The Five Hundred – Winters

TFH_RingMaster Review

Every now and then, without any debate, lustful pleasure is ignited by a release; by a band exploding on the sweet spot of ears and instincts with something which just seems to know what the passions like. Such an encounter for us is Winters, the debut EP from UK metallers The Five Hundred. It is hard to say what particularly incites such enthused reactions and appetite, the release weaving its fierce tempting with a host of familiar flavours and styles, but every one of its four incendiary tracks is hellacious manna to the ear and imagination; something we suspect to not be alone in feeling.

The Five Hundred emerged in 2014, a Nottingham quintet previously known as DAOR. In no time their fusion of brutal and melodic metal was whipping up ears and thick attention, every strain of extreme metal and numerous other styles seemingly entangled into a compelling maelstrom of enterprise and confrontation which now fuels Winters and already an acclaimed live presence which has seen the band share stages with the likes of Napalm Death, Fear Factory, All Shall Perish, Architects, and TesseracT. Recorded with Justin Hill (Sikth, Heart of a Coward), Winters is the band’s first fearsome roar at national spotlights, and if our ears are anything to go by, heading to rich success in awakening that broader focus.

Winters EP Front Cover_RingMaster Review    The press release suggests that the band switching to 8 string guitars has been a new spark to their sound and invention; whether it has or not, all that matters is that Winters is a full-on tempest of persuasion from first breath to last. The EP starts with its title track and straight away is grumbling in ears through the predatory bass of Andy Crawford, it a grouchy provocateur within a surge of wiry guitar. The hefty swings of drummer Liam Perez show no light in their nature either with each beat a shuddering impact as guitarists Mark Byrne and Paul Doughty weave more compelling bait for vocalist John Eley to spring from with great diversity. Just as musically the release ticks all the boxes so does the attack of the frontman, his fluid mix of clean, punkish, and outright raw hostility equally accomplished and perfectly measured in the split of all his strains of potency.

Death and heavy metal collude with metalcore and post hardcore ferocity though that is a simplifying of the hues creating the first and each track within Winters, as Come Closer swiftly proves. The lead track with a great video in tow, it emerges from a misty sonic atmosphere with military rhythms and emotive vocals, they still more in the background until a ravenous stomp of belligerent rhythms and caustic riffs is triggered. It in turn breeds a sonic blaze which is not so much mellow as less vicious than the surrounding and perpetually prowling ferocity soaking the walls of the incitement. Again at times as punk as it is metal and a constant exploit of seriously enticing elements amidst slithers of unpredictable ingenuity, the track is a ravenous treat but outshone within seconds.

The barbarous majesty of the first two tracks carries on in the outstanding Shutter to the Light, its immediate swagger as seductive as it is venomously violent. Like an anthem for the derailment of all that is hopeful, the track bellows at and trespasses the senses and imagination with enthralling enterprise, yet within its despoiling character harmonies and melodies are unleashed to wrong-foot and seize the passions even tighter. Everything about the track whips up a greedy appetite and pleasure; from the irresistible prime hook to the increasingly formidable vocals and the raging invention culturing the creatively rabid storm.

The EP is closed by The Cannibal Hordes, it also a quite thrilling and blistering arousal of ears and satisfaction. Melodically acoustic in its first caress, defiantly cantankerous from the second onwards, the track spits hostile intent and roars melodic understanding; vocally and musically entwining both with a skilled volatility that ensures expectations never gets proven. As suggested earlier, many elements and flavours are recognisable, bands like Fear Factory, Lamb of God, In Flames, and Hatebreed coming to mind, yet no song utters anything other than something unique to The Five Hundred.

The Winters EP is a crushing and scintillating introduction to The Five Hundred, band you should expect to hear a lot more of in sound and acclaim ahead, if only from our enraptured lips.

The Winters EP is out now digitally and on CD via

Pete RingMaster 24/11/2015

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Name Means Nothing – N.M.N

NMN_RingMaster Review

Making an agreeably grouchy introduction to themselves through debut EP N.M.N, is Italian metallers Name Means Nothing, a sextet which may not startle with their first clutch of metalcore/deathcore fuelled songs but will certainly lure plenty of eager attention. The four track encounter is a raging assault of bitter rhythms, voracious riffs, and vocals that ravage the senses. It is a potent base to expand their tempest of sonic spite and irritable temptation ahead, so strong that already we are impatiently anticipating their next outing.

