Kung Fu Jesus – Wolf

KUNG FU JESUS 3

The music world has been blessed with a torrent of thrilling and exceptional introductions from artists of all styles this year so far but there are few which have instantly recruited a willing ardour from the passions as the debut single from Kung Fu Jesus. Released via Gargleblast Records, Wolf is an irresistibly captivating and anthemic blend of acoustic and alternative rock with a healthy folk intimacy. The label’s press release calls the single “astounding” and it is hard to come up with many better adjectives for the riveting proposition.

Kung-Fu Jesus is a musician/writer bred in a Lanarkshire village who took to a global adventure to ‘escape’ the claustrophobic embrace of the place. His journey took in the sights and experiences of places such as South American and Taiwan, whilst emotionally love and its opposite also dramatically coloured the time. Returning home with a wealth of songs in tow Kung-Fu Jesus linked up with long-time friend/producer Andy Miller (De Rosa, Life Without Buildings, Foxface) to work on his compositions and music, resulting in the excellent Wolf whose release comes ahead of debut album Celestial Gold later this year.

Wolf opens up with a percussive shuffle over minimalistic keys. It is an unimposing entrance which barely scratches the surface of ears yet still nudges attention awake before the distinctive tones of Kung Fu Jesus joins a neat web of WOLF COVERmelodies to spark up greater appetite. Potently catchy and mesmeric, the song soon elevates its enticing with a burst of urgency lined with magnetic hooks and an infectious swagger. There is a feel of Lloyd Cole to the song but equally in its atmospheric keys seeded atmosphere Thomas Dolby. Predominantly though it is a unique flight of thought inspiring and evocative creative colour which sparks feet and emotions to move with eager revelry.

The song is a compelling lure alone but the single package is pushed to greater strength and ingenuity by the accompanying Wander. Again there is a mellow opening to the song which with keys and melodies making a coaxing bed for the vocals to paint with their expression, leads to an energetic dance of imaginative temptation. Impossibly contagious once into its provocative stride, the track swells and seduces with a celestial elegance aligned to a fiery rock flame of guitar and energy. Thoughts of Matt Johnson make hints as the song continues to excite and inflame the imagination but again by its conclusion the highly addictive Wander shows Kung Fu Jesus as a fresh and individual protagonist to cast a new breath to the British music scene.

With the second track stealing the show and both songs providing an extraordinary introduction, Wolf is an inspiring flame leading to the anticipation of a major fire ahead from Kung Fu Jesus, hopefully that will be Celestial Gold.

Wolf is available digitally now via Gargleblast Records @ www.gargleblastrecords.com

https://www.facebook.com/kungfujesusuk

9/10

RingMaster 26/08/2014

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Evolving explorations: an interview with Cole Salewicz of The Savage Nomads

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Copyright – Grace Lightman

Since the release of their debut single The Magic Eye in 2011, UK rock band The Savage Nomads has continued to impress and ignite the imagination with their ever evolving invention and sound. Through an acclaimed album, an equally showered with praise EP, and their stunning new single Jaded Edges, the London quintet has drawn and bred major attention, including that of Mick Jones of Big Audio Dynamite and The Clash. The time feels ripe and ready for the band to finally explode onto the frontline of the UK rock scene, something their single suggests is imminent as more boundary pushing, for band and genre, songs and releases are beginning to stir. Eager to find out about the inner sanctum of the band we grabbed the opportunity to talk with vocalist/guitarist Cole Salewicz, touching on the history of The Savage Nomads, BAD, songwriting and much more….

Hi Cole and thanks for talking with us at The RingMaster Review

A pleasure…

To start off with some background how did the members of The Savage Nomads get together and what brought the band into existence?

Josh and I were two like-minded souls that were lucky enough to meet each other via a once brilliant London group called ‘Sailor No Youth’. Del Guapo, a fantastic guitarist and songwriter who lives down in Hastings introduced me when I was 15 and Josh about 13 or so. I was playing bass with him in Sailor No Youth for a little bit and he thought Josh and I might be able to link some serious tunes together. Lucky, really…

Did you have a determined intent for the band when starting out and if so has that changed over the years, or has it always simply been an organic journey of discovery from day one?

At first you know we were like any other young band; trying to make whatever we could work and thinking we were God’s gift to music. I suppose that’s a good thing when you’re really young because we went out and played absolutely anywhere to anyone and I think Josh and I were really happy to do that: making our bones playing to barflys watching Champions league football. That was a crucial time, and also a pretty difficult one for some old nomads: a few stragglers got left by the roadside! We were rewarded with a year long residency at the 12 Bar Club eventually…We’re more determined than ever now, though…

Your sound is a multi-flavoured, multi-textured beast, one which is constantly evolving, what are the biggest inspirations to your adventure would you say?

Wow, I couldn’t tell you. Thank you! Anyone who is trying to push their limits I guess, anyone trying to be the best at what they’re doing. Arcade Fire’s new LP is emblematic of that ethos: they play to their strengths but are always looking to cover new ground. The Clash was a big influence on Josh and I growing up, as was Neil Young…I love Prince, I love Bowie…you know, all those guys…we like The Cribs’ attitude…

Each release from debut single The Magic Eye through an album and EP on to your recently released track Jaded Edges have

Copyright - Grace Lightman

Copyright – Grace Lightman

all had truly individual character and imagination from themselves and other bands around. How much has the changing sound been natural evolution and how much a determined guidance from yourselves?

Thanks, I think pretty much up until recently it was all completely natural. Maybe completely out of control! The new material is a different slice of pie…I can’t wait to release more of it…I want a bus driver in Wigan to be able to connect with the songs. We are retaining who we are, because we’re not getting away from what makes us write songs or why we write the songs but I think as we’ve gotten a little bit older we understand a bit more about crafting songs if you catch my drift; because in the past we were just vomiting out our insides, getting all the ideas out in a big pot, the songs came out in a stream of consciousness (a bit like this interview)…we’re a little more composed now. We practice deep breathing!

Earlier songs and releases were seemingly bred from a post-punk seed whilst recent tracks and the new single Jaded Edges, well they have unveiled a weave of diverse aural invention and styles honed into something contagiously ingenious in our book. How would you describe your sound to newcomers?

Golden Pop: The Real McCoy.

How has your music evolved since the early days to the new release for you?

Well we can play a little more and understand more about production and about different methods of writing songs. Different sexual positions! I don’t bother looking at the past too much, I’m very proud of Coloured Clutter but I haven’t listened to it in ages: I’m only interested in The Savage Nomads at this very second and in 2014.

I believe the line-up has changed over the past years, has this been a factor to the changing direction and ever hungry invention of the band?

Probably. Everything that is meant to happen does happen. I love those guys who were in the band before, they were great musicians but we’re in a more harmonious place now.

The Savage Nomads has been a band which has us bemused in the fact you have not exploded into the full attention and psyche of the country before now. We know it is not the music, so can you give us some ideas of the obstacles facing a band which keeps them under cover, prevents them finding the amount of ears needed to be noticed?

HA! Well, I thought it was going well…slowly, slowly catch a monkey, Pete…Guys like you are making it easier. It is hard, I mean, sometimes I feel like there are a million groups in London, let alone the rest of the country. I have often thought given the effort we put in and the organisation that we uphold; we really should of started selling laughing gas…

Have you found a laziness or apathy in some quarters from the industry and the public when it comes to trying to grab their attention in what is a thick wave of emerging bands at any point in time?

Hahahahahahahahhahahaha NOOOOOOO, not AT ALL…what on earth would give you that impression?!?!?!??

Copyright - Grace Lightman

Copyright – Grace Lightman

You have certainly gained strong attention and support from the likes of Matt Johnson, Robyn Hitchcock, and especially Mick Jones. Has this given your presence any extra spice within the music world?

All of that has helped and we’ve been really lucky but it doesn’t mean anything more than a nice endorsement. Mick isn’t going to come round and write the songs for me. What it has meant though Pete, is that lovely people like yourself have taken an interest when maybe they wouldn’t of otherwise. Another piece of the puzzle…

Tell us about your connection with Mick and BAD in particular. How did he become aware of you, which led to the band playing the Big Audio Dynamite Justice Tonight Tour, and how much did you learn from that event?

That was stupendous. A great experience playing on bigger stages and completely euphoric! That Scala show on the Justice Tonight tour was one of the best nights of my life. Mick discovered us when we were 16: West London buzz I guess…a big sewing circle that place. We played his Carbon Casino club nights at the legendary Inn on the Green in Ladbroke Grove. It led to a lot of great things, we met a tonne of people that would help us out later on…met our first guitarist, a really cool kid called Francis Botu…

Tell us about the songwriting process within the band and how songs expand from their early seeds generally.

Nowadays it’s different all the time but over the last year Josh and I have gotten really into using Logic. We immersed ourselves in it and came out with over 20 new tunes. I’m writing some new songs on an acoustic guitar and the new boys in the group are really terrific, really enthusiastic so we’ve started writing collectively as a group a bit more too. Getting competent on Logic was a major breakthrough for us though…

Are you a band which continues to evolve songs right up to the final recording or do you enter the studio/record with a relatively fixed sound and intent for a track in place?

Absolutely, songs have lives of their own so you’ve gotta let them do their own thing! We recorded the latest material at Café Studios in Bow with Cherif Hashizume who we got on like a house on fire with. He was actually in a band called Melody Nelson that we used to support when we were mid-teens, lying about our age to play at the Rhythm Factory…funny who comes back into the fold!

Returning to Jaded Edges, your songs have always had a swagger, a confidence to their bodies which instantly engages, but the new song has a mischief and deep belief as well as passion which suggest that The Savage Nomads has found a maturity and even greater appetite for experiment and inner exploration. Is that how you see it?

Yeah sure! Thank you for saying so! I have definitely become an avid fan of the love song: I don’t think there’s anything I have more fun writing about. I still write about what else is going on in my life and what I see around me but love songs are the best type of songs, aren’t they?

Can we take Jaded Edges as a potent indicator of the direction and avenues the songs you are writing and those to come will a0881502226_2investigate or as we spoke of before it is more of a let’s see what they say to us situation as they emerge for the band?

Jaded Edges is a good indication, yes…but we’re always gonna throw some surprises at you…I’m very excited about the new material, the new set is mainly comprised of it so you gotta come check us live…

What is next for and from The Savage Nomads?

Acrobat training…we wanna take our live shows even further…

Once again thank you for spending time with us. Any last thoughts or revelations you would like to share?

Grilled Honey-Glazed Mackerel, Cherry Tomatoes and Boiled Brown Rice. Add sour cream and scotch bonnet pepper sauce to taste…

Read the review of Jaded Edges @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/09/05/savage-nomads-jaded-edges/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 11/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Savage Nomads – Jaded Edges

savage nomads

Ever since coming across their debut single The Magic Eye, UK rock band The Savage Nomads has continued to impress and ignite the imagination with each and every release. At the same time they have evolved their presence and sound into one of the most impressive and exciting, yet weirdly still widely unrecognised, forces around today. From their starting point their debut album the inventive and thrilling Coloured Clutter, and the stylishly imaginative Tension In The Middle EP of last year, only continued to establish and elevate the London quintet in the passions of a great many whilst picking up strong acclaim along the way and drawing the eager attention of the likes of Mick Jones, Paul Simonon, Matt Johnson (The The), and Robyn Hitchcock. Supporting The Jim Jones Revue as well as Big Audio Dynamite on their Justice Tonight tour, at the request of Mick Jones, has done them no harm either but the band still remains in the shadows for a great many, well until they release new single Jaded Edges we suggest.

The song is exceptional and sees the band leaping up not just another level but many with the development and  honing of their already distinct sound into an even more potent and mesmeric persuasion. Consisting of vocalist/guitarist Cole Salewicz, guitarist Josh Miles (who has moved from bass within the band), bassist Rory Jones, guitarist/keyboardist Benjy Miles, and drummer Petr Matousek, The Savage Nomads has stretched their imagination and invention to compelling lengths to sculpt their finest moment by far. If the single does not trigger a wave of mass hunger for the band then maybe the nation truly has gone too far into the Cowell dark side.

Whereas previous releases were more post punk clad, Jaded Edges brings a stronger new wave essence into what is basically straight rock ‘n’ roll with a taste of garage rock. Imagine Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster and Baddies in a creative riot with The The and Lloyd Cole and The Commotions whilst Department S and Nick Haig add their thoughts and you get a strong flavour of what the single offers. From its opening bass groan and reserved yet swirling keys, the song instantly infects the ear and beyond. The vocals of Salewicz stand out straight away also as they rest easily on the senses, his almost Tom Verlaine like persuasion a smoother and richer textured temptation showing another evolution from the more Mark E. Smith offerings in the early days of the band. The song itself has a swagger which is deliciously confident and teasing whilst the melodic dance and coaxing of the song is gleefully mischievous within the addictive rhythmic cage.

Despite all of their previous glories, Jaded Edges is easily the most enthralling and masterful piece of songwriting and invention to come from the band’s imaginative creativity, and as it is just one of apparently 25 songs penned by the band in a 9 month immersion in their south London studio, anticipation for what is to follow which includes a series of videos and further singles, is already hungrier than a shark on land. If Jaded Edges does not start the rise of the band to greater plateau of awareness and recognition there really is no such thing as justice.

Jaded Edges is available mid-September from http://savagenomads.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/thesavagenomads/

10/10

RingMaster 05/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Savage Nomads: Tension In The Middle EP

After the acclaim that soaked their debut album Coloured Clutter, UK rock band The Savage Nomads return with the Tension In The Middle EP to justify previous opinions and inspire even more fervour and attention. Before the release the London quintet had set themselves up as one of the most exciting and promising emerging UK bands, the new EP takes that promise and turns it into a full reality. The sounds are unique, staggeringly imaginative, and wholly exhilarating, The Savage Nomads a band to fire up the heart.

With the likes of Mick Jones, Paul Simonon, Matt Johnson (The The), and Robyn Hitchcock adding their support and praise to the ever growing wealth of fans and media attention, the band has not looked back since their debut single The Magic Eye of last year. Consisting of vocalist and guitarist Cole Salewicz, guitarist Joe Gillick, bassist Josh Miles, drummer Billy Boone, and Aviram Barath on trumpet and synths, with all adding backing vocals, The Savage Nomads made a big impression when supporting Big Audio Dynamite, the band added to their Justice Tonight tour by the request of Jones.

Tension In The Middle brings the punk infused originality which ignited their album but with a more restrained and mellower intent, well if a subtler and more smoothly intrusive manipulation can be called mellow.  The energy within the EP may not be as boisterous and excitable as on Coloured Clutter but it is just as eager and deeply infectious, the band bringing an evolution which is thoughtful and openly adventurous whilst retaining the core and irrepressible heart of their sound.

The title track opens up the release with a shadowed atmospheric grace and emotive wash. The spoken vocals of Salewicz reflect and unveil their thoughts over the fine piano pulses of Barath. The song littered with the excellent beats of Boone floats with a riled smoothness over the ear, bringing group harmonies and incisive guitar charms alongside the throatier basslines of Miles. The song equally caresses and scrapes the ear like a mix of The Three Johns and Babyshambles with Salewicz adding a Mark E Smith lilt to his vocals.

The excellent Four Personalities steps up next to bring a variation and slightly livelier breath to that of the opener. Tall velvety bass notes at the start announce the arrival of the guitars, their slicing of the air accompanied by blistered trumpet melodies and artillery driven rhythms. After a riled crescendo it drops into a hypnotic vein of bass riffs and sonic guitar manipulations. The track offers to explode at various times but never quite does take that final step and the result is compulsive. With the distinctness of Jazz Butcher and the manic energy of The Higsons the track is a growing infection which leaves one breathless. It is not an instant engagement but give a deserved attention it emerges as a magnificent piece of songwriting and inventiveness.

An Empty Seat from Coloured Clutter is included on the album and again is pure magic. Full of feisty energy and eager attention seeking guitars it riles emotions and thoughts up into a bedlam of excitement and rattled nerve ends. The song is part Baddies, and part Wire with Andy Partridge seemingly at the helm, a track bringing a post punk intensity with modern unbridled creativity. It was a true highlight of the album and is so again though its companions more than match it in adventure and imagination.

Completed by the radio edit of Tension In The Middle and a clean radio version of An Empty Seat, the EP is as impressive as one hoped and truthfully expected from the band. It offers up an even greater promise with its stylish change in presence and a reassurance that UK post punk and ingenuity are in safe and instinctive hands with The Savage Nomads.

https://www.facebook.com/thesavagenomads

RingMaster 22/05/2012

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Tom Kills: Semi

The recent release of the single A Million Pieces from Tom Kills openly declared he was an artist with an inspired feel for bringing emotion, shadows and superbly crafted electronic sounds into vibrant and impactful soundscapes for the senses and thoughts to revel in. The song also bred an enthused anticipation for his debut EP Semi, something the six track release more than fulfils. The release is a real feast for the ear and beyond, its touch and caress upon the heart wholly infectious

From Cumbernauld, North Lanarkshire singer, songwriter, musician and producer Kills has created a collection of songs with a heart seeded in the eighties and passion firmly set in today. The release leaves one glowing and grinning from an accomplished journey through a diverse electro pop kaleidoscope of sound. Semi dances with the heart and teases the senses whilst all the time keeping the mind active with emotive lyrics and compulsive ambient textures behind the mesmeric melodic flow. It is also hell of a lot of fun recognising bands and sounds from the past though the songs themselves have an independent life borne solely from Kills.

