Adrenechrome – Tales From Adrenechrome

Pic Credit Dave Saunders_

Pic Credit Dave Saunders_

Just like a blurring of reality and fantasy, the sound of Canadian metallers Adrenechrome is a muggy fusion of styles and flavours, and just like a drug addled climate, it provides an adventure which devours and permeates every pore of the senses and emotions. Taking their name from the a fictional drug in the film Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas, Adrenechrome cast a kaleidoscope of rigorous and virulent tempting as creatively progressive as it is thunderously rock ‘n’ roll, as predatory thrash bred as it is spatially grooved, and as imaginatively ravenous as it is simply seductive. The evidence is all there within new album Tales From Adrenechrome, a seven track encounter which from its classic comic like cover, created by Clownbaby and Tim Kehoe, through to its final suggestive note, is a compelling exploration of self experiences, fantasy, sci-fi, and classic literature.

Hailing from Ontario, Adrenechrome began in 2010, formed by veterans of the music scene with bands such as Gaswitch, Shimmy Rabbits, and The Doug Trucker Band in their histories. Debut EP Hideous Appetites emerged in 2012, inspirations from artists such as Pantera, Black Sabbath, Thin Lizzy, Metallica, Mastodon, High on Fire, and Children of Bodom colouring a sound which soon lured strong support and attention to the release and equally the band’s adrenaline driven live presence which over the years has included playing with Corrosion of Conformity, Green Jelly, Ninjaspy, and Manahan. It is a reaction and success sure to be matched and overshadowed by Tales From Adrenechrome as it spreads its creative rabidity from hereon; with it the band ready to breach and incite richer and broader spotlights.

Album Cover - Adrenechrome - Tales From Adrenechrome _RingMaster Review   The album opens with A Familiar Face, an immediate tempting of bold rhythms and melodically spun sonic enterprise woven into a warm instrumentally led tapestry. The track swiftly captivates as its hooks and grooves seduce as the bass swings and drums badger, a union which only captures ears and imagination with vocal harmonies adding just one more flavoursome texture to the album’s initial temptation.

Things quickly get rugged and heavy as Lockstep storms in next; its thrash breeding is full rabid evidence as vocalist Chris Friesen rides his own riffs and the raw flames of fellow guitarist Tim Kehoe. As becomes the norm, the track is soon evolving within ears. The fury of more extreme metal hues collude with heavy Mastodon resembling grooves and a Torche likened web of flavours as the licking of thrash seeded and groove metal honed flames continues. It is riveting stuff, the body and emotions involved in the devilment as easily as pleasure and an appetite for more, which the song continues to offer with its persistently twisting proposal and Black Brubeck continues with its superb jazz lit imagination and progressively sculpted inventive waltz. As avant-garde as something from a Trepalium or a Pryapisme, and as heftily compelling rock ‘n’ roll as a predacious roar from an Anthrax or High on Fire, the song is irresistible; a fascination with mischief in its heart and fiery passion in its soul.

As all tracks, God Sized Shadow is nurtured with the same fire of intent and character, it even more rapaciously dirty and intrusive than its predecessor but with, greater degrees, the same kind of cosmic air and aggressive volatility, the blackened shades of the latter especially potent. Bewitching and intrusive, with the excellent dark grouchiness of Mike Van Dyk’s bass and the lethally swung beats of drummer Matt Copeland gripping, the track is a primal yet worldly blaze with the rawness of a Triggerman and dark seduction of a Faith No More.

The Heart and The Feather instantly incites ears and thoughts as clean vocals impress within a hug of spidery grooves and sonic expression, Friesen becoming even more compelling as he mixes up his delivery with dirtier tones and rasping expression. Musically the song matches him, again that bedlamic quality a perpetual enticement of unpredictability and highly persuasive surprises woven in to a mix of fierce and richly spiced metal and heavy rock styles. Hips are soon swinging and imagination entangled in the proposition, a success just as easily inspired by Hideous Appetites, a manic appearing and skilfully conjured smog of ferocious enterprise and dynamic devilment; a ravenous beast of a song with melodic and antagonistic weaponry.

Completed by the cauldron of warmth and hostility that is The Lead Elephant, a track which majestically merges melodic tempting, sonic trespasses, and cantankerous metal ‘n’ roll within its tenacious and often enjoyably bruising tempest, Tales From Adrenechrome is a thrilling beast. There is no moment where emotions and appetite are not inflamed and pleasure thicker than the grooves it unleashes.

