Hipbone Slim and the Kneetremblers – Ugly Mobile

Hipbone Slim_RingMasterReview

With some artists, the news of a new release sparks a twitch in the hips and itch in the feet. Such it is with Hipbone Slim and the Kneetremblers after enjoying four slabs of the band’s individual rock ‘n’ roll, and such it was coming into new album Ugly Mobile. Containing fourteen slices of multi-flavoured incitements bred on the seeds of original rhythm ’n’ blues, the album is manna for the ears and a puppeteer to the body. Released via the ever treat giving Dirty Water Records, the press release for Ugly Mobile stated that the album is the band’s “finest offering so far!” After the umpteenth romp with the irresistible release, we can find no reasons to disagree.

It is hard to be surprised at the sound and infectious mischief that Hipbone Slim and the Kneetremblers create when you look at its members. The band is led by vocalist/guitarist Sir Bald Diddley (aka Hipbone Slim), the man seemingly involved in more bands than a wedding courting jeweller. Among the list is the inimitable likes of Louie & The Louies, The Kneejerk Reactions, Sir Bald Diddley And His Right Honourable Big Wigs, and The Magnificent Escapades; that just ‘scratching the surface’ of his tenacious presence and work. Alongside him is drummer Bruce ‘Bash’ Brand, a veteran of bands such as the Milkshakes, Headcoats, the Masonics and more who has also worked with Holly Golightly, the Pretty Things, Downliners Sect, Wreckless Eric, Mungo Jerry, and Link Wray. The line-up is completed by bassist/harmonica player Gastus Receedus who has played in the likes of Big Wigs, Arousers, Playboys, and worked with legends such as Billy Lee Riley, Sonny Burgess, and Dale Hawkins amongst many. It is a trio which let rips from the first note of Ugly Mobile and relentlessly continues to incite and thrill until its flirtatious last.

The album opens with Bald Head, Hairy Guitar, a track opening like a Hank Mizell scented rumble as bass and drums grumble with a wink in their creative eye. In no time Sir Bald is spilling guitar and vocal bait into the virulent mix, the song mixing prowling devilment and infectious stomping to grip ears and body with relish. The same applies to the album’s title track which follows. You can almost see the grin on its creative face and eager energy as it flirts with a Bo Diddley spiced shuffle very easy and very quick to get physically and vocally involved in.

art_RingMasterReviewOrangutan steps up next, it’s beguiling coaxing carrying a great Johnny Kidd & the Pirates feel to its sultry persuasion and sound. The beats of Gastus alone create an anthemic trap reinforced by the great throaty roam of Bash’s bass. Further bound in the spicy string picking prowess of Sir Bald, the song as its predecessors, needs little time to seduce and enslave before One Armed Bandit brings its own quick persuasion, this time the band slipping in a seductive Del Shannon reminding melody amongst strands of surf rock tempting. A spark for ears and imagination, the instrumental also shows the variety already flowing through the album’s first quartet of songs.

The garage rock boisterousness of Sally Mae continues that flavoursome spread, keys and nagging riffs riveting textures in its rawer rock ‘n’ roll before Voodoo Love puts its late fifties/early sixties hex on ears and appetite. The fun uncaged simply continues as the exotic mystique of Hieroglyphic dances and flirts with the listener, its instrumental seduction nostalgia and fresh revelry combined whilst Hey Ramona! simply has the body bouncing with its lively contagion.

A steely texture lines the guitar bait as Hammond-esque enticement adds further tasty hues to next up Indestructible Love; the track part garage punk and part blues in its old school seeded rock ‘n roll that warms ears up nicely for the throbbing suggestiveness of Why Can’t I Find What I’m Lookin’ For. From its opening bass swing, the track has lust offered in return and only increasing its hold as a Meteors meets Billy Lee Riley like croon blossoms thereon in. The track simply hits the spot as too the excellent Don’t Know Where To Start, an irresistible and ridiculously catchy call for voice and body participation swiftly answered as the Johnny Cash tinted track ignites the passions.

The smouldering flirtation of Meanwhile, Back In The Jungle keeps things inflamed with its tribal rhythms and imagination stroking hooks  before Number One Son brings limbs into even keener action with its blues hued rockabilly and Joe Poovey like tenacity.

Closing with the bracing rocker, There’s Only One Louie, band and album provide a feel good stomp that simply leaves ears, spirit, and emotions high. If real rock ‘n’ roll is to your fancy, Hipbone Slim and the Kneetremblers and Ugly Mobile are a must.

Ugly Mobile is out April 22nd via Dirty Water Records @ http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/~/category/id=10017028&offset=0&sort=normal

http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/hipboneslim

Pete RingMaster 18/04/2016

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Motel Transylvania – They Dig After Midnight

Promo Photo_RingMaster Review

If your local graveyard seems a bit dull, feeling a touch lifeless, then an invitation to Italian rockers Motel Transylvania and their new EP They Dig After Midnight will be sure to get things ravenously rocking again. Fusing horror punk and psychobilly in a salaciously dirty punk ‘n’ roll stomp, the Savona hailing trio whip up a keen revelry with their latest encounter, create a sonic hex able to get decayed bodies jerking in tandem with the moves of the living. It is raw, untamed, and an easy trigger for excitement over its wares and the open potential of the band to dig down to deeper success ahead.

Formed in the final throes of 2013, Motel Transylvania began as a solo project for stand-up drummer/vocalist Toxi Ghoul. Within a few months it had grown by two more corpses with the addition of bassist/backing vocalist Vec and guitarist Eli. Inspirations to the band’s sound include, unsurprisingly listening to They Dig After Midnight, Misfits, Zombie Ghost Train, Mad Sin, and Demented Are Go, whilst equally the likes of Frankenstein Drag Queens From Planet 13 and The Order Of The Fly spring to mind at times across the release. Fair to say though, the Motel Transylvania sound breeds its own character from that healthy mix of influences, resulting in a compelling and thoroughly enjoyable introduction for ears to their tenacious incitements.

From the scenery setting Intro and its dank atmosphere around cinematically gothic and carnival-esque suggestiveness, They Dig After Midnight explodes into life with the rousing Go Psycho! Rhythms and swipes of guitar grab ears from the first breath of the track, Toxi subsequently reinforcing the bait and hold with a solo roll of addictive beats before everything unites again in a heated invitation. The grizzly tones of his vocals growl just as potently as the bass of Vec drops an addiction lighting bassline through the fiery mist from Eli’s guitar, and though the track never explodes into rowdy life as it might it becomes more persistent in its catchy temptation with every rhythmic swing and caustic hook. There is a moment when a thought arose that if The Rezillos were psychobilly, they would sound something like this, a hint to the virulence and mischievous charm fuelling the encounter.

They Dig After Midnight_RingMaster Review   The track Motel Transylvania comes next and immediately makes a more forceful but equally infectious blaze of sound and intent. Group calls make an early pungent lure, they sparking the more belligerently energetic heart of the track within a body and nature carrying a contagious provocation with an always welcome Misfits scent to its grouchy temptation.

There is a great strength of variety within They Dig After Midnight, the first pair of songs quick evidence backed by the rockabilly revelry and psychobilly irritation of The Room. Like Guana Batz meets Norm and The Nightmarez whilst digging in a punk grave, the track rocks and rolls like a devil hound on heat. The bone splitting beats of Toxi are a prime instigator of the raucous toxicity fiercely pleasing ears with guitar and bass similarly devilish and antagonistic cohorts.

Summer In the Grave arrives on the sound of waves lapping a dark beach, the guitar carrying a matching tone in its surf lined charm as calm vocals caress ears. There is a devilish wink to the moment though, one which spins a subsequent slim bodied and irresistible Tiger Army meets Buzzcocks rock ‘n’ roll tale with a further glint in its punkish eye. Its warm light within romancing shadows is a thrilling proposal quickly contrasted by the carnivorous temptation of Night of the Living Dead. Graves are emptied as The Meteors toned predation spins a deliciously essential hook as a core to rapacious grooves and hungrily badgering rhythms, they matched by the rabid urgency and snarl of the vocals. The track is glorious, one of the biggest highlights of the album especially with its venomous swagger midway setting up another tempest of savage rock ‘n roll.

It is a triumph more than matched by It’s Not So Bad, the band’s recent single. Slipping in on a heavy noir coated bassline, becoming more vocal with another of the irresistible hooks and grooved enterprise the band has already shown themselves to be potent at sculpting, the song is like a skeletal tango. Its elements unite to form and wrap the song’s volatile frame, offering individual dances in the making of one boisterous romp. There is an old black and white animated film showing skeletons in a demented shuffle, bones twisting and coming unravelled but simultaneously performing an increasingly compelling devilry; It’s Not So Bad is a sonic equivalent.

The release closes with I Wanna Be Your Ghoul, a Morricone-esque croon within a sultry climate scattered with spicy hooks for a dark blood-coated romance for the imagination. It is not a track which grabs the psyche and passions as forcibly as its companions within They Dig After Midnight though but still only pleases as it reveals another strain of imagination in the Motel Transylvania songwriting and sound.

As They Dig After Midnight infests ears for another thoroughly enjoyable romp whilst writing final thoughts, expectations are that Motel Transylvania has all the potential to grow into a formidable and even more striking proposition, and no doubt with plenty more successes like this littering the way.

They Dig After Midnight will be dug up and unleashed on December 18th via Undead Artists.

https://www.facebook.com/moteltransylvania/    https://twitter.com/MotelTransylvan

Pete RingMaster 17/12/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Scanner – Splat

scanner_RingMaster Review

Seeding their own devilish riots in old school punk bred both sides of the Atlantic, Pennsylvanian rockers Scanner unleash their third album to keep the aggressive roar of nostalgic and organic punk rock snarling. There is plenty more essences to the thirteen tracks making up Splat, variety as keen as the attitude fuelling the release, but ultimately album and band is raw rock ‘n’ roll in heart and temptation.

Scanner was formed in 1979 by vocalist/bassist Joe Brady and guitarist/vocalist Junnie Fortney, the band name inspired by the David Cronenberg film Scanners after Brady read about it in a monster magazine. Pretty soon the band was stirring up attention and a loyal following throughout the Central Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Washington D.C. areas. Their sound embraces inspirations from 50’s rock and roll, 60’s hard rock and surf, and 70’s glam and punk, honing it into the band’s own horror/ punk rock, surf and garage punk exploits. 2012 saw the current line-up come together with the addition of drummer/vocalist Troy Alwine, with a year later the trio releasing debut album One Foot In The Grave, And More Pissed Than Ever. It was an acclaimed introduction to the band for a great many and confirmation of the qualities Scanner fans had been enthusing about for the previous pair of decades. Last year was marked by the release of Exploding Heads in Harrisburg – Live Recordings From 1982, a live album of old material as well as the Monsters Axes & Choppers EP from Brady’s other project, horror rockers Losers After Midnight.

With the Brady conceived and produced 45 band strong critically acclaimed benefit compilation album Assault & BATtery, which raised funds for Bat World Sanctuary, also on the CV for 2014, Scanner now set sights on the broadest attention yet with Splat, and as soon as opener Fist in the Air has ears gripped and emotions elevated the thought is that punk fans of all ages and eras need this encounter in their lives. The track quickly ensures the listener is following its title, its opening throaty bassline the lure into familiar yet refreshing punk riffs and sonic spicery. Attitude is ablaze as the plain but inviting tones of Brady incite lyrically and in expression, his bait an easy involvement within the more calm but forceful blend of crisp rhythms and raw riffs.

_0_SPLAT_Cover_RingMaster Review   The strong start is soon overshadowed by Just Like Bela, the band’s horror punk invention lining the predatory gait and design of the song. There is a healthy whiff of Misfits/Wednesday 13 to the encounter but its own character shines through, especially with the inventive mix of vocals and hard rock enterprise which frees itself. As it eclipsed its predecessor, so the track is outdone by the outstanding Living Life to the Emptiest. The third track has the edge and air of Dead Kennedys to its belligerent and anthemic confrontation, entwining it with great slithers of melodic acidity from Fortney’s guitar and punching it through with the raunchy bass and whipping beats of Brady and Alwine respectively.

A rapaciously commanding cover of The Angels’ Straight Jacket comes next, the song given a no frills make-over and emerging with a feel of The Saints to its richly satisfying punk ‘n’ roll, before Biker provides its own seventies inspired enticement. The song takes ears and thoughts right back into the breaking storm of punk rock, its DIY feel a bracing two minutes of raw endeavour and tenacity.

   Letter to the Government spills seventies glam and southern dirt rock revelry in its political attack within a bluesy entanglement of sound and enterprise whilst Running Riot sees Scanner take on the Cock Sparrer’s street punk classic to captivating success before haunting the psyche with Ghost Song. All three tracks have ears and emotions fully enlisted but it is the last of the trio which seduces the imagination and passions most. Its surf/psychobilly climate has echoes of The Meteors and Tiger Army to it but, as with all songs, variety is a vocal part, here punk and seventies garage rock bring extra juicy hues.

The Turbonegro meets Jello Biafra smelling Queen of the Stage has the body bouncing around next whilst a broad smile and further burst of pleasure is sparked by the band’s reworking of Bowie’s Suffragette City. The song has everything which you will have enjoyed in the original but roughed up and twisted around a bit, resulting in a great version to rival any other you may have come across.

Mischief and humour is as much a healthy asset as the flavours and invention of the Scanner sound and all give a fun time in Yeah We Suck, a round-up of ‘advice’ they and most bands will have gained at one time or another. That urge to have a ball continues in the album’s title track, an infectious brawl of virulence which is for the most instrumental but does have a lyrical bounty consisting of just its title being repeated with increasing relish. It, as most before it, has a claim for best song within Splat but the favourite spot gets grasped at the last moment by closing song Kaw-Liga. A country music song written by Hank Williams and Fred Rose, and covered by the likes of Johnny and the Hurricanes, Del Shannon, Roy Orbison, and The Residents over the years, Scanner turn it into a dark rock ‘n’ roll predator. Riffs and rhythms almost stalk the senses as the outstanding blaze of vocals ebb and flow across its sinister surf spiced landscape. It is only half the adventure though, the band breaking out into cow punk devilry too, switching between both provocative contagions throughout for one riveting and thrilling romp.

The US hailing Scanner might be an unknown secret right now but they hopefully and should not be for much longer as Splat trespasses on increasing numbers of ears for an increasing awareness. Go get some is our suggestion.

Splat is out now.

RingMaster 26/08/2015

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Mickey & The Mutants: Touch The Madness

picture by Cathy Bloxham

picture by Cathy Bloxham

If anything from psychobilly to fifties rock ‘n’ roll and rockabilly to rhythms & blues gets your feet and heart eagerly moving than we just might have the album of the year for you in the mighty shape of Touch The Madness, the debut release of UK rockers Mickey & The Mutants. Multi-flavoured and insatiably contagious, the album is a storming slab of mutated rock ‘n’ roll brought with all the craft and devilish guile you would expect from the experience and invention of its creators.

Mickey & The Mutants is made up of double bassist/vocalist Mick White (ex-Guana Batz and ex-Meteors from the Mutant Rock/Wrecking Crew and arguably best era of the band), guitarist/vocalist Norm Elliott, and Sharks drummer Paul ‘Hodge’ Leigh. It is a trio which on past history we admit we here had greedy expectations of but with Touch The Madness they surpassed everything wished for with a wonderful devilment borne from honest uncomplicated rock music. Formed in the summer of last year the band, on the evidence of their debut, only has the single intent and that is to provide an unforgettable, high quality, bruising party for the senses and passions, something they succeed in doing within the first three songs alone and reinforce time and time again across the twelve track release.

The title track opens up the excursion through the ‘bedlamic’ enterprise’ and imagination of the band, a lone guitar and distant WSRC072_300psychotic wails displaced by a barrage of rumbling beats from Hodge and sabre like riffs from Elliott. Amongst their instant persuasion the nimble fingers of White bring throaty bass slaps into the mix and slightly crazed vocals which within the devil bred brew being cast recalls The Orson Family in touch. The song is pure psychobilly and an evocation of primal urgency to join its hungry commanding mood. The track also gives portent of the album ahead, its body a twisting and varied temptation that has limbs and voice offering their well in our case, feeble blasphemous help.

The following Elvirista (Queen Of The Dead) teases with again a single coaxing of guitar before once more the rhythmic potency of the thumping drums and belligerent bass provoke and fill the song with such depth and menace you feel you are about to succumb to aural voodoo. The vocals of this time Elliott, the vocalist within songs being who penned them, have a dark demonic shadow to their narrative which like and with White before, brings great character to each slice of devilry and the release as a whole. The track smoulders with wanton seduction and enchanting intimidation which again receives no resistance as it takes passions into realms of rapture.

These Ol’ Bones explores a country rock seeded field of compulsion which sounds like a mix of Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers and The Screaming Blue Messiahs, whilst veining itself with some tantalising blues guitar licks and flames which ignites further the immense pleasure the impossibly addictive song has already sparked. It completes one of the strongest starts to any album in a long time, but it does not sit back on its laurels or take a rest as the excellent Jacob And The Well Of Love and its successor Something Bad’s Comin’ Outa The Ground soon show. The first also walks with a rhythm & blues swagger and lilt to its mesmeric stroll whilst the second of the pair is a slow canter around another blues narrative that leaves the lips of satisfaction licking feverishly.

Adrenaline soon opens its boosters again as the old school stroll of Blonde Haired Assassin takes the ears in its Gene Vincent/Blue Cats like palm of sound. Not for the first time on the album the guitar of Elliott is a delicious blaze across the sky of the song whilst White leaps over the senses with his upright skills and Hodge simply hypnotises from start to finish with instinctive rhythmic bait.

If the album stopped here it would be fair to say acclaim would still only ooze from these words but thankfully it is only midway into its rewards and soon raises the temperature further with firstly the contagious punk driven Rock n Roll Messed Up My Mind and even more so with Phantom Of The Opera. The second of the two is to all extent and purposes a cover of the Meteor gem on their Wreckin Crew album of 1983, though as it was written by White anyway maybe cover is the wrong word,  nevertheless he has just reowned it with the stunning version on Touch The Madness which we would suggest surpasses the previous version, it is that good and still one of the most riveting psychobilly songs of all time.

Burn You Sinners Burn just stomps over the already seduced heart with another dark toned piece of rockabilly majesty, White and Hodge creating a menacing wrap of rhythmic menace psychotically ridden by the vocals of Elliot and his sweet toned guitar caresses. It is pure aural manna which is sidled up to in quality by the sultry and dangerous mystique of Kiss Of The Spider Woman. Winds of surf rock wash over mariachi whispers to draw out a sweltering ambience which soaks every pore of the body and senses.

