RingMaster Reviews Interviews – Terraborn

Pic by Greig Clifford

For those who may not know who you are, introduce yourselves quickly.

Terraborn (Melodic Death Metal) based in Sussex, UK

Describe your sound in as few words as possible.

 Post-Apocalyptic Soundtrack of Destruction.

Who are your three biggest influences as a band?

 Lamb of God, Pantera, Parkway Drive

What’s the meaning behind your band name?

 It means “Born of the Earth”. Mainly fitting in with the post-apocalyptic theme

How did you approach your latest release, the ‘Call to War’ EP, in terms of writing and recording?

Mainly through collaboration at home for the writing process with most of the music written by Dave (Guitars). All of the EP was recorded, mixed and edited by ourselves (with the exception of live drums) and fully self-produced using Andy (Guitars) home studio setup

Do you have any personal favourite songs on the release?

Our favourite tracks from the EP are the title track ‘Call to War’ and ‘Nations Wake’

Explain the meaning behind the title.

 Call to War! – Rallying the troops for battle.

Describe the concept of the video.

Trying to bring the Chaos behind our live performances into a video…Lots of lights, glitches, flashing, sci-fi type feel!

How does it tie in with the themes around the song?

Yes, calling on our soldiers to join the cause and fight for survival

Was it fun to shoot or did it prove to be quite a challenge?

Very fun, with access to a lot of hi-tech kit, an array of 4K HD cameras, HUGE screens, crazy lighting rigs! – As with any video though when you have performed the song 100+ times it wears a little thin!!

Do you have any live dates lined up at present?

Friday 2nd August at the Facebar in Reading (Supporting Rammlied – Rammstein tribute), Friday 1st November at the Crown in Littlehampton (Headline)

What are your favourite songs to perform live?

‘Hypocrisy’, ‘Nations Wake’.

What are the best and worst shows you’ve played to date?

The Best: Mammothfest 2016, M2M final Brighton 2017. The Worst: The Hub Brighton (horrendous sound issues!!)

If you could open for anyone, who would it be?

Lamb of God

Any comical stories from your time as a band you can share with us?

A Seagull stealing, and swallowing whole our bass players battered sausage outside of Sticky Mikes in Brighton, and our Guitarist (Dave) having to run out of the car at traffic lights in a one way system approaching Reading as he needed to pee, for us only to realise afterwards he had left his phone in the Car and was subsequently lost in the middle of the City with no way for us to contact him!

What’s the plan for the rest of 2019?

Promoting our video release and continuing the writing process for our album which we hope to get into the studio to record later this year – with a few live shows thrown in to keep us on our toes of course!

https://www.facebook.com/terrabornband/

Questions by Elliot Leaver

 

From Ashes Reborn – Existence Exiled

An introduction which is little short of striking, Existence Exiled is the debut album from German melodic death metallers From Ashes Reborn. Its eight dark yet sonically dynamic tracks is the announcement of a new emerging force in the extreme metal realm, a band which if surprisingly not now will surely lure major plaudits and attention whilst building on this richly potent first album.

With its members coming together from across Germany, the Wittlich based quintet emerged last year. Creating and honing their Scandinavian spiced melodic death metal bred sound, the band eventually entered Klangschmiede Studio E with producer Markus Stock (Empyrium, The Vision Bleak, Sun Of The Sleepless) to record Existence Exiled. They have come out with a release which embraces the familiar course of the genre from its early days but more so breeds its own invention and individuality within a rousing trespass further ignited by ravenous blastbeats within a rhythmic attack which savages as it incites. Add to that provocative melodic enterprise and intimation alongside a web of hooks which greedily linger and you have an encounter which commands attention.

Existence Exiled opens with the brief instrumental intro of The Onerous Truth, a piece from its initial lure of keys amidst a dark portentous air that easily lured anticipation and the imagination into its and the following depths of the release. With rich emotive strings adding to its lure, the track leads straight into the rapacious jaws of Fight For The Light. The guitars of Dirk and Sebastian create a wind of invasive temptation as the rhythmic touch of bassist Tobias and drummer Thomas growl and bite respectively. To this swiftly compelling surge, Ronni’s vocal growl provides its own invasive potency, his bearish tones a blend of persuasion and threat. Evolving its melodic and adventurous landscape, the song leaves predictability at the door, its calmer eye of the storm as magnetic as its surging inhospitable winds.

An array of varied flavours adds to the creative drama, blackened hues joining death and melodic endeavour; a feisty mix across the album which is just as compelling within next up Follow The Rising. Grooves spiral across its turbulence, their net of temptation easy bait for keen attention as too the melodic weave which shapes the track’s expanding invention. The craft of the individuals within From Ashes Reborn is also impressive magnetism with the solo touch of Dirk a rousing flame against the harsher but equally as potent draw of voice and rhythmic intrusion.

Across the stirring presence of The Essence Of Emptiness, with its opening melodic seduction as powerful a coaxing as anything within the album before voracious ferocity descends upon its engaging enterprise, and the carnal animus of Infected, the album strengthened its thick hold on ears and appetite. Both tracks are a captivating fusion of raw hostilities and melodically lined temptation with the second especially rampant in its blend of the familiar and new.

Suspense soaks every note and moment within the release and especially tracks like its title track which follows, the guitars stealing the adventurous limelight but skilfully and imaginatively backed by its rhythmic drama and the inhospitable yet enticing scourge of vocals while Homicidal Rampage has a bloodlust to its contagion which left us wondering whether to run or feverishly embrace its creative and emotional rancor; the latter winning out.

Completed by the melancholy fuelled, tension lined beauty of The Splendid Path, an instrumental which sets up a whole new adventure for the imagination whilst concluding the album’s own, Existence Exiled impresses from start to finish. At times it does not offer the most unique moments but among others which openly are, but every one, each twist and turn is an enthralling and challenging pleasure from a band which has all the weapons of imagination and craft to make a big impact.

Existence Exiled is out now @ https://thesplendidpath.bandcamp.com/releases

https://thesplendidpath   https://www.facebook.com/thesplendidpath/   https://twitter.com/splendidpath

Pete RingMaster 14/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Battlesword – Banners Of Destruction

As the band look forward to a potent 2018, appearances at the MetalDays Open Air Festival and Metal Inferno in Paderborn as support for Grave and Holy Moses already confirmed and in the midst of writing a new album, we look back at second full-length, Banners Of Destruction from German outfit Battlesword. Having missed it upon its release a fair while back and urged by the keen encouragement of our friend Markus Eck at Metal Message, we thought checking out what the fuss was about would be a smart move. This it proved to be, the release an imaginative and intense tempest of melodic death metal making a long overdue introduction for us to the Lower Rhine hailing quintet.

Formed in 1999, Battlesword has earned a rich reputation for their live presence and sound within the German metal scene, their 2003 debut album Failing in Triumph making a powerful statement in presence and sound. The years have seen the outfit earn plaudits sharing stages with the likes of Moonsorrow, Thyrfing, Suidakra, Warpath, Debauchery and many more alongside playing events like the Indoor Festival Battle of Otzenhausen and Slovenian festival MetalDays Open Air. It is also fair to say that Battlesword is a band which gives the time and effort needed to each step they make, a trait easily heard in their second album with its skilfully nurtured dynamics and enterprising textures. It is a sound which maybe evades true uniqueness, Amon Amarth easily coming to mind at times, but has its own character amidst enterprising adventure.

Banners Of Destruction is an album which simply grows in impressiveness and dexterity over time, each listen revealing fresh layers and dynamics maybe veiled upon initial visits. The same can be said for our ears about the tones of vocalist Axel Müller, his ursine delivery raw and centred on one attack to unsettle and scar ears yet with each listen his presence persuades that the album would not be as potent without his organic growl or indeed the specific craft of his companions.

The release opens with Spirit to the Flesh and an invasive yet enticing assault of heavy rhythms entangled in spidery tendrils of guitar. It is a strong invitation which soon breaks into an infectious saunter with a barbarous edge especially once Müller growls from its midst. The guitars of Christian Schmitz and Béla continue to encase the senses with predacious riffs and melodically lined grooves, the rolling beats of Andreas Klingen rousing and the grumble of Ben Bays’ bass taunting.

As the opener grabs attention, The Unnamed Magic similarly is a robust lure with its suggestive drama and portentous air around individual craft. It does not have the spark of its predecessor or seemingly the boldness but backs it up purposefully before the album’s title track winds rapacious grooves around the senses as rhythms pounce with matching character. The guitars continue to weave a melodic web as a great repetitious tinge lines their grooves, each adding to a suggestive tapestry of sound. Swiftly and firmly it eclipses the previous pair but itself is outshone by the prowling and imaginative presence of Grave New World. Müller’s almost corrosive style is a potent temper to the melodic spicing cast by the guitars, their union an effective conflict adding to the depth of song and sound.

The Silence of Victory continues the trend, one of the album’s very best moments an atmospheric instrumental which dances with the imagination as melodies seduce over a dark heartbeat while Tongues of Hatred brings carnivorous breath to the album’s experience with its intimidating air and touch. It is a trespass hungrily driven by the tenacious exploits of drums and bass but magnetically tempered by the spider’s web of animated melodies and venom lined but beckoning grooves. The track takes best song honours but soon equalled by successor Circle of Witches, a hip swinging, bone rattling stroll as flirtatious as it is predatory. Together they create the pinnacle of Banners of Destruction, a height prolonged if not quite to the same loftiness by the melodically mazy Bloodlust Symphony. It too is simultaneously a threat and enticement, Battlesword proving again they are adept at aligning contrasts.