cover_RingMaster Review   Formed at the beginning of 2014, Name Means Nothing consists of the dual vocal attack of Manuel Scarabaggio and Tomas Gerbec, guitarists Matteo Bucciol and Samuel Tinunin, bassist Luca Piras, and drummer Marko Zotti. Though not boundary stretching, it is fair to say that the band means business with their sound, EP opener In True, swift evidence. Its thirty second length is a stalking of riffs, barging rhythms, and a trespass of vocal hostility, all delivered in a Slipknot meets Suicide Silence like tempest. There is obviously not a lot to its brief body but it sets ears and attention up nicely for the sonic rabidity of Disease Of Men. Again riffs and rhythms harass and savage as the twin vocal trespass grips and sears the senses; it all quickly aligned to tendrils of sonic acidity and an ill-tempered virulence. There are no ground-breaking moments of originality to the song and indeed EP, but it does not stop either igniting the imagination and a greedy appetite as it rattles bones.

Unforgettable End springs it’s ravaging from an initial southern laced groove next; ire spewing out in sound and voice as the track drills deeper into the psyche with every predatory torrent of riffs and rhythmic battering. That initial bait continues to wind around the elements of the turbulence though, spicing up the fury of the track and ensuring that its metal/death core canvas has plenty more in shape and character to tempt and growl with.

N.M.N is completed by Pictures Of Reality, a similarly sculpted and honed brutality also keen to embrace a contagious toxicity to its ruinous intent and sonic carnality. It perfectly epitomises the EP, its body and touch familiar yet bred with a fresh and unruly scent of creative infection which worms under the skin to leave Name Means Nothing as a band a great many like us will want to know and hear more of.

Bottom-line is that the EP is an impressive start by the Italian scourge, one easy to expect only growing bigger and better, and probably more destructive, over time.

The N.M.N EP is out now as a name your price download @

Pete RingMaster 12/11/2015

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Seconds Alive – Bitter Moments

Seconds Alive Press Shots.

Seconds Alive Press Shots.

With a sound laying somewhere between metalcore and post hardcore, UK hailing Seconds Alive provide us with one interesting and firmly enjoyable confrontation with new EP Bitter Moments. Consisting of six tracks pouring out emotional torment and ire within technical scenery that is never less than captivating, the release makes a solid case to take the Exeter quartet’s under attention’s wing, though not the reason to get over excited for their open potential quite yet.

Formed in 2014, Seconds Alive have spent the past eighteen months brewing up a potent reputation across the South West of England, spreading outwards through an intensive live presence which has seen them play with the likes of with Idiom, I Divide, and Heck (formerly Baby Godzilla), and release a small clutch of singles. Now it is the turn of Bitter Moments to try and awaken stronger attention, success easy to see happening though maybe not to the extent that it is easy to feel was within the band’s grasp.

Seconds Alive Artwork_RingMaster Review     One of the prime reasons for that missed opportunity feeling is that despite the obvious talent and craft on show within the band, the EP lacks a certain spark to immediately elevate it out of the writhing throng of similarly sounding, genre bred bands. Close focus reveals they do have the imagination but in a time where attention in music is at best a fleeting breath in so many, Seconds Alive have not yet discovered, certainly here, that swift ‘hook’ to standout right away. The other element we would suggest the band might gain by looking into is the vocals. We have read many landing blows of displeasure upon the delivery of Robert Doran, something we cannot align to, the frontman has a good presence and attack but does, with great raw expression and emotion, only and repetitively offer exactly what is assumedly wanted in their raw style of music. The issue is again that his delivery easily slips into the crowd at the moment, another with an attack which never ventures too far from the caustic roar that as a style is becoming expectation feeding and thus frustratingly predictable for personal tastes. Hopefully though, the fact that Bitter Moments truly comes alive and steps out of the shadows when a diversity of vocals is released to match the busy sounds around them will not escape him and the band and spark adventure in that area ahead.

As said, it is always down to personal tastes though and there is no denying that EP opener Red Blood has ears on alert from its first sonic breath in all departments, especially once the guitar of James Hosgood begins his web of melodic and enterprising endeavour contrasting perfectly with the ruggedly aggressive rhythmic and vocal tempest quickly brewed. The bass of Rich Earle is especially carnivorous in tone whilst the beats of Rach Adams resonate with every impact without disrupting the contagious energy and craft fuelling the track. The fingers of Hosgood are as nimble as they are busy, and as elegant in touch as they are grouchy in craft to match and encourage the song’s growth in character.

It is a potent start taken up by Where Are You Going With This, another where musically the band is unafraid to twist and turn in their interpretation and use of familiar metal hues, though maybe again not bold enough at times. Vocally Doran again hits the mark in his angst driven, anger soaked delivery; never turning away from that singular attack but in a song swift in time more than playing his part in a potently satisfying incitement.

It is fair to say that the elements mentioned earlier which are lacking only really come to impacting light through latest single Drawing The Line, and because it does offer the essences to create something singularly potent. Opening on a more classic metal seeded lure aided by a great bestial tone from the bass, the track leaps into a regular metalcore proposal though again Hosgood is weaving tasty designs. It is the unexpected turn into a punk infused passage of virulent rock ’n’ roll guided by great clean vocals and hungry rhythms that things explode. An atmospheric aside shows adventure, if seeming a little out of place, but also reveals an experimentation and boldness of ideation that outshines the plainer metalcore causticity around it and of other songs on the release.

Upon Yourself steps up next and also impresses most dramatically when it employs cleaner vocals within an imaginative hug of sound, though also to be fair, the track is a tempest of craft and enterprise that might not lift the band’s too far away from a host of like sounding bands, but has ears keenly gripped throughout .

The slow emotive instrumental of Speechless engages the imagination next, its post rock lit coaxing a captivating suggestiveness reinforcing the evidence that this is band whose individuals can compose and play to the highest level. It haunting ambience leads into the ferocious throat of closer Jenna, a wind of squirming guitar imagination and emotive turmoil that easily invites if not overly excites ears, it again missing that indefinable element to prevent it quite reaching its potential.

A release for fans of bands such as While She Sleeps, August Burns Red, and Architects, Bitter Moments is a strong step in the growth of Seconds Alive that definitely courts attention and support. With personal hopes that they will get even bolder in composition and diverse in voice to forge their own unique identity, our expectations are that this quartet has a rather healthy future ahead of them.

The Bitter Moments EP is released October 30th through all stores.

Pete Ringmaster 29/10/2015

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Enrolling in Chugglife with ChuggaBoom

ChuggaBoom_RingMaster Review

Self-proclaimed Greatest Metalcore Band On The Planet, ChuggaBoom more than backed up their intent of bringing “their unique sound and dynamism to as many ears as possible” with recently released debut album Zodiac Arrest. The successor to the striking and well-received Trust Me, I’m a Proctologist EP, the UK band’s album bristled and exploded with their distinctive and uncompromising blend of “brutal screams, soaring cleans, dirty chugs and heartfelt lyrics.” The album’s impressive and thrilling body is steeped in and revolves around Chugglife and the calling of the Chugg Lord. As to what that means and entails we endeavoured to find out with the band whilst attempting to get to the heart of their outstanding first album. Here is what we learnt…

Good day guys and thank you for taking time out to talk with us.

For those new to the band how would you define a chuggalo and Chugg Life?

A chuggalo is a follower of both our band and the Chugg Life. Being a real Chuggalo requires a lot of time, effort, dedication and money. The top tier chuggalos are the first to buy our merch, come to all of our shows and pray to the Chugg Lord every night. The Chugg Life is a tough life, but if you live the life according to the Chugg Lord, you shall be elevated to a higher purpose.

How did the five members of ChuggaBoom get to meet and what spark united all your individual and varied talents and inspirations?

The almighty Chugg Lord wrote it into our DNA. We were destined from birth to congregate and form this band. It might seem like a strange clash of personalities at first glance (especially between John and I) but it’s a glorious unity that forms when we chugg as one.

Your sound is metalcore bred but with a diverse and distinct character all of its own, that tag lacking in telling the full story, so again for someone new to its creative ferocity please give us a one line description to it in the band’s words.

We steal all the chuggs from your favourite bands, improve them and release them and you then buy it.

You have just released the glorious voracious theatre of force, attitude, and ferocity that is Zodiac Arrest, your debut album. Fair to say it takes no prisoners in sound and creative imagination, ChuggaBoom cover_RingMaster Reviewso where does a band like ChuggaBoom begin in the weaving and sculpting of such a predatory encounter?

When we are writing, we medichuggitate a lot and find the inner chugg within us. We then channel this inner chugg and create the beautifully original music you listen to every day.

Lyrically the band takes merciless swipes at the world, life, and the music world to simplify things. These themes spring from experiences, observations…?

It depends on the song. Sometimes the Chugg Lord demands a song about a certain topic in order to further spread The Chugg Life, but most of the time we say shit how it is. We observe what is happening in the scene and in life and we write about it.

For some the irony and humour which also springs from ChuggaBoom incitements might fly high above their heads. Is that a worry or just proof they are not Chuggalo material?

A true Chuggalo will always understand the underlying message of our music. Sometimes it’s hidden and sometimes it’s obvious. If you search for the meaning you shall find it.

As a band, is the independent route the chosen path or are you open to moving to bigger homes, labels?

If there is a chance ChuggaBoom can spread the Chugg Life far and wide through a record label, we would be fools not to accept it. There’s a relatively small record label that is starting to make waves called Sumerian Records that we believe could work harmoniously with us to help spread our message. Only time will tell.

Back to Zodiac Arrest and why the admittedly strongly enjoyable cover of The Lonely Island track I Just Had Sex to close out the album? Had you guys run out of creative Viagra to Chuggaboom2_RingMaster Reviewcompose your own intimate ode? ;)

We did a cover of that song because it deserved to be a better song. And I had just had sex. It was alright.

We now know the tour de force that ChuggaBoom is in the studio, can you give some insight to the dangers, pitfalls, and adventures seeing the band live entails?

What happens at a ChuggaBoom show stays at the ChuggaBoom show. You’ll have to come see us live to find out.

Big thanks again for sparing time to enlighten us to the way of ChuggaBoom, any last words you would like to share?

Buy our merch. Buy our album. Buy tickets to see us live. Spread the chugg life! But mainly buy our shit.

And lastly…a Chuggalo and a Juggalo walk into a bar…please give us the ending.

A Juggalo? Sounds like a parody of our movement. The Chuggalo creates a guitar out of the Juggalo’s shin bone and gives him the full force of the chugg.

Read our review of Zodiac Arrest @

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 20/10/2015

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Counting Days – Liberated Sounds

Counting days_RingMaster Review

With their new album our first acquaintance with and taste of UK metallers Counting Days, we cannot suggest how strong the anticipation for Liberated Sounds was, but such its thrilling ferocious roar there is no doubting its successor sometime ahead will be the subject of thick and eager contemplation. The London band’s momentous debut full-length gloriously gnaws on the senses, its metalcore/hardcore fury savaging and bruising the same with equal animosity, but it is a ferocity bred with a creative virulence and open imagination that simply whips up a frenzied appetite in body and emotions.

Counting Days emerged in 2014 from a union of former members of TRC, Heights, Rough Hands, and Last Witness. The heartbeat came through the continuing song-writing partnership of guitarist Charlie Wilson and drummer Lasselle Lewis, the pair previously uniting song providers in TRC. Next former Heights vocalist Thomas Debaere was enlisted to the new project to become Counting Days, his addition followed by that of former Last Witness guitarist Bobby Daniels and subsequently Rough Hands frontman Alex Dench who was brought in on bass and additional vocals. A leap forward to now and first album Liberated Sounds, which was produced by Fredrik Nordstrom (At The Gates, Arch Enemy, In Flames, Opeth, Architects, Bring Me the Horizon), Counting Days is poised to shake certainly the UK metal scene, but suspicions are it will not stop there, ahead or with this stirring debut.

cover_RingMaster Review     The quintet start it with Burned By Faith and an immediate vocal roar which backed by a wall of rhythms and riffs has ears bent back as in a wind tunnel whilst the senses cower. Without losing its raw intimidation and strength, the track twists into a vociferous stride driven by raging vocal roars, this in turn spawning a predacious and eager canter of musical hostility. Fearsome from the start, the rhythms of Lewis become more agitated and robust as the metalcore seeded tempest rages, they sparking jagged lines of riffs and caustic grooves within a lyrical look at the things people do in the name of religion. It is an intensive and attention grabbing launch by the album, one already showing signs of an invention which becomes increasingly pronounced in following tracks.

Die Alone is next, spinning a tasty groove from its first breath as the rapier swings of Lewis collude with the predatory tones of bass. The vocal union of Debaere and Dench abrases as it entices, the former arguably finding more vitriolic charm and hardcore potency in his delivery than in his previous band, whilst around them the track explores melancholic and stringed textures within its unrelenting rancor.

As impressive as the first two are, the album just gets bigger and more exhilarating, finding its pinnacle in the next clutch of songs starting with Beaten & Scarred. Spinning on an addiction of a groove, the track spews a creative and emotional animus that is as contagious as the anthemic vocal calls and irritable rhythms driving the torrent of catchy riffery. A punk raging and metal hostility, the song is superb; it’s swerving grooves and nagging hooks alone ensuring the maliciousness in its veins is greedily welcomed.

