Kobadelta – Open Visions

Photo by Daniel Robson

Photo by Daniel Robson

Blending the rousing elements of their second EP and the mesmeric seducing of their last, UK psyche rockers Kobadelta unleash their finest moment yet in the hauntingly irresistible shape of Open Visions. The EP provides a feast for ears and imagination to contemplate and devour in their individual ways, its clutch of songs almost hex like in their immersion and seduction of both. Within its arcane charm the band also reveals a greater maturity and inventive lust in songwriting and sonic explorations, Open Visions the simply irresistible dark side of the band’s creativity and the listener’s psyche.

Newcastle bred and formed in 2010, Kobadelta did not take long to arouse a potent following and local clamour for their sonic swelter of a sound and matching live presence. 2013 Debut EP Ritual (Time Flies) lit more than a few fires in ears and thoughts, which the following year its successors Hidden Door and Remain Distracted, took to stronger and broader levels with their compelling sounds. It is fair to say that 2014 was a big year for the band in general. The release of the two EPs surrounded by further successes with Kobadelta being invited to perform a live session for BBC Introducing, headlining the Tanners stage at Evolution Emerging Festival in Newcastle, and playing events like Stockton Weekender alongside artists such as Peter Hook, Public Enemy, and the Happy Mondays as well as the Split Festival with the likes of The Cribs, Maximo Park, and Dizzee Rascal. Support slots for bands such as Temples, Allusondrugs, We Were Promised Jetpacks, Demob Happy, Splashh, The Temperance Movement, The Weeks, Lola Colt, and The Voyeurs, amongst many more has only increased their reputation and stature too. Now it is the turn of the Open Visions EP to push the Kobadelta cause and as we say, it is irresistible.

a0352850419_10   Even The Odds (They Mean You No Harm) is the first track on the release and immediately brings a raw and fiery proposition to bear on ears and thoughts. Guitars and rhythms make a formidable invitation which is easily accepted, even more so when an underlying melodic lure is given clarity as the initial tempest relaxes and the expressive tones of Dom Noble come in. There is still a muggy air to the song, and a siren-esque shadowing to the track which with the exotic enterprise arising from the guitar of Alex Malliris and the keys of Jordan Robson, entices like The Doors meets The Birthday Party. The song continues to immerse and swallow the senses with its sultry almost erosive beauty, increasing its glamour as it heads towards the moment it slips seamlessly into the following Blame It All On Me.

The second track is simple bewitchment from its first caress, smouldering melodies flirting with ears whilst being stalked by the throaty bassline of Jon Marley. The ticking percussive framing and rhythmic probing of drummer Chris Malliris adds intimidation to the dark premise of the song but it is the flowing melodic seducing of the keys and more unsettling designs cast by the guitars which shape the compelling drama emotively coloured by the distinct tones of Noble. There is a touch of Bauhaus to the post punk essences swimming within the psyche rock contagion whilst the gothic rock shading again springs hints of Nick Cave and co.

A fresh shimmer flows across Maskirovka next, keys and guitars a floating haze of sonic suggestiveness whilst bass and drums create a more formidable incitement which erupts with greater intensity around the climatic crescendos posing as choruses. There is something occult like in the dark rock toxicity oozing from the walls of the song and imagination of the band, an essence breeding encroaching shadows which infest and linger in ears and psyche.

The infectiousness kicks up another level with Watch What You’re Doing, its open caress of guitar the seeds for another compelling bassline and crisply landed beats to work their addictiveness as vocals and keys bring a haunting colour. Once into its magnetic stroll, the song shows itself to be as much pop rock as it is dark rock ‘n’ roll, its catchiness as captivatingly accessible as its soaring sonic enterprise is celestially provocative and darkly fascinating.

Ithaca ventures into an even heavier soundscape but swiftly tempers some of its daunting air with an echoing effect on the ever alluring vocals and backing harmonies, whilst guitars and keys sway and smother the rhythmic spine of the song with the dance of a sonic temptress. The song is pure mesmerism but with an underlying danger which seems to incite richer flames and piercing textures to emerge in the invention of Alex Malliris and Robson.

