In Love Your Mother – The Great Ape Project

ILYM_bandfoto

As well as holding gripping and inventive sounds, a song and release should be an adventure for ears and imagination to make the strongest connection, and they do not come more of a creative and challenging emprise than The Great Ape Project from Swizz trio In Love Your Mother. The album is a riveting and invigorating maelstrom of sound and deranged invention which leaves no stone unturned or bedlamic idea left in the shadows. Cramming eighteen songs in just over thirty minutes of creative mayhem means the album warrants and needs full attention so as not to miss any of the exhilarating drama within tracks which range from fourteen seconds to just short of four minutes in length. But the rewards are unrelenting and furiously imposing in one of the albums of the year.

Hailing from Zürich, the trio of guitarist/vocalist Valentin Baumgartner, bassist/vocalist Amedeo Mauriello, and drummer Andrea Tinner, unleash a sound which reaps the essences of mathcore and progressive metal and filters it through a vat of avant-garde, grindcore, and metalcore ingenuity. It comes out as a sound which can be best described as The Dillinger Escape Plan and System of a Down meets Destrage, Toumaï, and Kontrust yet isn’t like that either. It is a unique concoction which flirts and dances with senses as it brutalises them, and quite irresistible.

Themed by the sick and bad world our mothers warned us of, In Love Your Mother start the album and examination with The Mother Song. A thirty second tsunami of vocal causticity and rhythmic hostility speared by a sonic spite and toxic groove which all combines for a furious and concussive but appetite inflaming onslaught. Its swift assault is followed by the less intensive but no more lightweight 2116@#1916. It is immediately contagious, something alone impressive such its brevity of length, a slice of coarsely melodic and respectfully corrosive groove metal which slips agreeably before the vicious presence of We’re Gonna Dance Till Everyone Is Naked And Fallen Apart takes over. A metalcore canvas of vocals and maliciousness is soon twisted and bound in a weave of unpredictable and schizophrenic invention, the guitar of Baumgartner scything and spearing the heart of the tempest with breath-taking and psyche addling ingenuity. It is a manic endeavour matched by the swinging arms and prods of Tinner and the throaty creative predation of Mauriello. The longest song on the album, it explores and evolves with every second, bewitching and bewildering ears with almost hostile intent. The beauty of this and all songs, is the seamless and fluid transitions, one moment a bestial rampancy becomes a seductive croon and melodic embrace in another, all without a twitch of uncertainty or flex of ILYM_TGAP_albumcoverrandomness.

Johnny Rocket Is Not Dead launches its majestic uncompromising tirade next, grooves and bass temptation as eager and impacting as the vocal squalls and twisted sonic probing aligning to a rhythmic badgering. It is only one turn in the fifty second odd track though, as mentioned earlier every chord and jab of drums the detour to new and generally enthralling bliss, as evidenced no more potently than in Signs Of A Medium Life which splits the two parts of the title track. A hardcore/grind fuelled provocation, the track savages and pounds on the senses from the off. Riffs and beats show no mercy within the stalking gait of the song nor the blistering vocal roar which also has some restraint in its confrontation. Through the storm though, there are small and larger slithers of inventive majesty which enthral as much as the bruising thrust of the song.

The two bits of The Great Ape Project grab the hunger inspired already by band and album, but are swiftly surpassed by the brilliance of the also two parted Wish Me An Ocean, the first of its two scintillating movements a furnace of sonic fire and blistering psychotic beauty steered superbly by bass and drums. From the hasty senses foraging of its counterpart and the haunting piano sculpted drama of Drop The Back Of The Line, In Love Your Mother ignite another major blaze with Signs Of A Real Life. Striding forcibly with rhythmic and sonic nostrils flaring, the track soon slips into something more cantankerous and intimidating, crawling over senses and thoughts with a rabid breath and bestial intensity. It is just one border of the landscape though, an exotic melodic insanity blooming before a final fury emerges.

Through the thrillingly deranged, slightly post punk/noise rock spiced The Disco Fish, the melodically searing and perfectly crazed Inhale, and the restful and emotionally unbalanced Wish Me An Ocean Part 0, the album continues to engross and disorientate. But it is all just an appetiser for the pinnacle of the album, which is the song In Love Your Mother. With its first touch, a ridiculously addictive groove which only intensifies its lure as it is joined by rampant beats and a pleasingly varied vocal persuasion, the track is pure sonic and inventive alchemy. Demanding and infectious, imposing and wantonly accessible, it is a bargain for the soul made of the devil, a term which applies to the whole of the album.

The Hedgehog is more pure in its assault, its extreme metal rabidity direct and untethered yet still veined by a sonic enterprise to spellbind ears and thoughts. Its potent success is emulated by the inhospitable but irrepressibly catchy Ein Hase, Zwei Haese. With a swagger which only inflames its savagery and warped ingenuity equally, the track is a twisted mouth-watering blaze of unpredictability and extreme metal maliciousness to linger over.

Closed by the lo-fi folk croon of a track simply called Outro, The Great Ape Project is a sensational introduction to a band with the potential and invention to turn metal on its head at any time. The release is one of the real triumphs of the year and deserves the fullest of attention.

The Great Ape Project is available now @ http://www.cduniverse.com/productinfo.asp?pid=9357440

http://www.inloveyourmother.com

RingMaster 10/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Death and the Penguin – Accidents Happen

Death and the Penguin

Providing a clutch of immersive anthems, though may be not in the recognisable sense, Accidents Happen the debut EP from UK indie/rock band Death and the Penguin is not only magnificent stands as one of the most startling and compellingly invigorating releases to hit the senses this year so far. Consisting of six tracks which are as bewitchingly eclectic and striking as they are voraciously imaginative and inciting, the EP is a mouthwatering persuasion which boldly tempts and riotously seduces with an invention and virulence that is unstoppable. For a debut it is extraordinary and for a first step by a band one of the most exciting entrances in a long time.

Taking their name from a satirical novel by Ukrainian Andrey Kurkov, the London quartet of Tobias Smith (vocals, guitar), Christopher Olsen (guitar, keyboard, vocals), Andrew Acred (bass, keyboard, vocals), and Timothy Brennik (drums, percussion, vocals) make a first impression which it is hard to imagine could have been any more potent and incisive then what it is. It is a release which starts off with a stirring proposition and just gets better and bigger with each track, all the while revealing the depths to the band’s songwriting, craft, and adventure whilst soaking it in a promise which more than suggests of even greater things to come.

Opener Snuffed Out instantly awakens thoughts and attention, a blaze of guitar which almost swarms over the senses igniting an instant D&TPAHappetite with its Echo and the Bunnymen toning to the melodic flames leaving the fingers of Olsen and Smith. There is a throaty resonance to the sound which becomes a specific essence of the band across the EP to relish as well as a sweet tasting discord which only accentuates the impact of first impressions. As the song spreads its narrative, a Radiohead like whisper chills the lively ambience as a cleaner and warmer but no less striking version of an At The Drive In like rapaciousness rallies a greedy appetite. It is the dark heavy voice of bass and the coring riffs which steal the thunder though, their continuing likeness to McCulloch and co. irresistible. Though more of a grower than other tracks, it continues to worm its way under the skin and into the psyche, proving to be a dramatic and impossibly infectious not forgetting momentous first slice of temptation.

The following Space 1998 casts a spatial embrace around ears initially, its warm and intriguing elegance asking the imagination to play which it eagerly does, especially with the heavily weighted thump of beats and guitar snarl which joins the beauteous lure. From that union a dazzling mathcore weave of bass and guitar steps forth to toy and quickstep with the senses, their bewildering quickstep and groove unbelievably magnetic. The vocals as in the first song impress from the lead to the eager backing whilst the fire and passion in the band leaves no element unwashed as evidenced by the simply mesmeric chorus. For undefined reasons there is a feel of latter period XTC to the song which only adds to the insatiable funk and jazz bred ingenuity of the stunning and constantly developing landscape.

The song marks a loftier pinnacle in the terrain of the release, elevating past its predecessor before next up An Opening unveils an atmospheric and haunting embrace over the senses. It is a brief and highly evocative piece which swaps the adrenaline fuelled romps of other songs for a melancholic intensity and though it does not inflame emotions as elsewhere the track certainly leads thoughts into a potent venture.

Strange Times has no problem in setting a fuse to a predatory hunger with its roaring entrance; guitars, drums, and keys making a melodic cacophony courted by the ever heavy breath of the bass whilst vocally the band soars with relish and energy. The entrance immediately sparks thoughts of Young Knives though as ever the song twists and lurches through ingenious detours and turns in its way to seducing the passions. Continuing to ebb and flow in its evocative intensity, the eruption of a fire bred guitar surge and the persistently provoking rhythms of Brennik scorch and bruise the senses respectively as the band sculpts another gloriously unpredictable and vigorously compelling exploit.

The persistently rising curve of brilliance to the EP shows no sign of levelling out as it and band step to another level with the closing pair of songs. The first is Bitumen, a track which brings the anthemic unity of the chain-gang into a blues kissed slab of pure invention. As primal and tribal as it is voraciously soulful the track is just brilliant, a sonic and rhythmic alchemy which seduces and smothers every pore of body, mind, and heart. An element of De Staat comes to mind with the agitated glory of the drums and percussion, but again the song is as unique and distinct to Death and the Penguin as you could expect and wish.

As the track closed it has to be admitted that we thought the release’s pinnacle was found but The Words That Maketh Murder soon shoves that thought aside. The song leaps at the ear with a wind of raucous vocals and grooved sonic groans, like a mix of Collisions and Hadouken it consumes the ears with a punkish recruitment which has a greedy attention basking in the subsequent flow of emotive vocals and imaginative intrigue. The switching gallop and canter of the chorus is sensationally incendiary, whilst the increasingly fertile landscape of the track with its swing and groove lilted swagger just concentrates the submissive toxins of the quite genius encounter. With another flood of infection cruising through a climax clad in a kaleidoscope of inventive colour and sonic mystique to end things on a plateau, Accidents Happen is simply incredible and already the instigator to suggestions that the Death and the Penguin is the next big and important thing within British rock music. Time will tell but we will not be betting against it.

Accidents Happen is released on May 5th through Best Before Records.

https://www.facebook.com/datpmusic

9.5/10

RingMaster 04/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Rott Childs – Alleluia: A Brit Milah In G Melodic Minor

Masks / pic by Fia Cielen

Masks / pic by Fia Cielen

Undoubtedly a musical union from the loins of the Devil, Belgian noise manipulators The Rott Childs are poised to take over the world’s psyche with the unleashing of their second album Alleluia: A Brit Milah In G Melodic Minor. Consisting of ten tracks sculpted with schizophrenic invention and bedlamic imagination, the sonic alchemy uncaged is a breath-taking, fertile tempest of post hardcore and mathcore ingenuity aligned to an aggressive progressive intent which warns not to confirm those best of year album choices just yet.

The Rott Childs made their entrance with the well-received debut album Riches Will Come Thy Way, A Musical in 2009. It was a release which like for a great many outside of their homeland we suspect, evaded our attention but soon received a retrospective investigation once its successor had dug in its staggering sonic claws. Alleluia: A Brit Milah In G Melodic Minor follows on from the endeavour forged on the band’s first release taking it to a maturer and greater incendiary plateau of inspiring confrontation. The quartet of guitarists Christophe Dexters and Jethro Volders, drummer Wim Coppers, and bassist Florent Peevee who also fronts the brilliant Kabul Golf Club, are not content in just engaging the senses and imagination, they want and do take them on a journey through ravenous creative ‘mayhem’ which just enflames the passions.

The opening Prelude offers an intrigue but no real hint of what is to come, its melodic caress and rhythmic shuffling a lure soon 51-QuGgW9vL._SL500_AA280_left behind by the intensive fire of Caloric. Guitars are soon searing the air and teasing the ears whilst the excellent vocals offer a distinct acidic inventiveness too. A scorching sonic bedlam sounding like the deviant cousin to a merger between Blood Brothers and At The Drive In, the track whips up a frenzy of exhausting beauty and predacious energy courted by a crazed craft and mouth-watering invention. Bass and drums sculpt a web upon it which just seduces the passions whilst the guitars weave a ridiculously easy to be addicted to expanse of aural narrative which the excellent vocals and harmonies dance impressively along.

The following Pass Out the Charm parades an even darker psychotic swagger to its adventure, bass lures and sonically hued hooks as with its predecessor virulent tempters spearing the acidically spiced melodic net which just twists and evolves with every passing second. It is a riveting explosion of genius, a feisty torrent of inventiveness which moves its boundaries as it seamlessly flows into a noir clad shadow soaked finale. The song is another masterful pinnacle on an album which gets better song by song, as proven by the fire bred Pretty Diamond. Noise and radiance are easy bedfellows within the rhythmically challenging snarl of a track, a caustic essence of The Fall Of Troy and maniacal breath of The Mae Shi offering their references to the wonderful turmoil being played out.

The next up sinew veined Suitcase Full of Stupid has a Kabul Golf Club toxicity and antagonism to it but within another transfixing melodic meshugah which persists and niggles thoughts and emotions into submission whilst Stumble bursts in straight after with a certifiable rhythmic stomp and sonic rapaciousness, the track virtually stalking and teasing the synapses and emotions into lustful engagement. It is startling and incredibly impressive stuff from song and album, The Rott Childs bringing provocations and spices from all those bands mentioned, to which you have to add Mars Volta at times too, into something loudly distinct and dramatically innovative.

The triumph does not slow down or stop there though as the exceptional sonic storm that is Stutter, the track finding a carnivorous depth which the bass especially feeds off of, and the dark haunting Children’s Life Size Gorgeous Luxury Play House shows. The second of the two is haunting as in an Insidious way, sounds and emotively drenched sonic incitements leaping from the walls and heart of the song to seduce and disturb before ending on a sonic lancing of the ear which leads into another glorious mind challenging provocation. Marching Band is a warped festival of imagination and ingenuity, a technically exceptional, as the album, riot of loose limbed rhythms which simply leave the senses punch drunk and a sonic flaming that corrodes and ignites thoughts.

The closing Gold Crumbs leaves the release on the same persistently consistent high it started upon and maintained. A bewitching and disorientating brawl of never able to settle sound and creativity, the track is a romping puppeteer for lustful passions, a violent and merciless one but one with a wanton seduction it has to share. Not for the first time on the album the bass has a Gang Of Four growl to it presence as the guitars flay ears and air like sonic dervishes, It is a presence which is sheer contagious devilry proving again that quite simply Alleluia: A Brit Milah In G Melodic Minor is unhinged sonic poetry and The Rott Childs the authors of one of the very best albums this year.

http://www.therottchilds.com/

10/10

RingMaster 19/11/2013

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Bear – Noumenon

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Just when you think maybe you have heard the best the year has to offer, along comes a band like Bear to grip the imagination and passions by the throat, shake them rigorously until sense shows its teeth and then seduce to an even greater degree with sonic alchemy which leaves exhaustion and lust bred satisfaction raging rewards. Noumenon is the second album from the Belgium quartet, a release which ignites and fuses synapses with its bordering on psychotic mathcore and technical devilry. It has been a highly anticipated release but goes far beyond hopes and expectations those appetites will have had lying in wait, quite simply Noumenon is demonic genius.

Formed in 2010, the Antwerp-based foursome of vocalist Maarten Albrechts, guitarist Leander Verheyen Tsjakalov, bassist Dries Verhaert, and drummer Serch Carriere carve out new potent levels and mind altering creative temptations with their new album. Taking all the essences which have been spawned through previous releases starting with their self-released 5 track MCD Abstractions in their formative year, the band lends it to a greater corrosive and intensively invigorating scorching of the senses. Debut album Doradus of 2011 was the major seed which led to such a hunger for the new release along with its first single Wreckthings which preceded it. Both ignited the appetite and acclaim of media and fans worldwide and were followed by Bear stepping into bigger sized venues and recognition with shows alongside the likes of Periphery and within festivals such as Euroblast, Eierfest, and Groezrock. Released by Basick Records, Noumenon stalks and torments a new plateau of adventure and caustic brilliance to potentially steal end of year honours with insidious accomplishment and sinister ingenuity.

Opening track Boxer lurks in a reserved mist only allowing a singular guitar coaxing to wrap its tendril around the ear. It is soon Packshot 1500x1500welcoming a second strand of melodic acidity, again restrained and gentle in its touch though behind it there is a brewing presence and sinister electronic breath. Suddenly the song explodes into a tsunami of energy, rhythms cracking viciously on the ear whilst the guitars score and sear flesh though spirals of sonic fire and senses splicing corrosive predation. The vocals equally cut and scar though at times offering great melodic and harmonic mercury which makes for a mesmeric mellow union. The track is best described as The Dillinger Escape Plan and Kabul Golf Club meets Converge and The Fall Of Troy, though that only gives a whisper of the unique tempest of sound and invention working voraciously away and the psyche.

The brilliant start is soon matched by Mirrors, the track going straight for the jugular with crippling rhythms and bass rapaciousness coring another furnace of sonic irreverence and imagination soiling enterprise. Once again the vocals ignore predictability to squall and brawl within the song with the same passion and menacing invention as the sounds. Whether raging with antagonism or soothing the wound with harmonic craft, the vocals like the music are an evolving never settling torrent of flavours and energy. Across the track a punk scourge seems to tone the attack though it is just a spice to the unbridled twists of stance, technical conjuring, and time shifts. Like the album the song brings mathcore into a noise, djent, progressive metal maelstrom and emerges as something simply Bear.

Both Rain and The Falling Line snarl and spit out carnivorous toxicity which only seduces to greater depths, the first crafting an anthemic call to its venom and aggression whilst the second tunnels its way into the brain and stakes its territory with sonic weaves of twisted guitar animosity from within a wall of donkey punch raps upon the senses from the drums drawing unavoidable submission. Both are outstanding instigators of the passions and though debatably many of the tracks need a concentrated focus to discover all their nuances against each other, it is a rewarding endeavour which only increases the thrill of being the prey to the album’s hunt.

Mantiis unleashes a groove which is pure addiction, a hard rock teasing tightening its grip whilst vocally and through its contagion there is a familiarity which defines realisation as to the source. A major pinnacle of the album, the track is a storm of crescendos and climactic sonic insults which steals the breath and ardour with ease whilst laying down bait which lingers long after its passing of the fire to Aconite, a track starting with a somber invitation to emerge cobra like, swaying and growing its height into a hypnotic influence with a lethal acidic toxin and danger clad persuasion. The Fat Dukes of Fuck like in its diablerie, the track keeps Noumenon at its lofty height with grandeur and accomplished ease.

Through Centrefold and The Human Thing, the release and Bear strike with new ridiculously compelling and virulent suasion, the first of the two a mugging of the senses through a swarming attack which rather than picking certain targets just consumes and pressures in a blanket of intensity and creative sonic pestilence. There is a delicious blackened breath to the encroachment too whilst a Meshuggah like carnality of guitars and rhythms simply induces total slavery for its intensive landscape. Its successor is bred from the same beast and admittedly without attention the two can merge into each other but again the track is a bestial rabidity which leaves only exhausted pleasure in its tow.

Completed by the waspish swarming of L.A. Layer which chews and stings across its sultry atmosphere and inferno like landscape, and the wonderfully rabid and dramatically metallic Postbreaks where the chorus reminds of Sepultura though it’s a passing growl in one more fire-pit of an inventive scourge of sound, Noumenon is a riveting and senses frazzling treat which will demand contention in the awards giving come December and from a great many take titles.

https://www.facebook.com/bearpropaganda

10/10

RingMaster 08/10/2013

 

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Haut&Court.: La vie

Haut & Court

If you have not yet discovered French destructors Haut&Court. then read on to learn about your first essential purchase of 2013. Formed only in June of last year with this their debut EP being unleashed in the closing weeks of the 2012, the trio from Strasbourg has announced themselves with a quite incredible and irresistible onslaught of sonic intensity driven magnificence. It is wonderfully raw and unpolished, a cancerous corruption which uses your testicles, real and imaginary, as a malevolence drawing punch ball and the senses as passion soaked whipping boys. For a debut from a band arguably still learning their craft and way around their sound it is one of the most promising and rewarding releases in a long time.

Consisting of vocalist Arnaud, guitarist Bernard, and drummer Ravind, the band has fused the essences of grind, mathcore, crust, and hardcore to name a few of the flames which heat their sound to create a sonic furnace which is tagged as mathcrust. Whatever title you wish to give it, the music is a compulsive and invigorating abrasion which just sparks rapturous reactions. Describing the release as a mix of Dillinger Escape Plan, Pig Destroyer, Kabul Golf Club, Kunz, and Extreme Noise Terror is a mere hint but the best we can do for this unique and inspiring confrontation.

Let It Burst sets to upon the ear and beyond first with its sonic squalling, corrosive breath, and vicious growling vocals. Mixing up1102917326-1 its pace and pressure throughout, the song is either gnawing away at the synapses with tight insidious manipulation or pummelling with a tempest borne energy and might. The track in hindsight is the mere appetizer for the violent imagination to follow but is still an impressive and stirring opening for the release.

The raw almost suffocating edge to the production only adds to the strength of the EP, which has its pinnacle across the remaining rages of sound. Krokodil is a sensational infestation of serpentine guitar licks, crushing rhythms, and enveloping erosive energy. The soft undergroove of the song is a sirenesque beckoning from within the scything sonics and ravenous presence of vocals, intent, and simply the song itself, all merging to consume the senses.

The excellence of the song is exceeded by the following This Genesis, a track which is like a rabid beast playing with its victim, twisting, slapping, and slicing it into a bloodied whimpering husk. It is a staggering riot of invention and sound which sucks the breath away and turns thoughts and emotions to a quivering mess. We all know the term noise annoys but here noise is an orgasmic pleasure which is continued with the almighty bruising depths of Colision. Like a tsunami of sound the track overwhelms and snakes into every corner of the psyche and heart. It is a giant brawl of rhythmic malice, guitar mayhem, and vocal spite which triggers every positive acclaim possible especially with its squirrelling hornet nest of sonic nastiness.

La Vie is completed by the aural swipe Life, an avalanche lasting less time than it takes to grab a breath and the final triumph Wasted Time For Wasted Minds. The ingenuity of the EP continues into this last slab of brilliance, its vindictive presence crawling into the deepest corners as it lies on the ear with a richly ominous weight. It is a brutal swamp of intensity to perfectly end a release for which only the highest acclaim can be offered.

With La Vie being just the first introduction for Haut&Court. it is frightening of just how immense the band could become and very exciting. Released as a name your price purchase this is the only way to start your imaginative noise driven 2013.

http://hautcourt.bandcamp.com/

RingMaster 03/01/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

II II II : A Conundrum On My Coffee Table

cover

Something wicked this way comes, an exceptional experiment of sonics, sounds and adventurous sensibilities to engineer the deepest ardour. Plenty of releases excite and thrill the senses but just a few ignite a fire of passion and deeply rooted rapture for the sounds they offer. One such rarity has just been unleashed into the world by II II II. The project from former Mishkin vocalist Ben Davy is sensational and its debut release without doubt one of the most enthralling and intoxicating pleasures of 2012. The A Conundrum On My Coffee Table EP captures the imagination in every aspect, its innovative weaves and inventive teasing an invigorating breath of fresh air which like the band name inspires thought, intrigue, and a hungry anticipation which is quenched with staggering ease.

Being a massive fan of the now deceased Leeds band Mishkin, the excitement of hearing from Davy with the EP was immense and

Ben Davy

Ben Davy

arguably placed higher expectations on the impending release than any other new record might have to prove itself against. It was child’s play for the release though, its six tracks leaving hopes as just inadequate musings when placed before their creative triumphs and exhilarating sounds. Fusing  blend of mathcore, metal, jazz, and rock, the release is an experimental tempest which offers essences of Faith No More, Mishkin, 6:33, Mike Patton, Dog Fashion Disco and much more, all honed into a unique and compelling encounter. The tracks are slight sonic swipes, colourful aural blades which barely worry a third minute but are rigidly magnetic in the time they take to transform the emotions into a compliant subservient.

Dog’s Lost His Bone swaggers in with sultry melodies and bruising basslines over firm rhythmic slaps to immediately pull all focus in its direction. A tempest of delicious enterprise and aggressive sinews the track is a storm of scattergun like energies and sounds honed into deliberate patterns and senses manipulating structures. It is glorious, an evolving beast of sound which ignites every corner of mind and heart. The track reminds of Guano Padano at times especially their recent collaboration with Mike Patton, whilst offering the ever shifting weaves which marked Mishkin and the technical mesmerism of a Karnivool.

From there things just venture into arguably further elevated areas of psyched investigation and musical excellence. Firstly the psychotic HITPTYGWYDIYL exposes the nerve endings with its wanton melodic caresses and scything rhythmic malevolence, the track a piece of aural sculpture which teeters on insanity. It like the first song is just irresistible, a brief unpredictable expanse of taunting and challenges bringing the richest of rewards. If the likes of Polkadot Cadaver give you a buzz, this track as the release will have you feeling like a teenager on your first sexual quest.

No Condition and Memories follow with their own individual ingenuity, the first a tirade of white hot sonics and argumentative riffs with a smouldering seductive centre and expressive challenging gest, and the second a flash of thought exploiting invention which leaves nothing less than heightened pleasure in its wake. In addition to the previous mentioned references the release inspires there is a sense of the maniacal mischief of 12 Stone Toddler to this pair of songs bringing yet another refreshing and inspirational flavour to the whole experience.

The release is completed by the ravenous craft of The Key To Denial and the serpentine Shingles. The former is a sizzling encounter, a face to face with the devil in aural form, its sonic tongue licking over the senses with insidious sexual greed to leave you tingling whilst grinning in sheer pleasure. Like all the songs it caresses and investigates the body like an insatiable lover whilst all the time stretching and twisting their prey with their venomous desires.  The latter is even more dangerous behind its jazz lined melodic brilliance, the passage of almost corruptive challenges and dazzling invention just breath-taking and magically intrusive.

A Conundrum On My Coffee Table is pure excellence, a release coming in the closing days of December which sets the highest standard for 2013. The EP is an essential investigation and a must get with its name your own price offer on the II II II Bandcamp Page… so go on off you go.

http://ii-ii-ii.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/II-II-II/100277240054308

RingMaster 30/12/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Chopstick Suicide – Lost Fathers and Sons

If you ever fancy having your ears blistered and senses twisted inside out and stretched from pillar to post, then Turkish mathcore band Chopstick Suicide are eager and ready to do a very satisfying job with their new album Lost Fathers and Sons. A band that is as new to you as to us I am sure, Chopstick Suicide have come up with a tasty release that intrigues with fine unpredictable invention and pleases with a vibrant vein of dark humour and intent. The band fuse numbing heavy riffs and bulky intensity with jazz infused melodic ingenuity and head spinning discordance. Think Dillinger Escape Plan with a twist of Everytime I Die and Dog Fashion Disco and you get a feel for their distinct manipulations. The eight track album is challenging and a test upon the ear at times but it is thoroughly rewarding given time and room to violate.

From Istanbul the band formed in 2008 releasing their debut EP Recycle Your People in 2008 and first album Loserville two years later. A change that saw the current line-up of vocalist Mert, guitarist Yagiz, bassist Cem, and Alican on drums in place, released the Small People, Broken Glasses EP last year and now follow-up its strongly received  attention with Lost Fathers and Sons via Turkish label Peyote Müzik. One still feels with this release that without a slice of luck they will remain an underground name due to one assumes a limited exposure the label can give the album worldwide but once heard it is hard to imagine many not taken a shine at the very least to the sounds it offers.

The album goes for the jugular from the off with Everyone Sleeps But Me, the track winding up the senses until they snap with an eager groove, disruptive rhythms, and storming stuttering riffs. The guitars grin with a wicked glint as they twist the nerve ends with manic delight then chuckle as they surprise with some inspired jazz flavoured infusions. The vocals from growls to rough group harmonies work wonderfully alongside the decisive nastily hypnotic sounds and though when Mert slips into a cleaner approach there is a loss of strength to his delivery the song is deeply agreeable.

This is a great and powerful start to the release that is soon equalled by the following song The Chalk And The Matter. With even more intensity and mass the track marches through the ear with chugging riffs to evolve into an unrelenting battering of boisterous rhythms entangled with scorched melodic guitar jabs and a mesmeric jazz funk interlude. The maelstrom of sounds as on every track verges on lunacy and what a deeply pleasing wild ride it is.

The likes of the ravenous Shores Are Not For Vacancies, the wonderful barely controlled Television Television, and the belligerent As I Lay Fail, all continue the impressive level and leave one gasping for breath under the pummelling and unique invention the band thrust through the ear. The album will not work for all; those wanting an easy journey will run for cover shaking heads but for those with adventure to their tastes Lost Fathers and Sons is one stirring experience.

The album does not come without flaws though not majorly damaging ones. At times the release hangs almost too far over the ‘throw everything in the pot’ line to diminish the effect a leaner song would have offered but there is nothing that deeply detracts from a great collection of songs. The other aspect that does not quite work is the clean vocals of Mert, as a growling vocalist he is supreme and when he merges that into a smoother grizzled attack he is excellent too but straight clean vocals are not his forte as shown notably on Your Average Hero. Hopefully they will stick with the coarser attack in the future or bring another voice in for any clean elements they infuse into the songs.

The release ends on the wonderful punk riot of Kolpa, a straight punk /hardcore unbridled bomb of fun. It does not really fit with the rest of the album but is simply a bedlamic bundle of eagerness that has one grinning broadly especially the closing electronic repeating of the name Lene Lovich.

Lost Fathers and Sons is great fun and an accomplish work of musicians who have an ingenious and slightly insane creative ability to excite and pleasure. You may not have heard of Chopstick Suicide yet but go change that right now with this excellent album.

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Ringmaster 28/03/2012

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