Being As An Ocean – Self Titled

BAAO2015_live_RingMaster Review

Unleashing the successor to their acclaimed album How We Both Wondrously Perish of 2014, US melodic hardcore band Being As An Ocean, easily reinforce their already potent reputation with a new self-titled proposition. Building on what fuelled the last release whilst pushing its boundaries and imagination that little bit more, the new album is a captivating and fiercely accomplished offering, and though it did not consistently set our ears ablaze, it is one of the most refreshing encounters heard this year which at its heights is seriously rousing and in its less dramatic moments simply thorough enjoyment.

Creating emotive and tempestuous incitements from a fusion of melodic hardcore, post-hardcore, and metalcore, to condense the veins of flavours running through their sound, the Californian bred Being As An Ocean swiftly engages attention and imagination with the opening to first track Little Richie. Mellow keys and vocals unite for the initial atmospheric coaxing though that tender lure is soon engulfed in crisp beats and caustic vocals aligned to more merciful flames of guitar. It is a striking proposal which evolves with every emerging passage of ideation, continually revealing fresh invention whilst remaining as imposing and provocative as possible.

The strong start is quickly eclipsed by the following Ain’t Nobody Perfect where the ear gripping vocals of Joel Quartuccio reveal strong emotive textures in a varied delivery, an emotional success matched by the powerful clean tones of Michael McGough. Personal tastes mean the latter’s cleaner range is the one which sparks the appetite most but there is no escaping the strength and quality of Quartuccio’s aggressive squalls and spoken expression, and the way he masterfully uses them. The guitars of Tyler Ross and McGough similarly abrase and seduce across this and each track, their raw base an inflammatory persuasion on ears and individual imagination at times a spellbinding emprise to anticipate and devour.

IMP006_RingMaster Review The Zealot’s Blindfold spills angst and ire with every turn in its thick emotive landscape, vocals the rigorous vehicle for their narrative. Their expulsions of emotional fire are tempered and inspired by the eventful lines from Ralph Sica’s bass whilst drummer Connor Denis muscularly punctuates every expression offered. The track is another slice of seriously resourceful songwriting with an interpretation which is barely anything less than venomous. With the guitars and McGough’s soaring melodic tones the biggest thrills, the impressing encounter makes way for the excellent Sleeping Sicarii which has ears and appetite hooked from its opening of an almost senses grinding torrent of repetitive grooves. It is a stirring start which slips a touch as a spoken delivery aligns to a more relaxed enticement, though the bass seizes another chance to throatily seduce at the same time. The song comes vivaciously alive again when intensity and virulence breaks out to raise the temperature and thrills, a potency matched by a tremendous flight of choral harmonies later in the song amidst McGough’s rich croon.

A similar template feeds the heart and ferocity of Judas, Our Brother next, again Being As An Ocean masterly moving through melodic and predacious scenery within constantly varying climates. The song also reinforces that each track needs close attention and time to reveal all the nooks and creative crannies within, greater rewards as thrillingly shown here and proven again by the fascinating Saint Peter always the result from immersing under the surface tempest. Melancholic yet elegant keys hug the spoken narrative of Quartuccio to open up the subsequent song, guitars a quickly joining enticing within a brooding atmospheric charm. In no time though, Being As An Ocean expels crescendos of creative theatre and emotional energy, again the lead vocalist a gripping unchained protagonist within a rich and expansive web of sound.

Though not quite sparking as consistently as its outstanding predecessor, the emotional fire that is Forgetting Is Forgiving The I still provides moments which simply bewitch whilst only arousing thick satisfaction whilst The World As A Stage merges a celestial melodic shimmer with the raw Quartuccio antagonism to create a compelling storm of heart driven reflection and turmoil. As much as it is forcibly abrasive and caustic, the song is melodically turbulent, once more an intensive tapestry crafted and unveiled by the band.

The closing pair of first Sins Of The Father and lastly …And Their Consequence bring the album to an enthralling close. Both tracks twist through fiercely voracious and emotionally subdued drama across their dynamic proposals, the first almost burning with passion and sonic anxiety whilst its successor is even more emotionally apprehensive and musically incendiary with it’s searing anthemic blaze led by Quartuccio in full passion backed just as potently by McGough’s impressive voice.

The tracks are again evolving adventures providing a great end to an impressive release. As suggested earlier personal tastes waned in some aspects of songs, certainly over initial listens, but the fact that a constant returning to the release and a lingering persuasion bred by individual songs is a persistent outcome from every listen, provides the evidence to the success of Being As An Ocean, band and album.