From one major triumph to another pair in Life & Death and the album’s title track. The first rumbles with rhythmic thunder and cantankerous guitar rabidity, both matched in fierce kind by the air scarring vocals. With a touch of Static X meets Bloodsimple to it, the song intensely and explosively bellows within a landscape of melodic enterprise and sonic imagination, the savaging fuel of the song never diluted by the more refined invention within it and that captivating imagination defiant to being overwhelmed by the storm slamming through it. The band’s latest single is the same, Liberated Sounds a merciless festival of debilitating intensity and voracity infused with deliciously gripping grooves, potent vocal variation, and a contagiousness that infests and ignites the soul with lingering ease.

Five tracks in and ears are ringing and the body breathless, whilst enjoyment is flooding thoughts and emotions and fair to say no respite from any of it, thankfully, is forthcoming as firstly Fire From The Sky uncages its heavy metal meets post hardcore antagonism . The song’s climate is a muggy and unforgiving swamp of incitement veined by the thick melodic enticing of guitar, a blend which gives further substance to the song’s look at the mental effects of war. It is a hard task matching up to the previous trio of tracks but the invasive and provocative heart of the song leaves no-one short changed before making way for the caustic embrace and inventive accosting of Days Go By and in turn the short and evocative instrumental oasis of The Vines. Its calm gives a respite whilst igniting the imagination with warm strokes of sound within a somewhat haunting ambience.

Sands Of Time descends on the senses next, again a prime groove wrapped in great irritable textures coring a blustery climate whipping up the senses before Prison Of Misery through an initial bewitching melodic drama and coaxing, turns into a bestial rampage of scathing vocals, scarring riffs, and a sonic snarl that turns every note and beat into an inescapable and greedily devoured vicious incitement. It is another major highlight, amongst many, of Liberated Sounds, rock ‘n’ roll taking no prisoners in its vehement entrapping of ears and passions.

The album is closed by the equally acrimonious, unforgiving, and enjoyable Cold Truth and finally similarly crafted and toned Reunion. The track is a fine end to the album but just a touch too samey to its predecessor, a slight issue which does crop up in slithers across the album. The final pair of songs is where it is most noticeable but with both tracks nothing less than fiery stirrings of pleasure it is a minor blemish just to try and temper our otherwise full ardour for Liberated Sounds.

All the members of Counting Days come with a good pedigree in their experiences and craft but for personal tastes they have hit a new plateau in their creativity and invention with Liberated Sounds, and yes already anticipation for its successor is brewing.

Liberated Sounds is out on October 16th via Mascot Records.

Upcoming live dates:

23rd October – Riverside, Sheffield

24th October – The Festing, Southsea

26th November – The Scene, Swansea

28th November – The Rainbow, Birmingham

29th November – Sanctuary, Basingstoke

3rd December – Packhouse, Leeds

4th December – Vic Inn, Derby

5th December – Grog & Fiddle, Cheltenham

12th December – Craufurd Arms, MiltonKeynes

Pete RingMaster 15/10/2015

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You Shall Suffer – We Are Invisible EP

you-shall-suffer_foto_RingMaster Review

Introduced to it just recently by a member of the band itself, the We Are Invisible EP is one of those encounters to whet the appetite through potential and a potent sound. A fusion of death and metalcore, the release comes from Polish metallers You Shall Suffer and was released at the end of 2014 but a fresh acquaintance to us and now available as a name your own price download, we thought a quick perusal was in order to make others aware.

cover_RingMaster Review     Formed in 2013, the Wroclaw hailing quintet of Kuba Szewczyk, Michał Kacprowicz, Michał Szymański, Radek Strojny, and Marius Wołosz begin the EP with its title track. We Are Invisible opens on a great sinister sonic haunting which is quickly joined by almost tribal percussion and atmospheric intrigue. Things get darker and tenser as riffs and rapier like rolling rhythms join the tempting next, their presence the spark to a bullying tempest of sound led by raw vocals which ebb and flow in strength a little but keep ears gripped as the music works on the imagination. The song is at its most potent when entwining that initial coaxing of sound into its formidable body but less successful when it relaxes into a less imposing chorus that drifts across rather than accosts the senses. Nevertheless it is an enjoyable start to a release which gets stronger with every track.

