Vault 51 – Kid

It is never a bad thing to make a thumping good first impression and that is exactly what US quintet Vault 51 has done with their debut EP, Kid. Not that the band is exactly a new force to attention having been around a while now with a buzz soon brewing up around them and apparently they have been signed to Roadrunner Records at some point too. Kid though is their first meaty proposition for real focus following a clutch of magnetic singles, and a forcible reason to pay close attention to their rousing sound.

Roaring out of Atlanta, Vault 51 breed a sound which lies somewhere between alternative rock and melodic/post hardcore; a proposition embracing familiar essences with fresh invention to create an individual character which blossoms across the six tracks of Kid. Already earning comparisons to the likes of Red Jumpsuit Apparatus and Story Of The Year, the band gets straight down to persuasive business with the Drew Fulk (I Prevail, Motionless In White) produced and Lee Rouse mixed EP. Thirty Six gets things underway, it’s ticking suggestiveness soon submerged in a torrent of riffs and fiery sonic flames. That passing of time is still there working away as the song ebbs and flows, the bass of Alex Garmon a gnarly temptation and the jabbing beats of Joshua Landry a biting trespass as melodies and harmonies catch alight and soar. Frontman Landon Jones leads the way with his potent tones backed by the similarly alluring voice of guitarist Tom Jepson, whose strings simultaneously collude with those of Patrick Snyder in a web of enterprise which has ears gripped and an early appetite stoked in swift time.

It is a powerful start to the release, that mix of varied flavours and textures a tempestuous yet composed blaze which as suggested earlier merges recognisable essences with bolder exploits belonging to Vault 51; a success found again within the following We Don’t Care. The track quickly shows itself a predatory individual, riffs carrying a sinister and aggressive edge tempered by again impressing vocals. With rhythms bringing their own cantankerous almost inhospitable intent, the track still plunders the senses; a Spineshank meets Breaking Benjamin spicing grabbing keen attention as things flow through mellow and harsh scenery with craft and emotional intensity.

The first two striking tracks set the marker for the EP which arguably the subsequent songs miss matching yet as latest single Magnolia with its melodic graces and atmospheric caresses soon reveals, the adventurous ear pleasing nature and power of the release refuses to die down. A volatile encounter as calm and seductive as it is fiery and imposing, the third song breeds a virulent infectiousness as forceful as that cast by its predecessors and in next up Wildfire. A poppier incitement from the off but soon lighting a pyre of emotion and intensity, the song has something of Australians Voyager and Sick Puppies to it, a mix of the two in many ways at least which has the imagination soon caught up in its creative drama.

The magnetic reflective calm of Mourning View makes an engaging contrast soon after; the song a melodic serenade on the senses with a brooding rhythmic lining as keys cast their suggestive poetry.  It too has tempestuousness to its heart which flirts with rather than breaks in ears, adding an anxiousness which firmly appeals before Sincerely Me brings things to a ferocious conclusion with a blistering tempest abound with melodic beauty and emotional drama. Maybe taking longer to initially convince than other tracks within Kid, it blossoms into one of the highlight of the release with its cyclonic breath and rousing ingenuity.

Kid makes an increasingly compelling and impressive statement through every listen, sparking the lift off of Vault 51 into the grasp of real attention but more importantly a certain new wave of hungry fans.

The Kid EP is out now on Spotify, through other stores and @ https://www.vault51.net/merch/kid

https://www.vault51.net/    https://www.facebook.com/Vault51official/    https://twitter.com/vault51official

 Pete RingMaster 25/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Wax Futures – The Museum of Everything

Photo by Jonathan Dadds.

UK band Wax Futures to our mind has never fully fitted their post hardcore tag with their flavoursome sound but it has never been less applicable than with the bands new mini album The Museum of Everything. Boasting a virulent contagion of sound as indie, post punk, and new wave as it is math and punk rock, the release is a refreshing and inimitable slice of rock ‘n’ roll revelling in the new maturity and imagination fuelling the trio’s songwriting and music.