Grabbing a dose of Adrenechrome is a no brainer as far as we are concerned, Tales From Adrenechrome the release declaring a new band to challenge if not quite now certainly ahead those ‘giants’ mentioned.

Tales From Adrenechrome is out now @ and through most online stores.

Pete RingMaster 28/11/2015

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Bold webs of adventure: taking a Deep Breath with One Year Delay

OYD2_RingMaster Review

A sound hard to pin down always excites the imagination more than most and equally ears it is hoped. Greek hard rockers One Year Delay have such a proposition bursting from their imagination and craft and as proven by debut album Deep Breath it does give ears and thoughts a thoroughly enjoyable time. Offering seven songs entwining flavours such as nu and alternative metal, grunge and punk rock amongst many spices, the release is a roller coaster of invention and perpetual success. Wanting to learn more about One Year Delay and their ear catching proposition, we had the pleasure of talking with the band, exploring their origins, the spark to their diverse sound, and the recording of Deep Breath along the way.

Hi and welcome to The RingMaster Review, thanks for sharing your time with us.

For newcomers to the band can you give some background to the forming and early days of One Year Delay?

(Nick) One Year Delay started as a band of a few friends with the same goal. To write some music that we love and play as many gigs as we can, to express themselves and fulfil our need for creativity! To cooperate with your friends to a purpose like this, I assure you, it is not easy. And that’s because we all have different influences of all kinds of rock and metal genres. But the result is a good mix of all those genres. And the most important thing for the listener is to understand is the social and economic circumstances that we live in, and finally inspire us to our lyrics and music.

Was there a particular spark or intent taken into the band as direction or simply attitude in those first days?

(Nick) The spark was, in a way, the difficulties that we experienced as a nation the last few years, but also the personal problems that all people have faced through their lives. But I have to mention, that the expressions of your feeling such as anger, despair, terror etc. to another person, even if it is a friend, is equally difficult as dealing with it! And that’s another spark that boned us. The expression of ourselves; not feeling vulnerable!

Apart from member changes, how has the band changed in its ideas and thoughts in regard to making music if at all over the past three or so years?

(George)The main factor of changing the course of our compositions was the realisation that we have nothing to lose if we at least try to play anything we are fond of, following no linearity. We are all attracted to bands that are not afraid to experiment. Gradually it grew in us and we decided to establish this fusion of genres. The upcoming compositions will prove this even more, you can count on that!

OYD_RingMaster ReviewWe can confirm that great diversity to your sound, the embrace of numerous styles; so this has more evolved over time or was also a vibrant element at the band’s start?

(George) Like most bands in the beginning of their venture, we started in a rather tight musical frame. If you love music in general you don’t wanna focus on a particular influence I guess. The way I personally see it, it’s like entering a buffet restaurant and picking one dish! We are probably the guys that will fill their plates with a little bit of everything! Nevertheless we try to match our variable tastes as good as we can, being aware at the same time how difficult and risky it might be.

So it is fair to say that this strong mix of flavours has organically grown with band’s members individual and varied musical tastes or is there an element of intention fuelling it too?

(Stavros) Both at the same time…All members have got different tastes, with heavy sound as the joining point. Under this point of view we wouldn’t be satisfied with, for example, a 100% thrash or 100%hard rock sound. We use the style of sound in order to achieve contradiction and we don’t restrict ourselves in terms of genres. Everything has to do with matching and we could use more extreme combinations in case we thought it blends well. This is what we like and if you consider each song as a painting we like using lots of colours in the palette…

How would you describe your music to simplify it for newcomers?

(Stavros) Our music is based on the element of surprise. Our intentions are obvious through the blend of atmospheric/melodic parts to more metal sounds. You can spot this in the genres that vary in Deep Breath. Still the most distinguished part of our intentions to surprise is the bridge part of the songs that is not borrowing any structural element of the previous parts. Surely I cannot exclude the part we picked for the introduction to the whole album (Gunpoint intro)

Are there any specific and major inspirations which you would say have particularly impacted on the One Year Delay sound or invention?

