Guardian – Revolution

Guardan Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

There is a fresh tempest about to savage the British metal scene; a bracing consumption of the senses going by the name of Revolution. It is the title of the debut album from Guardian, a Northumberland quartet which had already shown its creative intent with their earlier Tyrants EP. A long time in the making, the new twelve fury encounter is a ferocious blend of varied metal provocations driven by themes “centring on the balance of life and nature, and an emphasis on the unsustainable damage that humans are inflicting on our planet”, and a wake-up call to national attention for the great invasive roar of Guardian.

The band made their first impact with the aforementioned Tyrants EP mid-2014, inspirations from the likes of Pantera, Machine Head, Whitechapel, and Parkway Drive adding to the varied metal bred textures making up the release’s sound and even more so now, Revolution. Well-received by fans and media alike, the EP was supported by Guardian going on a month long European tour followed by a just as busy series of shows around the UK. Thoughts then turned to the band’s first album, Guardian taking their time to write and create the beast before us and proving suggestions that they are one of Britain’s exciting new breed of extreme incitement.

The short introductory climate of Resolution starts things off, its sombre yet elegant melodies the lining to an emerging portentous air as the instrumental leads ears and imagination into the volatile and combative landscape of the album’s title track. Instantly Revolution is an intimidating threat of wiry grooves and biting riffs against barbarous rhythms, the raw antagonism driven by the throat grazing vocal scowling of Matthew Hall and lit by grooved spicing from guitarist Zac Yates. It is a magnetic challenging of ears and emotions; one sculpted with open enterprise and unpredictable imagination within a ravishing cauldron bred from essences to be found in many flavours from death and thrash metal to hardcore and metalcore.

Guardian Cover Artwork_RingMaster ReviewApart from the fade-out, the track is an immense beginning backed as forcibly by the mazy dynamics and brutal tirades of Politics. Ears are instantly pushed back by its intensity as the predacious nature of the song brews, building until erupting in a hellacious outpouring loaded with the violent rhythms of drummer Joshua Stephen matched in vitriol by the bestial tones of Cory Young’s bass. Yates again veins the storm with toxic but virulent grooves and hooks, their potency successfully riding the crushing breakdowns, as here, breaching the whole of the album.

Innovate devours the senses next, its instant cantankerous character the spark to the song’s savagery in sound and vocal animosity. Inhospitable but again rabidly catchy, the blistering track inflames the appetite for voracious trespasses before the rapaciously energetic prowl of Capitalism matches its triumph. Rock ‘n’ roll to beat up on the world to; the song is an incendiary slab of heavy-duty metal vehemence leaving body and emotions with a want to take on the world.

Through the fearsome heavy metal seeded enmity of Deliverance and the outstanding hardcore toned Catharsis, band and album keep an already hungry appetite greedier, both tracks a sonic web of inventive twists and murderous inclinations before Propaganda provides a rousing if corrosive weave of winding groove honed tendrils to inflame the cancerous tapestry of sound. In some ways the three together provide the pinnacle of the album, each leading and seeming to inspire the following to new creative antipathies before the ‘mellower’ landscape of Hope hugs the senses. Its touch sears the sense from the off and of course it too unveils barbarous sounds and imagination over time, but from start to finish it enthrals with a ‘lighter’ atmosphere and infectiousness absent elsewhere within Revolution.

Nomadic leads the listener through a meandering landscape coated in raw melodic and electric sonic endeavour next, its rhythms building another bad blooded dispute as Hall’s vocals infest the psyche as supporting band roars incite the instincts. It is a crushingly invigorating proposition setting up body and emotions for the back breaking intensity of Ambivalence and finally the ravenous sonic dexterity and rhythmic rabidity of Restoration. The pair creates an intrusively dramatic and explosively volatile finale to Revolution, at the same time giving glimpse of even richer veins of exploration within the Guardian sound.

Revolution is a thoroughly satisfying and enjoyably exhausting release from a band easy to see making strong waves ahead. It is an encounter which might not live up to its name in regard to stirring up the metal scene, moments of surface similarity between some tracks and a familiar feeling to others noticeable if no issue, but for relentless seriously accomplished and stylish metal fury, Revolution is set to wake up thick attention.

Revolution will be available from 22nd January through all stores and platforms.

https://www.facebook.com/GuardianUKNEMC

Pete RingMaster 22/01/2016

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The Order of Elijah – War At Heart

TOOE_RingMaster Review

In sound and word there is a real bite to War At Heart, the new album from US Christian metallers The Order of Elijah, which makes you pay attention. It is an unpredictable cauldron of varied metal bred flavours which savage and confront the senses as potently as the lyrical side incites thought with its bold and uncompromising exploration of all sides and shades of faith and life. Predominantly though, it is one rigorously enjoyable incitement which impressed on first listening and only grows more potent and compelling with each subsequent involvement.

Formed in 2009 by vocalist Shannon Low and guitarist Bryan Cox, the Joplin, Missouri quintet have only grown in sound and determination since the release of debut album Dethrone of 2013. According to the press release with the album, The Order Of Elijah have found themselves “being shunned by many peers, churches, and religious communities for the message they bring,” reactions to the band’s look and accusation at the “over-obvious corruption that many churches and cultures have adapted to the words of Jesus Christ.War At Heart shows that the band has only used any opposition as more fuel to their creative and emotional fire. The release is a tempest of anger, confrontation, and hope with a sound which alone leaves no doubts about the intensity and passion within The Order Of Elijah imagination and heart.

the order of elijah album art_RingMaster ReviewOpening with the dark vocal introduction of Heresy, band and album swiftly move to involve ears and imagination with its title track. War at Heart opens with a mesh of wiry guitar and attitude loaded rhythms, they soon joined by clean vocals which quickly reveal their raw and grouchy side. That fluid ability to swiftly change attack and character is echoed across the whole album in sound and invention, the metalcore meets heavy groove metal and electro resourcefulness of the song expectation defeating, even with its use of familiar textures at times.

The excellent track is matched in potency by Tyler Durden, where the guitars of Bryan Cox and Myk Lee Fodor create a gripping splattering of choppy bait initially as the voice of Low again swings from tone to texture with inventive ease. Like Slipknot meets Cryptopsy with a slither of Emmure involved too, the song is an impressive intrusion, those essences twisted into something maybe not dramatically unique but certainly distinct to The Order of Elijah.

The scything beats of drummer Josh Newlon open up God’s Unwanted Children next, his enticing assault wrapped in an electronic breeze which as expected soon erupts into a more volatile and tempestuous environment. The electronic smoulder of the song lends itself to thoughts of Silent Descent but again with Low in the throes of vocal adventure, things quickly take on a personality of their own which only invites deeper attention. Like a bear awoken from hibernation, the track roars and spits with unbridled antagonism, leaving ears ringing with content as the melodic calm of From the Dusk washes gently over the senses. The brief instrumental allows a breath to be taken though the excellent presence of James Copley’s bass ensures shadows are still courting thoughts and emotions before From the Dawn emerges from its beauty to inflame air and the senses again with a fiery and anthemic tempest. Vocal harmonies contrast grizzly tones and melodic suggestiveness tempers violent rabidity as the track blossoms into another crushing highlight of the release. Once more very passing minute brings a new twist to be caught unawares by and fully enjoy; electro spices alone colluding deviously with the primal metal resources fuelling the encounter to offer a whisper of The Browning in certain moments.

All American Plague lurches and invades next, throwing its elements around like a dervish but with a control which ensures no twist or texture is wasted, whilst Jennifer Mckenzie vs The Vampire Slayer straight after is a punk infested animus of fierce sound and agitated attitude. Featuring Zachary Scott of It Lies Within, the slightly Korn/Betraying The Martyrs like track is a ravenous contagion, which only sparks more greed in the appetite for the album, a hunger given more to happily chew on by both the hellacious onslaught of Haunted and The Art of Forgiveness. Admittedly neither track quite sparks the same thickness of excitement as their predecessors but each easily fattens up satisfaction before leaving the reflective intensity of Beautiful to bring things to a close.