Formed in the final breaths of 2011, the Telford hailing band soon made their mark on the local live scene. With a growing support and reputation they released the Breadcrumbs EP in 2013, before tempting bigger attention with debut album A History of Things to Come; it like its successor a seven track offering with a more post hardcore heart to its enterprise. With their live presence taking in the UK, sharing stages with the likes of Limp Bizkit, Bear Makes Ninja, &U&I, Tall Ships, Alpha Male Tea Party, Castrovalva, Bad Grammar, The JCQ, and Idles along the way, the band have spent their time working on The Museum of Everything, evolving and pushing their creativity simultaneously. It was a concentrated effort now easily and swiftly heard in the album and greedily enjoyed twist by turn.

Recorded with Ryan Pinson (God Damn, Bad Grammar), produced and mastered by Tom Woodhead (ex-¡Forward, Russia!), The Museum of Everything gets down to infectious business straight away as a lone riff squirrels itself in ears, a lure soon joined by a vocal count and controlled swipes from Simon’s sticks. As they all enjoyably collude, Sandcastles in the Snow comes alive, a scuzzy hook reaching out as rhythms slip into a controlled canter while vocals further capture ears in tandem with the groove escaping Graham’s guitar. With the easy going meander of Kieran’s bass teasing feet, the song becomes busier, heading into an equally undemanding but inescapably catchy chorus. Never quite igniting but with a neat whiff of early Kaiser Chiefs to its subsequent enticement, the song is a compelling start to the album setting out an appetising canvas of invention soon taken to bigger and bolder heights.

Demographics is next and instantly with its opening melody alone, brings a Young Knives feel into play, one only accentuated by the vocals and the subsequent web of sonic intrigue and infectious collaboration across the threesome. Hooks grab attention throughout, littering the aural drama and flirtatious energy combining like a mix of At the Drive-In and Swound! but only creating its own distinct adventure. A constant nag on body and pleasure, the song makes way for the just as impressive (My Body is a) Landfill. Instantly, more boisterous in energy and just as enticing in contagious endeavour as its predecessors, the track strolls along with a knowing and inventive swagger; its hands on receptive hips and tenacious feet teasing and taunting them into action with its creative zeal. As all tracks there is also a meatier, raucous edge and air which coats it all, the band’s punk instincts adding to the increasingly tenacious and imposing treat.

From one major highlight to another and Wreck of the Hesperus. As soon as it lays down its first line of bait, the song becomes a tapestry of seductive espionage woven from deceptive hooks and devious grooves, neither seemingly as intrusive and enslaving as they really are. With every passing second, the band’s rock ‘n’ roll heart becomes bolder, closing in on a volatile, increasingly menacing psychosis of a finale to leave an appetite hungry for more.

That heavier, irritable essence is still hanging round as next up The 90s Called, It Wants Yr Misspent Youth Back rumbles in ears. It is a ravenous bordering on rabid incitement from which a smiling groove and teasing stroll breaks free. Now with its relaxed but irresistible swing wrapped ingenuity fondling the senses, the song simply traps and chains the passions with something akin to We Are The Physics meets The Futureheads.

The cosmic twittering of { } leads in the evocative pastures of closing track Brittle Bones and an epic and increasingly dense rapture of melodic suggestion and angular jangles around rhythmic trespass. Holding its own lively groove led saunter, the song sees Wax Futures push their emotive intensity and creative designing yet again; both intensifying as the song brews and boils up into a powder keg of sonic turbulence eventually sending the album off into spatial unknowns leaving the listener lingering on keen anticipation for what comes next from the band.

The Museum of Everything is Wax Futures upon a new lofty plateau in songwriting and sound. At times it might not ignite as it hints it will and maybe lacks a final bite to its most agitated moments but only announces the band as a real player within the UK rock scene and a stalwart in the passions of certainly our personal soundtracks, something hard to imagine being alone in.

The Museum of Everything is out now @ https://waxfutures.bandcamp.com/

 

https://www.facebook.com/waxfutures    https://twitter.com/waxfuturesuk

Pete RingMaster 05/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Ghosts Again – The Closest Thing To Closure

Ghosts Again_RingMasterReview

Based out of North Carolina, Ghosts Again is a post hardcore trio releasing a new EP, The Closest Thing To Closure this month. Having missed their earlier efforts, the new five track encounter is the first time we have had to check out a band many are suggesting is loaded with promise. From a strong but initially underwhelming start, it is fair to say that The Closest Thing To Closure suggests that Ghosts Again is indeed a potential equipped band well worth paying attention to.