Being As An Ocean is released in Europe and the UK on 6th July via Impericon Records and available in the US now through InVogue Records

https://www.facebook.com/BeingAsAnOcean

RingMaster 06/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Call To Arms – Invictus EP

Call To Arms_RingMaster Review

If the members of Call To Arms are as young as photos of them suggest, then it is hard not to be gripped by intrigue and excitement as to how good this band could become given the impressiveness of debut EP Invictus. Made up of five voracious and inventive metal tempests, the release hits the listeners straight between the eyes with its raw hostility cast into imaginative and confrontational anthemic persuasion.

The band began in 2013, formed by vocalist Dean Donnelly alongside original bassist Jordan Conway. Quickly the line-up was completed by guitarists Daniel Tyrell and Niall Ennis, lead and rhythm respectively, and drummer Ben Deane. Concentrating on honing their sound for the first few months, it is fair to say that the Ballymun hailing Call To Arms quickly whipped keen vocal attention and support. Making their live debut at The Academy, Dublin as part of The Blastbeat: Battle of the Bands, the band has gone on to share stages with the likes of Avatar, Fozzy, and Chelsea Grin and personnel wise seen Alex Caffrey replace Conway and recently after the recording and release of Invictus, Deane leave the band.

Produced by Joe Cleere, Invictus as suggested earlier, is an imposing and striking entrance by the band, needing very little time to make a potent impression as opener Our Salvation gets to work on ears and appetite. Featuring guest vocals from Sam Gorman of Enshrined, the track builds a thumping invitation with rhythms and spicy grooves, its lure heavy metal bred but keeping in its creative pocket for now, the subsequent rage fuelling its presence. Soon hitting a thick stride though, vocals spill antagonism and combat in their raw tone and delivery, matched in kind by the bass as the guitars spin an infectious web of hooks and abrasing riffery. It is like a mix of Biohazard and Killswitch Engage in many ways, yet has a freshness which especially hits as band and song twist in unpredictable and gripping enterprise. As it evolves and expands its imagination, a psychotic influence hits the song’s compelling bassline and vocals, their moment to stalk the psyche only leading to another ferocious assault posing as the climax.

Cover_RingMaster Review     Bullet With Your Name steps up next bullying ears with vocals and ravenous sounds though yet again there is an infectious spine and adventure to the track which has you welcoming its vicious assault. As in its predecessor and songs to come, there is as much a punk/hardcore richness to the tempest as a thrash/metal breeding, though it is the latter spawning another magnetic persuasion of emerging imaginative twists and endeavour. The individual skills and resourcefulness of the band is also in open evidence as well as an eagerness to push ideas and textures with elements of discord and unpredictability.

The release continues to impress and reveal new aspect within the band’s songwriting and sound as Imprisoned Darkness unleashes its fury next. Opening with a mesh of acidic grooves which in turn spark a delicious hook which can only be described as Dead Kennedys like, the song rallies attention and emotions. Those initial lures continue to grip within a sonic and vocal abrasion unafraid to colour its animus with elements of classic metal and metalcore like hues. It is inescapable persuasion though soon outshone by the upstanding Mirrors, its opening military in rhythmic tempting and militant in attitude. Once more metal and hardcore unite in one hellacious and infectiously alluring examination veined by skilled and flavoursome grooves amidst rich sonic exploits. The track takes top honours within Invictus and if you want a teaser before braving the Call To Arms onslaught, it tells you all you need to know about band, sound, and their stirring potential.

The EP is closed by The Core, a final uncompromising anthem you just know will have venues throbbing with bodies and attitude. Thrash and punk bred, the track is an intense and incendiary end to a tremendous first look at and feel of the Call To Arms sound and presence. Invictus is pleasingly raw and shows the band still finding its unique feet but there is no doubting that we have one rather promising and exciting protagonist in our midst which can only get big, bolder, and more fearsome.

The Invictus EP is available now @ http://calltoarmsirl.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/CallToArmsIRL/   https://twitter.com/CallToArmsIRL

RingMaster 03/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Islasorna – E.D.E.N

Islasorna Online Promo_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Band and sound might be tagged as progressive metal, but the best description for both elements and the creative and technical fury of Scottish band Islasorna, is psychotic. The Edinburgh quintet’s debut EP E.D.E.N is a tempest of bedlamic ideation, a deranged onslaught of inventive noise which could be declared a sonic psychosis and should be acclaimed as one intoxicating slab of thrilling turmoil.

Formed at the beginning of 2014, Islasorna create the most unpredictable maelstrom of sound. It is indeed bred in from a progressive seeding, but from second to second comes infused with a diverse array of flavours and psyche twisting imagination. Inspirations for the band are drawn from the likes of The Devil Wears Prada, Northlane, Whitechapel, Sikth, The Dillinger Escape Plan, Animals as Leaders, and Metallica, varied spices adding to a striking proposition in sound matched by a live presence which has increasingly earned acclaim and attention as the band shared stages with bands such as Bleed From Within, Carcer City, Demoraliser, Martyr Defiled, and Continents over the past year or so. E.D.E.N is a fierce nudge on broader awareness and recognition, and though for some it might be a creative turbulence too far such the intensive nature of the EP, Islasorna will surely be a name on a much wider roar from hereon in.

The EP opens with Obliteration and a melodic twang of guitar which alone soaks the air in a sultry yet slightly portentous suggestiveness. It is a hint quickly realised by the forceful beats of Michael Devlin and the vocal roar of Justin Dilworth. At first their presence only brings a small element of imposing urgency with it, a slither of increased intensity but also a stronger and darker apocalyptic hue which toys with and ignites the imagination. At the song’s climax a voice skirts the senses and provokes thoughts, menacingly flirting from the shadows before the following Achluophobia emerges to bring its words to thicker destructive reality.

Islasorna cover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster ReviewThe second track instantly expels a djent spawned predation around a blaze of vocal scowling and sonic intimidation from the guitars of Dean Watson and Jamie McArthur. As the first track, it is more a prowling ravenous predator than a vicious onslaught yet the pathological agitation its title suggests is fuel to the attention gripping enterprise and imagination cast by the band. Simultaneously the track is savage and seductive, extremes entwining and in revolt against each other as the listener is dragged through a landscape of metalcore and grindcore to name two of the open essences sculpted in a progressive and experimental voracity.

Judas in comparison is a calmer incitement on ears and senses, and opens with a thoroughly engaging melodic caress of guitar courted by the darker lures of Mark Brunton’s bass. It is a fascinating start, the equally mellow tones of Dilworth adding to the tantalising proposal. The feeling that something is brewing is never far from the surface though and by midway the brief but potent offering has uncaged a caustic climate of sound and emotion though it is still with restraint as the band reveals more of their diversity in songwriting, sound, and individual prowess. Its magnetic bellow makes way for the harsher but no less inventive Choices. The song continues the melodic and dazzling progressive elements of its predecessor but cages them in a jagged confrontation of riffs and barbarous rhythms, both Devlin and Brunton as carnivorous in their attack as the guitars are melodically riveting. Arguably the encounter fits into the more expected template of progressive metal and the inspirations to the band mentioned earlier, yet it is a perpetual provider of unique twists and senses spearing sonic flirtation again setting the band apart from the crowd.

Creative mania returns in full lung bursting vocal and noise driven devilry next with 4-2-8, the track full warfare on the senses as Dilworth reveals his broadest vocal derangement yet and musically the band twists like a sonic and rhythmic dervish. The track is outstanding, not necessarily better than any other upon E.D.E.N but staking a favourite claim with increasing success over every listen. Its rigorous and rugged turbulence is instantly contrasted by the EP’s closing title track where once more Islasorna pull back the shades on another side of their imagination. An initial breeze of melodic beauty kisses ears and thoughts first, keys colouring a shadowed ambience with elegant charm before evolving into an electro rock seducing around militant rhythms and a union of harsh and harmonic vocals. Post hardcore, scream, post rock, they are all amongst the spices within the encounter, whispering hues within the enthralling finale going towards further proof of the band’s originality.

As outstanding as it is, E.D.E.N still feels like it is only the first big step of the band, one loaded with such promise that it suggests it is merely going to be the springboard for bigger, bolder exploits ahead. This only adds to the excitement of the emergence of potentially a new force in European metal.

The E.D.E.N EP is available from June 1st through all stores.

http://Facebook.com/islasornauk

RingMaster 01/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Virtue In Vain – For All You Know Is The Mask I Wore

Virtue In Vain Promos

Virtue In Vain Promos

Though it makes a strong impact first time around, it is with further intensive attention that For All You Know Is The Mask I Wore from Welsh progressive metalcore band Virtue In Vain wins out and defuses any initial doubts or uncertainties. To be fair there is little about the band’s debut EP which raises any major disagreements between ears and proposition from the start, but being as brutal as it is creatively uncompromising, there is plenty to try and take in which needs time to explore and appreciate. The potential of the band within the release is especially exciting, and fills any moments which do not quite work as well as other elements, with assumptions of greater things to come.

Hailing from Cardiff, Virtue In Vain began in 2012 sparking and spicing their sound with inspirations from the likes of The Devil Wears Prada, Napoleon, Whitechapel, and August Burns Red. Their impact and sound has led the quartet to be regarded as one of the strongest upcoming bands in the UK metal scene, backed impressively by shows alongside bands such as Napoleon, Demoraliser, Dead Harts, Astroid Boys, Ready Set Fall, Lock & Key, Fathoms and many more. Now they are poised to explode upon the nation attention with For All You Know Is The Mask I Wore, a release with more than enough to leave a hungry appetite in its ferocious wake.

virtue in vain     The EP opens with Prologue, a decent enough short instrumental soaked in drama and portentous ambience. Its dark tones do have the imagination supposing something predatory and intensive coming to examine ears, and so it proves to be once Martyrs emerges. A heavy snarling riff is first point of provocation, backed swiftly by uncompromising rhythms and a winy sonic lure of guitar. It is a gripping entrance, enticing bait which subsequently gathers its opening elements together to forge a more direct and slimmer raw incitement growled over by vocalist Hywel Thomas. Venom and antagonism spill from his gutturally bred syllables whilst the guitar of Emyr Thomas dances over the hellacious attack with sonic endeavour. Additional squalls of vocals add good variety whilst the guitars scythe through their attack and the corrosive potency of rhythms with addictive and acidic enterprise. The vicious swings of drummer Luke Sullivan bruise and tenderise the senses whilst the bass of Ryan Jones is a perpetual stalking of song and listener. Continuing to twist and show plenty of imagination in its varying gait, sonic trespass, and creative hostility, the track is an impressive full start to the release.

In Faith, In Ruin leaps in next and immediately has a great almost swinish texture to the vocals to shuffle things up there, whilst riffs and grooves again snarl with almost toxic intent. The more formula tones of Hywel Thomas provide the rawest challenge but variation again ensures that their alluring violation matches the persistently shifting landscape of the song. The intensive and busy nature of the track, as across the EP, means the technical and deeper layers within the encounter are often smothered but given time reveal the strong depths to songs, as shown again with the erosive persuasion of Left Behind. Its more restrained opening subsequently kicks up a gear though still reining in the violence and unleashing an addiction forging groove which lures the listener swiftly into the sonically cancerous and turbulent heart of the song. Aspects like that simply bewitch as does an unexpected and calm passage of melodic beauty which leads to a tempestuous climate, though the more expected sonic raging in the song does feed expectations and enjoyment equally. The potential even in the less striking elements though is inescapable and only adds to the anticipation for what comes next.

My Heart Is Bruised But Never Broken is another which takes longer to reveal all of its persuasion. Its technical and imaginative layers within the less attention sparking storm raging around them, are again the song’s major potency but once more needing time for ears to explore and revel in. It is nevertheless an intrigue and satisfaction igniting offering revealing more of the inventive songwriting within the band and their ability to skilfully create ruinous and inhospitable landscapes or scenery of pure melodic beauty as evidenced by the brief instrumental Relapse which follows. Like the oasis within the savaging of Left Behind, the piece is enthralling, spreading its elegance and charm into the EP’s title track which evolves out of its embrace.

The closing track is soon slipping into the darkest, ravenous depths of despair and sonic confrontation with a rhythmic battering to match, but still blending in the transfixing invention of its predecessor. The song slips from fury and violence to gentle seducing impressively and seamlessly, another aspect to the band’s creativity which it is easy to expect greater exploits from.

For All You Know Is The Mask I Wore is a strong and impressive introduction to Virtue In Vain, not one which declares the band as the future of British extreme metal but certainly with the potential to suggest they could make that kind of impact as they grow and evolve.

The For All You Know Is The Mask I Wore EP is available from May 11th through all digital platforms and at http://virtueinvain.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/VirtueInVain https://twitter.com/VirtueInVain

RingMaster 11/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Under Paris – Transitions

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A release does not always have to totally blow you away to make a compelling and perpetually appetising proposition, but it needs something at its core and invention which through any uncertainties and ‘issues’ acts like an alluring beacon. That is exactly what Transitions, the debut album from US metalcore band Under Paris has. There are elements which do not whip up the imagination and passions as pungently as others within it but consistently the release has ears and imagination seriously engaged, and though it might not take metalcore into something approaching new pastures the Iowa quintet’s ferocious incitement definitely has plenty about it to stir up serious attention.