The album ends on the twin psychobilly enticement of Zombie where every aspect of band and sound stalks the passions with all the relentlessness of the risen dead, the song feeding off on the eagerly given submission to its virulently infectious jaws, and the insatiable Mind Control, the only time the band really reminded of The Meteors. It has to be said expectations to like Touch The Madness were strong but to the depth that we did was wholly unexpected and greedily taken. Mickey & The Mutants has opened its account with a killer album, one which is not quite up there with the major genre classic but easily one of the very best rock ‘n’ roll albums heard in a long time.

https://www.facebook.com/MickeyAndTheMutants

10/10

RingMaster 23/07/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Demented Are Go: Welcome Back To Insanity Hall

Be afraid; be very afraid for the asylum borne mayhem that is Demented Are Go is back. Their long awaited and permanently desired return comes in the size of the malevolent new album Welcome Back To Insanity Hall. They have not just re-emerged to stalk nightmares once more but burst in on us again with an intensity and dark villainy that sees them back to their very evil best.

When psychobilly was at its height in the eighties with the likes of Meteors, Guana Batz, and King Kurt leaving wreckage wherever they stomped with their infectious sounds, Demented Are Go was the one band that stood out and fired up these senses more than most. From the moment their debut album In Sickness And In Health put its nasty twisted fingers around the heart with slices of evil in the shape of tracks like Pervy In The Park and Rubber Love, devotion was inevitable so that even the mention of their name was inspiration for a deep malignant glow within.

Sparky

The years and lives of Demented Are Go and especially of band original and vocalist Sparky (Mark Phillips) have been turbulent and unsettling to say the least but throughout the band has fought back to rile up music and their fans with notable releases such as Kicked Out Of Hell of 1988 and Hellbilly Storm in 2005. Times have been rocky for Sparky and testing for a band that has seen many changes over the years but nothing could stop them for long. For all the great releases it can be said that the band has not always lived up to those early days even if they out shone most other pretenders throughout but with the new album they have once more taken their place at the head of the genre with a mighty declaration.

Just to prove that the world of Demented Are Go is never straight forward the album was touched by tragedy in the death of engineer/producer Tim Buktu with whom the band also worked when he remixed their earlier Hellucifernation in the late nineties. Aged only 53 he died from a heart attack having already mixed the new release and it hit the band hard as one can imagine. Eventually with the determination and strength that has always been a hallmark of Demented Are Go, the album was finished by late 2011.

From the opening madness of the intro a feeling brews that this will be an unforgettable hellish ride, the opening title track bringing the confirmation and so much more. Rampaging through the ear the song litters the senses with unbridled tumbling riffs, insatiable beats and Sparky ripping up things with his gravelled venom dripping vocals. It has been seven years since their last album but Welcome Back To Insanity Hall makes it feel like they have never been away, something all the subsequent tracks endorse with a vengeance. What emerges is an album which might just be the most complete and consistent ever from the band and certainly one of the very best.

Earlier albums gave us classics like Human Slug, Transvestite Blues, and Pickled And Preserved to name just a trio that scarred the heart for blissfully ever. The new album adds to the list with the mighty black wickedness of Devil Says Kill, the menacing Heads On A Pole with rhythms that see walls crumble and enemies run in fright, and the outstanding Lucky Charm, a song that plunders the senses with punchy rhythms and riffs which command and taunt. With the best song on the album The Life I Live adding to the deep quality and fun this is an album that Demented Are Go were always destined to make. Like the album, The Life I Live has a swagger to it, a mischievous glint in the eye and satanic grin that is addictive from the moment the opening intermittent guitar strikes beckon with their steely fingers. It has a reflective feel, a personal heart, and a defiance that says this is how it is just deal with it.

It is unfair to pick out some songs over others as the whole release is of such a high standard. From Sparky growling and back as the frontman of psychobilly to the flesh searing slices of deviltry from guitarist Holger and the bone shaking stomps of drummer Criss Damage the band tears a wide one in all it makes contact with. The trio excel everywhere to make every song deeply impressive but things are taken to an even greater height by the double bass sorcery of Grischa. He prowls and pounces on the nerves through each song like a ravenous beast and in this disciple resurrects the long burning desire to get ones hand on a slapper…. the instrument obviously.

