Czar – Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal

cover-front_RingMasterReview

Finding something which stands out from the crowd let alone presents something truly unique gets harder and harder but Czar and their new album Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal easily tick both boxes. Creating a compelling experimental, bordering on psychotic, brew of sound bred in the raw essences of anything from progressive metal, hardcore, and grind to mathcore, post punk and more, all woven with avant-garde tendencies, the Tacoma, Washington based Czar infest ears and infect the psyche with relish. Certainly it is a challenge not all will take to, yet every intrusive assault, off-kilter trespass found within their album has an instinctive infectiousness which rewards as it devours. Like a mix of Dillinger Escape Plan, Mr. Bungle, and Psyopus, yet as suggested creating its own individual character, sound and indeed Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal is one of those times when you really feel something special is in the making.

The album makes a subdued entrance with the beginning of Owls, etc; electronic throbs and melodic coaxing a minimalistic but potent lure. Soon the enjoyably strained and captivating tones of vocalist Dr. Landon Jared Wonser join in with lively beats and a brooding bassline alongside. The track is still restrained but smouldering greater volatility in its belly. With the funk of Red Hot Chili Peppers and the progressive lilt of The Fall of Troy laced into its Every Time I Die like swing, the song never does explode and only benefits from that teasing of expectations for a thrilling start to the release.

Too Many Yetis quickly follows; its agitated heart and enterprise a caustic invasion as the guitar of Nicholas J. McManus drizzles sonic psychosis upon the rhythmic battering of drummer David Joseph Dorran Jr. and Peter Joseph Ruff’s throbbing bass meandering. Its brief but potent escapade further whets an already awoken appetite before Arachnochondriac casts its unhinged waltz on the senses, guitars a web of irrational melody and bass a roaming grumble as the keys of Christopher Duenas intensely sizzle. It is a frenzied ear twisting affair as magnetic as those before it with its unstable yet skilfully nurtured trespass.

Antelope Mask steps to the fore next, it’s extremely short hunt the perfect appetiser for Beware the Flies, Orestes and its unleashing of a post punk woven landscape littered with cold stabbing riffs, steely grooves, and vocal predation. The eye of its tempest sees keys sharing a classical beauty as harmonies float behind the corrosive squalls of Wonser, the combination as riveting as it is enjoyably testing as it leads ears into the Latin kissed melodic festivity of Vultures Never Eat In Peace. This is a hot bed of unpredictability and cracked emotional turbulence hugged by the toxic sonic craft of guitar and the perpetual imposing enticement of rhythms; drama soaking every twist, sinister deceit each throat spewed syllable.

With a psychedelic lining, The Worm Enters the Moon prowls the listener next, its theatre of sound and imagination sharing attributes found in UK band Japanese Fighting Fish and indeed Dillinger Escape Plan. The open variety of the flavours making up the band’s sound and individual songs is already clear and only reinforced by Canine, No Eyes Just Teeth, spoken word nestling in raw lo-fi sound and straight after the ferocious punk and metal bedlam of Shark Cancer, a track suffocating and igniting the senses simultaneously. Its mordant assault is then matched by that of The Golden Calf, its breath scathing and touch scalding yet equally captivating as it fluidly shifts from venomous pattern to corrosive irritability; and even when the movement is more of a clunky sidestep it works perfectly.

Through the creative surf hued snare of Mister Reindeer and the melodic calm of Domesticated Wolves, ears and imagination are effortlessly reeled in with the rest of the body disturbed into compliance by the predatory jazz infested mania of the exceptional first and the poetic serenade of the second. That track is an oasis in the certifiable invention and nature of the album, a gripping dementia fuelling the crumbling climate and emotional erosion of You Were a Comatose Lion and in turn the jazzily bipolar Wine Hog, both revealing an array of crazed facets to their attention demanding personalities.

So often a nineteen track release is sharing a filler or four along the way but there is no such moment within Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal, the celestially bent x̌ʷiqʷadiʔ provoking grateful reactions while Blind Mice provides a bewitching espionage of twisted enterprise and haunted frenzy with interruptions of dark repose with their successors in Prawn and after that RxABBITS invasively exploring and stretching the psyche respectively. The later of the songs is especially striking with its incendiary fusion of raw and composed sonic belligerence.