Clinton hailing Under Paris began in 2012 and swiftly went to work enticing appetites with their first single If the Drugs Don’t Work, Can You Drive Me Home?, a track featuring Rene Lopez of Scarlett O’Hara. An acoustic EP called Clean Lungs and shows with the likes of Beartooth and The Ghost Inside only enhanced their emergence before the beginning of 2014 saw the release of debut full band EP Our Stories, recorded with Derek Moffat of 608 Studios. The encounter and the two singles unveiled from it before hand in the shapes of You’re Going Nowhere and Hold On Pain Ends sparked yet another influx of attention and interest. From there and later that year Under Paris ventured into the studio to record Transitions, releasing its first single Midwest Winters as a flavoursome teaser soon after. It lured in another dose of keen interest, which the band having signed with Imminence Records this past February, hope to exploit with the worldwide release of their new album.

IR032     Release and band prey on the senses immediately through opener Shallow Graves as irritant riffs and venomous vocal growls collude with vicious beats and bestial bass tone from the off. It is an imposing and gripping start which relaxes a touch as melodic toxicity and rampant rhythms erupt and smother ears in familiar yet fresh metalcore hostility. The guitars of Jayden Serrano and Evan Morrow spin a web of sonic enterprise within their barbarous riffery, enticing and holding the imagination whilst rhythms and vocals create a hellacious trespass of the senses. It is a strong and consuming beginning to the album but a nagging doubt arises in thoughts during it too. The excellent caustic vocals of Michael “Thorr” Alexander unleash an impressive and enjoyable ferocious fury yet with a singularly inhospitable delivery which admittedly personal tastes wondered if they might fail to provide the diversity the album potentially would need. Hopes that there will be something to temper and contrast his imposing are swiftly realised by Under Paris with At War with Myself. Once again Alexander and the vicious side of the sound is a merciless single minded tempest but in no time finds itself bound in a spicy enterprise of guitar aligned to the excellent clean vocals of bassist Rylie Phillips. He has a warmth and catchiness in his tones which works perfectly with the expressive brutality of Alexander, the song musically matching their ferocious and melodic union in creative kind. The sinew swung beats of drummer Lucas Richards create a rugged yet understanding companion to both sides too as the band merges light and dark impressively, calm and violent textures bonding with captivating ease.

The album’s title track crawls with the senses next, Transitions an instant wall of bruising provocation but also soon veined by the magnetic voice of Phillips. The track grows into an ever twisting tempestuous exploit of emotion and sound, the guitars managing to flirt and scar ears with their invention whilst rhythmically the encounter reveals sheer brutal rapacity. Its hellacious but enthralling presence is matched by What’s the Big Deal About Alaska though the song lacks the incendiary spark of its predecessors. It does come dramatically alive though around midway when the band slips into an evocative and thoughtful passage of relative peace and intrigue away from the fierce bluster, though that subsequently returns in a bellow of greater infectiousness.

The very swift rage of Yoloswag#420 provides an inescapable contagion next, the viciousness coming with a virulent swing before descending into a corrosive bedlam of spite. Its brief assault is followed by the heavily engaging Midwest Winters. The song’s landscape is a turbulent terrain of heavily delivered rolling rhythms and sonic acidity, again under a murderous atmosphere cast by riffs, predatory basslines, and vocal fury. Across it though, fiery melodies and the clean tempting of Phillips, provide the light in the dark, for a union of extremes which need each other to work and in turn flourish impressively together.

Both Devil’s Trap and Too Far Gone hold ears and attention tightly, the first a web of jagged riffs, bass imagination, and tremendous crippling beats from Richards. As in all tracks unpredictability is given plenty of exposure but often elsewhere comes shadowed by the storm around and above it. Here though it is allowed the strongest clarity enhancing the drama and appeal of the experience. Its successor is simply a torrential ravaging of malevolence and emotive rancor aligned to a fascinating weave of sparkling melodies and harmonies, each an imposing magnificence whether presented alone or entwined.

A tantalising warm reprise of At War with Myself leads the listener into the explosively fearsome and seductive throes of closing track At Peace. Featuring The Color Morale vocalist Garret Rapp, the song brings all the impressive and flavoursome aspects of the album into one bewitching intrusive roar; contrasts and rigorous extremes embroiled in one emotionally fierce and sonically intensive fire. The best track on the album it ensures Under Paris end their confrontation with a gripping and lingering incitement.