Purposefully striding forward from a distance, Corporate Bitch is next, coiled grooves spewing their alluring toxicity across a brooding mass of riffs and rhythms which in turn breed a varied vocal aggression. A dark throated bassline grips attention as quickly and strongly as anything in the song initially, but as it weaves its sonic enterprise and flavoursome metal predation, the song itself becomes increasingly enticing and distinctive upon a recognisable raw metal canvas, especially in its great prowl of a climax.

Sound wise You Shall Suffer are not breaking boundaries or reshaping existing landscapes but there is a spark to their sound which ensures it does not easily fall into the crowd, Diggin’ Your Own Grave further proof with its meandering melodic toxins and guttural vocal antagonism around flesh whipping rhythms. Uncompromising and irritably hostile, the track keeps ears and attention glued but finds itself eclipsed by the closing might of Sleeper Must Awake. Easily the best and most inventive track on the EP with its tempestuous onslaught of intensity and hostility, it also comes equipped with a compelling and unpredictable tapestry of guitar and bass prowess around vocal causticity that just hits the spot.

On the other three songs alone, the We Are Invisible EP is an enjoyable and more than solid proposition but add Sleeper Must Awake and you have a release suggesting You Shall Suffer has the potential and invention within them to be much more than just another extreme metal encounter.

Go grab your free copy of the We Are Invisible EP @

Pete RingMaster 13/10/2015

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Zephyr – An Odyssey For The Living

Zephyr Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

There has been a wave of metalcore seeded releases to cover recently and joining that relatively strong list is the debut EP from UK quartet Zephyr. The band’s sound is a little different to the rest though with its fierce roar aligning with progressive metal imagination and post rock ambience. Fair to say it is a blend which swiftly engages ears and makes the An Odyssey For The Living EP one fascinating potential loaded enticement.

London bred Zephyr only emerged earlier this year with the foursome of vocalist Cameron Alexander Thomson, guitarist Jacob Gudge, bassist Attila Tashi, and drummer Gideon Waxman quickly unveiling video single The High Road. Its viral online success sparked a live presence which in little time was also soon gaining strong support and praise. Now a full introduction comes the way of An Odyssey For The Living, five compelling and tempestuous tracks recorded with Kelly Pinchin and Ollie Dow from In Archives and produced by Julian Rodriguez from Elitist.

Zephyr Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review     The release is opened up by Familiar Spirit, a track instantly wrapping ears in an atmospheric guitar melody before thick bass groans and firm beats collude with raw vocals squalls. All the time the fingers of Gudge are weaving sonic and evocative tendrils around which keys lay their tantalising hues, the song as ethereal as it is viciously uncompromising. It is an enjoyably busy track with new corners and layers being unveiled through subsequent listens, a quality applying to the whole EP, and a personal want of diversity in vocals within a genre generally seeming to lack adventure in that department, nicely satisfied by Thompson.

The strong start is potently backed by Little Lamplight where again a warm melody honed coaxing brings the track into view before cruel riffs and rhythms bruise whilst being entwined in a provocative and perpetually shifting web of progressive leaning guitar enterprise united with suggestive keys. Further variety to the vocal incitement from Thompson and the band equally adds to the alluring but dangerous nature of the song to leave ears and thoughts firmly involved.

Cloud Spires opens in similar style to its predecessors whilst creating its own persuasive design of open technical craft and jagged riffery soaked in melancholic and emotionally reflective ambience. Those evocative textures are matched in potency by the mix of scarring and clean harmony wrapped vocals and though there does seem to be a kind of common template to Zephyr songs each creative canvas is coloured and twisted into individual characters that, as here, hold ears and imagination firmly in their intrigue lit tempests.

Next up is Gemini where, with Rodriguez guesting, a mariachi like vocal lure leads the listener into a maelstrom of jazzy guitar tempting, vocal ire, and a sonic painting of evocative endeavour and textures. Enthralling with its unpredictable imagination and great diversity, the song emerges as the strongest highlight of the release before Black Luster brings it all to an invasive and tantalising close. It is an outpouring of physical and atmospheric emotion, an undulating wave of intensity and creative tempting which like the sea has fierce under currents below a shimmering surface beauty.

An Odyssey For The Living is an impressive and thickly enjoyable debut from Zephyr, the band’s potential as rich as the flavours in their sound. There is for personal tastes that final spark missing to really inflame thickly satisfied reactions and emotions to the release but easy to sense that will come as the band grows, matures, and evolves in all aspects. Certainly they are ones to watch ahead and enjoy now.

An Odyssey For The Living is available from October 9th through all digital platforms.

Pete RingMaster 07/10/2015

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