Rising from the ashes of its member’s previous projects, Close Up on the Quiet Ones and Messenger Down, Ghosts Again picked up highly positive attention in 2015 with the release of the single, Business as Usual. It and their sound lured understandable comparisons to bands like Underoath and The Amity Affliction, suggestions easy to see happening again with The Closest Thing To Closure EP, though what ultimately emerges is an imagination and boldness in song which suggests Ghosts Again are shaping something heading towards being distinctly theirs.

GA4(Art_RingMasterReviewThe EP opens with Skeleton Boy which quickly shows the vocal and melodic prowess of vocalist/guitarist Alex Cortright. As the darker hues of Brandon Washington’s bass unites with the swinging beats of drummer Arun Bose, a great blend of brooding and lighter sonic hooks ensnare ears as Cortright’s roars continue to flame and impress. There are elements which really grab attention but equally from sound and the raw side of the vocals things are a touch too formula; failing to ignite personal tastes beyond being contented and firmly intrigued.

Pant’s Division (The End is Silence) makes a similarly expected and appealing start with heftily swung beats within sonic smog of suggestiveness around the band’s vocal variety. As the first, the song is skilfully woven with each moment involved yet a fluid web of sound and emotion; not openly striking but potently persuasive. It is the emerging element of discord and in turn melodic elegance which lifts the song to another alluring level though. It brings greater drama to the temptation and a richer element of unpredictability which really grabs the spotlight in the following and outstanding Les Enfants Terribles. From the start, grooves wind their charms around ears, the imagination just as easily bitten by the web of melodic enterprise and vocal dexterity which blossoms as the song broadens its adventure. There is a touch of My Chemical Romance to the track at times which enjoyably lines the more volatile and metal bred dexterity as well as the thickly emotive calms within the persistently evolving song.

That new level of invention continues in Relive Revive; its emotional and sonic blaze colouring an equally fascinating tapestry of guitar craft and rhythmic theatre. As with all songs on the EP, there are plenty of textures and moments of creativity to recognise or certainly compare to other bands within the post hardcore scene but tinted with a freshness of thought and skill which stops it becoming too indistinct or dull.

Ending with the increasingly compelling Eleven, a song fusing symphonic hues in its boisterous and bracing tempest of heart and sound, The Closest Thing To Closure leaves a healthy, and growing with every listen, appetite to indulge in the highly enjoyable Ghosts Again challenge and reward proposal. It is a band showing that earlier mentioned potential at every turn of an EP which is not ground-breaking but offering plenty to please ears with vigour and style.

The Closest Thing To Closure EP is out now on iTunes.

https://www.facebook.com/ghostsagainband   https://twitter.com/GhostsAgainBand

Pete RingMaster 25/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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We Fight Like Kids -Superficial Behaviour EP

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With a large crowd of accomplished and inventive bands fuelling the UK post hardcore scene right now it is hard to stand out from the pack but one band which suggests it has the potential and imagination to do so is Midlands quintet We Fight Like Kids. The band recently released debut EP Superficial Behaviour, a five song stomp of appetite sparking and strongly impressing encounters. It is too early to say that the band has carved its own distinct presence away from the masses just yet but it suggests it is on the cards whilst leaving ears thrilled and interest in the band full.

The first single from the EP, Falconer starts things off, a twist of the radio dial leading the listener into a wind of vocal scowls and potent rhythmic incitement. This comes clad in a sonic colour which is as biting as it is coaxing, riffs and melodies harsh yet welcoming from the guitars of Gianni Basi and Jacob Ford. It is a strong if underwhelming entrance though, something to intrigue if not yet excite. The vocals led by Ant Pain add to the drama, showing themselves in three forms. There is a great clean delivery which continually impresses across the release as it tempers a darker heavier roar which whilst lacking the same vibrant spark in comparison challenges and commands, especially as it lies alongside a stronger and rawer, almost black metal inspired scowling. Who delivers which we cannot yet tell you but they all bring a great drama and diversity to a song which grows stronger and more pleasing over time and a release which as mentioned marks the cards of future attention.