Transitions is a thoroughly satisfying proposition. It does not always go as far in its imagination and boldness as it should and would be liked, meaning at times it fails to meet its potential but certainly the release shows Under Paris to be a band which should be locked into the radar and their album a regular proposal to embrace.

Transitions is available now via Imminence Records at most online stores and physically @ http://www.underparis.bigcartel.com

https://www.facebook.com/underparisband

RingMaster 01/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Skeyes – Empty Mirrors

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Like with post-hardcore, for any emerging band to stand out in metalcore, even in its more progressive state, is a bit of a tall order. US band Skeyes is another coming up against that challenge but with debut EP Empty Mirrors, the band certainly makes a potent introduction and offers plenty of potential that they can rise up from the pack. The four track offering is a very likeable slice of metal voracity with a melodic invention which wakes up the imagination. Whether it has enough to push the band above the crowd time will tell but right now the release sparks the feeling that the Pennsylvanian band can ascend to that spotlight pushing height at some point.

Skeyes was formed in 2013 by Jesse Cease and Tyler Williams, and originally was intended as a studio project. Their first year saw many changes in line-up which led to the becoming a fully functioning band with vocalist Dale Brosious and guitarist Ryan Macaluso alongside guitarist/vocalist Cease. Drawing on inspirations from the likes of Erra, Mureau, Northlane, and For the Fallen Dreams, Skeyes have now arrived at the point of unleashing their presence on a broader landscape. Featuring guest vocals from Garret Rapp of The Color Morale and Jesse Cash of Erra, and released on Imminence Records to whom the band signed last October, Empty Mirrors is a more than solid and pleasing base for the band spring forth from.

Ethereal sets the ball rolling and instantly is a flame of clean vocals amidst a web of sonic enterprise, a coaxing punctuated by thumping rhythms which shows restraint in their attack but not their weight. With Garret Rapp bringing his strong guest tones to the song, it is soon a turbulent storm of an encounter, the caustic roars of Brosious an increasingly enjoyable squall against the warmer colours and harmonies of the song. The guitars also grab attention swiftly, tendrils of sonic imagination aligning with ragged riffs equipped with a djent seeded agitation. It is a strong song which satisfies with ease especially through the ever growing voracity of the rhythms, but elevates its stature with an excellent twist of melodic calm coloured by excellent vocals of Rapp.IR030

The following Myriad also needs a breath before unleashing its maelstrom of imagination and sonic tenacity. In some ways it is a less imposing and intrusive track yet still stirs up an intimidation and creative agitation which keeps expectations at bay. Even so there are plenty of recognisable things about the song, as the EP, but it would be amiss to not say it comes over as fresh and with a hungry passion as it roughs up and seduces the listener’s ears and thoughts. Strangely another thing in its favour and success is the briefness of its presence, at under three minutes the track is a dazzling quick jab to the senses with certainly as the old adage says, ‘leaves them wanting more’, just as the similarly swift offering of the EP’s title track which steps up next.

With Jesse Cash involved, Empty Mirrors is virtually a bedlamic swirl of venomous raw growls and melodic suggestiveness within a cage of aggressive riffery and belligerent rhythms. Holding magnetic calm at moments and unbridled energetic hostility in others, the song seduces with dramatic keys and impressive clean blazes of vocal expression. Easily the best thing on the release, the inventive bellow is as fascinating as it is exhausting and with more songs like this, Skeyes will definitely rise to join the cream of melodic metalcore.

The closing Ars Amatoria revels in the mellower side of the band’s sound and songwriting, initially at least anyway. The voice of we assume Cease shows its strongest and most impressive moments on the EP as the song brews up a tempest of sound and angst round him. It does not take long for Brosious to unleash his thick venom too as guitars paint a reflective sonic picture in the rabid frame of rhythms and riffs. The song is also brief, though this time it feels like an unfinished proposition once it departs, as if there was more to say but instead just walks away.

Empty Mirrors as suggested is a strong way to open up their entrance into the ears of the world. It is not going to shake the tree but certainly will do enough to ensure Skeyes and what comes next is given stronger attention, and if the band can really build on songs like the EPs title track, with equally potent rewards in return.

The Empty Mirrors EP is available now via Imminence Records @ http://imminencerecords.bandcamp.com/album/empty-mirrors

https://www.facebook.com/skeyesband

RingMaster 26/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/