Through the excellent Left for the Vultures where not for the first time on the album classic metal hues keenly lure ears and appetite and the tenaciously infectious and invasive There Will Be Blood, band and album hold attention with a firm hand, each of the two and especially the latter springing their own adventurous but enjoyably fierce and quarrelsome enterprise, aspects just as prevalent within the infernal temptation of Where Demons Awake, its charms woven by the ever alluring craft of the guitars.

Closed by the intensive examination sent across the senses by Enemy Divine and its hellish beauty, Banners of Destruction leaves pleasure rife. It maybe does not realise all of the bold adventure and individualism it persistently hints at but grabs the imagination from start to finish and nurtures a real anticipation for its successor.

http://www.battlesword.de/    https://www.facebook.com/Battleswordofficial

Pete RingMaster 09/01/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Furyborn – Dawn Of Leviathan

Since emerging in 2010, UK outfit Furyborn seem to make a potent statement with every move they make within the British metal scene. From their live debut in 2011, they have earned support and a reputation which has only gathered momentum and is sure to again with the release of their debut album, Dawn Of Leviathan. It is a ferociously imposing and compelling affair that arouses the same senses it trespasses with the band’s increasingly distinct and adventurous style of melodic death metal.

That live side of the Poole hailing quintet has seen them become one of the most potent forces across the South of England, win the regional Metal 2 The Masses competition and play Bloodstock Open Air for only their seventh live outing. Since then they have shared stages with the likes of Napalm Death, Threat Signal, Mors Principium Est, Sylosis, The Agonist, Malefice, The Defiled, Evile, (Hed) P.E. and Ted Maul as well as release their first acclaimed EP, The Reaping Of Our Days released in 2012 through Bored Stiff Records. Fair to say the band has been nagging at national and broader attention since day one, increasingly growing both which the highly anticipated Dawn Of Leviathan can only escalate.

The album quickly shows a new strength in intensity, craft, and imagination within Furyborn; a growth in all aspects infused into a maturity which is maybe unexpected within a first full-length, even from a band in its seventh year. Dawn of Leviathan opens with the atmospheric trespass of Second Sun, a brief harass of raw sonic dissonance which leads into the album’s title track where instantly a barrage of intrusive beats from drummer Tim Coulson and ravenous riffs from rhythm guitarist Rob Walker devour ears. Just as forceful are the raw throated roars of vocalist Jut Tabor who quickly seizes attention with his grudging tones, their causticity leading to a great flame of clean endeavour; the frontman, as the sounds around him showing a new dexterity and range which only impresses. It takes little time for band and song to reveal a new lofty plateau to that of the first EP, the melodic suggestiveness of lead guitarist Nick Richardson alone a striking new adventure equipped with the broader imagination and uniqueness that flows through the veins of the track.

The Reckoning follows with the same striking creative tenacity and character, the track a tirade of biting rhythms and corrosive riffs leading the listener into a web of melodic and cleanly delivered temptation. Within the burly, ravenous tempest of bitter sonic and vocal inhospitality, it makes for a compelling mix which only intensifies its lures as the song evolves and broadens its inventive landscape before Exult in Extinction uncages its own rabid assault again led by the uncompromising swings of Coulson. Stalking the senses, the bass of Timmy Hodgson is predatory if sometimes overwhelmed by the storm of riffs and beats while again Richardson veins the cauldron of sound with tendrils of skilful melodic lava. Contrasts flare and meet within the encounter, each colluding with and countering the other in a twisting tempest matched by vocal resourcefulness across the band.

The industrial opening of A Fault in Our Design brings a bold hint of Fear Factory like hues before the track turns to stalking and intimidating the senses. There is a swing to its core presence with breeds the infectiousness soon seeping into every element, the result a blistering yet controlled incitement as predatory as it is melodically tenacious while Life Begins uncages its own mercurial invasion of sound and emotion. Though swiftly persuasive and increasingly compelling, the song does not quite reach the inventive and  gripping heights of its predecessors for these ears though individual flair is as open as the track’s animosity and melodic assurance.

The raw rabidity of I Am Heresy has the imagination and appetite magnetically hooked again straight after with its ravenous and invitingly inhospitable assault of the senses while Deep Rising provides an enthralling lure of Tabor’s striking clean side courted by a laid back but fully suggestive climate of electronically led sound. With the irresistible carnivorous tone of Hodgson’s bass to the fore, the track is superb, another stirring magnet within the release adding further aspects to the bold adventure and evolving imagination of Furyborn.