The following Tequila Slammer is an immediately more intensive offering from its first breath, jagged riffs and vocal causticity embracing the again potent clean delivery of the song’s narrative. With also a stronger infectiousness to it, the track is soon enlisting body and imagination in its virulent proposition as the punchy beats of Liam Keeling and dark hearted basslines of Sam Capps show they are no addictive slouches alongside the thick grooves and sharp hooks lighting up the song. Greater and brighter imagination shows itself in the song too, a pleasing twist of Cover-frontpiano led enterprise a great touch before the equally magnetic charms of Select The Ejector take over. Merging emotive balladry with muscular antagonism, the song unveils a little more of the continually broadening sound and songwriting of the band, its ire and melancholic reflection a united portrait of emotion against the similarly blended aggression and seduction of sound. The track does not quite send the passions racing, but as those before, its offering brings thoughts and appetite closer to that destination.

Ice Breakers flirts with radiant keys initially before shrugging off the calmer veil for a Meshuggah seeded voracity and provocation. From here on it is a battlefield of bruising provocation and progressively spiced melodic adventure, the extremes uniting rather than conflicting within the ears. It is a perpetually fascinating proposition never allowing expectations to have their say as it without really stretching post hardcore boundaries gives them a creative going over.

It is fair to say that the EP just gets better with every track, each song leading an ascent to the pinnacle of Superficial Behaviour which is the exceptional Creeper Complex. The song romances ears straight away, luring them in through expressive keys before pulling aside the drapes for a mouth-watering theatre of varied grooves and tangy hooks flirting from a drama of melodic intrigue and gothic inspired devilry. Like a mix of early My Chemical Romance, Only The Quiet Ones, and Bury Tomorrow, the track sculpts its own identity and alone shows the band has the attributes to join the unique cream of post hardcore at some point, though you suspect their evolution of sound will eventually transcend genres anyway.

It is a stunning end to a thoroughly enjoyable and impressive release. Superficial Behaviour provides an introduction impossible to ignore whilst We Fight Like Kids instantly lives up to the buzz already bred locally around them.

The Superficial Behaviour EP is available now as a free download at https://bit.ly/1kLwqtc

https://www.facebook.com/WeFightLikeKids

RingMaster 27/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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When We Were Wolves – Heartless

When We Were Wolves

At the end of our review of the deeply pleasing The More Things Change, The More We Stay The Same EP from Welsh post hardcore band When We Were Wolves, we added that this was “still a band in the making”. Now the Bridgend quintet unleash its successor in the stunning shape of Heartless to show that they are a creative tempest which has arrived at its first pinnacle whilst still offering the potential of even greater things to come. The five track fury of invention and intensity is a startling encounter exploring a broader and more mature landscape than its predecessor yet still passionately driven by the band’s now distinctive and imaginative post hardcore intent.

Formed in 2011, When We Were Wolves has built a rich reputation for their live presence, which has seen them play alongside the likes of Bury Tomorrow, The Blackout, Devil Sold His Soul, Malefice, Born Of Osiris, Exit Ten, Betraying The Martyrs, Martyr Defiled, and Carcer City. Add that to the success of The More Things Change, The More We Stay The Same and it is fair to say that anticipation for its successor was ripe and full, a hunger swiftly sufficed as Heartless rampages through the ears.

Opening track Dying On The Inside straight away lays a feisty glaze of riffs over ears, their lure fusing a punk and metal attraction before the rampaging beats of drummer Josh Baker uncage their full weight upon the sonic turbulence. The bass of Matt Shaw prowls the gripping brawl of sound with relish whilst vocalist Mitch Bock roars with emotion and animosity. Riffs and grooves spill equal animosity through the craft and invention of guitarists Steve French and Rhod Evans too, their intensive proposal alone creating a riveting baiting of thoughts and emotions within the song. It is a stunning start to the EP, the track twisting and embracing the senses with enthralling imagination whilst further inescapable temptation is expelled through the outstanding and impressive vocal delivery of Bock. Like a collision between While She Sleeps and Slipknot with a twist of Cancer Bats, the song is an irresistible contagion.