If asked after the first couple of listens or so, War at Heart would have been labelled as impressive with the ability to lure attention back, but over time it has emerged as one fiercely delicious enjoyment which is seriously hard to leave alone. Not all will be as taken with it obviously but every metal fan should seriously think about giving the new creative bellow from The Order Of Elijah deserved attention.

War At Heart is available via Luxor Records from 8th January @ http://www.victorymerch.com/merch/label/luxorrecords

http://theorderofelijah.com/   https://www.facebook.com/theorderofelijah   https://twitter.com/orderofelijah

Pete RingMaster 07/01/2016

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Networks – Enough To Save Us EP

Networks_RingMaster Review

There is a bit of a buzz brewing up around UK metalcore band Networks and though we are not ready to yet add majorly enthused voices to the rising roar, intrigue and attention for the Portsmouth band has certainly been sparked thanks to their debut EP Enough To Save Us. It is a tempest of sound and ire fuelled emotion which sits easily within expectations of the genre inspiring it but dig deeper and there is an underbelly of invention and imagination which incites closer inspection and a want to know more.

Formed in 2014, Networks was soon stirring up ears and support across shows and a handful of festivals like Redfest, Edgefest and Messtival. From there opportunities to share stages with the likes of The Blackout, Slaves, and Astroid Boys have arisen, 2015 being a thick nudge of broader attention by the band. Seeing a couple of personnel changes early on this year, they set about writing new songs whilst playing with artists such as Palm Reader, Zoax, and When We Were Wolves and at the Crossroads Stage at Butserfest with HECK, Fathoms, and Shields. Now they attempt to whip up more of us with Enough To Save Us, a try easy to imagine leading the band to some potent success.

Networks ETSU EP Front Cover_RingMaster Review   Wires gets things off and running, its opening a worldly bred flavouring infused with samples and a brewing turbulence which soon drives the heart of the raw fury and enticing sonic tempting gripping the track. In no time the guitar of Joe Soar builds a web of engaging grooves and sonic enterprise, they a less hostile tempering to the heavy growling vocal antagonism of Sean Kelly and the hefty swipes of drummer Harry Fielder. The main body of the track is potent and persuasive if without springing any surprises but it is the twists of sound and imagination, at times only in slithers, which turn a good track into a keenly appetising one.

A melodic caress opens up the following End Of An Era, though soon jagged exploits from the guitar step forward in tandem with the dark menace of Josh Slade’s bass. Within a few more breaths, the track is stomping with energy and irritable emotion, though again things evolve as all the creative tendrils and facets of the excellent track collude and entwine. Once more it is fair to say that Networks are not breaking free from established metalcore scenery and hues, but with bright imagination and a good level of unpredictability, the track provides an increasingly enjoyable incitement.

The rugged and challenging Darker Truth steps up next, vocals a rasping provocation against barbarous rhythms. As the lure littered sonic weave spun by Soar breaches ears, the bass brings a great bestial voracity to the song’s tone, it all uniting in an appealing trespass on the senses with again surprises low but enjoyment thick.

The EP is completed by its title track, a proposal carrying a similar and satisfying template to its predecessor. There is an open degree of similarity across all songs in varying ways, the admittedly strong and pleasing vocals of Kelly one such area which might blossom further with a touch more diversity. More than most, the final provocation suggests this closeness but nevertheless it still enlivens the appetite whilst confirming the prowess and potency of Networks in songwriting through to sound.

Enough To Save Us suggests there is plenty of potential and quality which will see Networks emerge from the crowd in time and coax strong attention and support along the way. Fair to say that the band’s opening gambit is a strong and fiercely solid introduction providing ears with a potently enjoyable slab of confrontation, a sign of things to come we suspect.