(George) The gamut is infinite…Here is an attempt to include some names, though it still won’t be very representative: Korn, Deftones, Metallica, Alice in Chains, Nirvana, Tool, Black Sabbath, Slayer, Primus, Faith No More and the list goes on and on… Now as far as the influence is concerned there can be tiny parts of songs or a musician’s particular style that inspired us. The list definitely expands to a broader musical scale.

You are of course from Greece, where to us on the outside it seems it is the extreme styles of metal which predominantly occupy the thoughts of new bands and fans there. What is the reality and how has home grown rock fans taken to your adventurous sound?

(George) That is true. Greek metal fans mostly appreciate the archetypical elements of speed, heavy sound, groove, etc., although this not a rule. Younger generations are willing to embrace newer, more radical forms of music. It is kind of early to estimate the level of approval currently since our debut album has just been released. We are feeling optimistic but we know that Greek crowd is a difficult one to please…

You went over to the US to record just released debut Album Deep Breath. How did the opportunity to travel to Nashville come about and why that decision? deep_breath_oyd_RingMaster Review

(Jack) Everything started when the band decided to record the debut album. Then Pete said “hey guys, wanna contact a very well-known producer?” We said yes, of course; after that we started sending emails and stuff until one day we received an email from Toby which said, “guys, I would love to produce your band,” so we went to Nashville! That comes out because Toby lives Nashville, but on the other hand Nashville is like the Mecca of music. It’s definitely the hottest destination for every kind of musician. That city has music exhibitions even at the airport; I personally think that this place can make you a better musician only by visiting it.

As you just mentioned you recorded the album with the legendary Toby Wright. How was that experience and how much did he help shape or maybe re-adjust your ideas for songs in the studio?

(Jack) Ok, Toby is a great person and a really, really good producer. The experience of working with a producer like him is absolutely amazing. He can make you a better musician only by telling you a simple idea; he knows his job in and out of the studio. He helped us play our own songs better and get the best possible results from us. He has the ability to approach you as a friend and a musical expert at the same time. It is not a common thing for a music star to combine these two facts, is it?

Was there anything which came out of the recording of Deep Breath which surprised you or you discovered which will be a strong help in your next recordings?

(Orestis) We managed to handle a difficult situation. For example, we are a band that made pre-production and production of an album at the same time! Pre-production procedure was very difficult for us. We were in Greece and Toby in the States so we had to work all our ideas through email so Toby could hear it and send back his remarks. It wasn’t live at the studio like “play this or change that,” but I think in the end we have done a very good job as a band and Toby as a producer and we learned our lesson; next time pre-production time will be in the studio hopefully!

As far I remember that time while we were in the studio recording Deep Breath, we were focused on the album trying for the best possible result, so the answer to the second part of the question is no. However, we had a perfect idea before production time which we thought we might have the time to develop and place it as the outro of the album, but eventually it didn’t work. Despite that, this flawless idea will develop into a whole song for our next album. I sense that the new one is a progression or an evolution of our “5m9k song.”

OYD3_RingMaster ReviewNow the album is out there will you be taking Deep Breath to ears via live shows?

(Orestis) Yes, our main objective now is to provide our sound and material live across the country, also hope to support large metal /rock acts from all around the world when they come to Greece and hope that we will have the opportunity to navigate across Europe and then maybe the world, you never know!

And next for One Year Delay?

(Sotiris) I think that the next thing for O.Y.D. is, of course, live concerts around Greece, Europe and the U.S. (we must pay our bills first). At the same time we have new ideas for our next album which we are working on already, but mostly our aim is to become better musicians in every level and I believe it’s gonna be an interesting year.

Thanks again guys for talking with us, any last words you would like to share?

(Sotiris) Thank you for the interview and your fans for reading it …Make music and love…NOT war!

Read our review of Deep Breath @

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 20/10/2015

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City Of Thieves – Incinerator

CoT_RingMaster Review

We just cannot say no to a rousing slab of rock ‘n’ roll at The RR and that is exactly what UK hard rockers City Of Thieves uncage with their debut EP, Incinerator. It is five tracks of varied, no frills heavy rock which may not carry too many big surprises but potently feeds the instincts to roar and brawl with revelry. After the first minute of its opener you will kind of know and certainly welcome what you are going to get thereon in, but with a formidable freshness and passion to it too, it quickly shows why there is a thick buzz brewing up around the band; Incinerator inciting heavy satisfaction as it sonically lives up to its name.

