Zen Juddhism – Private Banks (So Cold) Feat. Opkar Hans

Zen Juddhism -Pic (2)

Ensuring an incitement for feet and emotions, Zen Juddhism release new single Private Banks (So Cold) this week, a contagiously rowdy slice of punk ‘n’ roll with a healthy feel of Fountains Of Wayne to it. Taken from the band’s self-titled debut album, the song is an openly familiar and virulently catchy proposition, not trying to bend boundaries or reinvent the wheel, but delivering what always goes down a treat, honest rock ‘n’ roll.

Zen Juddhism is the new music project from Southampton based guitarist /songwriter Jude Ωne Eight, formerly of Cold Forge and better known as part of HYBRID 6.0. Drawing on a lifetime of influences which shaped his personal tastes, from rock and metal to soul, folk, and pop acts, the guitarist wrote a host of songs inspired by the artists most prominent on his playlist in the past year, including Metric, Led Zeppelin, Garbage, Fountains Of Wayne, and TV On The Radio. Enlisting the assistance of friends such as Lord Lav, Andy Thomas, Marlene Rodriguez, Naomi Terry and many more, Jude recorded the previously mentioned self-titled album at the renowned River Studios with its subsequent release on his own Loosh Rote Records. Now Private Banks (So Cold) which features Opkar Hans is here to make an inescapable invitation to check out the album and indeed Zen Juddhism.

A raw caress of guitar with percussive enticing makes the first bait, its lure a mere moment before a blaze of grungy toned punk ‘n’ roll aggression and virulence takes over. Riffs blaze and hooks swing within the rowdy encounter, all adding further captivating bait to the infectious stomp. Its chorus takes ears into a more pop bred persuasion, that Fountains Of Wayne reference a loud whisper but equally you can sense a Ramones like essence equally fuelling the addictive nature and lure of that particular aspect of the song.

As mentioned Private Banks (So Cold) flirts with a familiar and energetic tempting, not really caring about creating new templates but eager to provide a boisterous and anthemic roar of voracious rock; an aim realised with enjoyable results for all.

Private Banks (So Cold) is out now via Loosh Rote Records with the Zen Juddhism also available @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/zen-juddhism/id943656548?ign-mpt=uo%3D4

http://zenjuddhism.com/   https://www.facebook.com/ZenJuddhism

RingMaster 31/03/2015

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Little Lapin – Remember The Highs

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There is no getting away from the tantalising Chrissie Hynde essence to the voice behind and The Pretenders like colouring of new single Remember The Highs, but equally there is no escaping the seductive potency and unique bewitching qualities of song and creator either.

   Little Lapin is a British singer-songwriter who from the release of her self-titled debut EP in 2013 has continued to inspire a greedy appetite for the melodic folk/pop romance she crafts. She has captivated audiences and imagination around the world, UK crowds and fans joined by those in New Zealand where she was based for five years, and in New York where she recently performed the last performance of her acoustic tour. As mentioned it is not a new persuasion on offer though, the song Waiting Room from her first and equally well-received EP, luring radio play with the likes of Tom Robinson on BBC Radio 6 and eager online radio play. Ahead of her highly anticipated debut album, Remember The Highs is now here to tease an even greater appetite and anticipation for the forthcoming full-length whilst confirming Little Lapin as one of British folk’s most bewitching propositions.

Remember The Highs opens on a wonderful tangy guitar melody, its winy lure an instant temptation swiftly matched by the mesmeric vocal croon of Little Lapin which in turn is embraced byPicture 76 an additional caress of reserved but potent guitar strings. That Pretenders simmer is lively from the start, recalling Hynde and co around their first album but similarly casting a fresh and vivacious breath which has a texture more aligned to a Metric or even The Cranberries. The song continues to entwine ears and imagination with its spicy melody and sultry temptation, assisted by a great dark bassline which flirts behind ever compelling vocals. The song is delicious, pure manna for body and soul and the most rigorous enticement likely to be heard this year for any album.

The track is accompanied by Over The Draft, an acoustically crafted smooch with ears moving into a more folk bred proposal compared to the rock pop triumph of its predecessor. Radiating charm and melodic elegance as a rhythmic shuffle offers a lively backing, the song shimmers over the senses. There is an essence of Lizzyspit to the song, revealing more of the variety within sound and songwriting of Little Lapin as previously suggested on her EP and previous tracks. Without quite rising to the heights of the first song, it still seduces from start to finish with sublime beauty within the rich smoulder of keys.

Featuring celebrated New Zealand producer, and ex member of Goldenhorse, Ben King, Remember The Highs is one of those songs which has the potential to open up broad spotlights and worlds to an artist, much like Brass In Pocket did for a certain Ohio bred musician/songwriter. It is an irresistible and exciting treat from an artist which still feels like they are only just beginning their journey.

Remember The Highs is available from February 9th @ http://littlelapin.bandcamp.com/

http://www.littlelapinmusic.com/

RingMaster 09/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Ex Norwegian – Wasted Lines

Ex-Norwegian

It was with second album Sketch that US band Ex Norwegian reeled us in with their hook laden mix of power pop and indie rock. Subsequent releases and songs have only dug a little deeper into a keen appetite but with new adventure Wasted Lines, the Florida band has bound ears and passions like they were Houdini whilst ensuring there is no escape from their tempting bonds.

Every encounter from Ex Norwegian comes with a creative twist and pleasing unpredictability even within a distinct and wonderfully recognisable sound, and this time it is through the addition of vocalist Lucia Perez and her sixties pop touch seductive tones. Her voice adds a new warmth and cheeky lure to the intriguing drama of the songs, an additional colour igniting another real treat from the band. The album as a whole strangely shows a bigger gap between its delirious highs and lesser, a word used with tongue firmly in cheek, successes compared to previous triumphs, but emerges as the band’s most complete and riveting, not forgetting exhilarating release yet. Produced by band founder Roger Houdaille alongside Fernando Perdomo (Linda Perhacs), Wasted Lines is simply a radiant melodic rock captivation casting a perpetual spell over senses and imagination.

Formed in 2008 and grabbing their name from the one Monty Python sketch everyone knows, Ex Norwegian made their mark with debut album Standby of 2009 and the following Sketch that same year, though its initial release was followed by a break up in the band before being re-released in 2011 when the band was reformed by Houdaille. This was the trigger to stronger and broader attention with both House Music in 2012 and Crack a year later pushing the band into hungrier spotlights. As suggested though Wasted Lines is the new pinnacle of the band’s artistry and sound and as opening track CheepCheep alone toys with emotions, easy to expect the catalyst to major success.

The first song is swiftly stamping its rhythmic and riff wrapped feet with an almost glam rock swagger before being joined by great heavy basslines and the pop fuelled revelry of Perez’s voice. Ex-Norwegian coverThe song bounces around but with hints of an explosive nature which intermittently erupts with a raw and fuzzy blaze of guitar. Managing to be clean cut pop and dirty rock ‘n’ roll simultaneously, it is an infectious start to the album and a tasty appetiser for the following Be There and its sultry climate. Like a mix of Blood Red Shoes and Metric aligned to a great funk seeded, the track flickers and seduces like a fire. Its touch is hot and magnetic, especially with the alluring bedlamic mix of noises which frequent its body and the great contrasting moments seeing a union of vocals between Perez and Houdaille.

The lively croon of Much Rooms swings it’s tempting next; celestial vocals from Perez a siren-esque courting of the tangy hooks and dark throated basslines which fill the song. Its radiance makes way for the outstanding Unstoppable, a song which from a potent if understated start grows into a virulent addiction thanks to a chorus which flames like a pop version of Spinnerette. In many ways as punk as it is indie pop, the track glows in ears with a guitar solo bringing its own spicy coaxing to excite further a by now very greedy appetite.

The gentler, folk kissed caress of All The Time comes next, its rhythmic energy a sturdy spine through the melodic elegance around it whilst its successor First Time confidently strolls through a harsher but no less graceful landscape of melodic rock and ska glazed scenery. The latter is just a whisper but there in the swing of the increasingly enticing offering.