The album is wonderfully unpredictable, eagerly diverse, and a marauding storm of rock n roll from beyond the grave. Sparky and co sold their souls to the devil a long time back and now they want yours. Welcome Back To Insanity Hall shows there is no resistance strong enough to avoid the inevitable.

RingMaster 04/03/2012

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Thee Exciters – Perpetual Happening

From the opening pulses of its first track, Perpetual Happening the new album from Thee Exciters grabs hold of and parties on the senses.  The experience is raucous, at times very dirty, and constantly refreshing as the UK garage punk band unleash track after track of vibrant infernal rock ‘n’ roll. The second album from the Southampton based band leaves one sweaty, energised and totally fulfilled which is all one can ask of a release though Perpetual Happening satisfies far deeper than most other releases heard in recent months if not the past year.

Formed in 2003 Thee Exciters have garnered increasing acclaim and drawn more and more to their sonic sounds via their self released debut single ‘Johnny’s Too Messed Up’ in 2004 and their releases since joining Dirty Water Records of the EP Dial ‘E’ For Excitement of 2006 and impressive debut album Spending Cash, Talking Trash two years later. Their follow up album again released on Dirty Water Records brings more gutsy fuzzed up almost primal slices of rock ‘n’ roll that sound like the bastard offspring of a beer soaked union between the likes of MC5, The Stooges with The Clash and Sham  69, with added seed from the psychotic delights of The Cramps and Reverend Horton Heat. An infectious flavouring that spurs on Thee Exciters own scuzzed up garage punk sound.

The album breaks loose with opening track ‘Dinosaur Traffic’, the track throbbing with bluesy riffs, swinging basslines and group shouts behind the brazen vocal delivery of Paul Le Brock. A delicious start toned in echo that riles up the senses for the even more impressive and excitable things to come. There is an instinctive feel towards the music that Thee Exciters make, it wakes up the raw energy within as well as in some ways give that wonderful feel of reinvented nostalgia. Though it has to be said for any bands or sounds they remind of or bring in they are mere spices within the distinct Thee Exciters feast of sound.

The fuzzy title track follows to mesmerise and pulsate within the ear, the insistent yet veiled key sound sweeping across behind the acidic guitar of Justin Cunningham a teasing element. From here the album explodes into a higher intensity and pleasure. The filth coated punk rock of ‘Flower Punk Girl’ sees the band living up to its name thrusting irresistible original UK punk intent with traces of Stiff Little Fingers and Subway Sect. Its raw, dirty, and with the drums and bass urgent and forceful totally outstanding.

The album is highly consistent but certain tracks stand out more as in the again punk fuelled garage rock gem ‘Paint Me’. As with all the tracks really it is impossible to fully tag the sound fully for in this alone there are plenty of psychedelic tones, psychobilly blooded veins and more running through the punked up rock ‘n’ roll, the diverse elements combining to make the band as exhilarating as they are. The album’s two other classic tracks are the same, varied and irrepressible. ‘Hang Loose’ may not have the most original sixties sound but it is an infectious burst through the ear to sweep one up in its distorted melodic arms, and make it impossible to resist its eager hooks and intention to ignite the senses.

The best track on Perpetual Happening is easily ‘Devils Make Up’, pure hypnotic psychobilly. The track gyrates with insistent rhythms, voodoo spawn riffs, and seedy barroom piano, and with essences of The Cramps, Meteors, and Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers oozing throughout, the album is a must listen from this track alone, though it is backed up by plenty more impressive tracks like the psychotic ‘Mirrors Never Lie’ and the uncomplicated and direct glory of the blues punk ‘Killing You’.

Perpetual Happening is masterful and a deep pleasure that whips up a storm as it winds itself into the senses to incite and ignite more pleasure than can be found in a blues and spirit fuelled whorehouse. Thee Exciters are back with a bang, rejoice and enjoy yourself with Perpetual Happening.

RingMaster 31/01/2012

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