The London quartet emerged in May of 2015 and as soon as their sounds hit ears and their feet stomped on stage, City Of Thieves began stirring up rich attention. Their live debut was an acclaim awarded introduction at his year’s Camden Rocks Festival, whilst debut single and now EP title track Incinerator, saw the band play listed on the New Rock Show on Planet Rock Radio for 7 weeks. Since then the band has found itself booked for this year’s Hard Rock Hell, Legends Of Rock, and Rockstock Festivals, played Bloodstock, and seen their EP already covered in plaudits.

EP Artwork_RingMaster Review     Recorded with producer Toby Jepson (Little Angels, The Answer, The Virginmarys), mixed by Mike Fraser (Metallica, AC/DC, Slipknot, Aerosmith), and mastering by Simon Francis (Kodaline, Kaiser Chiefs, Primal Scream), the Incinerator EP starts with a bang and never looks back. That first single opens things up, enticing ears and teasing an instant appetite with its initial predatory prowl of riffs, they courted by the swiping beats of drummer Will Richards and the gnarly tones of Jamie Lailey’s bass. Pretty soon things have ‘relaxed’ into a fiery stroll as the guitars of Ben Austwick and Adam Wardle spin a melodic web of grooves and spicy riffs , and Lailey unveils his sandy, slightly grizzled vocal tones. Like an old buddy, a familiarity entwines with the sonic enterprise and stalking rhythms, and like a returning friend it only pleases as it comes further alive with individual prowess and a creative energy which many bands never ascend to, especially within a debut.

The great start continues with Buzzed Up City, a mellower and warmer grab of the senses but one not scrimping on vociferous snarls within its fiery heart as the band embraces a more classic rock tone with eighties hues in its infectious rock ‘n’ roll. It hits the spot with accuracy though is still eclipsed by its predecessor and the following Lay Me To Waste, the best track on the release. From the almost carnivorous tone of the bass, the rebellious nature of drums and riffs, and grooves which flirt like a lithe seductress, the track smoulders and blazes with a virulence and enterprise which swiftly captures the imagination, and of course greedy ears.

Here Comes The Shot is more of the same infection in its individual way. Its bluesy air and rumbling rhythms also immediate persuasion as vocally again Lailey, like the song and indeed EP, brings a ‘this is how it is, take it or leave it’ attitude and the taking is the only reply possible to the rousing anthem.

A live acoustic take of Mr 50/50 brings the release to a fine end, the song a closing reminder of the core craft and qualities of City Of Thieves always lying beneath the full on riotous sound of other tracks whilst providing a last shot of aural liquor complete with boozy harmonica.

The bottom-line here is that there are few BIG surprises with Incinerator but an unbridled dose of fun and rousing rock ‘n’ roll, and who is never up for that?

The Incinerator EP is available now via Townsend Records / Monster Box Music

Pete RingMaster 23/09/2015

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Suffer No Fools – Songs For The Restless Youth

suffer no fools_RingMaster Review

Suffer No Fools is a name you will be getting used to if they fulfil the promise running through debut EP Songs For The Restless Youth. The British metallers are merely months into their emergence after forming earlier this year but offer a sizeable introduction and potential loaded first collection of fiery, groove lined incitements suggesting there is experience in the ranks of their creators. Whether that is so or not, it is a highly accomplished encounter leaving a definite appetite for more from the London based quintet.

Roaring out of Ealing, Suffer No Fools draw on inspirations from the likes of Metallica, Rammstein, Killswitch Engage, and Trivium for their aggressive melody rich sound, influences which do not hide in the shadows within songs but tone rather than direct their direction. As mentioned the band only formed a few months back but have quickly got down to creating strong persuasions as shown in Songs For The Restless Youth. Led by the strong tones of Ali Khan and driven by the rousing rhythms of bassist Alex Bain and drummer Mike Taylor, music and songs take little time in luring ears and attention. Once entwined in the skilled and imaginative enterprise, whether in stirring riffs, imagination inciting grooves, or evocative melodies, of guitarists Jamie Newdeck and Jack Kirby, the EP is a magnetic fire of potential and thick inventive craft. Recently Kirby has left the band to pursue other musical ventures but leaves his potent part in the first steps of a band surely heading to bigger and stronger things.

albumart_RingMaster Review   Opener Acheron is a one minute atmospheric introduction washing the senses in intrigue and sonic radiance; calm before the storm of The Bombing Campaign which is already brewing its potency and tempest in the closing ambience of the first track before striding purposefully into ears with military like rhythms. As riffs and beats welcome the voice of Khan there is no escaping the Metallica spicing, a hue also lining the subsequent melodic and grooved exploits of the song. It is an ear pleasing, emotion stirring encounter, a sturdy anthem to set the EP off properly but one also unafraid to switch into contrasting provocative flavours and textures.