The Enough To Save Us EP is available via on Viper Trail Records, digitally now from most online stores and as a physical copy from December 3rd when it will be launched at the EP’s release show at The Edge Of The Wedge in Portsmouth.

https://www.facebook.com/networksband        https://twitter.com/networksband

Pete RingMaster 30/11/2015

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The Five Hundred – Winters

TFH_RingMaster Review

Every now and then, without any debate, lustful pleasure is ignited by a release; by a band exploding on the sweet spot of ears and instincts with something which just seems to know what the passions like. Such an encounter for us is Winters, the debut EP from UK metallers The Five Hundred. It is hard to say what particularly incites such enthused reactions and appetite, the release weaving its fierce tempting with a host of familiar flavours and styles, but every one of its four incendiary tracks is hellacious manna to the ear and imagination; something we suspect to not be alone in feeling.

The Five Hundred emerged in 2014, a Nottingham quintet previously known as DAOR. In no time their fusion of brutal and melodic metal was whipping up ears and thick attention, every strain of extreme metal and numerous other styles seemingly entangled into a compelling maelstrom of enterprise and confrontation which now fuels Winters and already an acclaimed live presence which has seen the band share stages with the likes of Napalm Death, Fear Factory, All Shall Perish, Architects, and TesseracT. Recorded with Justin Hill (Sikth, Heart of a Coward), Winters is the band’s first fearsome roar at national spotlights, and if our ears are anything to go by, heading to rich success in awakening that broader focus.

Winters EP Front Cover_RingMaster Review    The press release suggests that the band switching to 8 string guitars has been a new spark to their sound and invention; whether it has or not, all that matters is that Winters is a full-on tempest of persuasion from first breath to last. The EP starts with its title track and straight away is grumbling in ears through the predatory bass of Andy Crawford, it a grouchy provocateur within a surge of wiry guitar. The hefty swings of drummer Liam Perez show no light in their nature either with each beat a shuddering impact as guitarists Mark Byrne and Paul Doughty weave more compelling bait for vocalist John Eley to spring from with great diversity. Just as musically the release ticks all the boxes so does the attack of the frontman, his fluid mix of clean, punkish, and outright raw hostility equally accomplished and perfectly measured in the split of all his strains of potency.

Death and heavy metal collude with metalcore and post hardcore ferocity though that is a simplifying of the hues creating the first and each track within Winters, as Come Closer swiftly proves. The lead track with a great video in tow, it emerges from a misty sonic atmosphere with military rhythms and emotive vocals, they still more in the background until a ravenous stomp of belligerent rhythms and caustic riffs is triggered. It in turn breeds a sonic blaze which is not so much mellow as less vicious than the surrounding and perpetually prowling ferocity soaking the walls of the incitement. Again at times as punk as it is metal and a constant exploit of seriously enticing elements amidst slithers of unpredictable ingenuity, the track is a ravenous treat but outshone within seconds.

The barbarous majesty of the first two tracks carries on in the outstanding Shutter to the Light, its immediate swagger as seductive as it is venomously violent. Like an anthem for the derailment of all that is hopeful, the track bellows at and trespasses the senses and imagination with enthralling enterprise, yet within its despoiling character harmonies and melodies are unleashed to wrong-foot and seize the passions even tighter. Everything about the track whips up a greedy appetite and pleasure; from the irresistible prime hook to the increasingly formidable vocals and the raging invention culturing the creatively rabid storm.

The EP is closed by The Cannibal Hordes, it also a quite thrilling and blistering arousal of ears and satisfaction. Melodically acoustic in its first caress, defiantly cantankerous from the second onwards, the track spits hostile intent and roars melodic understanding; vocally and musically entwining both with a skilled volatility that ensures expectations never gets proven. As suggested earlier, many elements and flavours are recognisable, bands like Fear Factory, Lamb of God, In Flames, and Hatebreed coming to mind, yet no song utters anything other than something unique to The Five Hundred.

The Winters EP is a crushing and scintillating introduction to The Five Hundred, band you should expect to hear a lot more of in sound and acclaim ahead, if only from our enraptured lips.