The smouldering croon and melodic balladry of You Could Be Someone brings strong satisfaction next as once more a sixties flavouring lies on the irresistible vocal tempting of Perez as well as the more incendiary surface of the guitars. Its heated embrace leads to the contagion of the glorious It’s Too Late, the best track upon Wasted Lines with a swing and character which excites like a pact between Late Cambrian and Kirsty MacColl. It’s enthralling feet and voice sparking romp is matched in favouring by Only The Clues, those comparisons and especially that of MacColl, an extra spice to the temptress like allure of another very fine persuasion.

The heavy and thick romance of Unfair to Compare starts the final breath of the album, it’s almost oppressive atmosphere a mystique loaded tantalising engulfing ears and immersing thoughts. It is an exotic and slightly imposing psychedelic adventure of idea and craft which seems to pass on its ethereal qualities to the harmony fuelled closing Love Is. Acoustically shaped and vocally coloured, the track is a beaming sunset to the album and one final enslaving incitement.

With every listen Wasted Lines as well as growing in sound and stature, reveals more underlying qualities and treasure within its depths. It is a blaze of imagination and uplifting sounds which all should contemplate blessing their days and nights with.

Wasted Lines is available now via Limited Fanfare Records as a CD Digipak limited to 200 @ http://limitedfanfare.bigcartel.com/product/ex-norwegian-wasted-lines and digitally and on standard Cd @ http://shop.exnorwegian.com/album/wasted-lines-deluxe-edition

http://www.exnorwegian.com/

RingMaster 09/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

 

The Capsules – The Long Goodbye

the capsules pic

Having been seduced by US electro pop band The Capsules through their previous album Northern Lights & Southern Skies, anticipation for its successor The Long Goodbye has been excitable and at times impatient especially when having the honour of a sneak preview a short while ago, and the album does not let any expectations and hopes down now that it is finally ready to immerse the world into its mesmeric embrace. Its predecessor was an enthralling proposition which did not ignite a fire in the passions though it had them bubbling nicely with its enchanting charm and qualities; The Long Goodbye though does both. At times it has emotions and satisfaction simmering vivaciously but more often than not it leads them to raging flames of pleasure and rapture whilst revealing a thrilling evolution in the band’s sound, craft, and songwriting maturity.

Originally from Kansas but now Dallas based, The Capsules’ seeds began in high school with Julie and Jason Shields. Coming together to write music, it subsequently led to romance, marriage, and first band Shallow as well as the first bloom of their breath-takingly textured sounds. Next the pair enlisted drummer Kevin Trevino as they looked to expand and further refine their sound, a potent move resulting in the emergence of The Capsules. As the trio grew in sound and presence so did attention towards them, debut album Reverser sparking a focus upon them followed by two more increasingly captivating full-lengths before Northern Lights & Southern Skies brought in all into a much greater spotlight. Along the way the band has also grabbed an increasingly growing legion of fans including SpongeBob SquarePants creator Steven Hillenburg who asked them to write a song for the show. Understandable comparisons to the likes of Cocteau Twins, Blonde Redhead, Metric, Phantasmogram, and My Bloody Valentine have graced the band over releases and their performances with bands such as The Flaming Lips, Garbage, Mercury Rev, and Low, but it is honest to say that The Long Goodbye places the band into their own unique centre of attraction with its invigorating electronic caresses and seductive vocal temptations. Released via Saint Marie Records, the album quite simply is one ridiculously potent siren.

The entrancing flight of the album starts with The Beginning and its initial jangling enticement, guitars offering more tangible bait in 10364099_10152403884081346_7913373131760722158_nan increasingly immersive ambience bred by the keys. Instantly there is a whisper of drama to the song, a colourful essence which erupts into an eager breath to a lively and in comparison to its start, urgent stroll to the song. The crisp beats of Kevin bring a coaxing spine to the song as the increasingly mesmeric tones of Julie wrap and envelope the senses but it is the teasing melody crafted by Jason which lays down the strongest trap, its Altered Images intrigue, simulated by haunted yet warm harmonies, simply delicious. It is a rousing anthemic start to the album, a scenic evocative contagion which takes the imagination and passions into bright aural views.