Prey continues the strong start to Songs For The Restless Youth in equally rousing fashion, pushing the accelerator down a touch more and creating an aggressively urgent and compelling proposition at the same time. Again fluidly emerging spicy melodies and vocal harmonies provide a temper to a stormy landscape whilst some of those other inspirations come to mind across the song. Equally though Suffer No Fools, if not dramatically, still offer their own character as shown by the growling Forgiven Or Forgotten. Here guitars further flirt with sonic imagination and ear wrapping grooves but in a climate more hostile and dirty than in its predecessors; its riffs a snarling confrontation and rhythms a fierce barracking. As all tracks and the EP itself, it makes a more than decent first impression but just grows in stature and persuasion over time.

Both the resourceful almost progressive scenery of Abyss and the scorching prowl and anthemic enterprise of Dirge Of The Old Gods make enjoyable times, even if without finding the same heights of those before them and certainly the EP’s best track which brings Songs For The Restless Youth to a mighty close. Into The Breach is the jewel in the crown of the EP, a treat of a song equipped with striking imagination and ear enriching melodic enticement lined with glorious hooks. The song takes a little while to get going but when in full flight and flow, is a riveting beast simultaneously antagonistic and bewitchingly seductive. Alone it makes Suffer No Fools worth keeping an eye on and with its companions in tow encourages thoughts of a band with the tools to make a big impact.

It is probably fair to say that Songs For The Restless Youth has open embers of originality but apart from its final offering, lacks the spark of the unpredictable, to yet truly leap away of the crowd. Suffer No Fools though is a band with individual skills and a united craft that demands attention, rewarding that with a strongly satisfying first look; so again make a note of the name as you enjoy the quality and potential.

Songs For The Restless Youth is available now from the Suffer No Fools Bandcamp.

Pete RingMaster 01/09/2015

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Helligators – Road Roller Machine

Hell_RingMaster Review

It is fair to say that Road Roller Machine lives up to its name, the new album from Italian heavy rockers Helligators an unrelenting juggernaut of ravenous riff driven rock ‘n’ roll. Immersing strains of blues and stoner bred colour into a raw and uncompromising tempest of power and intensity, the release is a thumping treat of bruising and invigorating sound; not the most unique you are likely to come across this year but without doubt one of the most exhaustingly enjoyable.

Hailing from Rome, the 2009 formed Helligators self-released their debut album Against All Odds two years later, it and a video for the track Tattooed Killer, enticing keen attention the way of the band. The varied flavouring in their imposing sound sparked increasingly eager appetites from that point on, with the release of 2012 single Snake Oil Jesus only reinforcing their emerging presence and potent musical persuasion. The song was a strong teaser to things to come too, pleasures to be found and grown further in the 2014 recorded and recently released Road Roller Machine. Alongside all of this the band’s live presence has equally drawn acclaim, the sharing of stages with the likes of Orange Goblin, Nashville Pussy, Doomraiser, Strana Officina, Bad Bones and many more persistently impressing over time. Now it is with their second album released on Sliptrick Records, to whom the band signed this past spring, that Helligators are looking to stir up rock ‘n’ roll ‘trouble’, and such its rigorously persuasion it is hard to see them not becoming a loud household name.

copertina_road_roller_machine_RingMaster Review     Recorded with Luciano Chessa, Road Roller Machine bursts into rugged life with Nomad, a lone invigorating groove straight away gripping ears and appetite before rhythms and heavily robust riffs join the deliciously intensive early bait of the song. Thoughts of Motorhead quickly take hold, hints joining just as pungent ones of Danish band Grumpynators spicing up the deluge of spiky rhythms and ravenous riffery. It is a thrilling onslaught only accentuated by the growling tones of vocalist Hellvis, his bear like delivery a thick incitement within the increasingly tenacious enterprise surrounding him. Guitarists El Santo and Kamo bring stoner and blues lined hues to entwine with insatiable charge of riffs, both also providing good vocal backing to Hellvis, with everything involved adding up to the most hellacious and thrilling start to the album; maybe to any heavy rock album this year.

