Infinitas – Civitas Interitus

Today we bring you some melodic thrash metal from Switzerland and a debut album which makes easy work of capturing the imagination as it storms the senses. The band is Infinitas, a quintet stirring attention for a while now but has really been luring ears and praise recently with their first album Civitas Interitus. It is easy to hear why too as the release soon reveals itself a web of creative intrigue and drama with a sound much more than that earlier description suggests. In its cauldron you will find as rich an essence of folk and extremes of metal as thrash with elements of power and gothic metal similarly woven into its inventive tapestry.

The band itself first emerged in 2009, formed by guitarist Selv Martone and drummer/vocalist Pirmin Betschart. Its line-up was complete by the following year with the addition of bassist Pauli Betschart, violinist Joëlle Sigrist, and vocalist Isabelle Sigrist. 2011 saw the departure of Isabelle but it was not until 2013 that the band found the right replacement in Andrea Böll. Two years from there Infinitas unveiled their first release, the Self-Destruction EP. It swiftly enticed awareness and high praise the way of the Muotathal outfit in a year which also saw Joëlle depart and preparation for the band’s first album begin with session musician Hanna Landolt providing violin across the 2016 recorded Civitas Interitus. Laura Kalchofner became a permanent member soon after but too late to record the album though she does play on its hidden track with her e-recorder and provide backing vocals in other tracks.

Released earlier this year, Civitas Interitus is a concept album centred round the city of Lunatris which to slim its history down is attacked and torn apart by demons. As its tale, the release needs little time to grab the imagination and intrigue attention with opener The Die Is Cast. A portentous air rises up around the unsuspecting city and populace, a lone voice aware of the dark tide looming over its skies. Peaceful melodies and harmonies rise up next, a deceitful calm bewitching the senses before Alastor opens the gateway for hellish hordes to descend and ravage. Instantly a flirtatious groove grips ears and appetite, the swiftly striking vocal adventure and dexterity of Andrea riding its swing. There is a Toyah like essence to her voice across the album which only adds to her magnetism, an equal attraction just as potently conjured within the song by Selv and Hanna’s melodic often acidic adventure.

It is an outstanding first surge into the psyche, that mix of styles a web of compelling trespass and just as enticing within the following Samael. The song is maybe less bold in its invention than its predecessor but just as fascinating and arousing with the backing tones of Pirmin a fine raw contrast to Andrea’s melodic roars. With rhythms a senses plundering prowl and the violin scything spicily across their bows, the song only enthrals before Labartu ventures into the eye of the storm with its melodic oasis again surrounded with ever enclosing threat. It is an escape though only into the diseased psyche and arms of its particular demonic devouring, the sounds a corrupted fusion of celebration and cancerous rapacity as virulent as a plague.

Its irresistible dance is matched by the instrumental symphony of Aku Aku, a piece of melodic beauty with floating harmonies which gives respite from the tempest soon escalated by Skylla and its siren-esque sonic  waters where again melodies tempt and violin coaxing suggests as vocals narrate pleas and acceptance of an inevitable outcome. Both tracks grip attention with their infectious attacks and imaginative twists and turns, the second an especially adventurous flight of sound and emotion.

The outstanding Rudra curses the senses next with its death/folk metal twisted tempest, defiling and seducing them with its climatic roar while being sat astride by Andrea’s striking presence. With thrash bred riffs and toxic grooves infesting song and listener, the track simply grabs the passions to add another lofty peak to the landscape of Civitas Interitus, a plateau equally graced by the Celtic bred Morrigan. From its poetically dark entrance, the track stomps like a tribal dervish, those Irish hues inciting rousing crescendos leading to symphonically seeded venomous claws. As with all songs, there is a great unpredictable edge and uncertainty which never lets expectations get a hold, only intrigue and a hunger to further explore.

The album is finished off by firstly Amon, a song and entity hard to know whether to fear or embrace but one which is impossible to resist and avoid being enslaved by such the instinctive swing and creative maze of the proposition, and lastly through A New Hope, where the native tongue of the narrator leaves words unknown but sentiment open as a sunset of melodies and chants descend. Actually it is not quite the last breath of the album as from its lapping waves that hidden track erupts to add one final pleasurable adventure to the album’s creative theatre.

Before Civitas Interitus was sent our way we had not heard even a whisper of Infinitas; it is something we suspect a great many will be in the position of but for not much longer we suspect if the band’s fiercely enjoyable first album gets the attention and acclaim it undoubtedly deserves.

Civitas Interitus is available now @ https://infinitasmetal.bandcamp.com/album/civitas-interitus

http://www.infinitasband.ch/    https://www.facebook.com/infinitasband/    https://twitter.com/infinitasband

Pete RingMaster 03/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Odium – As The World Turns Black

With next year seeing their 25th anniversary, German melodic thrashers Odium have set it up perfectly with their new album As The World Turns Black. A hungry and imposingly virulent slab of metal, the band’s eighth full length is a band at the top of its game but one still pushing their boundaries and the borders of old school meets modern thrash metal.

Formed in 10993, the Frankfurt hailing quintet has grown to be one of Europe’s most potent if not always openly recognised thrash exponents; a band unafraid to be as boldly infectious as they are aggressively adventurous. Among an increasingly impressing series of releases over the years, the word around is that As The World Turns Black is the band’s finest moment; a suggestion as the Martin Buchwalter (Tankard, SuidAkrA) recorded album roars in ears once again, hard to confidently dispute.

The album opens up with the quickly rousing The end of everything, a beast of a track which from its drone lined sonic seeds springs a web of riffs and grooves which alone has the appetite licking its lips. The rapid fire kicks and jabbing thrusts of drummer Jan Heusel leave an early welcomed impact as riffs nag and tempt; guitarists Rochus Pfaff and David Hübsch swiftly into their inescapable manipulation of neck muscles and imagination. It is stirring stuff given further impetus by the equally anthemic tones of vocalist Ralf Runkel, his swinging delivery incitement alone whilst tendrils of melodic dexterity just seals the deal.

Point of no return ensures the great start is continuous, the song winding grooves around ears straight away as riffs lurk and beats intrude with a controlled hungry edge. With the great grumble of Belinda Ann Smaka’s bass to the fore, the song rapaciously huddles around the listener before unleashing its own swagger loaded, groove veined surge. The bass continues to almost venomously grumble as the contagious exploits of the track leave their anthemic mark, together creating a glorious tapestry of attitude honed incitement.

The calmer waters of No goodbye comes next, emotive melodies wrapping the imagination as a subsequent wash of reflective vocals and restrained intensity looms. Of course things ignite with feistier intent though still the song has a reserve compared to its predecessors which adds to its magnetic and skilfully woven persuasion before Blind sets another memorable marker. The bass of Smaka again seduces instincts for irritable basslines, its grumble a persistent lure within the more tempestuous blaze of guitars. Though its chorus is maybe not as commanding as others around it, the track is just as manipulative with its devilish hooks and ravenous riffs as Runkel enticingly growls from their midst.

Every track has a contagion loaded temptation in their plans, it overcoming any possible resistance with varied tenacity across the album but no more irresistibly than within Revolution. The song is a call to arms in sound and heart, courting its arousal with just as striking invention and unpredictable twists but never detouring from its predacious core before Frozen world descends just as rapaciously on ears. Again it is impossible not to swept up in antagonistic torrents and aggressive catchiness though the track misses the more unique twists and bolder moves of surrounding songs to grab personal tastes as forcibly as others. In saying that its melodic caresses are simply tantalising and pleasure never less than full as with the more barbarous exploits of Time is a killer where riffs and rhythms alone prey on the senses. Almost carnal in nature and tone, the track is superb, another invitation for the spirit and emotions to get thickly involved.

The album’s title track follows and quickly has attention cast in a web of melodic enterprise and intrigue, every subsequent tendril a suggestion in sound explored by Riunkel. Bringing another fresh spice and aspect to the release, the song is a tenacious croon unable to keep its riotous instincts in check and only growing more compelling because of it.

Closed up by the rhythmically commanding and sonically conspiring Inside the Incubus, the track a nefarious invitation turning into a bullish stomp, As The World Turns Black leaves greed and exhaustion in its wake. It is a full-on trespass which rewards submission with a tapestry of melodic fascination. For the second time in a week we have to say, here is one of the most enjoyable and invigorating thrash encounters of recent years.

As The World Turns Black is out now via Black Sunset / MDD across most online stores.

Upcoming live shows

  1. August – Hasselroth, Rock in Schröth Open Air
  2. November – Nijmegen (NL), Rockcafe Backstage

http://odium-metal.de/     https://www.facebook.com/odium.thrashmetal/

Pete RingMaster 19/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright