Matt Finucane – Vanishing Island

As uncertainty consumes an isle through Brexit confusion, Vanishing Island sees the troubadour of disharmony, Matt Finucane is back to confront, provoke, and captivate in his unique way. As all its predecessors, the new album is a release which comes soaked in physical and emotional discord whilst wrapped in melodic dissonance. It is another complete lure of fascination from the Brighton alternative singer songwriter and without doubt his most pop infested outing without losing any of the disharmony which gives his music its richness;  a proposition which without quite putting a finger on the actual ingredient it has added alongside a general blossoming, is easily his finest incitement yet.

The past couple of years or so has seen Finucane especially lure attention and acclaim through the likes of the Disquiet and Ugly Scene EPs, though neither success has exactly been a stranger since the release of previous album Glow In The Dark six years back. Through singles and EPs since, his sound and songwriting has thickly enticed as it has continuously grown but as suggested Vanishing Island has something extra which truly set it apart as it boisterously got under the skin.

The album carries the raw jangle of early Orange Juice, the pop disharmony of Josef K, and the sonic dissonance of Swell Maps whilst lyrically and vocally Finucane again embraces the inspirations of Mark E Smith and Lou Reed but all essences warped and mutated into its creator’s own imaginative and individual proposition. Vanishing Island opens up with War on Pain and immediately is baiting keen attention through a rhythmic pulsation swiftly joined by the inimitable tones of Finucane, his vocal delivery as maverick as his music. As the song expands with real catchiness to its swing infested hips, drone inspired melodies weave patterns in its sky colouring the route to the subsequent turbulence which from a simmer bubbles up and over.

It is a great magnetic start to the album but soon eclipsed by the following pair of Submissive Pose and Menace. The first similarly tempts with a potent rhythmic beckoning, its first lure continuing to steer the track as its pop roar and rock antics collude. Openly virulent, almost taunting ears like a blend of Television Personalities meets Marc Riley and The Creepers, the song is delicious pop cacophony and one of the albums major highlights but soon matched by its successor, The third track prowls the senses, crawling over the psyche with its singular sonic intimation but again there is an inherent catchiness in voice and character which easily seduced from within its devious drone.

Next up, Looking for a Genius is no lightweight in temptation either, its bass strolling alone enough to bait attention and more than ably assisted by the relatively calm but corrupted melodic clamour of the guitar and the general pop nurtured balladry at its heart while in turn Perilous Seat explores its own low key yet boisterous intimate clamour; both inescapable epidemics of sheer catchiness.

The dark, haunting summoning and provocative fingering of Offertory provides yet another shade to the crepuscular depths and adventures of Vanishing Island before Expensive Habits infests hips once more with its inherent pop sway; the latter carrying a hint of bands like The Only Ones and The Freshies in its eager breath.

Through the sonically suggestive, untamed croon of Yr Own Way and the seared rock ‘n’ roll of Safehouse Rules, the album expands its creative landscape further with the conclusion of the creative tour of Vanishing Island being cast by the siren sigh of Time Begins. A slow burner compared to many before, the song is an evocative shimmer on the ears and imagination, a sail into the sunset off of the album’s creative shores.

Matt Finucane is a one of a kind proposition and Vanishing Island an inimitable offering in his own creative adventure.

Vanishing Island is released May 3rd with pre-ordering available @ https://mattfinucane.bandcamp.com/album/vanishing-island

 https://mattfinucane.net/   https://www.facebook.com/Matt.x.Finucane/

Pete RingMaster 08/04/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Matt Finucane – Disquiet EP

Following the release of Ugly Scene this past May, an “abrasive, noise-heavy protest” of an encounter, British alt rock troubadour Matt Finucane has its successor, Disquiet, poised for unveiling. Living up to its name, the EP is a collection of songs which as mellow and intimate as they are, come soaked in discord and melodic dissonance. They all breed a mix of challenge and seduction but most of all a fascination leaning towards needing more.

Having come across Finucane back in 2012 through his acclaimed album, Glow in The Dark, an encounter which had us simultaneously absorbed and confused, pleased yet unsure and most of all compelled to pay attention to its creator ahead, there has been constant intrigue to follow how things evolve. Fair to say feelings around Disquiet have not ventured too far away yet the enjoyment of his sound has certainly continued to grow through the offerings between both releases and is now at its most eager with the latest encounter.

As all his propositions, Disquiet is a DIY cast summons on ears and imagination as raw as it is creatively animated with opener Ulterior Motives quickly establishing Finucane’s distinct character of enterprise. Its acoustic/electric indie pop dances and flirts with ears though biding its time disharmony haunts the shadows brewing its infestation by the chord until eventually sparking a low key but inescapable cacophony for a captivating incursion of senses and song. The track epitomises the indefinable nature of his music; art and punk rock possible tags, wonk pop and dark folk others but honestly it is in a corner of its own.