Silly Little Self opens up the EP with a reflective purge of emotion, the song a stirring expressive recognition for all in some degree. The music slowly envelopes the ear offering a heightened richness and touch whilst Kills surfs its melancholic wave with a vocal that encapsulates the tones of Bowie, Numan and Matt Johnson. Lined with inner shadows the song wraps itself around the senses without inviting pity to unveil its heart.  Though instantly mesmeric the track is a brooding darkened pleasure which leaves the following Dvorian Grey to bring a lightened swell to the proceedings.

The track brings a mix of sound that swarms warmly around the ear, its pulse offering the haunting elements of a Japan, the darker corners of Strangers, and the dazzling pop of a Visage. Dvorian Grey never breaks out in to an urgent glittering song but melds its enthused beacons of melodies into a darkened tome, the result a pulsating spread upon the ear.

Next Kills takes us down the darkened footpath of Catastrophe, its Joy Division/Depeche Mode corridors dimly lit with the warm melodic torch of an OMD. The overall effect is a wonderfully crafted eager play with the ear and a nostalgic feel of The The. Again one should note that despite all the references mentioned to try and portray the impressive sounds within Semi, the songs are spiced by these flavours but the recipe is all Tom Kills.

The excellent Million Pieces still holds court with the same majesty as when first we reviewed it, its beauty and tenderly hypnotic sway a dawning feast for all the senses to bathe within. Previously the likes of Depeche Mode and Strangers were stated as ingredients the song reminded of and though they still remain the more the song serenades the ear the likes of early Human League come to the fore, the League before misguided hairstyles and candy hooked songs came along. Graceful and bewitching the song is a near perfect electro pop pleasure, its power fuelled by the reserved energy and the caring nature of music and vocals.

Though still the favourite song so far from Kills and probably the best on the EP, Million Pieces is seriously challenged by Sex Robots. With a symphonic intro and computerised word the song steels up the EP with an industrial muscle and delicious electro waltz for the emotions. Part Marilyn Manson part Gary Numan with an excitable splash of Thomas Dolby the song leaps to its feet taking the listeners hand in a cyber dance and lustful affair. If you are not singing along and moving your limbs by the end of this irresistible piece of joy check for a pulse.

Semi is a true pleasure and treat, every aspect of the EP is a joy and impressively crafted. Light and dark fuel the release and one suspects Tom Kills too by the emotive edge unleashed on Semi and long may they rage with music this satisfying.

www.tomkills.com

RingMaster 22/03/2012

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Tom Kills – Million Pieces

Rather than introducing himself to the world through an elaborate bio or a colourful rhetoric Scottish singer songwriter Tom Kills has announced himself with the release of the single ‘Million Pieces’ and further more made it a free download. Giving away tracks is nothing new of course but usually an artist or band has constructed a ‘body’ to themselves before hand. Kills is letting his music make his welcome, his song being the first ‘face’ for people and a fine introduction it is.

From Cumbernauld, North Lanarkshire Kills creates music that swarms slowly but eagerly across the senses, its 80’s electronic pop laced with a dark tone bringing a thoroughly mesmeric sound. ‘Million Pieces’ wraps itself around the ear, soothing deeper as it caresses with vibrant graceful melodies and atmospheric sways of synth creativity. The track is emotive despite the lighter easy hook that latches on first to open up the listener for the expansive emotion touching sound surrounding it. The track carries an expressive mix of Strangers, Depeche Mode and Matt Johnson (The The) blending a nostalgic 80’s feel with a modern darker edge.

For a starter to any public musical introduction ‘Million Pieces’ is deeply impressive and a perusal  and digestion of other tracks posted on Kills’ web site and profiles shows this is not a one off. Songs like the emotive ‘Silly Little Self’, the excitable majesty of ‘Sex Robots’, and the impassioned ‘Catastrophe’ all show that Kills is a songwriter than knows how to create well crafted songs that make their home far deeper than the ear. All are haunting in some degree and trigger responses to ensure they are not fleeting romances with their hosts.

As mentioned ‘Million Pieces‘ can be downloaded for free by simply going to his official website @ http://tomkills.com/ or Facebook profile https://www.facebook.com/tomkills to treat yourselves.

RingMaster 18/01/2012

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Tom Kills – Million Pieces

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