythmic prowl almost crawling over the senses as electronics atmospherically play and guitars toxically simmer. As vocals and harmonies radiate and yet another wicked bassline from Higgins grips, the track moves and burns like gothic lava.

Its startling presence is matched by that of Boxing Days straight after, the song aural seduction from its bewitching vocals and crabby bassline to its harmonic romancing and infectious tempestuousness. From a fascinating simmer it grows into a conflagrant eruption of sound and intensity impossible to evade not that you will wish to.

It is fair to say there are no weak moments within Admission; no times it comes close to loosening its masterful hold and creative success as proven once more by the closing creative outcries of When You Had The Choice and Future Shock. The former is a romping slice of rock ‘n’ roll with an unmistakable Foo Fighters like boisterousness and aggression in its punk heart while the latter skilfully blends calm and clamour in its own garage rock/punk driven trespass, each entwining a host of flavours in their spirit rousing traps.

It is very easy to keep heaping more praise upon Admission but the evidence is in the sound and time shared with it, though Dearly Beloved need little of either to convince and prove themselves one of the most exciting bands out there.

Admission is out now via Aporia Records across most online stores and @ https://dearlybeloved.bandcamp.com/album/admission-2

http://www.dearlybelovedmusic.com/    https://www.facebook.com/TheBeloveds/    https://twitter.com/thebeloveds

Pete RingMaster 31/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright