Sonic Tides: talking Oceans with guitarist Tom Hollands

The release of a new EP suggests 2018 is set to be a potent and busy year for Brighton, UK based Oceans. It is a multi-flavoured, ear grabbing incitement of the band’s post hardcore and alternative rock blended sound building on their previous encounters whilst venturing into new imagination. We recently had the pleasure to dive into Oceans and their new offering with guitarist Tom Hollands, exploring their beginnings, fresh endeavour and more….

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Much like the actual Oceans, we are a band made up of 5 mostly water based entities: Zach Silver – vocals, Conor Hyde & Tom Hollands – guitars, Jack Warren – bass and James Gillingham – drums. We all either lived, partied or performed alongside each other before the current line-up was formed, that and our shared desire to create made Oceans happen!

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Collectively we’ve all played in bands or made music of many different genres. Perhaps without being fully aware of it we draw on this when writing – We’re all quite different as musicians too so I think we’re bound to end up with quite an eclectic sound.

What inspired the band name?

We came to Brighton and based it on things we saw – So it was either something to do with seagulls, falafel (love it), or the ocean… No unfortunately that’s not true; our guitarist Conor got it from a Mallory Knox song!

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

The idea has always been to try to make music that we love and hopefully others do too, and to do this as a career – We always strive to be somewhat original yet familiar enough to still fit into a scene.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Most of us didn’t have any real direction until we decided to pursue music. We also love playing live and like most bands can’t wait to hopefully play to bigger crowds and do more tours!

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

We’re evermore critical with our songwriting and I’d say we’re starting to really refine our sound – The music has grown darker sonically and thematically and we’ve tried to strike a balance between more poppy hooks and heavier riffs.

This has been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately trying new things?

Although it’s felt like a natural progression, we’re actively trying to make the best songs we can and sometimes that means tearing apart or scrapping ideas we’ve worked on for ages and doing something completely new instead.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

We all have rather different tastes in music; artists that have had a considerable impact on us are Incubus, Don Broco, Black Peaks, Deftones, Marmozets… There’s so many. We’ve heard of some bands that will try dozens of different melodies or ideas before settling so we’re just trying to be as critical as possible!

Is there a regular process to the band’s songwriting?

We don’t have a set method, however it usually starts with guitar riffs written at home and then built upon bit by bit in rehearsals. We all have a say in every part of the process so it really is a collective effort. Now we do demos and backing tracks to try out synths and things like that.

Where, more often than not, do inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs come from?

Our singer Zach writes the lyrics – Subject matter is usually based on personal struggles or stories relative to what’s happening in our lives (get over ourselves, right?) – We try to leave things open to interpretation, we want our audience to be able to relate.

Could you give us some background to your latest release?

Our new EP, Far From Composure dropped on March 13th. It’s available on practically all platforms and we see it as a big milestone for Oceans.

How about some insight into the themes and premise behind it and its songs?

Thematically the EP spans elements of coping with mental instability and it’s causation due to physical condition, relationships with yourself/others, escapism… The premise of this EP was to really capture our progression as a band from previous works and most importantly create something very emotive that connects with listeners. We also wanted to write big riffs, hit stuff and make loud noises.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Our intention has always been to enter the studio with finished songs, however we always end up adding bits and pieces and coming up with extra ideas – We actually recorded a whole extra song last time!

Tell us about the live side to the band?

We play with a lot of energy and really like to throw ourselves about, I’d like to think if you don’t enjoy our recorded music at first our live set would… Captivate you… (Pun FFO Marmozets…)

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

It can be tough for any new band to branch out from their hometown and it certainly hasn’t been any different for us. It helps being driven for sure – We lost count long ago of the amount of gigs we’ve played around trying to make a name for ourselves. We’ve had our fair share of bad luck but we’ve found that the harder you work the more chance of creating positive opportunities you have – Though there are many other factors to consider!

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

Social media has played a big part in enabling us to reach people we otherwise wouldn’t have been able to. However, working round changing algorithms and the like can be difficult when trying to connect with fans (Or gain new ones). It’s a big discussion, though now it’s pretty much a necessity for new artists to engage in social media. Like with anything, it’s really about figuring out how to utilize it most effectively for your band, we’re definitely still learning! I’d say do what you can without losing sight of what’s important, the rock and/ or roll (or whatever genre you play). Cliché I know…

For further dips into Oceans check them out @

https://www.facebook.com/pg/oceansukband   https://twitter.com/oceansukband     http://instagram.com/oceansukband   http://oceansuk.bandcamp.com

Pete RingMaster 13/04/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Everyday Sidekicks – Fracture

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Fracture is the new video single from British post hardcore quartet Everyday Sidekicks and a track which venomously growls as it grips ears in a pleasing tempest of sound and emotion.