The album concludes with firstly the varied metal symphony of Wraith, an array of flavours swarming with each other before a writhing death metal causticity bursts from within their midst, and finally with the symphonically laced As We Burn. The closer revels in all the new attributes of the band’s sound and writing, its proposal as invasively seductive as it is rancorous and transfixing. Again Fear Factory-esque hues entice as more Sepultura/Gojira like elements challenge, each woven into the individual character of Furyborn’s own sound. One of its major highlights, the song ensures that Dawn of Leviathan ends on a fascinating high.

Throughout, the album tightly holds attention and fiercely pleases, increasingly so with every subsequent listen. The fact that you still feel we are listening in on one step in a journey still to unfold only adds to the impressive nature of a release which is as much about potential as it is ear exciting craft and adventure.

Dawn of Leviathan is out now through most online stores and @ http://furyborn.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/furyborn/

Pete RingMaster 11/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dead Asylum – Death Always Wins

It is hard not to be enamoured with the Canadian underground metal scene and the number of striking and very often seriously impressive bands it spawns so it is not a surprise to find another making a sizable addition to the list. They are Vancouver quartet Dead Asylum who through new album Death Always Wins leave no hiding place from their ravenous blend of melodic death and thrash metal with plenty more things on offer. It is a creative scourge relentlessly harassing body, senses, and imagination but rewarding each in return.

Emerging to the rear of 2011, Dead Asylum lured attention and praise in their second year with debut album General Carnage. Time since has seen their reputation especially as a live force escalate; the band sharing stages with the likes of Anvil, Toxic Holocaust, Warbringer, Exmortus, Soulfly, and Soilwork, as well as touring across their homeland into the US and play alongside bands such as Suffocation, Bison BC, and Holy Grail at numerous festivals. Now they have Death Always Wins to offer up, and straight away it shows itself one of those encounters which quickly has you thinking broader attention and opportunities are lying in wait for its creators. Time will tell if it bullies and seduces that success but certainly the album has stamped Dead Asylum down as a band to take real notice of.

Instantly the album consumes ears in virulent grooves and rapacious riffs, Defiance fuelled by a vocal animus as rhythms plunder the senses. The grievously magnetic vocal attack comes from rhythm guitarist Mike Lister and bassist Roger Mowat, their interchanging and entangling deliveries as venomously intrusive and compelling as the sounds around them. Thereon in lead guitarist Eric Morrison spins and spreads a web of grooves and melodic toxicity, his enterprise entwining around the punishing yet equally virulent and rousing assault of drummer Samantha Landa. Infectiously nagging and trespassing ears and imagination, the track is a superb arousal of the senses to explosively set things off.

The album’s title track is next, unleashing its own hungry grooves and barbarous beats within seconds as vocals share a cancer of expression and word. Death Always Wins equally conjures a labyrinth of melodic and sonic craft to expand its temptation, one flooded by a pestilential infectiousness based on a thrash breeding which is rabid and irresistible.

Somehow things become even more predatory within Between Me and the Grave, the track initially prowling with ill-intent before accosting ears in a primal surge of carnivorous riffs and grooves as Landa brings even greater malice and swing to her rhythmic trespass. At times there is something of the likes of Soilwork and Scar Symmetry to the encounter, the band’s Swedish death metal inspirations open if twisted into Dead Asylum’s own creative antipathy within this and surrounding tracks like Bury the Living; another corrosive barrage of invention and dexterity bred on imagination and unpredictability. Whether the Dead Asylum sound is truly unique can be debated yet as this song alone shows, it has a memorable character and adventure which sets it firmly apart from the crowd.

Forgotten Sacrifice with its senses niggling grooves and instinctive grudge fires up the passions yet again, the track a skilfully sculpted blur of hostility and sonic violence twisted by Morrison’s vitriolic grooves and entrancing citric melodies and further scarred by Landa’s intrusive rhythms and the vocal rancor of Lister and Mowat.

Through the bestial dance of Bred to Die and the malignantly seductive fire of Welcome, ears and appetite for extreme adventure are gripped, the second of the pair especially enthralling with its almost exotic charm and jaundiced tapestry of sound. Neither quite have the little extra which makes their predecessors so incendiary for the imagination but each adds a potent reason to acclaim the album before final track Inmate 666 seals an already done deal with its psychotically bred and insatiable invasion of thrash death rancor. The track is glorious, an exhilarating end to a mutually riveting release.

Dead Asylum will be new to many, after Death Always Wins they will surely be the lust for a great many more.

Death Always Wins is released June 2nd through https://deadasylum.bandcamp.com/album/death-always-wins

http://www.thedeadasylum.com/    https://www.facebook.com/deadasylum    https://twitter.com/DeadAsylummetal

Pete RingMaster 01/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Xerosun – This Dark Rage

Photography by Olga Kuzmenko

Time for another catch up moment, this time with the This Dark Rage EP from Irish melodic death metallers Xerosun released a handful of months back. It is fair to say that since we covered and enjoyed the band’s debut album Absence of Light way back in 2011, they and their sound have quite simply evolved into completely new attention grabbing beasts, changes and evolution leading to their latest impressive  proposition more than deserving of a belated look.