Concluded by the minimalistic lure of Taking Roadkill to the Vet, a track warming up to the task of seducing the listener with sonic malignancy through every second of its low key but haunting  electronically spun three minutes,  Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal is a rare gem as creatively murderous as it is formidably tempting. Czar themselves are a fresh breath which you will not have to go searching for; their music and talent will do the hunting.

Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal is out now @ https://czar.bandcamp.com/album/life-is-no-way-to-treat-an-animal

http://czarband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/czartheband

Pete RingMaster 08/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Twisting sounds and textures; exploring the sonic roar of Fero Lux

Fero Press_RingMasterReview

Casting their own fusion of math and hardcore upon the senses, Fero Lux is a South Florida quartet beginning to spark richer attention. The release of latest album No Rest has played a big part; the raw but addictive sound it shares demands attention as in infests the imagination. Live the Broward County hailing band has similarly earned a formidable reputation so we thought it was high time we got to discover more about the band. With big thanks to vocalist Victor, we look at the heart of Fero Lux, its beginnings, that latest album and more…

Hello Victor and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Yo! Thanks for talking TO us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started and what brought you all together?

We’re a band called FERO LUX from south Florida. When we started, we all played in other bands. Our guitarist, David, wanted to start a heavy, mathy band. So he recruited us all. I was in something else at the time that I wanted to take seriously, and realized this was more fun. So…over five years later, here we are.

So you have been involved in other bands before so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring style or change of direction?

Oh yeah. We’ve all been playing in bands for 12+ years. I think FERO LUX is a HUGE melting pot of all of those bands combined. Our sound certainly has an overall heavy theme, but we’re all over the place if you listen to our latest record from front to back.

What inspired the band name?

We were huffing the smell of 100 unwashed turtle tanks. And boom…FERO LUX.

art No Rest_RingMasterReviewWas there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Yeah, like I mentioned we started with a sound in mind, but after half a decade we certainly found what we were aiming for all along. I think it shows on NO REST.

Do the same things still drive the thoughts of band from when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

I think we’ve become more socially aware. We always wanted to be a band with something to say, and I think we’ve harnessed that a little better over time.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

It’s more refined. The song writing is far more structured, but there are still a lot of riffs you have to hear more than once to kinda fully understand; still heavy, still mathcore. Also, this line-up–myself, Ben, David, and Nick are the most cohesive we’ve had to date.

Has it been more of an organic movement of that sound or plenty of moments where the band deliberately wanted to try new things?

It was certainly organic. We just lock ourselves in our warehouse and jam until new songs come out. We don’t really vocalize how we want them to sound. They just…sound.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

At The Drive-In is one we all say we can agree on musically. They pushed it like no other. They mesh all sorts of ideas and themes into each record…and ALWAYS had something to say. We consider them a very brilliant and selfless band.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the writing of songs?

Nawh.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Global strife.

Give us some background to your latest release.

NO REST came out on March 25th, 2016. It’s about a bunch of different things happening all over the world and locally. There’s heavy stuff, and not so heavy stuff. I personally like to think it has something for everyone.

Can you share some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs?

The opening track is called No Insignia. It’s about the war crimes committed on Ukraine and Crimea upon the invasion from Russian soldiers who wore no identifying insignia. People were forced from their homes, people were killed, and we here in America cared more about what was taken off Netflix that month.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

They’re finalized beforehand. I’d say the lyrics are usually 85% done beforehand and I just top it all off whilst in the studio.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?FL_RingMasterReviewn

It’s certainly my favorite. Live, we like to jump on people and have them jump on us. What fun is a live show if everyone is just standing around? And when we’re tuning and whatever, I like to try to make people laugh. We’re a “serious” band who tries to not take ourselves too seriously.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

It’s hard in south Florida. We have to drive over 6 hours just to leave the state. We’re always envious of the north eastern states that can cross three or four borders in the time it takes us to get to Georgia. We’ve found the cities we do well in down in Florida, so it’s been cool to revisit them. But we’re planning some longer stuff for Fall and Winter and we’re very excited to share these dates with everyone.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

It’s honestly crazy. Bands that seem to know how to manipulate Tumblr and Instagram get huge. Unfortunately for us, we don’t know how to do either of those things. We also don’t know how to sign unfair record deals. So I feel like we’re destined to remain the size we currently are. But who knows…maybe Myspace will come back?

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you again! Check out our music and videos at https://www.facebook.com/feroluxmusic and http://fero-lux.bandcamp.com

As far as a reveal, not yet! But we’re doing a small run in August, so if you’re in the south east, come check us out!

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 21/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Lower Automation – Maps

lowerautomation_2016_RingMasterReview

You have seen those scenes in movies where people are strapped in front of a screen and bombarded with rapid brainwashing images; finally succumbing to the kaleidoscope of ravenous suggestiveness. Listening to Maps, the debut EP from US experimental punks Lower Automation, is like a sonic version of that; a proposition gripping the psyche with its quick fire and voracious onslaught of mathcore and noise rock trespasses. The difference is that Maps is a welcome infestation of ears and imagination which with every listen becomes more and more tenaciously seductive.

Hailing from Chicago, the seeds of Lower Automation begin with experimental/post-rock band Counterfeit I and Derek Allen who came from the band to form the new “kinetic frenzy” posing as Lower Automation  that is about to invade the rock scene. His former project found potent success which, from Maps alone, it is easy to suggest the threesome of Brian Sutton, Matt Walen, and Derek has the potential to eclipse.

lower_automation_maps_cover_RingMasterReviewRecorded with Sanford Parker (Pelican, Wovenhand), Maps instantly entangles the senses and a quickly eager appetite in the discord fuelled enterprise and sonic dissonance of opener Ring. It is a striking web of imagination which flirts and picks at ears with unpredictable and incessantly hungry dynamics; a creative dilemma for the senses  which plays like the mutated offspring of a liaison between At The Drive In, Devo, Wire, and The Dillinger Escape Plan. Fair to say though that the song quickly breeds its own unique character and devilment as frenetic bursts align with, and become tempered by, ‘mellower’ flirtatious passages as song and band reveals new sides to their rebellious adventure. It is when the creative ‘psychosis’ breaks loose though that lustful passions are especially sparked and further the track’s attempts to steal the whole show.

The excellent start though is more than matched by the band’s new single Decorated; the song swiftly showing itself another invasive tapestry of rhythmic agitation and raw sonic virulence. There is a much catchier almost pop element to the song too, the likes of Baddies and We Are The Physics coming to mind at times, though again as it warps into distorted spatial atmospherics Lower Automation show the fullness of their imagination and an invention which is all their own.

Break Room Curators offers a more noise rock sculpted venture; its body and features slightly more fluid in their infectious flow than certainly the first song but still casts a dark and sinister, not forgetting infectiously flowing, tirade of off-kilter and intrusive discordance in voice and melodic toxicity amidst scything rhythms. The track does lack a certain spark that its predecessors irresistibly carries but it still leaves enjoyment high and ears eager to devour more, which the following caustic maelstrom of The Cartographer feeds impressively. The track is a maze of sonic paradoxes and melodic toxins with an emotive angst to match as it rummages through the psyche, blisters on the senses, and fascinates the imagination.

Closing with the initially hellacious exploits of Scissor Lapses, the EP offers a final glimpse into the creative craft and aberrant imagination of Lower Automation. The song proceeds to explore a cacophonous and demandingly addictive landscape of sweeping hooks and inviting grooves within an ever evolving exploration of rabid sound and unpredictability; finally leaving on a senses invading sonic clamour.

It is a fine end to a thrilling debut from Lower Automation; a release which has certain familiar and welcome traits but is a whole new psychotic frenzy of invention ready to infect an as yet unsuspecting rock world.

Maps is released April 1st @ https://lowerautomation.bandcamp.com

Upcoming US Tour Dates:

3/5 – Skeletunes Lounge | Fort Wayne, IN

3/12 – The Oasis | Grayslake, IL

4/8 – The Refuge | Pana, IL

4/10 – Bremen Cafe | Milwaukee, WI

4/13 – The Rockery | Wyandotte, MI

4/14 – Buzzbin | Canton, OH

4/15 – Spacebar | Columbus, OH

4/16 – Crofoot | Pontiac, MI

https://www.facebook.com/lowerautomation
Pete RingMaster 28/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Killer Refrigerator – The Fridge and the Power it Holds

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We all know that technology is taking us over, but an on-going war between it and man, well easy to have doubts there. That was until this computer began deciding alone when it was going to connect to the internet and my iPod began mashing up songs randomly like a manic DJ to mess with the psyche. Of course if we had all listened to Killer Refrigerator previously battle plans would be drawn up and war cries in place. Thankfully they have returned with second release The Fridge and the Power it Holds at the right time, to awaken all and help turn the conflict back into the hands of humanity.