Final track Black Pyramid, like the first, accosts ears with a slightly caustic and hazy roar of sound but is soon casting an invasive exotic atmosphere through guitars and keys. Eruptions of energy and intensity only add to the sweltering air and impact of the song, whilst melodically and vocally, there is again no escaping a reference to the Jim Morrison’s led band.

If like us you fell in love with Kobadelta’s last EPs, then lust is the outcome with Open Visions, the pinnacle of the band’s sound and invention to date. If new to the transfixing world of the band, then a wealth of dark sultry treats await.

Open Visions is released on May 1st and available via http://kobadelta.bandcamp.com/album/open-visions-ep

Upcoming Kobadelta shows, including EP launch…

Friday 1st May – Think Tank? Newcastle (‘Open Visions’ EP Launch)

Saturday 30th May – ‘Sonic Union #2′ at The Sun Inn, Stockton (with TOY)

Saturday 11th July – Corbridge Festival 2015 (Acoustic Stage)

Friday 24th July – ‘Double Denim Live’ at Verve Bar, Leeds

https://www.facebook.com/Kobadelta

RingMaster 27/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Kobadelta – Remain Distracted EP

kobelta

Having been enthralled by their rousing EP, The Hidden Door earlier this year, there was keen anticipation waiting for the release of its successor Remain Distracted. Both EPs come from the creative minds and resourceful imagination of UK band Kobadelta, and each provides a fascinating climate of sound and excitement to greedily immerse within. Remain Distracted takes the strengths and potency of its predecessor into new emotive and adventurous sonic flights, pushing the potential and emerging presence of the band into riveting and sultry landscapes. In some ways it is a slow burner compared to the last release but through a quartet of fiery and seductive songs, sets down the most potent and heady pinnacle from the band yet.

The release of Remain Distracted comes in a potent year for the Newcastle quintet which has seen them chosen to play Newcastle’s Evolution Emerging festival, as well as Stockton Weekender (with Happy Mondays and Public Enemy headlining) and Split Festival (with Maximo Park, The Cribs and Dizzee Rascal). Added to that there has also been a live session for BBC Introducing as well as numerous successful shows with bands like Allusondrugs. The new release adds another strong moment in the band’s year and one more irresistible enticement to develop a rich hunger over.

As soon as the sultry stroke of guitar from Alex Malliris opens up first track Siam, there is a potent temptation at work, its smouldering yet ripe lure a swift caress and announcement of the dark psychedelic invention the band is already acclaimed for. Another breath sees the hypnotic throaty basslines of Jon Marley join the evolving enticement of the guitar and the enterprising rhythmic framing of Chris Malliris. It is a glorious flame brought further to life by the mellow yet nicely raw tones of vocalist Dom Noble, all this against the already tantalising weave of melodic expression cast by the keys of Jordan Robson. It is a stunning track, elements of The Doors colluding with other whispers of bands like early The Horrors, 13th Floor Elevators, and Thee Exciters in an original fire of sound equipped with infectiously imposing hooks and grooves.

Repetition steps up next and instantly finds a heavier growl to its riffs, though that weight is not quite transferred to the crisp beats and elegant bassline. That restraint on some aspects and the mix of dark and light within the song works kobadelta epa treat all the same; its steady but feisty canter evolving through a sultry slow flight of immersive keys before breaking back with increasing tenacity in energy and attack. The Birthday Party like song is an intriguing shadow blessed proposition, not as dramatically gripping as its predecessor but growing into another absorbing and incendiary involvement of the imagination and emotions.

Its successor is less slow in gripping the passions, They Can’t Hurt Me floating in on another delicious almost sinister bassline. Its dark tone inspires a haunting essence to the minimalistic melody of the guitar and vocal croon of Noble, the merger offering a noir wrapped sultriness in presence and sound. There is a definite Cramps essence to the song as well as that of Jim Morrison and co, as well as hints of Damn Vandals and The Dropper’s Neck, but with an ingenious addiction sparking bait from bass and guitar aligned to similarly anthemic beats, the track is a slice of brilliance distinct to Kobadelta and their greatest song yet since forming.

The EP is closed by The Heretic, a sizzling sway of sonic causticity and melodic temptation driven by a swaggering rhythmic and riff crafted enterprise. As in other songs there is a prime hook which is inescapable for ears and passions, its coaxing leading the senses into the scorching haze of guitar and atmospheric heat of the keys. With the delivery of Noble again parading the song’s narrative with an unfussy but magnetically expressive texture, the song is a mesmeric consumption of the senses and a fine end to another impressive release from Kobadelta.

The band just gets better and better as evidenced by Remain Distracted ensuring whatever comes next from Kobadelta will be met with greedy anticipation.

The Remain Distracted EP is available from September 26th @ http://kobadelta.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/Kobadelta/

RingMaster 26/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Jekyll – I Do What I Can

jekyll

Taken from their debut EP of a couple of months ago, I Do What I Can provides plenty of evidence as to why there is a healthy buzz around Jekyll. The band’s new single is a flavoursome mix of crisp rhythms and evocative melodies seduced by potent vocals and infectious enterprise, and though the song is not carving out new directions for melodic/alternative rock, it certainly provides a captivating and inventive flavour which sets the band apart from most of the crowd.

Formed in 2011, the Blackpool quartet of Joel Foster (vocals/guitar/keys), Jonny Chatterton (guitar/vocals), Lewis Armistead (bass), and Liam Singleton (drums) were soon grabbing attention locally and further afield with their emerging sound. Inspired by the likes of Muse, Radiohead, Kasabian, The Smiths, Nirvana, Editors, Joy Division, Maximo Park, and REM, the band followed up the well-received release of their demo, which drew strong attention from BBC Introducing and more, with their self-titled debut EP in May of this year. It too was met with an eager response. Released ahead of and in celebration of Jekyll’s appearance at The Membranes upcoming gig at the top of Blackpool Tower to celebrate the landmark’s 120th anniversary, I Do What I Can is one of those melodic parties which linger and never go home. It does not offer startling surprises and ground-breaking moments but for providing rich satisfaction it is a sure bet.

From its first second guitars are crafting an emotive melodic web as rhythms jab across them purposefully whilst the bass independently offers a potent shadow to an already melancholic air. It is a swiftly enticing blend which the vocals of Foster only brings more evocative expression to, the song now relaxing to a percussive coaxing as guitars tenderly embrace his entrance. There is a familiarity around the eventful chorus, vocally and musically, with that REM essence open but equally it flows into a sonic colour and adventure which soon has the imagination lost in originality and melodic emprise. The track continues to flirt and seduce with invention and skilful twists across its fluid narrative, and though lyrically a couple of times you have to give the song the benefit of the doubt, I Do What I Can embraces and leads ears through to emotions on a tantalising flight of creative and anthemic endeavour.

Jekyll is a band catching on with the thoughts and emotions of an increasingly growing following and I Do What I Can will certainly do no harm to their growing spotlight.

I Do What I Can is available digitally now.

http://jekyllband.wix.com/jekyllband

8/10

RingMaster 04/08/2014

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Forever After: Pictures EP

This year has seen many impressive and promising pop punk bands emerge but the majority offer the same conclusion, still to find a distinct personal voice to their sound. These bands share a similarity to each other and those before them to make the moment enjoyable but the future the canvas where hopes of standing out from the crowd, or not will play out. UK band Forever After is one of those rare exceptions, not only does the band ooze great promise ahead with the impressive EP Pictures but already has stepped into a unique place of their very own.

The bio for the Essex quartet states ‘for fans of Lower Than Atlantis, Deaf Havana, and The Maccabees. You cannot argue against that but easily can add the likes of Buzzcocks, Undertones, and Hagfish, such the feisty new wave and original punk essences which tantalise and molest the passions wonderfully throughout. Though not quite perfect Pictures is outstanding, an immediately exciting treat to fire up the heart which just gets better and better with every play.

Formed at the beginning of the year, Forever After soon had audiences baying for more with their live shows which included playing alongside bands including Mallory Knox and Ten Second Epic. Released earlier as a free download, Pictures too only excited a crowd looking for something different and with its official appearance November 5th, as the band prepare to record its follow up, a wider recognition seems inevitable once the four tracks thrust their wanton hook smart dance on more and more eager ears.

Touring The Map opens the release up with fiery riffs and thumping beats, as most pop punk songs do. It pulls attention its way without startlingly offering anything new, leaving expectations exactly where they are when being confronted by another pop punk effort. Into its stride the track whips out teasing hooks, beckoning melodic weaves, and the excellent distinct voice of guitarist Dom Littler. Suddenly you realise you are in the midst of a sonic storm of originality and outrageous infectiousness, the beats of drummer Craig Mcqueen persistently probing the ear whilst bassist Harry Stokley prowls the song with throbbing intent whilst adding his own fine vocals to back up Littler. This alone would certainly ensure a fresh sound and experience but with the excellent guitar invention of Sam Byford, his melodic weaves bordering on lustful irreverence, the song is an irresistible piece of aural mischief, the thing sonic wet dreams are made of.  The song is brilliant, one which leaves one breathless whilst in full union with its passion physically and vocally, and the beginning of one of the bigger musical indie thrills this year.

The following (Old) School, is as it says on the tin, well in part as original punk flavours vein this great slab of rock n roll. Slightly grittier than its predecessor but equally as contagious, the song is a kind of mix between Bad Religion, Radio Stars, and Maximo Park but again belongs to no one but Forever After. A more abrasive affair the hooks easily captures the imagination whilst the vocal harmonies and melodic flames from the guitars just ignite further thrills and appetite for much more form the band. Like the first, the song is a shifting beast of pleasure, the rhythms erupting into excited bursts and bass offering a swagger which sets it apart from but perfectly in league with the charge of the guitars.

The third track called Interlude is just that. It is an ok instrumental but out of place on the release and just feels like a filler which is needless on a brief EP. Saying that though it leads perfectly into final track Say It True so maybe just reinventing it and making it a proper intro to another great song would be a rewarding thing to look at. The closing track is a riot of manic guitars, anthemic energy and shouts, and challenging rhythms all wrapped in irresistible invention and magical enterprise. The track just kicks up a storm of pleasure from which escape is impossible and full engagement willing.

Pictures is outstanding, simply as, and Forever After a band destined to make the future one thrilling and explosive punk rock adventure.

www.facebook.com/foreverafteruk

http://foreverafter.bandcamp.com/album/pictures

RingMaster 04/11/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Late Cambrian: Social Season EP

The Social Season EP from US indie pop band Late Cambrian, is one of those releases you cannot help becoming enamoured with, its vibrant and excitable pop heart a smiling and infectious tease. The EP offers up five songs which ooze eighties new wave and melodic pop flavourings within the mischievous personality of a Weezer. It makes for in Late Cambrian, a band which you feel you already know as a friend before even the end of the first song and a companion to bring out the inner smile.

The Brooklyn band were formed by ex- Flying Machines and The Attorneys, John N. Wlaysewski (guitar, vocals, songwriter) who alongside drummer Colin Schiller began recording their debut album The Last Concert in early 2011. During working on the songs the band saw the addition of O (synth, backing vocals), her glowing voice enhancing some of the later songs recorded. By late March the same year, the band made their live debut with bassist Nunzio Moudatsos (A Crimson Affair) also on board. Social Season is the first release with the full line-up and probably the first enterprising introduction for many to the fun sounds of Late Cambrian, but better late than never.

The opening track Ryan Gosling has already garnered good acclaim and responses as the first single from the release across the US and beyond. The song drives a thumping beat through the ear guided by contagious riffs and jangling melodies which only ensure eager attention. Once the shining harmonies and warm vocals play within the sounds the pull is irresistible and openly anthemic, defying all not to join in with the simple chants and chorus. To be honest like all the songs, it does not try to bend boundaries or break out into new inventive realms for indie pop, but certainly makes finding many rivals in the deep contagion stakes difficult.

The following Trash Show has a slight punk swagger to its boisterous presence to bring a mix of Arctic Monkeys, King Prawn, and Presidents of The USA. As the guitars twist and flash across the ear and the vocals coax the senses into further addiction, the song is like an old friend returning home. The sounds and energy of the track is instantly recognisable but equally and immediately fresh and rewarding, indie pop punk at its best.

Already on a high the EP gets even better with Song 11, an enthused stomp which ignites all the primal rhythms and melodic passions within. The Monkees meets Blink 182 with Maximo Park for company, the song is a pulsating and riotous thrill which has an insatiable hunger to exhaust the senses and bring the heart to a climax. As before the song has one accompanying its voice and limbs thrashing to the wonderful discord which spices the guitars and boisterous energy. The combination of Wlaysewski and O when they come together is stunning and in general the harmonies are delicious. The song also features a solo from Brendan Brown of the band Wheatus which only ignites further enjoyment.