Super Symmetry takes over and just as quickly has ears and thoughts transfixed with its expressive electro courting, its breath a mix of melancholy and elation. Julie’s voice smoulders as she glides over the minimalistic yet fully hued landscape of the song, noir kissed shadows and lapping incitements of melodies filling the unfussy and infectious premise. There is a hazy light which soaks the song, one which flirts as it soaks every note and syllable to help create a presence which simply absorbs mind and soul before making way for the thicker narrative of Monsters. Like the opener it has an eighties synth pop like spice to its cloudy wash of acidic guitar enterprise and smothering melodies, but truly comes alive when the band opens up its chorus with a rhythmic crescendo matched by elevated sonic flames.

Both the title track and Death Of A Comet steer the senses into a spatial climate, the first soaring with rapturous vocal flumes and magnetic rhythmic enticement within expansive and emotionally invasive weaves of keys laced together by the intricate guitar sewing of Jason. The second provides an initial emotional dawning which slowly spreads its colour and aural heart until finding itself casting a gentle stroll beneath a moonlit smile. Both tracks light up ears and air, bulging melodies aligned to soaring beauty and a spellbinding croon respectively showing just two more twists in the diversity seeding the songwriting and album, an aspect pushed again by the outstanding Hollywood. With a thick and glorious dark bass prowl stealing attention as the song radiates its entrancing suasion whilst again celestial flavouring breeds sonic fascination, the track is an impossibly beguiling and infectious flight into shadowed climes and compelling sunspots, much like its namesake.

The brooding grandeur of You Are A Metaphor keenly kisses ears next, again layers of dark and light converging into an enriching provocative ambience sculpted in reflection and thought, before being put in the shade just a little by Signals, a song where from its first scattering of Numan-esque trappings steals undiluted attention especially when it brings a heavier and no less welcome OMD expression to its electro stirring. Gripping and mouthwatering the song is itself just a very tasty appetiser for the highlight of the album, The Lonely End. The song is just majestic pop alchemy which stands as one of the best song unveiled this year. From its first strands of electro infection aligned to loudly vocal melodic emotion, the track swarms around seducing senses and imagination like a dark temptress, one needing no assistance but getting it with a just as potent sultriness from the fabulous tones of Julie. Robust but as finely crafted as porcelain, the spellbinding encounter with its earthy bass sound and scorched sonic guitar bred flames aligned to breath-taking melodies is simply stunning.

The height of its glory leaves songs like With Every Hour and Don’t Look Down which follow a thankless task but both without truthfully coming near still enrol the listener in a masterclass of picturesque melodies and imagination painting keys embraced in possessive harmonies and vocals. Neither song admittedly takes the bull by the horns either, both in distinct ways exploring their own independent emotional investigations without the same contagious toxins found elsewhere, though that virulence is soon rediscovered by the almost imposingly dramatic The Forgotten Days. There is a nagging essence and potency to the song which like a dog with a pig’s ear never relinquishes the instant hook it places in the passions early on. With guitars and drums steering the encounter as powerfully as the vocals, the track is a formidable provocateur, one which never truly explodes as expected but still provides a gem of an incitement.

The Long Goodbye closes with the excellent version of I Will Survive, a slowly awakening temptation which once more prefers to croon than romp but still finds a level of energy and enticement which leaves breath gasping. The song is one which has never found favour here but in the hand of The Capsules has become a firm favourite. The Long Goodbye is easily one of the special treats of the year so far suggesting that from being compared to many others The Capsules from this point on will be who others are compared to.