Coating ears in an initial melodic yet fiery embrace, the next up The Devil You Know soon twists into a ferocious beast of vocal hostility and sonic antagonism. It is a demanding and compelling start but taken to another level as Bock PromoImageunveils more of his superb clean and melody rich vocals which had already enhanced its predecessor. Equipped and skilled to merge both extremes, he proves himself on Heartless to be one of the more exciting frontmen around. An essence of Dead Til Friday prompts thoughts towards the song but again a mere whisper to a sound undeniably belonging to When We Were Wolves. Predatory and seductive, it is a riveting adventure matched immediately by the voracious Blind. A sonic haze starts it off before grooves come out of the woodwork with insidious intent as pounding rhythms bring their equally enslaving thunderous textures. Vocals also explode with wide variety and unbridled passion across the destructive maelstrom smothering the senses. It is an exceptional savagery with a lingering spite ensuring it is one of the pinnacles of the release.

The following Confession takes its spark from the previous track, staggered riffs and venomous grooves an intensive and welcome intrusion as rhythms cast their heavyweight provocation. There is no respite from the vocals either initially, the fighting tones of Bock showing no mercy until his seamless slip into the equally impacting clean and velvet delivery he possesses. The encounter is a masterfully invigorating tempest which like most of the songs, perfectly sculpts its relatively brief length for the most dramatic impact before making way for the closing title track. Lighter in its presence in comparison to the last couple of tracks, Heartless is a radiantly emotive song, a melodically fired croon of sonic enterprise and vocal intensity which steals attention and ardour with Bock again exceptional though well-matched by the skilled sonic and rugged rhythmic charm of the rest of the band.

The Heartless EP is a major triumph for When We Were Wolves and the British post hardcore scene. The Welsh band has not only found its own voice but set out a new vat of promise and invention to inspire even greater anticipation for their next offerings.

The Heartless EP is available digitally through all stores on Monday 22nd September.

https://www.facebook.com/whenwewerewolves1

RingMaster 21/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Forever Can Wait – Beauty & Grace EP

FCW promo

Though their sound is not yet burning new grooves in the walls of melodic rock, UK band Forever Can Wait have something about them which suggests that there is a richly promising and even greater presence within the Southampton quintet which will only accelerate on from and build from their impressive debut EP. Beauty & Grace is an enthralling magnet of a release, six fascinating merges of melodic rock and post hardcore which seduces at every twist of its inventive encounter. It does not ignite raging fires in the passions it is fair to say but undoubtedly with a craft and melodic instinctiveness which only persuades strongly, the EP has emotions and satisfaction burning brightly and hungrily for the band and their future horizons.

Formed in 2009, Forever Can Wait has earned a strong reputation for their live performances which has seen them share stages with numerous higher profiled bands and over 2013 with the likes of Press To Meco, Out For Tomorrow, Bad Sign, and Villains. Equally the year has found the band drawing acclaim for their sets at the Butserfest, Takedown, and Download Festivals, the last coming about from the band winning this year’s Red Bull Studios Live At Download competition. With good airplay also following recent singles, it is not hard to imagine and suspect that the Beauty & Grace EP will register the band within a nationwide awareness and spark an even greater ascent for the creative band.

The title track sets things in riveting motion, guitars scoring the air with emotive tones over a firm rhythmic beckoning. It is not a Beauty&Grace Artworkdramatic entrance but one with a potency to light keen appetite for how things will evolve, which they do in fine style with the vocals of Tash Crump taking control. From within a reserved and teasing passage, the lady’s tones make a strong and pleasing caress which only impresses across the song as they more than hold their own as the guitars of Liam Baker and Will Wilson turn in a snarling enticement and heat to the song. As the EP, the track does not quite get the heart fluttering and gasping for breath but definitely awakens keen eager attention.

The following P&Q brings the intensity and contagion which is only simmering within its predecessor and takes little time in securing a rampant greed for its presence. The guitars initially churn up the air with expertise and temptation before stepping in restraint to allow the jabbing beats of drummer Toby Leonard to build a formidable frame which the rapacious growling basslines of Luke Gould deliciously prowl. With caustic hooks and clean grooves weaving within the scorched energy, the song is a feisty encounter if one which never fully ignites as it hints at or one hopes. As in the first, Crump makes for a richly appealing narrator and makes the perfect temper for when the track does unleash a sonic scourge which teases bedlam but pulls away before crossing the lip of tempting chaos.

Rest is a smouldering seduction from its first breath but one stalked wonderfully by the grouchy throat of the bass. With great backing vocals from the guitarists, something arguably there is not enough of on the release, and a brooding atmosphere to the reflection tackling track as well as the ever convincing expression of Crump, the song takes its time but emerges as one of the strongest highlights of the EP alongside its predecessor.

The brief and decent enough piano crafted instrumental Release makes an evocative interruption before leading into the equally emotive Excuses. With a female fronted band like Forever Can Wait, Paramore comparisons always seem second nature but over the length of Beauty & Grace, this track is the one which really only sparks that thought. The track does not match the heights of the previous songs but still holds the listener in a tender but firm grip which the closing Hopes & Dreams matches with an emotionally hued flame of melodic craft and intensive enterprise.

The first half of the EP is certainly the strongest but Forever Can Wait has a strength and potency which makes Beauty & Grace something to enjoy and hanker for from start to finish. There is massive potential within the five piece and using their debut as an impressive base you can only see them becoming a familiar and sought after name on the rock bred lips of the country.

https://www.facebook.com/forevercanwait

8/10

RingMaster 27/11/2013

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Teenage China – Forth EP

Teenage China

With a debut as strong as the Forth EP it is impossible not to suspect and imagine that Scottish band Teenage China has a potent and vibrant future ahead of them. Three tracks of inventive and colourful rich sounds ensures the release makes the strongest introduction whilst suggesting there is still plenty more to come from the band and for them to investigate within. Taking post hardcore as their seed and invigorating it with melodic and alternative rock essences, the band has created something not yet wholly unique but with plenty of distinctive temptations which sets it and them apart from the bulk of similar genre fuelled artists.

Seemingly themed by youth and its fit in the world of today, the EP takes mere moments to make a loud and impressive persuasion, the quintet of vocalist Ged Cartwright, guitarists/vocalists Barry Topping and Richard Fish, bassist/vocalist Simon Watt, and drummer/vocalist Francis Morgan, flying from the traps with energy and melodic fire on Millionmurk. The vocals of Cartwright instantly impress, never dipping throughout the release, whilst the guitars and firm rhythmic dance match his entrance as they combine to form an immediate pleasing hook. Constantly on the move in sound, direction, and imagination the song is a riveting creative exploit which recruits the passions with ease whilst offering an evocative weave for thoughts to be inspired by. It is an exceptional start which offers more to contemplate and enjoy the more of its incendiary invention you share. It does put the rest of the EP under pressure in many ways such its potency but the rest of the tracks never offer anything less than captivation even if maybe they do just miss that opening set plateau.

Embrace The Street takes a more reflective and settled entrance with melodies and vocal harmonies washing pleasingly over the ear as Forth Coverthe song primes all its elements for the subsequent charge of sound and energy. With a definite Avenged Sevenfold feel to the steely riffs and sonic enterprise, the track like the first offers outstanding vocal craft and invention to its continuing to impress creative charm and the skills of Topping and Fish. Everything fits perfectly, the drums and bass as inspiring and accomplished as any other factor of the band and the quite incredible vocal mix from across the whole band adventurous and always fresh.

The closing doesawasphaveaface has a deep soulful growl to its presence especially through Cartwright, and pushes the boundaries of the EP yet again so all songs though closely related offer something different to greedily seize upon and find a passion for. Morgan drives the song with his ever twisting rhythmic attack impressively, giving it intensity and imposing height which is built upon by the striking flames of guitar and again vocal union. Maybe not as immediate as the other two songs, with the additional vocal elegance of Carine Tinney adding further suasion the track slowly burns itself deep into the emotions and emerges as another real highlight of the release, though every track deserves that accolade.

Teenage China is a big force ready to explode upon the world and they can only get better which really heats up the anticipation, but available as a name your price download there is no point in waiting for that to happen when Forth is this damn good.

www.facebook.com/teenagechina

www.twitter.com/teenagechina

http://teenagechina.bandcamp.com/

9/10

RingMaster 29/08/2013

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