Hand Stamp reins in the energies a touch but still is a feast of melodic joy, the bass pulsating besides the air heating slices of guitar and vocal harmonic elegance. The track does not quite have the pulse rate soaring as previous songs but its warmth and sweet taste is a rewarding dessert to what came before.

Social Season ends with the instrumental Saint James, a track which probably means a lot to the band but is a little lost on others. It is a great piece of music skilfully presented but does not fit with what went before so feels ultimately like a filler. It does have a departure of sound which opens some different anticipation to things in the future from the band though to be honest.

Late Cambrian is one of those bands we all need, fun, excitable, and able to put a smile on the face with  richly pleasing and open infectious sounds.

http://www.latecambrian.com/

Ringmaster 22/08/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Black Hats: Austerity for the Hoi Polloi

To be honest when the songs from the outstanding debut album from UK indie rock band Black Hats graced the ear there was an instant thought it was a new release from Young Knives even though the CD said differently. As Austerity for the Hoi Polloi unveiled its full might and collection of infectious and striking tracks there was obvious that there was much more going on within the songs but there is no mistaking that the band which came to mind first is a big influence to Black Hats, which can only be a good thing.

From Oxford, Black Hats consists of Ian Budd (bass, vocals), Nick Breakspear (guitar, vocals) and Mark Franklin (drums, vocals). Eighteen months or so as a band has seen them consistently and increasingly grab attention as they unveiled new songs, grabbed radio play including a live session for BBC Introducing (Oxford), and released their first EP Magnets. With the release of their debut album Austerity for the Hoi Polloi, one can only see bigger and more urgent things coming to hound and throw acclaim at their door.

As the opening guitars shower the ear with crystalline melodies, first track You Make Us What We Are immediately has the ear offering full attention. With a slight ska lilt to the riffs the song pokes and insists the senses take notice as a delicious dark bass line meanders wonderfully through the centre. It is very Young Knives which made the double take at first but as the song plays and captivates more and more the distinct and different qualities of Black Hats is easily apparent. The song never ignites into a full out frenzied party but borders it closely to make a song which is deeply engaging and openly infectious.

     Death By Record bounces in next with a punk urgency and inspired melodic mesmeric teasing. Checking into the band before writing the review there were quite often comparisons with Gang of Four mentioned which the first song never suggested at all which had one wondering where they were coming from. Here there is a definite feel of that band which spices the flavoursome song, to which you can add essences of Maximo Park and Baddies too. By this point an affair with the inspired basslines of Budd has been nurtured, his reggae grooves and punk moodiness an easy and impressive meld.

Already the album is destined to only acclaim which Blood And Space with its jazzed bass invention and thoughtful structure only enforces and the following and amazing Impossible View ensures is an even greater affection. The best song on the album it is instant addiction. The rhythms of Franklin cage the sirenesque melodic conjurations which light up the ear and beyond. Breakspear and Budd dazzle with inventive play and the sax that strikes ingeniously is glorious. With its ska lined riffs and rhythms alongside its indie pop heart the song is a full pleasure.

Impending single Fall Out and current one Kick In The Doors complete the album just as impressively as up to this point. The first is another ska riffed, dub beat spined feast of post punk power pop. A mouthful but it brings it all into its excellent vibrant body. The closing Kick In The Doors with its acidic striking keys clasping and squeezing the consistently striking guitar and bass invention leaves one as the release ends simply breathless and with no option but to dive right back inside Austerity for the Hoi Polloi again. To be honest any song would be the perfect entry point into Black Hats but this track certainly scoops one up welcomingly in its irresistible arms of intelligent and articulate pop-punk.

Normally when a band reminds of another as closely as Black Hats did initially there is a doubt about them but this trio soon put all those thoughts firmly away with their skilled, inventive, and completely absorbing impressive sounds. There is a new energy for indie music starting and it is in the shape of so pick up Black Hats and their simply wonderful EP Austerity for the Hoi Polloi.

http://www.blackhatsmusic.co.uk/

RingMaster 30/04/2012

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