The Doomstroyer holds court next, its opening sonic coaxing over swiftly addictive enticing from drummer Alex, again an immediate grab of the listener. Heftily anthemic from the first instant, the track continues to incite imagination and body with the descriptive expression of Hellvis against slightly restrained rhythms and riffs but lures still pulling at the leash of intimidation. There is a Desert Storm like air to the track, a dirty and tempestuous climate which is as volatile as it is infectious, especially as guitar cast melodic tendrils wrap around rhythmic pistons and the song’s raw ferocity.

A ‘lighter’ air springs forth with Scream next; its blues rock breeding spicy veining to a landscape as rugged as that of its predecessor. The bass of Goblin stalks the song from its first second, a dark and predacious spine the guitars entwine with their constantly evolving and enthralling ideation. The individual craft and passion of each member is an equally roaring essence in each album track, and here uniting in a furnace of virulent adventure and instinctive tempting for a success more or less matched by both She Laughs and Snake Oil Jesus. The first of the two tempers its rabid aggressiveness with mellower melodic rock resourcefulness, both guitars and even the vocals infusing a relative calm to proceedings though the gripping snarl of the bass and the ever wickedly jabbing beats of Alex ensures there is no lack of the bands intimidating edge. Its successor is a groove machine all on its own, an incessant scorcher which spills adrenaline fuelled intensity and rebellious attitude with every caustic syllable and acidic chord. Once more the band twists in strong variety to the design and persuasion of the song; never going into the unknown but only leaving ears and appetite urgently wanting more.

More is what you get with Truckdriver, a track with little in the way of major surprises but a tank load of inventive enterprise in its southern honed rumble. There is no escape from the pure contagion of the song or that of the sultry and sinister dark majesty of Swamp Man Voodoo. Every groove and predatory hook oozes menace, backed by the rapacious nature of rhythms and the ever hungry riffs though each element also leaks rich seduction that never lets go. The outstanding song is pure theatre, a satanic dance and fiercely vociferous trespass for the soul.

No surprises for guessing the character of a song called Bad Ass from Helligators, its air instant belligerence and sound swift confrontation with of course plenty which just invites full involvement before Stone Crusher takes over with its Metallica meets AC/DC like blaze. There is no denying that the song did not find the same depth of appetite as those before it, or to be fairer as consistently as those as there are moments when the band again shows they can rival any one in unleashing a torrent of rock ‘n’ roll brilliance with thick rigorous invention.

Road Roller Machine is brought to an end by the acoustically crafted Black Sun and its blues kissed melodic smoulder. The song fuses stoner and southern rock hues with classic rock ingredients to sculpt another song which maybe does not quite match those earlier within the album but is impossible to tear one away from whilst providing a fine end to one mighty slab of heavy duty rock ‘n’ roll. Helligators have no interest in re-inventing rock music but certainly they want to give everyone a riotously good time and that they do big style with Road Roller Machine.

Road Roller Machine is out on Sliptrick Records now!

RingMaster 12/08/2015

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Fallen Angels – World In Decay

Fallen Angels Band Photo 1_RingMaster Review - Left2Right Steve-Brad-Erik-Carl-Matt - cropped

Creating a compelling maelstrom of energy and familiarity, US thrashers Fallen Angels back up their acclaimed second album Engines of Oppression, with another tempest of aggression and craft in the masterful shape of World In Decay. The Seattle based quintet once more openly weave the inspiration of genre masters and originators such as early Metallica, Testament, Slayer, and Megadeth into their equally classic metal hued sound, and again the band uncages a proposition which only excites ears and appetite. It is fair to say that in many ways you know what you are going to get with a Fallen Angles encounter, but not in what shape or gripping design it comes in. The same applies to World In Decay, an album with few major surprises but a torrent of things to drool over.

With their 80’s thrash and 70/80’s heavy metal influenced sound, Fallen Angels has increasingly and persistently lured strong attention, establishing themselves with fans and media as a proposition ripe with contagious and aggression driven adventure. Equally the band is a dab hand at entangling it all with a modern take on melodic and imagination sculpted textures, as first shown through 2008 debut album Rise From Ashes and even more so in Engines of Oppression three years later. World In Decay is more of the same but also equipped with an even fresher breath of craft and maturity equating to Fallen Angel’s finest moment yet.