The Winters EP is out now digitally and on CD via https://thefivehundred.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/wearethefivehundred   https://twitter.com/thefivehundred

Pete RingMaster 24/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Name Means Nothing – N.M.N

NMN_RingMaster Review

Making an agreeably grouchy introduction to themselves through debut EP N.M.N, is Italian metallers Name Means Nothing, a sextet which may not startle with their first clutch of metalcore/deathcore fuelled songs but will certainly lure plenty of eager attention. The four track encounter is a raging assault of bitter rhythms, voracious riffs, and vocals that ravage the senses. It is a potent base to expand their tempest of sonic spite and irritable temptation ahead, so strong that already we are impatiently anticipating their next outing.

cover_RingMaster Review   Formed at the beginning of 2014, Name Means Nothing consists of the dual vocal attack of Manuel Scarabaggio and Tomas Gerbec, guitarists Matteo Bucciol and Samuel Tinunin, bassist Luca Piras, and drummer Marko Zotti. Though not boundary stretching, it is fair to say that the band means business with their sound, EP opener In True, swift evidence. Its thirty second length is a stalking of riffs, barging rhythms, and a trespass of vocal hostility, all delivered in a Slipknot meets Suicide Silence like tempest. There is obviously not a lot to its brief body but it sets ears and attention up nicely for the sonic rabidity of Disease Of Men. Again riffs and rhythms harass and savage as the twin vocal trespass grips and sears the senses; it all quickly aligned to tendrils of sonic acidity and an ill-tempered virulence. There are no ground-breaking moments of originality to the song and indeed EP, but it does not stop either igniting the imagination and a greedy appetite as it rattles bones.

Unforgettable End springs it’s ravaging from an initial southern laced groove next; ire spewing out in sound and voice as the track drills deeper into the psyche with every predatory torrent of riffs and rhythmic battering. That initial bait continues to wind around the elements of the turbulence though, spicing up the fury of the track and ensuring that its metal/death core canvas has plenty more in shape and character to tempt and growl with.

N.M.N is completed by Pictures Of Reality, a similarly sculpted and honed brutality also keen to embrace a contagious toxicity to its ruinous intent and sonic carnality. It perfectly epitomises the EP, its body and touch familiar yet bred with a fresh and unruly scent of creative infection which worms under the skin to leave Name Means Nothing as a band a great many like us will want to know and hear more of.

Bottom-line is that the EP is an impressive start by the Italian scourge, one easy to expect only growing bigger and better, and probably more destructive, over time.

The N.M.N EP is out now as a name your price download @ http://namemeansnothing.bandcamp.com/album/n-m-n

https://www.facebook.com/nnmntv

Pete RingMaster 12/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Seconds Alive – Bitter Moments

Seconds Alive Press Shots.

Seconds Alive Press Shots.

With a sound laying somewhere between metalcore and post hardcore, UK hailing Seconds Alive provide us with one interesting and firmly enjoyable confrontation with new EP Bitter Moments. Consisting of six tracks pouring out emotional torment and ire within technical scenery that is never less than captivating, the release makes a solid case to take the Exeter quartet’s under attention’s wing, though not the reason to get over excited for their open potential quite yet.

Formed in 2014, Seconds Alive have spent the past eighteen months brewing up a potent reputation across the South West of England, spreading outwards through an intensive live presence which has seen them play with the likes of with Idiom, I Divide, and Heck (formerly Baby Godzilla), and release a small clutch of singles. Now it is the turn of Bitter Moments to try and awaken stronger attention, success easy to see happening though maybe not to the extent that it is easy to feel was within the band’s grasp.

Seconds Alive Artwork_RingMaster Review     One of the prime reasons for that missed opportunity feeling is that despite the obvious talent and craft on show within the band, the EP lacks a certain spark to immediately elevate it out of the writhing throng of similarly sounding, genre bred bands. Close focus reveals they do have the imagination but in a time where attention in music is at best a fleeting breath in so many, Seconds Alive have not yet discovered, certainly here, that swift ‘hook’ to standout right away. The other element we would suggest the band might gain by looking into is the vocals. We have read many landing blows of displeasure upon the delivery of Robert Doran, something we cannot align to, the frontman has a good presence and attack but does, with great raw expression and emotion, only and repetitively offer exactly what is assumedly wanted in their raw style of music. The issue is again that his delivery easily slips into the crowd at the moment, another with an attack which never ventures too far from the caustic roar that as a style is becoming expectation feeding and thus frustratingly predictable for personal tastes. Hopefully though, the fact that Bitter Moments truly comes alive and steps out of the shadows when a diversity of vocals is released to match the busy sounds around them will not escape him and the band and spark adventure in that area ahead.

As said, it is always down to personal tastes though and there is no denying that EP opener Red Blood has ears on alert from its first sonic breath in all departments, especially once the guitar of James Hosgood begins his web of melodic and enterprising endeavour contrasting perfectly with the ruggedly aggressive rhythmic and vocal tempest quickly brewed. The bass of Rich Earle is especially carnivorous in tone whilst the beats of Rach Adams resonate with every impact without disrupting the contagious energy and craft fuelling the track. The fingers of Hosgood are as nimble as they are busy, and as elegant in touch as they are grouchy in craft to match and encourage the song’s growth in character.

It is a potent start taken up by Where Are You Going With This, another where musically the band is unafraid to twist and turn in their interpretation and use of familiar metal hues, though maybe again not bold enough at times. Vocally Doran again hits the mark in his angst driven, anger soaked delivery; never turning away from that singular attack but in a song swift in time more than playing his part in a potently satisfying incitement.

It is fair to say that the elements mentioned earlier which are lacking only really come to impacting light through latest single Drawing The Line, and because it does offer the essences to create something singularly potent. Opening on a more classic metal seeded lure aided by a great bestial tone from the bass, the track leaps into a regular metalcore proposal though again Hosgood is weaving tasty designs. It is the unexpected turn into a punk infused passage of virulent rock ’n’ roll guided by great clean vocals and hungry rhythms that things explode. An atmospheric aside shows adventure, if seeming a little out of place, but also reveals an experimentation and boldness of ideation that outshines the plainer metalcore causticity around it and of other songs on the release.

Upon Yourself steps up next and also impresses most dramatically when it employs cleaner vocals within an imaginative hug of sound, though also to be fair, the track is a tempest of craft and enterprise that might not lift the band’s too far away from a host of like sounding bands, but has ears keenly gripped throughout .

The slow emotive instrumental of Speechless engages the imagination next, its post rock lit coaxing a captivating suggestiveness reinforcing the evidence that this is band whose individuals can compose and play to the highest level. It haunting ambience leads into the ferocious throat of closer Jenna, a wind of squirming guitar imagination and emotive turmoil that easily invites if not overly excites ears, it again missing that indefinable element to prevent it quite reaching its potential.

A release for fans of bands such as While She Sleeps, August Burns Red, and Architects, Bitter Moments is a strong step in the growth of Seconds Alive that definitely courts attention and support. With personal hopes that they will get even bolder in composition and diverse in voice to forge their own unique identity, our expectations are that this quartet has a rather healthy future ahead of them.

The Bitter Moments EP is released October 30th through all stores.

https://www.facebook.com/SecondsAliveOfficial https://secondsaliveofficial.bandcamp.com/

Pete Ringmaster 29/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Enrolling in Chugglife with ChuggaBoom

ChuggaBoom_RingMaster Review

Self-proclaimed Greatest Metalcore Band On The Planet, ChuggaBoom more than backed up their intent of bringing “their unique sound and dynamism to as many ears as possible” with recently released debut album Zodiac Arrest. The successor to the striking and well-received Trust Me, I’m a Proctologist EP, the UK band’s album bristled and exploded with their distinctive and uncompromising blend of “brutal screams, soaring cleans, dirty chugs and heartfelt lyrics.” The album’s impressive and thrilling body is steeped in and revolves around Chugglife and the calling of the Chugg Lord. As to what that means and entails we endeavoured to find out with the band whilst attempting to get to the heart of their outstanding first album. Here is what we learnt…

Good day guys and thank you for taking time out to talk with us.

For those new to the band how would you define a chuggalo and Chugg Life?

A chuggalo is a follower of both our band and the Chugg Life. Being a real Chuggalo requires a lot of time, effort, dedication and money. The top tier chuggalos are the first to buy our merch, come to all of our shows and pray to the Chugg Lord every night. The Chugg Life is a tough life, but if you live the life according to the Chugg Lord, you shall be elevated to a higher purpose.

How did the five members of ChuggaBoom get to meet and what spark united all your individual and varied talents and inspirations?

The almighty Chugg Lord wrote it into our DNA. We were destined from birth to congregate and form this band. It might seem like a strange clash of personalities at first glance (especially between John and I) but it’s a glorious unity that forms when we chugg as one.

Your sound is metalcore bred but with a diverse and distinct character all of its own, that tag lacking in telling the full story, so again for someone new to its creative ferocity please give us a one line description to it in the band’s words.

We steal all the chuggs from your favourite bands, improve them and release them and you then buy it.

You have just released the glorious voracious theatre of force, attitude, and ferocity that is Zodiac Arrest, your debut album. Fair to say it takes no prisoners in sound and creative imagination, ChuggaBoom cover_RingMaster Reviewso where does a band like ChuggaBoom begin in the weaving and sculpting of such a predatory encounter?

When we are writing, we medichuggitate a lot and find the inner chugg within us. We then channel this inner chugg and create the beautifully original music you listen to every day.

Lyrically the band takes merciless swipes at the world, life, and the music world to simplify things. These themes spring from experiences, observations…?

It depends on the song. Sometimes the Chugg Lord demands a song about a certain topic in order to further spread The Chugg Life, but most of the time we say shit how it is. We observe what is happening in the scene and in life and we write about it.

For some the irony and humour which also springs from ChuggaBoom incitements might fly high above their heads. Is that a worry or just proof they are not Chuggalo material?

A true Chuggalo will always understand the underlying message of our music. Sometimes it’s hidden and sometimes it’s obvious. If you search for the meaning you shall find it.

As a band, is the independent route the chosen path or are you open to moving to bigger homes, labels?

If there is a chance ChuggaBoom can spread the Chugg Life far and wide through a record label, we would be fools not to accept it. There’s a relatively small record label that is starting to make waves called Sumerian Records that we believe could work harmoniously with us to help spread our message. Only time will tell.

Back to Zodiac Arrest and why the admittedly strongly enjoyable cover of The Lonely Island track I Just Had Sex to close out the album? Had you guys run out of creative Viagra to Chuggaboom2_RingMaster Reviewcompose your own intimate ode? ;)

We did a cover of that song because it deserved to be a better song. And I had just had sex. It was alright.

We now know the tour de force that ChuggaBoom is in the studio, can you give some insight to the dangers, pitfalls, and adventures seeing the band live entails?

What happens at a ChuggaBoom show stays at the ChuggaBoom show. You’ll have to come see us live to find out.

Big thanks again for sparing time to enlighten us to the way of ChuggaBoom, any last words you would like to share?

Buy our merch. Buy our album. Buy tickets to see us live. Spread the chugg life! But mainly buy our shit.

And lastly…a Chuggalo and a Juggalo walk into a bar…please give us the ending.

A Juggalo? Sounds like a parody of our movement. The Chuggalo creates a guitar out of the Juggalo’s shin bone and gives him the full force of the chugg.

 

http://chuggaboom.bigcartel.com/   http://facebook.com/chuggaboomuk   https://twitter.com/chuggaboomband

Read our review of Zodiac Arrest @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/09/29/chuggaboom-zodiac-arrest/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 20/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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