From Ohio, Killer Refrigerator is the side-project of Cody Coon, the guitarist/vocalist of death thrashers UnKured. Recognising man’s slavery to iPhones, toasters, blenders, every appliance imaginable; a dependency seeded from the aftermath of surviving an attempt to wipe out humanity a Millennia ago by the omniscient refrigerator Lord Freezus Christ ( You may laugh but think about the panic and fever which breaks out when you lose your phone), Cody and Luke “Java” Sackenheim decided to rebel against the appliances in 2014 and formed Killer Refrigerator, releasing debut album When Fridges Rule This World as their first assault and warning soon after.

Drawing on cult movies such as Microwave Massacre, Terrorvision, and Basket Case alongside their belief that appliances want to destroy the world, the band create a bedlam of sound and psychological ferocity from a vicious tangling of every extreme flavour that they can conjure, with much more besides. The Fridge and the Power it Holds EP provides seven tracks of almost indescribable but thoroughly thrilling confrontation, and sets up the battle front perfectly for upcoming second album Refrigeration Plague.

TFATPIT_OPTIMIZED     For all the theatre behind the intent and creativity of the band, Killer Refrigerator has a skilled and inventive sound which if you can ride its unpredictable tsunami, blows ears and imagination away, with the passions in quick succession. Straight away The Fridge and the Power It Holds is rich evidence as opener Terrorvision erupts into life with a web of sonic enterprise sculpted by guitars. A muscular and skittish rhythmic accompaniment adds to the initial coaxing before it all colludes with a dark bassline and a salacious mix of senses scorching vocals for a hellacious punk lined ferocity. Not reaching a minute and a half in length, it is a searing and striking start swiftly over shadowed by the excellent Slaystation. Predatory in its first breath, almost sizing up the listener as it dangles a discord kissed bassline and sonic lures from its rhythmic spine, the track is soon driving for the jugular on a tide of thrash bred riffery and ruinous vocal incitement. Squirming around this, acidic flavoured melodies and progressive nurtured endeavour fascinates, leading ears towards an unexpected Nintendo-core interlude before exploding again into the creative and rasping sonic fury the track started with. As mentioned previously, the band’s sound is an unrelenting and evolving maelstrom defying real description but with avant-garde and mathcore tendencies as prevalent as death and grind endeavours, it is a one compelling and intoxicating assault, deranged manna for the imagination.

Shower Thrashing Death toys with folk metal influences before turning into a carnivorous rampage of thrash/death seeded lavatorial rampage announcing the coming of the “toilet gods”. The bass simply seduces within the grimy scenery whilst vocals announce the demise of all with an outstanding mix of vocal deliveries which range from hardcore angst, grind squalls, to Patton-esque crooning. One of the pinnacles of the release it is matched by Killer Refrigerator VS Godzilla, the big fight off between two merciless goliaths. The track stomps with heavyweight rhythmic feet and fiery climactic endeavour, guitars scything across the battleground with sonic rapacity whilst vocal war cries breed a warped anthemic support.

The insidiously enthralling Slave To The Easy-Bake comes next, a scourge of sonic grooving and melodic flaming spun around a simple but gripping bassline. Of course this does not tell the whole deranged psychotic story of the song, every aspect from vocals to guitars, beats to imagination a distorted intrusion to fear or greedily devour.

The EP’s title track steps up next and after battering the listener senseless through pummelling beats, goes on a brutal and feverish march of searing grooves and scarring riffery. It holds back at one point to intensify its weight and drama, before regaining momentum but with an even more destructive and imposing trespass of the psyche. Deathcore, thrash, mathcore, and psyche rock are all in there running amok with the ideation and raw adventure of the band, the outcome another mouth-watering violation.

   The Fridge And The Power It Holds closes with bonus track To Hell With Cancer, one of the most grouchy siren-esque enticements you are likely to hear this year. Ravaging air and ears around a funk bred devilry, the track is a carnival for the mosh pit and a thrilling, uncompromising call to arms.

Lyrically and musically The Fridge And The Power It Holds is so much fun but equally a serious slam of extreme incitement which might have a theme bred from a truth stretched to cultish proportions, but delivers it as a unique and irresistible tempest. It is probably not going to work for all but if it does click an explosive thrilling time is guaranteed.

The Fridge And The Power It Holds EP is available as a name your price download from April 7th @ https://killerfridge.bandcamp.com/album/the-fridge-and-the-power-it-holds

As a backstory to their origins, the band recently released a 20 minute documentary featuring the hilarious exploits of Cody and his fellow fridge warrior Luke “Java” Sackenheim. The documentary can be viewed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8m1zCBvL4EU

https://www.facebook.com/KillerFridge

RingMaster 07/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Zapruder – Fall in Line

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It may be titled Fall in Line, but the debut album from French band Zapruder does everything but that with its rigorously unpredictable and exhaustingly diverse sound. The release is made up by a collection of tracks which are as distinctly different from each other as they are united in brewing up intensely compelling and experimentally fiery landscapes. It is devilish and seductive, mischievous and aggressive; a release which confuses and ignites the imagination across its explosive length but ultimately leaves ears hungry and emotions basking in a unique challenge.

Hailing from Poitiers, Zapruder swiftly set about creating new propositions from fusing the likes of mathcore, noise, and post-rock amongst numerous ingredients. First release, the Straight From The Horse’s Mouth EP, was unveiled in 2012 and made a potent mark in drawing attention towards the quintet. Recorded with and mixed by Amaury Sauvé, the mastering done by Sylvain Biguet (Birds In Row, Trepalium), this well-received EP brought forth a creative template which has been pushed and explored to enthralling lengths by Fall in Line. Live the band has similarly risen in stature and acclaim, sharing stages with the likes of Kruger, Celeste, Cowards, As We Draw, June Paik, Offending, and Betraying The Martyrs. Now the also Sauvé recorded and mixed new album, with mastering this time taken on by Rob Gonnella and Nick Zampiello, is ready to draw the hungriest spotlight upon the band, one it is hard to see them missing out on such the creative alchemy within Fall in Line.

Out through both Apathia Records and Hipsterminator Records, the band instantly awakes ears and attention with the raw and corrosive opening to We Are Orphans. The first track is an immediate squall of sonic causticity and rhythmic predation, the guitars of Etienne Arrivé and Quentin Cacault roaring and chugging for a magnetic lure before the scathing vocal tones of Isaac Ruder erupt with searing antagonism. It is a harsh and gripping mix, especially with the throaty bass bait of François Arrivé aligning to the rhythmic antagonism of drummer Romain Fiakaifonou. The track at this point is hardcore and noise fuelled but already igniting intrigue with its emerging startling twists and warped grooving. Well into its assault, the song’s body is a delicious tangle of spices and ideation, every aspect unafraid to venture into unexpected explorations though the blunt force and raw energy of the song never waivers. Teasing melodies and blistering scythes of guitar only increase the potency of the turbulent maze as the song moves through a slightly more placid and reflective passage before closing out in a scorching finale.

The following Cyclops is bred from the same raucous template initially, guitars and vocals a scarring tempest punctured by just as hostile and disorientating rhythms. The track like its predecessor has a definite essence of Coilguns and Fall in LineKunz to their ferocious touch, but also as warped infestations of noise and melodic toxicity worm under the skin of the song and the listeners psyche, hints of bands such as Destrage and Kabul Golf Club play with thoughts. Persistently dark and imposing, the song begins reeking of delicious evocative sax and clarinet wails through guest Clément Beuvon, whilst coarse melodies add to the emerging colour and expansive depths of the thrilling track. It is a glorious examination of the senses and thoughts, one soon surpassed by the brilliant Modern Idiot. Another kind of beast entirely, the song buzzes around ears straight away with a jazzy sonic blistering and rhythmic juggling before exposing its venomous intent and malevolent contagiousness. Grooves swell and spin within the intensive tempest, breaking free to sculpt an almost deranged revelry of charm and mischief within the still lingering oppressiveness of the song. Post rock, groove metal, jazz funk, and psychotic mathcore are all in the staggering brilliance of the encounter, each seamlessly flirting and twisting around each other for a major pinnacle to the release.

Moloch explores another fiercely intensive landscape, its scenery brutal and emotionally stark but moving towards and evolving into a just as forcibly compelling and potently evocative beauty. The thick texture and atmosphere of the song never relinquishes it’s also smothering agility, thoughts and emotions inescapably wrapped by the almost dystopian touch of the track’s climate. As all the songs on the album no matter their brutality or charm, there is an infectiousness which is captivating and commanding, as shown by the riveting and sultry instrumental Delusion Junction and the cryptic ingenuity of Doppelgänger. The first is a jazz kissed smouldering of elegance and searing beauty whilst its successor is a hellacious stomp of inhospitable and addiction sparking genius. Grooves swing with salacious appetites whilst pungent rhythms stomp with irreverent urgency, The vocals are also unbridled in their ravenous intent, but it is the manic flames of sax which holds the key to making an outstanding song into a classic one. With the discord lilted ingenuity which marked out Essential Logic sounds in the eighties, the sax of Beuvon flirts and swaggers with a ridiculously captivating groove all of its own, in turn seemingly to spark an increased playful and dramatic vaunt in all elements of the track.

From that stirring peak the album turns to another right away, the heroic stroll of Monkey On My Back explosively igniting ears before erupting into a bedlamic storm of rebellious rhythms and psychotic guitar revelry, all grazed by the scarring intensity of the vocals. The song is a furnace of contagion and disorientating enterprise, but again one not content to risk the listener getting an understanding and expectation of things in motion as it falls into a black pit of sonic anguish and rhythmic stalking. As the album, the track needs plenty of time and attention to reveal all its depths but rewards with another major twist to the release.

The radiance of the melodic croon that is Loquèle is just as wrong-footing as the bedlam within the songs before it, its unexpected and untainted beauty a relatively smooth emotive flight within a shadow coated ambience. With equally clean and unclouded vocals from this time Cacault, the track feeds an already thoroughly greedy appetite for the album, as does the closing Je Ferai De Ma Peau Une Terre Où Creuser. A blazing final hoarse roar, musically and vocally, the track is a post hardcore/post metal journey through raw and climactic emotions and sonic terrains. It as the previous track cannot match the heights and might of the songs before them, but each show a passion and majesty to their impacting enticement that only means the album ends as impressively as it started.

Zapruder tests and make demands right across Fall In Line which means they will not be for everyone, but for all with a taste for experimental and intrusively inventive explorations, they are a proposition which should be hastily sought out.

Fall In Line is available now via Apathia Records / Hipsterminator Records @ http://www.apathiarecords.com/en/albums/fall-in-line-by-zapruder/ or http://zaprudertheband.bandcamp.com/album/fall-in-line

www.facebook.com/zaprudertheband

RingMaster 22/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

 

 

In Love Your Mother – The Great Ape Project

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As well as holding gripping and inventive sounds, a song and release should be an adventure for ears and imagination to make the strongest connection, and they do not come more of a creative and challenging emprise than The Great Ape Project from Swizz trio In Love Your Mother. The album is a riveting and invigorating maelstrom of sound and deranged invention which leaves no stone unturned or bedlamic idea left in the shadows. Cramming eighteen songs in just over thirty minutes of creative mayhem means the album warrants and needs full attention so as not to miss any of the exhilarating drama within tracks which range from fourteen seconds to just short of four minutes in length. But the rewards are unrelenting and furiously imposing in one of the albums of the year.

Hailing from Zürich, the trio of guitarist/vocalist Valentin Baumgartner, bassist/vocalist Amedeo Mauriello, and drummer Andrea Tinner, unleash a sound which reaps the essences of mathcore and progressive metal and filters it through a vat of avant-garde, grindcore, and metalcore ingenuity. It comes out as a sound which can be best described as The Dillinger Escape Plan and System of a Down meets Destrage, Toumaï, and Kontrust yet isn’t like that either. It is a unique concoction which flirts and dances with senses as it brutalises them, and quite irresistible.

Themed by the sick and bad world our mothers warned us of, In Love Your Mother start the album and examination with The Mother Song. A thirty second tsunami of vocal causticity and rhythmic hostility speared by a sonic spite and toxic groove which all combines for a furious and concussive but appetite inflaming onslaught. Its swift assault is followed by the less intensive but no more lightweight 2116@#1916. It is immediately contagious, something alone impressive such its brevity of length, a slice of coarsely melodic and respectfully corrosive groove metal which slips agreeably before the vicious presence of We’re Gonna Dance Till Everyone Is Naked And Fallen Apart takes over. A metalcore canvas of vocals and maliciousness is soon twisted and bound in a weave of unpredictable and schizophrenic invention, the guitar of Baumgartner scything and spearing the heart of the tempest with breath-taking and psyche addling ingenuity. It is a manic endeavour matched by the swinging arms and prods of Tinner and the throaty creative predation of Mauriello. The longest song on the album, it explores and evolves with every second, bewitching and bewildering ears with almost hostile intent. The beauty of this and all songs, is the seamless and fluid transitions, one moment a bestial rampancy becomes a seductive croon and melodic embrace in another, all without a twitch of uncertainty or flex of ILYM_TGAP_albumcoverrandomness.

Johnny Rocket Is Not Dead launches its majestic uncompromising tirade next, grooves and bass temptation as eager and impacting as the vocal squalls and twisted sonic probing aligning to a rhythmic badgering. It is only one turn in the fifty second odd track though, as mentioned earlier every chord and jab of drums the detour to new and generally enthralling bliss, as evidenced no more potently than in Signs Of A Medium Life which splits the two parts of the title track. A hardcore/grind fuelled provocation, the track savages and pounds on the senses from the off. Riffs and beats show no mercy within the stalking gait of the song nor the blistering vocal roar which also has some restraint in its confrontation. Through the storm though, there are small and larger slithers of inventive majesty which enthral as much as the bruising thrust of the song.

The two bits of The Great Ape Project grab the hunger inspired already by band and album, but are swiftly surpassed by the brilliance of the also two parted Wish Me An Ocean, the first of its two scintillating movements a furnace of sonic fire and blistering psychotic beauty steered superbly by bass and drums. From the hasty senses foraging of its counterpart and the haunting piano sculpted drama of Drop The Back Of The Line, In Love Your Mother ignite another major blaze with Signs Of A Real Life. Striding forcibly with rhythmic and sonic nostrils flaring, the track soon slips into something more cantankerous and intimidating, crawling over senses and thoughts with a rabid breath and bestial intensity. It is just one border of the landscape though, an exotic melodic insanity blooming before a final fury emerges.

Through the thrillingly deranged, slightly post punk/noise rock spiced The Disco Fish, the melodically searing and perfectly crazed Inhale, and the restful and emotionally unbalanced Wish Me An Ocean Part 0, the album continues to engross and disorientate. But it is all just an appetiser for the pinnacle of the album, which is the song In Love Your Mother. With its first touch, a ridiculously addictive groove which only intensifies its lure as it is joined by rampant beats and a pleasingly varied vocal persuasion, the track is pure sonic and inventive alchemy. Demanding and infectious, imposing and wantonly accessible, it is a bargain for the soul made of the devil, a term which applies to the whole of the album.

The Hedgehog is more pure in its assault, its extreme metal rabidity direct and untethered yet still veined by a sonic enterprise to spellbind ears and thoughts. Its potent success is emulated by the inhospitable but irrepressibly catchy Ein Hase, Zwei Haese. With a swagger which only inflames its savagery and warped ingenuity equally, the track is a twisted mouth-watering blaze of unpredictability and extreme metal maliciousness to linger over.

Closed by the lo-fi folk croon of a track simply called Outro, The Great Ape Project is a sensational introduction to a band with the potential and invention to turn metal on its head at any time. The release is one of the real triumphs of the year and deserves the fullest of attention.

The Great Ape Project is available now @ http://www.cduniverse.com/productinfo.asp?pid=9357440

http://www.inloveyourmother.com

RingMaster 10/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Death and the Penguin – Accidents Happen

Death and the Penguin

Providing a clutch of immersive anthems, though may be not in the recognisable sense, Accidents Happen the debut EP from UK indie/rock band Death and the Penguin is not only magnificent stands as one of the most startling and compellingly invigorating releases to hit the senses this year so far. Consisting of six tracks which are as bewitchingly eclectic and striking as they are voraciously imaginative and inciting, the EP is a mouthwatering persuasion which boldly tempts and riotously seduces with an invention and virulence that is unstoppable. For a debut it is extraordinary and for a first step by a band one of the most exciting entrances in a long time.

Taking their name from a satirical novel by Ukrainian Andrey Kurkov, the London quartet of Tobias Smith (vocals, guitar), Christopher Olsen (guitar, keyboard, vocals), Andrew Acred (bass, keyboard, vocals), and Timothy Brennik (drums, percussion, vocals) make a first impression which it is hard to imagine could have been any more potent and incisive then what it is. It is a release which starts off with a stirring proposition and just gets better and bigger with each track, all the while revealing the depths to the band’s songwriting, craft, and adventure whilst soaking it in a promise which more than suggests of even greater things to come.

Opener Snuffed Out instantly awakens thoughts and attention, a blaze of guitar which almost swarms over the senses igniting an instant D&TPAHappetite with its Echo and the Bunnymen toning to the melodic flames leaving the fingers of Olsen and Smith. There is a throaty resonance to the sound which becomes a specific essence of the band across the EP to relish as well as a sweet tasting discord which only accentuates the impact of first impressions. As the song spreads its narrative, a Radiohead like whisper chills the lively ambience as a cleaner and warmer but no less striking version of an At The Drive In like rapaciousness rallies a greedy appetite. It is the dark heavy voice of bass and the coring riffs which steal the thunder though, their continuing likeness to McCulloch and co. irresistible. Though more of a grower than other tracks, it continues to worm its way under the skin and into the psyche, proving to be a dramatic and impossibly infectious not forgetting momentous first slice of temptation.

The following Space 1998 casts a spatial embrace around ears initially, its warm and intriguing elegance asking the imagination to play which it eagerly does, especially with the heavily weighted thump of beats and guitar snarl which joins the beauteous lure. From that union a dazzling mathcore weave of bass and guitar steps forth to toy and quickstep with the senses, their bewildering quickstep and groove unbelievably magnetic. The vocals as in the first song impress from the lead to the eager backing whilst the fire and passion in the band leaves no element unwashed as evidenced by the simply mesmeric chorus. For undefined reasons there is a feel of latter period XTC to the song which only adds to the insatiable funk and jazz bred ingenuity of the stunning and constantly developing landscape.

The song marks a loftier pinnacle in the terrain of the release, elevating past its predecessor before next up An Opening unveils an atmospheric and haunting embrace over the senses. It is a brief and highly evocative piece which swaps the adrenaline fuelled romps of other songs for a melancholic intensity and though it does not inflame emotions as elsewhere the track certainly leads thoughts into a potent venture.

Strange Times has no problem in setting a fuse to a predatory hunger with its roaring entrance; guitars, drums, and keys making a melodic cacophony courted by the ever heavy breath of the bass whilst vocally the band soars with relish and energy. The entrance immediately sparks thoughts of Young Knives though as ever the song twists and lurches through ingenious detours and turns in its way to seducing the passions. Continuing to ebb and flow in its evocative intensity, the eruption of a fire bred guitar surge and the persistently provoking rhythms of Brennik scorch and bruise the senses respectively as the band sculpts another gloriously unpredictable and vigorously compelling exploit.

The persistently rising curve of brilliance to the EP shows no sign of levelling out as it and band step to another level with the closing pair of songs. The first is Bitumen, a track which brings the anthemic unity of the chain-gang into a blues kissed slab of pure invention. As primal and tribal as it is voraciously soulful the track is just brilliant, a sonic and rhythmic alchemy which seduces and smothers every pore of body, mind, and heart. An element of De Staat comes to mind with the agitated glory of the drums and percussion, but again the song is as unique and distinct to Death and the Penguin as you could expect and wish.

As the track closed it has to be admitted that we thought the release’s pinnacle was found but The Words That Maketh Murder soon shoves that thought aside. The song leaps at the ear with a wind of raucous vocals and grooved sonic groans, like a mix of Collisions and Hadouken it consumes the ears with a punkish recruitment which has a greedy attention basking in the subsequent flow of emotive vocals and imaginative intrigue. The switching gallop and canter of the chorus is sensationally incendiary, whilst the increasingly fertile landscape of the track with its swing and groove lilted swagger just concentrates the submissive toxins of the quite genius encounter. With another flood of infection cruising through a climax clad in a kaleidoscope of inventive colour and sonic mystique to end things on a plateau, Accidents Happen is simply incredible and already the instigator to suggestions that the Death and the Penguin is the next big and important thing within British rock music. Time will tell but we will not be betting against it.

Accidents Happen is released on May 5th through Best Before Records.

https://www.facebook.com/datpmusic

9.5/10

RingMaster 04/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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