Produced by Grammy award winning producer Michael Rosen (Forbidden, Testament, Death Angel, Flotsam and Jetsam, Tesla, Vicious Rumors), World In Decay erupts into life with The Hammer’s Blow and an instant onslaught of spicy guitar and rampant riffs from Erik Hanson and Matt Be Rot. They coax from amidst intensive rhythms led by the swings of drummer Steve Spitzbart, the track an uncompromising lure before brewing into a more welcoming creative blaze of flying grooves and hooks over the magnetically growling bass of Carl Larsson and around the vocal roar of Bradzilla which quickly emerges as the ringmaster to the rampage in furious motion. Thoughts of Exodus and Annihilator spring up from the growing tapestry of fierce enterprise engulfing ears, whilst the melody toned side of the song dabbles with folkish/Celtic flirtation at times, the whole thing ensuring the album gets off to a stirring start.

Album Cover - Fallen Angels - World In Decay_RingMaster Review   The first single from the album, Nightmare comes next, its darker and more predatory character swiftly igniting the imagination whilst discord lined sonic enticement has ears seduced before it all momentarily halts for riffs and rhythms to collude and unleash a ravenous charge. That Metallica whiff is a rosy hue within the raw and incendiary landscape of the song, but as everywhere it gets honed into something maybe enjoyably familiar but leaves expectations scrambling for success. The song potently backs up the might of its predecessor before Forsaken Existence kicks things up another gear with its inventive and melodically emotive presence. From the opening breath, the track is a maze of twists and provocative craft before settling into a leaner surge of bruising enticement, though it in turn is soon wrapped in more sparkling invention and sonic colour which go on to entwine for the remaining length of the fascinating offering. The track is irresistible, at its heights when exploring a diversity of styles and pure contagion when just bullying air and ears.

Leading the Blind is another proposal prowling the listener from its first touch, riffs and rhythms as good as stalking the senses as an intoxicating seducing from Hanson spreads tantalising beauty around the bestial heart of the song. As in the last, it simply grows in weight, creative strength, and addictive resourcefulness with every passing chord and rhythmic swipe. The vocals alone enthral and within the gripping drama of sound, it all results in one of the pinnacles of World In Decay, through a triumph superbly supported by Fire At Eden’s Gate. Whereas the last song was beast like, its successor is a caress of classical hued melodies and mesmeric string craft from the guitarists, only the firm rhythms providing any hint of the dark intent of the song within its impressive entrance. They soon get their way though and spark an uncompromising confrontation led by the great grouchy tones of the bass and the ever ready to grapple delivery of Bradzilla. The track never uncages its fullest fury or violence though which only adds to its commanding air, but once in full stride, it never allows an easy or unrewarding time to brew either.

The weighty stance and sound of Into The Abyss keeps things burning brightly though it lacks the same spark as the songs before it. Its body is almost subdued in energy at times in comparison, saving it for the sizzling crescendos which do escape across its evocative length. The individual skills and united craft of the band again only impress though so that the song is only ever pleasing, a quality also applying to The Hour of the Time, another which does not impact as firmly as others, certainly initially but only grows into ears and in stature through every excursion through its web of flavours and tenacious execution.

The album ends on a lofty high with Mortis Ex Machina, the song a rousing anthem from its opening roar and with a volatile nature casts a thoroughly bewitching instrumental landscape punctured by recurring and ferocious vocal incitement aligned to skilfully rabid rhythms and riff driven fury. Talking of instrumentals, the album actually finishes on a mesmeric untitled offering which like an epilogue to what came before leaves ears and thoughts enraptured and eager to experience the release all over again.

World In Decay brings the best of familiarity and fresh endeavour together like an old friend carrying a whole new persona, whilst Fallen Angels as reinforced themselves with the album as a band not yet able to turn the trash/metal scene on its head, but one easy to get a bit greedy over.

World In Decay is available from August 4th via Cyberdyne Records.