With a just as hungry progressive bent to their ravenous sound, the Dublin quintet has persistently drawn greater praise and support in recent times. Building on previous successes like that first album and sharing stages with the likes of Avenged Sevenfold, Soulfly, Xerath, and In This Moment, the past two years have been exceptionally busy for Xerosun. Two headline UK tours have been accompanied by performances at festivals such as Mammothfest and Siege of Limerick, times capped off by the release of EP/mini album This Dark Rage and the Olga Kuzmenko created video for its title track, both themed around the Craigslist killer Miranda Barbour, a subject set to be further explored in the band’s new album set for later this year.

This Dark Rage opens with that title track, vocalist Martyna Halas-Yeates’ raw throated scowls courted by the predatory prowl of guitars and rhythms; it all soaked in venom and spite. As riffs continue to gnaw and beats stab, the primal instincts of the track suddenly flip into a groove driven canter, Halas-Yeates’ tones becoming a siren of beauty before the beast returns in voice and song again. The rapier like jabs of drummer Damian Dziennik hold even more spite while David Kuchar’s bass is savage in tone and flirtatious in swing matching the now established web of hostility and grooving. It is a compelling blend and result, the guitars of Fiachra Kelly and Gareth Jeffs rich in craft and enterprise while Halas-Yeates captivates in her dual persona. She is angel and demon and though her melodic prowess feels more natural, her vocal causticity only convinces within the adventurous tapestry around her, wicked grooves deviously colouring the unfolding lyrical drama.

Anatomy of a Lie follows the great start, even overshadowing it as it creates its own groove sculpted temptation, one again bred from ruinous fractions of intent and a blossoming of magnetic melodies and harmonic flames again led by Halas-Yeates’ kind side. It is a song which has grown and evolved since its first outing within a great video back in 2013 and another sign of the band’s hunger to grow and draw every ounce of their imagination to the fore. As all tracks, it is a fusion of flavours beyond the description we first gave you, a controlled but bold maelstrom of antipathy and warmth lighting the senses much as the tempest within next up I Spared Hundreds succeeds in. With electronic essences almost taunting ears from its shadows, the song is a carnal provocation with a relatively latent but openly glimpsed peace. Harmonies and keys temper the cancerous instincts surrounding them, while imagination is an increasingly riveting trait in the song as innocence and insanity mingle in the corners of its psychosis.

The release is brought to a close by firstly The Mother of Morality, a corrosive web of sound with Middle Eastern veining radiated in suggestive melodies and vocal elegance. At times it is like a mix of The Agonist and Motherjane, in other moments more Scar Symmetry and Arch Enemy nurtured, and quite beguiling. As the EP, the track just grows with every listen, the enjoyment of its first appraisal becoming more lustful and impressed with every venture into its passionately lit caverns.

Repent, Rewind, Reset brings it all to an end, its seven minutes plus a spiral into emotional and mental turbulence matched by a soundscape of volatile and schizophrenic sound. Though for whatever reason the track does not grab as powerfully as its predecessors, it makes for a fine and fascinating conclusion to a release which only impresses more and more. Xerosun is a band on the ascent with a potential driven, imagination powered sound to match.

This Dark Rage is available on CD and download @ https://xerosun.bandcamp.com/

http://www.xerosun.com/    https://www.facebook.com/xerosun   https://twitter.com/xerosun

Pete RingMaster 31/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Unheard Before The Wake – Humanity Burning

UnheardBeforeTheWake_RingMasterReview

It is fair to say that Humanity Burning took its time to fully convince, for its ideas and elements to fall into place within ears and understanding, but when it did, the new EP from UK melodic death metallers Unheard Before The Wake showed why the band is beginning to be strongly noticed within the British metal underground. Unleashing five intrusive tracks which devour the senses while intriguing the imagination, the band’s sophomore EP emerges as an attention grabbing trespass.

Formed at the end of 2013, the Sutton hailing Unheard Before The Wake has increasingly lured fans and keen interest through the release of their self-titled debut EP on 2014 and more so a live presence which has seen the quintet share stages with the likes of Xerath, Meat Train, and A Vulgar Picture. Their sound is a tempest of extreme flavours unafraid to entangle black and classic hues into its death and melodic metal bred invention. Humanity Burning is the band’s new national assault on ears, a release which maybe does not always fit perfectly with personal tastes but certainly left them with an appetite for more.