Towards the end of last year, the Bristol hailing band released The Things I’ve Seen EP, an encounter which certainly pleased with the potential of bigger and stronger things to come the lingering emotion. Fracture realises some of that promise, the track a rousing and imaginative confrontation revealing the swift growth of the band’s sound since emerging in 2012, debut single Hometown Hero two years later, and indeed since that last EP. The years have seen the foursome of vocalist Archie Hatfield, guitarist Tim Brown, bassist Sam Hughes, and drummer Mat Capper earning a potent reputation for their live shows, which have included sharing stages with ands such as Marmozets, Shvpes, and Coldrain, and praise from the likes of Rock Sound, Metal Hammer, and Powerplay Magazine. Fracture suggests a new chapter in their ascent and continuing plaudits will be no surprise.

The single descends on ears in a wall of thumping rhythms and climactic riffs, both wrapped in melodic intrigue before things settle down into a groove infested swing fluidly broken up by the blend of harsh and clean vocals as well as a web of suggestive enterprise from the guitar of Brown. The intensity and power unleashed by Hughes and Capper is formidable; almost merciless at times as they drive the song forward but always respectful of the ‘gentler’ aspects of the track and its varied dynamics.

As yet, the Everyday Sidekicks sound is not the most unique but Fracture shows an individuality to the band which is equally as big a step forward as the imagination involved.  Everyday Sidekicks left satisfaction behind with The Things I’ve Seen EP, Fracture leaves an excited pleasure with the suggestion of plenty more to come.

Fracture is out now.

https://www.facebook.com/everydaysidekicks   https://twitter.com/edskofficial

Pete RingMaster 05/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Circle Of Reason – Faith Or Theory

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On the back of a collection of releases which have taken ears and enjoyment on an adventurous ride, anticipation for the debut album from British alternative rock band Circle Of Reason has been rife and ripe for quite a while. The wait is now almost over and a new creative escapade from the Southampton quartet waiting to be greedily devoured; a reaction hard to see Faith Or Theory missing out on.

Emerging in 2011, Circle Of Reason was soon stirring up their local scene before poking at broader recognition a year later with their excellent debut EP, A Favour For A Stranger. Led by outstanding single Silver Scene, the three-track introduction lit the ears and spirit whilst revealing the potential of bigger and bolder things to come. And so they did with a big leap in the These Hands & This Mind EP of 2013/14. With their music inspired by the likes of Mastodon, Deftones, Biffy Clyro, Muse, and Queens Of The Stone Age, the second EP showed the band developing their own distinct and eventful sound. There was a new imagination fuelled character to it without defusing the already established fire and creative enterprise in their sound and an increasingly renowned live presence seeing Circle Of Reason share stages with bands such as Feed The Rhino, Marmozets, Neck Deep, Inme, Mallory Knox, Heck, Allusondrugs, Freeze The Atlantic, Breed 77, Zico Chain and many more over the years.

The past months has seen a slight line-up change and the creation of Faith Or Theory. It too is an open step on from past triumphs; bringing a bolder maturity and imaginative zeal with its fascinating body that demands attention. Opening with the band’s new upcoming video/single, Never Enough, the album has ears gripped within its first sound bulging seconds. Instantly a barrage of thumping beats and hungry riffs collude to envelop the senses, spicy grooves emerging from the inviting tempest to entice an already eager appetite. Straight away there is something unique to the band’s proposal from the start but also their recognisable hunger and energy to take ears on a new adventure.  As the song expands into a web of melodic enterprise and rhythmic tenacity, the tones of vocalist/guitarist Simon Osman quickly hit the mark, reminding of his already established quality and emotive expression. The same applies throughout the band, in the evocative strains of Gary Slade’s guitar inventive bait and the growly hues of bass from its  newest member, he only going by the name of Rob so far, which add an almost bestial edge to the enjoyably raw air and roar of the track’s fiery escapade.

circle-of-reason_RingMasterReview The great start is soon eclipsed by Questions, it too holding a heavier and enjoyably intimidating essence to its virulent proposal. The versatile swinging beats of Andy Milwain leave no spot unmarked whilst the hooks of Osman and addictive grooves of Slade swiftly get under the skin with their melodic colour and varied flavouring. At times there is a touch of Reuben to the song, other moments of bands like Freeze The Atlantic, and persistently a tapestry of rock and alternative spicing keeping things inventively unpredictable whilst making it easy to be caught up in the contagion.

My Emergency steps up next with a less intrusive and imposing nature yet it too has a tempestuousness to its energy and emotion which intrigues as it whips up another increasingly robust and catchy affair. Backing harmonies court Osman’s ever impressing delivery whilst guitar and bass almost entwine like lovers in their infectious and dramatic endeavours around Milwain’s potently jabbing beats. Leaving body and spirit bouncing, the track makes way for Clarity. It also has a less forceful attitude to its persuasion but a host of ear seizing and imagination sparking twists and turns within its slowly and increasingly anthemic arousing of sound and pleasure cored by a rhythmic spine and nagging riffery which worms into the psyche.

Every song makes an immediate impact but maybe none as striking as In Other Words. It opens on a seductive and slightly melancholic melody with an almost theatrical feel to it; the coaxing continuing to keep ears hooked as the song opens up with voice and additional vines of poetic melodies matched in imagination by the evocative lures of bass. As it builds up in intensity, emotion, and creative fire, there is a definite Muse like quality to the song but only enough to add colour to the band’s own sonic and inventive drama.

The following Tie Up The Sky uncages its enthralling and volatile tempest from the first breath, again rhythms a prowling network of enticement within the sonic and melodic theatre captivating ears and thoughts around Osman’s plaintive and dynamic croon. Circle Of Reason has the great knack of being aggressive, almost fearsome at times, and ridiculously infectious and vibrantly inviting; this compelling offering epitomising that potent quality in rousing style.

Completed by latest video single Colours, a track which climbs over the senses and into the passion with exotically hued grooves and a thick drama of sound and emotional suggestiveness, Faith Or Theory rumbles and blazes with heart bred fervour amidst an invasive quality. It feels like the Circle Of Reason sound has come of age yet something still says there is plenty more yet to come, which can only be very good for the UK rock scene.

Faith Or Theory is released 27th May via Freefall Records.

https://www.facebook.com/circleofreason   https://twitter.com/Circleofreason

Pete RingMaster 09/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Banshee – Say My Name

Banshee_RingMasterReview

Formed in 2011 as Life on Standby, Scottish quartet Banshee has re-launched themselves for 2016 with a new twist in their alternative rock sound to go with the new band name. Embracing electronic imagination and textures within their already recognised rousing melodic rock sound, the Greenock hailing outfit has equally found a new flame to their creative fire; it all in captivating evidence in new EP, Say My Name.

The foursome of vocalist Erin Donnachie, guitarist/keyboardist Gavin Williams, bassist Liam Walker, and drummer Gianluca Demelas have already potent successes like playing Download and supporting the likes of Fearless Vampire Killers and Marmozets under their belts. 2015 though was not as lively a time for the band. In a recent interview with Contact Music, Demelas admitted, “Last year things were so slow, at one point it felt like we had hit a brick wall and we were struggling to move forward.“ From the outside it looked like a spark went out of the ascent and subsequently emotional energy of the band. But Banshee is obviously a band never willing to give up without a fight and so they have burst back into ears and attention with their new name, EP, and going by its energy and hungry sounds, re-ignited energy.

art_RingMasterReviewTaking inspirations from the likes of Biffy Clyro, Enter Shikari, PVRIS, and Marmozets into their electronic fuelled alternative rock, Banshee open up Say My Name with the brief and atmospheric Intro before uncaging its title track. The opener quickly entices ears with its suggestive keys and the vocal potency of Donnachie before the band’s new single, from a similarly low key opening, spins a dramatic and feisty tapestry of sound and voice for the imagination to play with. In full flow, song and Donnachie swiftly reveal their tenacious qualities, riffs and grooves a fiery haze around crisp and brooding rhythms as synths cast an emotive mist.

It is a pungent ‘introduction’ to Banshee and the Bruce Rintoul and Romesh Dodangoda produced EP; one quickly backed up by the highly enjoyable Eagles. Less intensive and slightly calmer in its touch, the song unveils a landscape of evolving sonic adventure and aggressive energy; all the time springing imaginative twists and feisty endeavour from its transfixing scenery. As all the band’s tracks, subsequent listens to its busy creative exploit brings something more in texture and enterprise to grab eager ears.

One Step Behind is another dramatic tale of sound and craft; its mellow entrance the lead into fretful sonic suggestiveness and rhythmic trespasses held in check and simultaneously sparked by the rousing presence of Donnachie. The track grips ears and imagination, again as all within the releases equally inspiring the body to get involved in varying degrees; a success even more firmly spun by closing track Landing Strip. Increasingly contagious and robustly combative without losing its melodic and synth bred elegance, the track, whilst taking best track honours, is a compelling close to a thoroughly enjoyable encounter.

Whether the band would have been just effective and potent in their next release under the old name we can only mull upon, but Say My Name certainly hints at a new forceful spirit in their music and creative heart to reflex the new moniker…one also hard to see allowing Banshee to be ignored.

The Say My Name EP is out now via iTunes and @ http://bansheeofficial.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/BansheemusicUK/   https://twitter.com/BansheeMusicUK   https://www.instagram.com/bansheemusicuk/

Pete Ringmaster 25/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Everyday Sidekicks – The Things I’ve Seen

Everyday Sidekicks _RingMaster Reviewhot

Everyday Sidekicks is another UK band emerging from the hot bed of fresh and exciting music that is Bristol, and another prospect leaving a want to know and hear more in its wake. Their sound is a fiery and gritty post-hardcore proposition and their new EP, The Things I’ve Seen, a potent nudge on national attention. Listening to the six track encounter there is the feeling the band is still on a journey of discovery with their sound, tracks often weaving in recognisable and at times expected flavours and hues to its undoubtedly inventive heart. That familiarity and lack of major uniqueness though, rather than providing a dampener on the EP’s lure, just adds more substance to the release and excitement to the potential of where the band can take their music and imagination.

Formed in 2012, Everyday Sidekicks soon became a keenly followed and supported prospect on the local scene spreading outwards, though it was with the release of the single Hometown Hero in 2014 that they began flirting with national awareness. Live the quintet has shared stages with bands such as Marmozets, Shvpes, and Coldrain; increasing their reputation simultaneously over the past couple of years whilst also drawing attention from new fans and media alike. The Things I’ve Seen is the next potent nudge to awaken thicker and stronger attention, a success easy to see coming as its sextet of tracks tempt and sear the senses.

Everyday Sidekicks Cover Artwork _RingMaster Review    Opener F.T.B is a minute long lure into the release but much more than an intro, its belly of craft and passion a potent roar on ears and indeed and already brewing appetite. Its strong coaxing is quickly matched by the punchy swagger of Mirrors. Straight away the anthemic swings of drummer Mat Capper and the dark alluring tone of Sam Hughes’ bass grip ears as a spiralling of sonic enterprise escapes the guitars of Tim Brown and Josh Pasley. It is a rousing entrance that continues to entice as the enjoyable varied vocal attack of Archie Hatfield blazes away with angst and passion. He shows a diversity and imagination in this song alone which is echoed throughout the band and song, and though Mirrors offers familiar spicery, it makes for a stirring slice of post-hardcore bred rock ‘n’ roll.

It’s All Smiles and Laughter rolls in with a lighter and brighter air, its infectiousness aligned to elegant keys and a cleaner vocal presence to Hatfield. Also embracing a pop rock ingredient, the song soon brews up a more volatile intensity and intent, its eruption stirring and when the track especially hits full potency. Across its length though, imagination and craft is a magnetic lure but it just lacks the same striking spark as its predecessor and indeed the following Pitch Black. It too merges emotive calm and beauty with a tempestuous irritability and angst, this time crafting a more balanced and perpetually stirring proposition with a healthy scent of Billy Talent to it.

The melodic enterprise already lighting tracks is given a full canvas with Rosa where guitars and keys converge in a misty coaxing before uniting for a contagious incitement which punctuates and at times inflames the emotive balladry driving the song. Beats are punchy and the bass a throaty tempting, even as their shadows become bound in the sonic tendrils spun by the guitars. It is a potent affair with moments of gripping adventure and though the clean vocals are not as impacting as they are in other moments in the EP, it is fair to say the raw charm of the song pleases whilst offering more variety to the release with its cleverly aligned textures.

The Things I’ve Seen is closed by How We Survive, a raucous and dynamic onslaught of fierce punk ‘n’ roll. it ensures the EP ends on a high, even if it lets its ferocious roar and in turn creative intensity ebb and flow a touch. Nevertheless it is a great end to a heftily satisfying proper introduction to Everyday Sidekicks. It is early days but the band has plenty going for them in sound and invention and a potential hard to dismiss.

The Things I’ve Seen EP is released November 20th through all stores.

https://www.facebook.com/everydaysidekicks   https://twitter.com/edskofficial

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Eva Plays Dead – Sounds of the Written Word

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UK rockers Eva Plays Dead have been stirring up plenty of attention and praise loaded support over the past couple of years through a potent live presence and a host of songs and debut album fuelled by with impressing adventure and the potential of even greater things to come. The Sounds of the Written Word EP continues the band’s potent emergence and evolution of sound with five rousing slices of undiluted rock ‘n’ roll. It is an encounter which confirms the Nottingham/Derby bred quartet as ones to watch and to find plenty of flavoursome enjoyment with, but also suggests that they are still only at the beginnings of exploring their creative depths.

Formed in the January of 2013, Eva Plays Dead weave inspirations from the likes of The Dirty Youth, LostAlone, Marmozets, Joan Jett, and QOTSA into their diversely spiced sound. Thick strains of metal, hard and alternative rock, and even punk are entangled and fused together as proven by the band’s new encounter, which relentlessly entices and holds attention. Live the band has frequently drawn acclaim too whilst supporting the likes of We Are The Ocean, LostAlone, Max Raptor, Canterbury, and also across their own country wide tours. The band’s 2013 album Guilt Trips & Sins equally drew its plaudits though it took the single of earlier this year, Wonderland to spark and lure in the increasing focus of the likes of Team Rock and Kerrang. The song was a rich taster of Sounds of the Written Word which itself is already creating a bit of a feisty stir since its release via SoundHub Records.

EP Artwork_RingMaster Review     The EP opens with Live Again and a rich torrent of fiery riffs, pungent rhythms, and a sonic enticing impossible to ignore. In fact the whole song is a wall of persuasion, especially once the rich voice and expressive delivery of Tiggy Dee joins the muscular party. Her tones wrap syllable and ears with tenacious seduction yet carries a raw edge which only adds to the aggressively creative enterprise of sound around her. The guitar of Matt Gascoyne is just as lively in its imagination and craft, its melodies and Dee’s siren-esque roar in turn trapped by the masterful and fiercely magnetic rhythmic cage cast by bassist Zach Shannon and drummer Seb Boyse.

The tracks’ bluesy air and hard rock enticing continues in the more predatory Bad Girl, the song with the sinister persuasive lure of a temptress prowling the listener musically and vocally. It is dark, dirty, and a weave of sonic resourcefulness seeded in classic and alternative rock. As its predecessor, the song is firmly infectious whether roaring with full passion or delving into more concentrated tapestries of thick texture and invasive spicing. It easily continues the strong start to the release, though both songs get outshone by Wonderland. From its first dark rumble, the track is sheer addictiveness, riffs and grooves a flirtatious confrontation over the anthemic twist of rhythms and subsequently stalking beats. Dee again sits astride the magnetic drama at play, her voice attitude fuelled yet with a raw regal air as the equally riveting sounds dance around her with bright invention and raucous energy. It is no surprise that the song stirred up ears and appetites as a single as here it pretty much steals the show, though it is quickly rivalled by the closing pair of songs on the EP.

We Ain’t A Family uncages its own virulent hooks and tangy grooves in short time, rhythms showing more restraint amidst the melody rich proposal though again the bass finds an intimidating snarl to drool over. Like the last track, it shows an eagerness to explore an undulating landscape of ideas and evolving sound, crescendos of energy and skilful ebbing and flowing of intensity and passion alone an enthralling tempting.

Final track 1950’s Woman has a similar template to the previous pair but finds its own individual character within a familiar bellow of rigorous sound and bewitching vocal theatre. The song maybe does not define its distinctiveness as much as others on the EP, but when it leaves ears basking, imagination smiling, and emotions hungry for more, there is little more you can ask of it.

There is definitely the sense that Eva Plays Dead has more in the locker than shown on Sounds of the Written Word which only makes their future something to keenly anticipate. This is a band to keep close attention on with an EP to thoroughly enjoy.

Sounds of the Written Word is available now via SoundHub Records through most online stores

http://www.evaplaysdead.com/     https://www.facebook.com/EvaPlaysDead

RingMaster 31/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Digits – Footprints And Embers EP

 

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Having caught ears and attention with promise soaked debut EP Acquiesce To Violence in 2013, UK alternative rockers Digits return with its successor Footprints And Embers. All the thoughts bred by its predecessor remain with the new EP, the potential of the band growing into a really striking proposition ahead as persuasive as before. The new four song encounter also shows a solid growth and freshness to the last release but equally carries a rawness at times which occasionally numbs the creative ideation and potency being shown. Despite that, Digits remains a band to keep under close view with the imagination of big things in their future.

The time between releases has been a trying time for the band it is fair to say. Acquiesce to Violence found itself earning plenty of praise and support as well as having tracks gracing cover CDs of Rocksound and Big Cheese Magazines whilst the band shared stages with the likes of Margera, Feed The Rhino, Marmozets, and played the Make A Scene Festival with the likes of Funeral For A Friend, The Blackout and Hacktivist. Since then though injuries have accosted the band; vocalist/guitarist Chris Bradley damaging ligaments in his ankles, guitarist Craig Strawbridge managing to cut off half his thumb, bassist Stu Latham damaging his back, and drummer Dan Cooper having to leave the band due to persistent problems with his wrists. The Newcastle quartet has endured and overcome though, and with Matt Hickman now swinging the sticks and equipped with a host of new songs, Digits are forging on as they unleash Footprints And Embers to pick up from where they were before being temporarily derailed last year.

Embers starts things off, emerging from a distant wash of sound and prowling forward with pungent rhythms, caustic riffs, and a spiralling lure of strong melodic enterprise. It is a strong start Digits coverbut turned into a less successful moment by the blazing roar of raw vocals from Bradley, his tones bullish and clad in a post hardcore texturing which in turn permeates the song and mutes its initial potency. It is something ears soon acclimatise to though, especially when the song grows again by relaxing into a mellow passage with similarly delivered vocals. Courted by a great bass tempting, alluring guitar endeavour seems to light the touch paper to another explosion of intensity and passion. The song ebbs and flows like this throughout its presence, not always winning its persuasion entirely but with wicked grooves and an irresistible anthemic rhythmic baiting from Hickman, the song wins its argument, and becoming stronger and more potent with every listen.

As mentioned the opener has a post hardcore like nature compared to the alternative rock aggression of the following Dysphoria, a song which as some on the last EP, finds a Reuben like essence to its contagious lure of riffs and hooks. There is another drift into an emotive calm in the song which works but maybe not quite as powerfully as it might against the otherwise tenacious and confrontational qualities of the track. Nevertheless, it is a pleasing and compelling lure which overcomes a slight wavering of vocal quality with ease.

The next up Parachutes is of similar breeding, its sinews flexing with every forceful beat and abrasing riff as vocals unite to push the just as fiery narrative of the song through ears. There is a rage to the song which is cleverly tempered yet enhanced by the marauding rhythms and sonic enterprise, they in turn seeming to encourage a spicier vocal ferocity and control. It and its predecessor take the honours on the EP, reminding and pushing forward the reason why the last EP suggested Digits was a brewing storm to watch.

The calmer skies of Eros concludes the album; the song a melodic hug within brooding bass shadows. Bradley proves his vocal strength on the song, bringing Paul Heaton like tone to his delivery, and at times the melodic breath of the song does have a Housemartins like croon before it erupts into a final blaze of roaring intensity speared by a quite inescapable hook. Again it gives thoughts a nudge to the depths and potential of the band whilst providing ears with another highly satisfying offering.

Digits still feel like they are still looking for their own specific sound and have yet to fully tap into the certain potential within them, but with releases like Footprints And Embers it is no hardship to carry on waiting and enjoying the band’s growth.

The Footprints And Embers EP is available digitally from February 2nd via iTunes.

https://www.facebook.com/Digitsuk

RingMaster 02/02/0215

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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