The darker woozy presence of Happy Chains continues the contradiction and temptation, it’s off kilter shimmer and Finucane’s equally divisive vocals infesting melodic radiance like disorientating haze over a sunspot while the following People Move On exposes its fuzz seeded instincts. There is something akin to the kind of music artists like Frank Black and Pere Ubu have spread to Finucane’s sound, certainly a hue in its want and need to unsettle the expected and orthodox.

The EP concludes with firstly the warped melodic reflection of Always A Shadow, a track which feels like the aural side of a distorted mirror, and finally the seven minute plus journey of Dead Men Sing Us To Our Rest. In a cavernous embrace of echo and distortion, emotively and physically, the track is a malaise of frictious harmony, melodic discrepancy, and pretty much unnerving beguilement.

There is no doubt that the music of Matt Finucane is not going to sit easy with a great many but for those with a penchant for disturbing adventure and the song of the asylum, it and Disquiet should definitely be checked out.

The Disquiet EP is out October 19th via Crude Records; available @ https://mattfinucane.bandcamp.com/album/disquiet

 https://mattfinucane.net/   https://www.facebook.com/Matt.x.Finucane/

 Pete RingMaster 19/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Matt Finucane: Glow In The Dark

Hard Science the latest single from UK songwriter Matt Finucane left a mixed emotion to its intriguing and unpredictable sounds. The song hit the spot at times but also missed easily in others moments to spawn an uncertainty towards his wrong footing invention. August 13th sees the release of his new album Glow In The Dark via Light Crude and is a collection of songs which offer a broader understanding of the man and his intent. It does really not solve the riddle of how one feels about his music but it certainly makes it fun trying to find out.

From Brighton, Finucane began on his solo quest in 2008 after fronting art rock band Empty Vessels. His limited edition Episodes EP of the same year drew some attention but he stepped back to write more songs. Last year saw the singles Wet Dream Disaster and Hands Up released, the latter earning some good radio play. Both marked the way for debut album This Mucky Age which came out in July that year and again to strong responses. A re-issue of Episodes began 2012 with Hard Science which with its release in July heralded the imminent arrival of Glow In The Dark. Though our first introduction to the man, within a few tracks of the album it is clear Finucane is one who rips up the supposed rules into little shreds and discovers his own path. There is always something impressive about a musician prepared to create his own world of sound and disregard what came before and the opinions of others. The album is a perfect reflection and one can only admire its rugged use of discordance for a blistered adventure. Sometimes it did not work to the preference of these ears but to the ideas and emerging intention one can only nod in approval.

Finucane is from the same stock and well of musical destruction as Mark E. Smith, an explorer and purveyor of the wonderfully unconventional and confrontational. You can add elements of Lou Reed and Iggy Pop especially vocally to the man but it is that breath which took The Fall to such heights which marks the sounds and invention of Finucane.

The album opens with the acoustic enticement of Into It. The track is simply guitar and voice stirring up the air with a gentle coaxing of the senses whilst an electric whisper plays in the background like a searchlight of inciteful invention. Finucane has a voice which takes a little while to warm to and at times is not easy to get a handle on though as always it is a matter of personal taste and connection. As the song plays there emerges a shuffling sound as if the body of familiarity and expectation is being dragged to the nearest dumpster to inspire great delight even if the thoughts drawn were not as intended.

Hard Science works better within the context of the album or it is just that it has worn the defences down through multiple plays. The sizzling electrified surface sound which roughs up the ear is a great counter to the strong melodic play and eager hook which becomes quite infectious over time. Imagine Thomas Dolby creating sound with 1,000 volts running through his veins and you can imagine Hard Science.

The likes of Face Of Stone with its assembly of disconnected but perfectly aligned sounds, Impermanence and its disruptive garage rock barracking, and the acoustically shimmering In The Market Place, all leave one in various degrees of pleasure. Each keeps one attentive to their presentation though trigger many questions alongside the enjoyment they bring, though thought provoking music is never ever a flaw in our book.

The highlight of the album comes with a consecutive trio of songs. The first Larkin’ hypnotises with a nonstop spotting of the senses through pulsating beats and irresistible melodic guitar strikes. Easily the best song on the release it jabs persistently whilst giving a caustic vocal rub and that alone is mesmeric but with the distillery of thrilling concussive unique sounds and teasing hooks it elevates itself to greatness. The other two tracks have their own individual and equally compulsive worlds. Great Beginnings pulsates with a swing groove which no one can say no to within its stirring discordance whilst Doom Vibes is a sinister caress with less than healthy intentions which leaves one rattled but needing to feel its shadows again.

The album is maybe a rocky journey with the likes of Love Unknown, Alter Ego Hi-Way, and Yr Own Poison not hitting same personal target of the hungrily received imaginative sounds of the tracks previously mentioned. There is nothing truly wrong with them but just do not find a welcoming home but this is a release for individuals, what works for one will not always for another. Glow In The Dark is a release which deserves investigation, to ignore it would be a mistake. Honesty dictates that we declare the album was certainly enjoyable but by how much is still in debate with a decision not expected until further meet ups.

http://mattfinucane.net/

RingMaster 10/08/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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