The EP opens with its title track and a nagging of riffs, their whiney hue like raw nectar swiftly grabbing keen attention further enhanced by the barbarous torrent of beats and the great gnarly tone of the bass. As its predatory nature continues to ignite the appetite, the track rumbles and grumbles like an awakened beast, subsequently stretching into its prowling gait and animosity as the heavy throaty growls of vocalist Chris Rossiter enter the scene. At this point the guitars of Dylan-Thomas Chinchen and Ryan Adams expand their own tapestry of enterprise and sonic flavouring, the song blossoming into an unpredictable and increasingly rousing proposition. On the initial listen, it almost seems to have too much going on in its rabid assault but with time each twist and turn skilfully flows and in turn impresses. The personal taste thing does kick in as cleaner vocals make their appearance, an addition which just does not work for these ears, though the only time something grates against rather than benefits the song.

Unheard Before The Wake Cover Artwork_RingMasterReviewLurker steps up next, again with an opening which demands attention. This time the invitation is a threatening collusion of sound and texture, almost asylum like in its tone and vocal cries. Framing the drama, drummer Jasper Brownlow and bassist Adam McGuinness again place wonderfully grouchy bait which only finds greater impact as a thrash bred surge of riffs and energy erupts. As its predecessor, the song also flows through intensive and slower predacious moments to keep expectations on their toes, especially the almost theatrical passage of the lyrical protagonist’s introspection which comes forward.

It is clear Unheard Before The Wake know how to compose a song to make an immediate impact, The Pluto God also stirring up ears in seconds with its fierce waltz of grooves within an intimidating rhythmic shuffle. In no time from that great start, the song is stalking the senses and psyche with the excellent heavy throated growling of Rossiter a potent lure in the corrosive storm. The twist of classic metal seeded vocals derail the track a touch again for these ears though it is soon back to its former glory with raw guttural vocals leading to a weave of tantalising craft and flavours.

The EP’s best track, Right To Die, comes next; it a maelstrom of intrusive rhythms and riffs bound in roaming grooves and melodic toxicity which swiftly inflames air and ears. Clean vocals do make another appearance but in spoken form to great effect, providing another texture in the resourceful blaze of sound and imagination.

Completed by an instrumental reprise of its title track, Humanity Burning is a release which takes its time but makes a thoroughly enjoyable persuasion of the potential and readymade qualities of Unheard Before The Wake. Their sound still feels like it is in evolution which only adds to their promise. The press release suggests Humanity Burning is something fans of The Black Dahlia Murder, Carcass, Dimmu Borgir, and Cannibal Corpse might take a shine to; something easy to agree with. As for the clean vocals, we suggest the band really does not need them with everything else boiling up rather nicely.

The Humanity Burning EP is released April 29th @ https://unheardbeforethewake.bandcamp.com/ and most online stores.

http://www.unheardbeforethewake.com/   https://www.facebook.com/unheardbeforethewake

Pete RingMaster 28/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Except One – Haunted Humanity

ExceptOne_RingMasterReview

The past couple of years has seen a striking amount of potential loaded and highly enjoyable bands emerging from the French underground metal scene to which you can now add another in the imposing shape of Except One. Creating a concussive yet persistently engaging proposal merging melodic death metal with metalcore and other extreme flavours, the Paris quintet had already nudged spotlights with a previous EP but now is as good as stalking them with Haunted Humanity and its seven tracks of attention grabbing voracious metal.

The Except One sound is not necessarily unique but carries plenty of twists and imaginative moments which command extra attention.  The band’s five track debut EP, O.M.N.I. #1, provided a potent introduction though it is Haunted Humanity which it is easier to imagine awakening ears and focus the way of vocalist Estelle, guitarists Junior and Ad’ibou, bassist Boris, and drummer Fanch’.

It opens with Rise and a sonic embrace around the accusing yet coaxing voice of Estelle. In no time the track is a tsunami of intensity and riffs led by the impressing tone, which by now has become throat grazing, and roar of the singer. Grooves and sonic endeavour vein and wind around rhythmic hostility as the track hits top gear but equally a swiftly pleasing invention emerges which sees moments of predatory calm and imposing sidesteps reshape the hellacious assault of the excellent track. Not ground-breaking but perpetually striking, it provides a stirring start to the release which continues with Lost.

The second track instantly grinds upon and nags the senses as guitars lead its invasive character. The dynamics of drums and bass which ignited the opener are more reserved initially but build in tenacity and imposing adventure to match the brewing imagination of the guitars and vocal rapacity of Estelle. Ears and appetite are sold in no time, more so as a passage of evocative calm is shaped by provocative melodic hooks and clean vocal tempting. As the first, the track is bordering irresistible before Schizofriend takes over with its spirals of niggling grooves and hefty rhythmic swipes. A great blend of clean and abrasive vocals again only add to the infectious nature and drama of a track, the band also flirting with post hardcore to add to its arsenal of flavours and textures.

Haunted Humanity_RingMasterReviewRevenge is a maelstrom of riffs and rhythmic antagonism driven by the ear catching prowess of Estelle and the equally alluring craft and enterprise of Junior and Ad’ibou which ensures one of the more formula sculpted tracks stands out as potently as the more experimental ones such as Elm Street which follows. It is another seeing the band weave and hone a broad array of creative spices and genre flavours into one rabid and merciless incitement. Further coloured by melodic and harmonic imagination, it grouchily bristles as it entices and seduces as it gnaws on the senses.

Personal tastes most greedily take to the tracks which see Except One pushing their imagination and undercurrent of diversity the most, Disease another where a host of styles get entangled as eventfully as the results snare ears and pleasure. As much as that merging of flavours brings the band’s songs alive so too does the vocal variety which blends to captivating effect and the moments of unpredictability that at times just does not go far enough.

Completed by the barbarous and simultaneously evocative exploits of 7even, the hellacious charm and captivating tempest of Haunted Humanity leaves satisfaction bursting at the seams. The release is a signpost to the potential and already healthy invention within Except One and a sound which may be is not yet unique but has much to suggest it might just be a matter of time before the French band majorly steps from the crowd. With more enjoyable offerings like this along the way though, we can happily wait for the moment.

Haunted Humanity is out now @ https://exceptone.bandcamp.com/album/haunted-humanity

http://www.exceptone.fr/   https://www.facebook.com/ExceptOneOfficial   https://twitter.com/except_one

Pete RingMaster 12/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Unbowed – Dogma

Unbowed_RingMaster Review

Two years ago Canadian metallers Unbowed grabbed thick attention and praise with debut album Collapse The World. It was a raw and ravenous slab of black metal atmospherics fused with death metal corrosion; blackened death metal with melodic tendencies that was unafraid to push it and its creator’s boundaries. It was also rich in open potential which has now been nurtured to striking effect for new EP Dogma. Offering four atmospherically primal and raw yet creatively elegant tracks, the release sees the Ontario duo breach a new plateau of songwriting and sound whilst opening fresh potential suggesting even bigger triumphs to come.

Formed in 2011 as a studio project by multi-instrumentalist Alex Snape and vocalist Ioan Tetlow, Unbowed proceeded to release a self-titled demo EP, the aforementioned Collapse The World, and bring together a live line-up which has played a host of shows and shared stages with the likes of Battlecross, Einherjer, The Contortionist, and Erimha throughout Ontario. Their bracingly invasive and imaginatively provocative sound has seen the band’s reputation grow within the underground spreading outwards and you suspect things are set to erupt with greater strength again as Dogma infests ears.

Unbowed Dogma - Final Cover Art_RingMaster ReviewThe EP opens with The Bleeding Throne; an enveloping of the senses and imagination from its first breath marked with a herald of melodies and atmospheric keys. It is a welcoming if portentous prelude to a rampant cascade of rabid riffs and matching rhythms within a wave of intensity as catchy as the thrash like canter that emerges from it. The craft and sound of Snape quickly impresses and works away on appreciative ears whilst the raw throated vocal squalls of Tetlow add a just as effective drama and predatory temper to the tapestry of provocative sounds around him. Thoughts of warriors, deceptions, and bloody turbulence are easy casting for the imagination as the song expands its sonic narrative, but equally there is an exotic beauty and expressive majesty to the song which grips the listener. It all further enhanced by the tendrils of varied metal and livelier variety in the vocals with blossom throughout.

It is a gripping and fascinating start which continues in the even more confrontational Besieged; though it too spins a web of guitar enterprise and rhythmic tenacity as infectiously alluring as it is barbarously intimidating. With sweeping melodies and expressive keys, you can visual the setting for the song’s drama and narrative. Broad and expansive, harsh yet beauteous landscapes are visualised, providing the canvas for the resourceful and enthralling imagination of the two musicians. As the first, the song bewitches as its trespasses, leaving a hunger for more which the closing pair of The Fall and Echoes of Cernunnos heftily satisfy. The first merges consuming textures and destructive virulence with flowing ambiences around epically poetic melodies whilst its successor provides an animus of ill-intent and immersive sufferance brewed with sonic rabidity. Both take unexpected and dramatically contrasting turns, the first especially enthralling with its melancholic and tainted reflections. The final song is more concentrated in its core attack but around its invasive spine, Snape creates a realm of celestial grandeur and earthbound intimacy coloured by the great vocal abrasion of Tetlow.

Dogma is superb, a release which only reveals more depths and corners with every listen. It leaves the band’s potent last album pale in comparison and equally many a black and death metal emprise heard in recent times.

Dogma is available from February 12th @ http://unbowedofficial.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/UnbowedOfficial   https://twitter.com/UnbowedOfficial

Pete RingMaster 12/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Fall – The Insatiable Weakness

Fall_RingMaster Review

Busier than a swarm of flies on a carcass but far more thrilling and rewarding, The Insatiable Weakness is a seriously explosive and dramatic introduction to Texan band Fall. The album is a cauldron of styles and flavours within a progressive/melodic death metal landscape which never gives ears and the imagination a moments rest whilst creating a gripping incitement as creatively tempestuous as it is coherently fascinating.

Taking inspirations from Scandinavian metal and bands such as Opeth, At the Gates, and Soilwork to their sound, the Portland based quartet emerged as 2010 took its early breaths. It was not too long before they were a notable presence on the live scene, going on to share stages with bands such as Helstar, Periphery, The Human Abstract, The Contortionist, Textures, Fallujah, and Aegaeon as their presence and reputation grew. A self-titled EP was released in 2012, an encounter featuring guest vocals from Soilworks’s Bjorn Strid which soon awakened not only more of the US to the band’s emerging potency and force but ears and attention further afield too. Now the band’s self-released debut album is set to stir up plenty more with its inescapable adventure and invasive imagination.

Consisting of vocalist/keyboardist Jessie Santos, guitarist Daniel Benavides, and bassist David Gutierrez alongside, for the album, the ever irrepressible rhythmic craft of Soilworks’ drummer Dirk Verbeuren, Fall swiftly encase ears in a cloud of sonic and rhythmic incitement as opener From Ashes rises threateningly to spawn a maelstrom of cutting riffs and intensive rhythms. In its air harmonies also break out with an atmospheric tempting, both getting their moment to descend poetically on the senses within the storm with Santos revealing pleasing variety and strength to his vocal delivery, raw and clean. Given potent hint of what is to come, the song continues to evolve its forceful and evocative tapestry with strands of progressive invention and rousing enterprise, all amidst intrusive turbulence led by Verbeuren’s renowned prowess.

Cover artwork by Niklas Sundin

Cover artwork by Niklas Sundin

Not of the Sky continues the attention catching start; the vocals again one focal point in a cascade of many, with their slight discord, whether intentionally or not, adding greater character to the emerging bedlamic and creative tirade of the song. Furiously unpredictable and fluidly aligned, melodic enticing and colliding flavours breaks through as each twist grips ears, softening and working them up into an eager appetite for the also tempestuously toned and adventurously woven Ever Hollow. Bellowing and tempting, the track is a magnetic fury veined by seductive magnetism, extreme and progressive metal uniting in something intimidatingly hellacious, sonically psychotic, and at times rousingly catchy.

Through both Harvester and Cinis, band and album continue to infest and corrupt the senses, though the former is just as potent in its infectious glaze of pop metal. Featuring guest vocals of Jessie Frye, it is another bundle of contrasts and clever contradictions creating a track which mesmerises as strongly as it bruises. Arguably it is the most accessible offering on the album but is as inventive and volatile as any of the more challenging and invigorating proposals within The Insatiable Weakness. Its successor is a much more voracious proposition, as swiftly shown by Strands of Night vocalist Asa Dubberly, who guests on the tempest, and the carnivorous tone of the bass which builds on the darker menacing tone it offered the previous song. Around them, and the bracing roar of Santos in its different strains, guitars stir up a nest of sonic vipers and melodic resourcefulness, the track painting a turbulent and tenaciously diverse canvas of raw and alluring flavours.

Ears and appetite are only drawn in tighter as the celestial hued and aggressively bracing Desolation and the predatory thrash seeded, death fuelled torrent of provocation posing as Soul Ignition thickly satisfies whilst …to dust lights ignites another fuse to lustful reactions with its unbridled ferocity and cantankerous attitude lined with infection soaked exploits. Providing one more major highlight amongst only heftily persuasive successes, its rich tempting is emulated in kind by the uniquely different Empty where, arguably for the first time, keys stretch their ever present atmospheric and ambience casting prowess into being a leading protagonist.

The album closes up with firstly Gods of Ruin and its landslide of unforgiving rhythms within an exhaustive infestation of expansive metal voracity and finally You were but a Shade, it an invasive and virulent episode of unpredictability, absorbing imagination, and explosive individual craft from all concerned. A seduction that tears strips off the senses, the song is an immense end to a similarly impressing release.

Only a weighty amount of listens does The Insatiable Weakness true justice, but every venture reveals new striking layers, previously undiscovered twists, and a bigger hunger for more as reward. As a name, Fall does not make a particular impact but rest assured from their first moments, sound and album more than make up for it.

The Insatiable Weakness is out now @ http://fall1.bandcamp.com/album/the-insatiable-weakness

http://facebook.com/falltodust

Pete RingMaster 28/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/