RingMaster 03/08/2015

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Prowler – From The Shadows

Prowler_RingMaster Review

Not to be confused with seemingly a handful of metal bands with a matching name, the Prowler unleashing new album From The Shadows, hail from Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and create a rousing onslaught of horror fuelled heavy/thrash metal. Theirs is a sound which is maybe low on major surprises and high on familiarity, one unafraid to wear its inspirations on its blood soaked sleeve, but equally it only provides a compelling and thoroughly enjoyable escapade that hits the undemanding sweet spot time and time again.

Prowler began in 2010, releasing a quartet of EP’s which they subsequently brought together with an additional new track for their debut album After You in 2013. The band’s inspirations seem to stem from early Metallica and Anthrax, taking From The Shadows as an example, and indeed eighties thrash in general, essences twisted into sonic echoes and offshoots from horror movies of the same era. 2013 also saw the release of The New Blood EP, a well-received attention grabber in many ways sowing the accomplished and ravenous seeds for the Roger Lian (Slayer, Overkill, Pantera, Damageplan) mastered From The Shadows. As suggested the band’s new album does not particularly reshape the landscape or scenery of thrash metal but it does join a handful of genre releases this year which simply leave ears and appetite highly satisfied whilst uncaging anthemic fun easily luring limbs, neck muscles, and voice to get fully involved.

The album opens with R.O.T.L.D and the first of the individual film samples bookending each track within the album; here a slither of Return Of the Living Dead triggering a swiftly contagious rhythmic stroll. A riff and groove sculpted swing soon adds to the dynamic theatre and persuasion of the song, whilst vocally with a whiff of Wednesday 13 to his delivery, guitarist Patrick Best opens up the cinematic narrative. It is a raw and magnetic concoction with a horror punk scent brewing up its enmity within a thrash spawned prowl, and a rousing start to the album.

cover_RingMaster Review     The excellent track makes way for Out Of The Fog, riffs and beats encasing the opening sample just as the theme of the lyrics impose within the cinematic source. Keys soon add spicy colouring to the antagonistic prowl of sound whilst the bass of Shawn Bruce and beats of drummer Jak Sumwalt cast their own sinister and rampant cage. It is a predatory mix with plenty of enjoyable and generally unpredictable twists, and knowing the films seeding each track, as here, only adds to the theatre of it all.

I Am Wolf quickly hunts down the senses and psyche next; the throaty primal tone of the bass and the rapier like beats alone inciting ears and imagination whilst vocally Best is a protagonist with barker like appeal around the continuing samples which puncture the passage of the track. As the first pair of songs, the track is undiluted full-blooded thrash metal, easy to offer comparisons too but hard to dismiss as a pale imitation of anything.

The commanding and stirring beats of Sumwalt make an inspiring impact across the whole of the album, and at the start of the following The Thing Not Seen, simply stalking ears with a tribal come demonic stance and canter. Like the bass tempting offered continually by Bruce, which is just as potent across From The Shadows, there is a primal feel and air to the rhythmic provocation, one emulated in their own raw and spiteful fashion by vocals and searing guitar enterprise of Best.

Prowler next offer a cover of The Ramones track, Pet Sematary, the song given a heavy metal make-over fuelled by another thrash cast tempest of energy and sound. It is a more than decent and pleasing version but lacks something compared to the band’s own songs, which maybe is how it should be with any cover song, always being eclipsed by a band’s own invention as shown immediately by Return To The Lot. Another entwining rabid rapacity and a more stalker like gait to its primeval hell, the Salems Lot inspired ravishing captures ears and imagination with visceral ease, again not splintering into new domains but healthily feeding any wants from a thrash/horror punk fusion.

Death On Wheels carries a similar attack and growl to its predecessor and wears arguably the strongest Metallica/Anthrax sound of any song within the album, and through those aspects does not quite match what has already lit up From The Shadows. There is no denying though that it has ears and pleasure in full swing before leaving Creature Of The Black and its atmospheric entrance to work another enthralling tempting. Eventually the song grows into a muscular and savagely predacious offering with carnivorous rhythms and caustic grooves, and a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable album.

From The Shadows certainly offers little new but it certainly provides a festival of eighties aural and visual devilry with an attitude and snarl as nasty as the creatures central to each and every song. As mentioned earlier, it is enormous fun and that definitely works when looking for something to simply get the blood rushing through veins and emotions primed to take on the world.

From The Shadows is available digitally and on CD now via Slaney Records and @

RingMaster 21/07/2015

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