The Long Goodbye is available via Saint Marie Records now!

http://www.thecapsules.com/

9.5/10

RingMaster 20/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Hitchcock Blonde: Five Pounds EP

When Avenge Vulture Attack announced a reincarnation as Hitchcock Blonde it has to be admitted a slight groan escaped from within, accompanied by an audible air of worry. Would the sound follow the same route as the move from what was a snapping combative name into a more, though admittedly it carries its own intrigue and shadows, noir yet glamorous one? Would the great punk pop sounds with their impressive snarl which had captured our enthusiasm previously turn into an elegant fluffier form of pop music was the question and fear. Their debut release the Five Pounds EP now provides the answers and dispels those fears. Yes the music has changed but into a new compelling force which, yes has arguably lost the raw punk edge which wonderfully marked their previous releases, but has evolved into something just as enthralling and exciting, to make the release itself one thrilling contagion.

From London, Hitchcock Blonde consists of guitarist Drew Wynen, bassist Joss Nightingale, and drummer Ben Davies, speared by the enticing and striking voice of Ella Grace. It is a combination of skilled inventive musicians and elements which has already led the band to strong acclaim, an energetic and growing fan base, and to playing some of the top venues around the UK this past year sharing stages with the likes of The Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster, My Red Cell, Wrongnote, and The Mars Patrol. Comparisons with bands such as Band of Skulls, the Foo Fighters, and Skunk Anansie have been placed upon the bands though the quartet inspire other more accurate thoughts in that area whilst creating their own distinct presence and breath with songs which captivate and lead senses and bodies into a riot of infectious escapades.

Recorded with Tobin Jones (Cold Specks, The Twilight Sad), Five Pounds opens with the immediately engaging Baby Knows Best. Its initial breeze is a gentle caress rising to a crescendo of striking riffs and vibrant energy. The song then settles into a warm slow stroll with the wonderful vocals of Grace leaving extra heat with her expressive and full tones. Though arguably that previously mentioned snarl has now gone the track as it explodes into dramatic sonic explosions still offers a certain attitude from their previous guise, a bite which obviously will never abandon the creativity and heart of band and music. The song moves through unexpected and delicious breaks in pace and direction, brief seamless movements which flow perfectly and only go to make the song magnetic and impressive.

The great start is left in the shade somewhat by the brilliant Buzzkill, a song which holds many disguises within its pulsating and magnetic enterprise. It is another gentle and warm beginning with the guitar of Wynen playing the ear and heart like a harp, his play tantalising the aural taste buds and thoughts whilst the bass of Nightingale prowls around the sounds with a devilish yet unintimidating gait. As the guitar plucks with singular and hypnotic elegance, Grace offers her vocal seduction to leave one transfixed. Once immersed within its irresistible arms the song then erupts into a bristling and inciting energy safe in the knowledge you are going nowhere. The mini ‘riots’ are another shift within a song of great imagination and outstanding craft. Along its delicious body the song integrates the same elements again whilst offering further stunning delight through slow sparkling melodic kisses until it all sparks up into a fiery climax which leaves one breathless. The best song on the release, it is an excellent invention of elegant craft, unchained imagination, and controlled aggression.

Cutglass is a less provocative track, its crystal whispers next to eager rhythms from Davies is a skilful union whilst again the vocal smouldering of Grace bewitches the passions. It does not quite light up the fires as the first pair of songs but leaves one completely absorbed and satisfied with its more reserved yet potent emotive charms. The track carries a charge too which ignites its climax, an energy and intent which ripples throughout Sexy Like You, a piece of pop rock which sways and taunts with attitude and sweltering melodic majesty with a blues whisper on its lips.

The release ends with the sizzling energy and charge of Let It Go and the irresistible teasing of Animal, an exceptional track where the band venture into the punkish qualities which marked their early days. Both take one on a ride of infection and enterprise, the first a slice of sparking muscular pop with a touch of Metric to it and the second a lightly bruising piece of brilliance which comes from the same blood pumping rock n roll found within the likes of The Objek and eighties band Au-Pairs.

The Five Pounds EP is exceptional, a real pleasure to leave the heart excited and desperate for more whilst destroying those initial groundless fears. Hitchcock Band will be a band to shape the future of UK indie Pop rock and we for one cannot wait.

http://www.hitchcockblondeband.com

RingMaster 09/11/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright