Audio Poets – Make a Scene

artworks_RingMaster Review

Such the almost scattergun diversity escaping Make a Scene there are times you wonder how it works with such coherent unity but it does and what is on offer is one gloriously rousing and dynamically imagination incitement for ears and emotions. The new album from US rockers Audio Poets, it is a thumping merger of pop punk, alternative rock, and unbridled rock ‘n’ roll, to try and slim it down, which leaves an increasingly greedy appetite breathless for more.

Formed in Dallas as 2014 made its goodbyes, Audio Poets quickly hit the live scene the following year, playing their first show in Buffalo with Rookie of the Year. Debut EP Colours had its successful release the following month before the quartet spent the spring of 2015 recording Make A Scene. The latter months of the year saw the album uncaged and the band relocate to Los Angeles, as well as hungrily hitting the live scene across the US. The UK and Mainland Europe are now in their live sights for 2016, the band ready to pounce on the already eager reactions to the galvanic sounds and the quickly impressing adventure of Make a Scene.

Recorded with producer Geoff Rockwell (Forever The Sickest Kids, Memphis May Fire, Crown The Empire), the band’s album swiftly hits a rousing plateau with opener The Anthem. A scuzz lined guitar makes the first invitation with its sultry hues, the lead vocals of guitarist Chris Durio quickly adding their punch to the attitude loaded proposal. As the track develops there is no escaping the potent and enjoyable Rage Against The Machine essence to the track, it coming bound in just as appealing stoner-esque grooves from the fiery guitar enterprise of Bru Whitley and Durio who create a magnetic web around the increasingly defiance loaded narrative and vocal tones.

It is a riveting and contagious start to the release but soon overshadowed by the outstanding Wake Up. Straight away that variety in sound and imagination is arousing ears and thoughts, the second song bounding around with pop punk energy and revelry whilst casting an aggressive CIV like snarl and melodic tempting. There is a touch of UK band Hawk Eyes to the romping escapade too, enslaving hooks aligned to rowdy but controlled dynamics colluding excitedly with the darker inviting prowess of bassist Mike Knight and the sinew swung beats of drummer Landon Jett.

Next up Not My Time is a triumph to match the last, this time the band exploring a My Chemical Romance meets Fall Out Boy like theatre of invention and creative mischief. Feet and hips are soon seriously involved with the more restrained, compared to its predecessors, yet feistily swinging canter of the spellbinding song and its unpredictable invention. There is a serious urge to dive right back into the track after its conclusion, though that is soon diverted by the punchy roar of Burn and after that, the album’s Marilyn Mansion scented title track. For the first, Durio mixes his strong clean tones with more rap bred vocal jabbing, though this time The Kennedy Soundtrack is a closer hint to the adventure of sound and voice on offer. As the song evolves between standing toe to toe with grouchy agitation and seducing with poetic melodic infectiousness, a touch of Lost Prophets slips into the captivation, that one more arguably familiar colour which, as within every song, simply helps flavour something openly unique. Next up Make A Scene flirts with and barges across ears with a virulence of craft and sound which again has the body and emotions subservient; electronic and industrial ingredients as powerfully persuasive as the punk infused rock ‘n’ roll at its heart.

Fiery interlude Space is more the doorway into a new turn to the album than a break, its cosmic air a progressively textured tempting for the imagination before Revolution stands tall and defiant in attitude and sound. Featuring Jay Miller of Texan band Drudge, the song is a brooding maelstrom of imposing rock ‘n ‘roll spiced with melodic hardcore imagination and an array of intriguing sonic colours and styles. It easily holds attention and enjoyment tight and leaves satisfaction full though it is maybe not as inventively bold and tenacious as earlier songs, a success found by the equally weighty emotive and tempestuous embrace of Wounded Eyes. Mixing a rich blend of varied metal infused rock flavours, the track is again an encounter fulfilling all wants and hopes if without quite breaching the same plateau the album set in place early on.

Do You Feel It (Now) brings a feistier and in some ways creatively livelier proposal with its tapestry of styles soon after, vocals and sounds from every corner of the band helping draw physical participation before closer Make It Through, escorts ears into a broader electronic landscape that sees the album go out on a potent high.

For personal tastes the album produces its richest and most ingenious mastery across the first five or so tracks, exploring more emotively shadowed and intensive depths to matching success thereafter, and from start to finish Make a Scene is one irresistible and rousing temptation from a band surely heading towards major attention.

Make a Scene is out now through most online stores.

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Pete RingMaster 07/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Demons Of Old Metal – Dominion

DOOM 2_RingMaster Review

We all know rock ‘n’ roll is spawned in hell and eager through hordes of bands to spread its glory, an infestation proven over the decades to only thrill especially in the hands of bands like Demons Of Old Metal. Theirs is a forcibly vocal and thrilling stomp consuming the senses which is in full roar within the glorious shape of new album Dominion. The UK band has been around a little while, working away at trying to “win back the souls of those that have turned their back on sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll!” From the fact that their new release is our and a great many others introduction to them suggests it has been a slow battle to date but things are about to get hot and dirty we suggest once their outstanding album uncages its contagion.

Formed around the time 2010 turned into its successor, Demons of Old Metal emerged as four veterans of the UK metal scene united to play “what got them into music in the first place – classic metal.” Casting a sound, presence, and stage show coloured by schlock horror inspiration, the band released their debut offering on the Halloween of 2012, in the riot of mini-album, The Demonic Chronicles Vol. I. It as a well-received and praised proposal followed by the band creating metal havoc across the country live and the subsequent releases of Vol. 2 and 3 of The Demonic Chronicles over the next couple of years.

The Torbay hailing band’s sound is mutant rock ‘n’ roll rising with creative bloodlust from a twisted blend of Pantera, Them County Bastardz, Hell Yeah, Steel Panther, and Machine Head, to give its hellacious voice some description. And as Dominion swiftly reveals, it is an infestation of ears and imagination refusing to take no for an answer with its virulent hostility.

Dominion Artwork -_RingMaster Review   The album announces itself with the brief theatrical Domintroduction before launching itself at the senses, with nostrils flared, through the outstanding Fakeskin. Riffs and rhythms quickly build a wall of spite and enticement, already badgering and welcoming a just as instant appetite for the provocation. As the expressive punkish tones of vocalist Tombstone Cowboy leap into the brewing tempest, electronic slithers and teases play, a side-helping of temptation to the full meal of a voracious onslaught luring away as the guitars of Tombstone Cowboy and Psycho Wing continue to rampage and flirt with the throaty toxicity spread by bassist Babyface Stephens s. With the scything violence of drummer Dr Doom simply nasty and gripping, a rich Slipknot essence can be added to the suggested breeding of song and album, but all flavours here and ahead stretched and mutated into a web of metal distinct to the demons.

You Version 2.0 leaps on the listener next, its physical and emotional agitated an open toxicity within another storm of merciless rhythms and riffs bound in nagging grooves and confronting vocals. The electronic sparks of the first song is replaced by a more industrial metal predation, thoughts of Pitchshifter teasing throughout whilst heavy and more classically honed spices venomously soak the pores of the track and senses. It’s addictive quality is emulated by both Dance of the Damned and Open wide and Scream, the first stalking its victim with rugged textures and the electronic toxins woven by Digital Death whilst growing into its spite with an increasing weave of flavours and inhospitable but gripping enterprise. The successor to this Devildriver like animus of a song, stomps with a dirty rock ‘n’ roll swing and theatrical snarl, its lure smothered by a sonic climate of intensity and rancor. The band seamlessly fuses the contrasting yet similarly belligerent winds of that invention, creating a hellish primal nursery rhyme as catchy as it is intimidating.

There is a ‘mellower’ trespass next with The Quiet Ones, its southern rock flames and dirt lined grooves locked into a thick turbulence of riffs and rhythms, neither outweighing the other but mutually leading to a moment of groove heaven and an increasingly explosive and vicious outpouring of sonic rabidity. A borrowing of a Rage Against The Machine tempting only adds to the fun, and as much as the album bruises and devours it also offers a rich tongue in cheek layer through lyrics and mischief.

Grind was a little ‘disappointing’, though only in the fact with its title hopes were it would burrow into flesh and psyche like a drill bit. Instead it spun a wiry web of grooves and sonic tenacity amongst a threat of rhythms and riffs; the result being another inescapably persuasive and seriously enjoyable intrusion before making way for the writhing and relentless nagging of Behind the Mask. With a ripple of rap metal to its persistent niggle of riffs, the song demands attention, evolving new strains of melodic and cantankerous imagination in return. Longer to hit the same rapturous reactions as most of its predecessors, the song easily succeeds in leaving satisfaction full before being over shadowed by the excellent The Star of your Nightmare. Its electronic coaxing amidst prowling riffs is almost Marilyn Mansion like but in no time a cancerous violation unique to Demons Of Old Metal with the track emerging as a theatre of cinematic mayhem and sonic ingenuity.

Cast around a fiery acidic groove, See How They Die seduces and menaces before overpowering its initial rich flame to dominate through bearish riffs and ill-tempered rhythms, the vocals bridging both emotions with open relish. Like The Union Underground with anger problems, the song is a grizzly treat leaving Get Outa Dodge to provide one last growl of insatiable and uncompromising rock ‘n’ roll, and ending the album on another big high.

British metal/rock ‘n’ roll is building towards a new heyday going by releases over the past few months, and when it erupts in full voice, there is no way Demons Of Old Metal will not be there leading the thrilling riot.

Dominion is out December 1st with pre-ordering available now @ http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/-/221931265158

http://www.demonsofoldmetal.co.uk   https://www.facebook.com/demonsofoldmetal  https://twitter.com/demonsofficial

Pete RingMaster 05/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Dead XIII – Catacombs

temp dead xiii final_RingMaster Review

Just over a year ago, UK horror metallers The Dead XIII, without majorly startling ears made a potent introduction with their Creatures Of The Night EP. It certainly whetted the appetite and revealed the potential of the band forging out a distinctive presence in the British metal/rock scene. Now the Mancunian quintet unleashes their debut album Catacombs, an encounter which weaves all the promise of its predecessor into a hefty slab of skilled and thrilling enticement. Whether the band has quite found that unique voice can be argued, for us it is still something brewing, but there is no doubting that the album is a potent nudge to awaken national attention and push the band well away from the crowd.

The Dead XIII escaped their crypts in 2013 and was soon breeding an increasing number of loyal fans through a live presence which over time saw them sharing stages with the likes of The Fearless Vampire Killers, William Control, Dead, and Bad Pollyanna. Creatures Of The Night lured new blood to the band with its Wednesday 13 meets Misfits like sound in 2014, a base which The Dead XIII has torn and sculpted into a more mature, inventive, and predatory proposal. Fresh from the British Horror Story Tour with Ashestoangels and Farewell, My Love, vocalist Kurt Blackshard, lead guitarist Ste Mahoney, keyboardist/guitarist Symon Strange, bassist Paul Ryan, and drummer Spike Owen reveal the evolution that has coursed through their songwriting and sound over the past year with Catacombs, and provide a rather tasty offering at the same time.

catacombs-cover_RingMaster Review    The album opens with its lead single XIII; guitars instantly weaving a mesh of sonic bait before the song erupts into a cauldron of electronic and guitar driven causticity. The distinctive tones of Blackshard quickly enter the building drama oozing from every aspect of the song, his unpolished and ghoulish dark tones another magnetic lure to an already heftily enticing encounter. There is a whiff of Marilyn Mansion and White Zombie to the track, as well as The Defiled, hues which collude to create a contagious trespass of the senses and a mighty and irresistible start to the album. It is a potent first roar matched by Frostbite and its fiercely aggressive tenacity aligned with a wintery atmosphere cloaking keys and vocals. Whereas the songs on the previous EP rarely strayed from their core design, here as in its predecessor, the song is unafraid to twist further unpredictable and imagination bred flirtations of sound and ideation into its appealing intrusion.

Daemons shows its teeth straight away with thumping beats piecing carnivorous riffery. The keys almost as quickly spread their sinister gothic charm and melodic resourcefulness into the ravenous tempest of the song where again there is an energy and intensity which never relents from badgering, almost bullying the listener. It is a great union, warm inviting textures contrasting the imposing bellow of the song whilst rhythms and the growling vocals temper the provocative tapestry of the keys and melodies. It is fair to say that every track is aural theatre, and each song upon Catacombs a mouth-watering dark escapade perfectly epitomised by the third song on the album.

The album’s title track is its successor, another proposition which gets straight down to the virulent nitty-gritty of its devilish invention and uniting horror metal/punk resources. Once more the grizzled delivery of Blackshard is like the barker or crypt-keeper to dark deeds and deathly delights within the song, and whereas on the last EP his tones occasionally tested with their one dimensional presence, in song and album they reveal, as the music, that they have evolved and discovered their deep potency.

The pair of Be-Were and The Greatest Escape richly catch the imagination next, the first encroaching on ears with stalking riffs and jabbing beats around a demonic fusion of singular and mass anthemic vocals whilst the second, being arguably the most openly Misfits toned song on Catacombs, dances on ears with a voodoo-esque array of hooks and again mass vocal roaring. Both tracks captivate with its slithers of heavy metal seeded enterprise from Mahoney whilst the latter further grips though it’s entwining of intimidating rhythmic and metal textures with melodically searing flames erupting within the song’s smouldering heart.

Not quite living up to those before it, lacking the creative spark which ignites its companions, Haunter with its corrosive metal breeding still leaves appetite and satisfaction content next before making way for the outstanding and ravenous Lay Siege To Hell. The song is unbridled and bruising rock ‘n’ roll but equally bold with sidesteps into electronic/techno adventure and a host of ever changing hooks and scorching guitar imagination adding up to another boisterous rousing of body and psyche within Catacombs.

The closing stretch to the album begins with Can’t Escape The Grave, more highly agreeable rock ‘n’ roll to lose your inhibitions and soul to and ends with Apothesis, a death infused, ambience crafted encounter which is as much post-hardcore and blackened metal as it is horror metal, and quite enthralling. It too does not quite match earlier tracks yet it is the most inventive and increasingly fascinating offering on the album revealing the depth to The Dead XIII invention still brewing and to be explored ahead.

There is no doubting that Catacombs is a must explore treat for horror and gothic metal/punk fans. It is not the perfect offering with some tracks a little too similar in some areas and hues of other genre bands seeping into play, but one impressive leap forward for the band and undeniable impressive romp for ears. As things moved forward between EP and album, evolution will see the same ahead as The Dead XIII progresses and we for one cannot wait whilst continuing to devour Catacombs right now.

Catacombs is out now

RingMaster 13/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Black Space Riders – D:REI

 

 Black Space Riders official 2014

   A spatial exploration of progressively sculpted metal and psychedelically forged rock merged with varied additives into thirteen rugged landscapes, D:REI is a compelling incitement for the imagination and fuel for the passions. Consisting of strikingly varied and ravenously adventurous tracks, the third album from German heavy rockers Black Space Riders is one of those treats you just cannot exhaust your hunger for. Our first encounter with the band, D:REI is an exceptional triumph sure to also invite an intensive retrospective investigation of the band.

     Formed in 2008, the Münster hailing band immediately triggered acclaim and attention with their self-titled album two years later. A quartet consisting of JE (lead vocals, guitars), SLI (guitars), SAQ (bass), and CRIP (drums, vocals), Black Space Riders hit European stages to reinforce their presence and rising stature in support of their feverishly received record. 2012 saw second album Light Is The New Black unleashed, again with strong support and praise soaking the even more adventurous and sound diverse release. As the year merged into the next, a second lead vocalist, SEB who had already provided additional background-vocals on the album was recruited into the band. Now Black Space Riders look poised to thrust themselves further into the devouring passions of the wider metal and heavy rock world with D:REI. It is an encounter which is impressive with either predatory aggressiveness or wanton seduction, merging both more often than not; the ignition to a greedy appetite for the invigorating and scintillatingly unique provocation.

     The album is a concept styled encounter: a journey from impending doom through devastation on to a voyage to a new 13_10_17 lp_sleeve.inddunknown adventure though that is simplifying it. The tracks are split into chapters within the exploration starting with D – Defiance moving on to R – Ruins and E – Escape through to I – Beyond. It is an encounter which sparks the imagination and the inventiveness of thoughts as well as providing a musical soundscape which evokes the passions. From the opening track Stare at the Water the album simply captivates with an unrelenting but continually riveting tempest of sound and sonic design. A slowly unveiling landscape is revealed by the start of the first song initially, an entrancing ambience aided by a singular guitar. Two minutes in it is dispersed by a stormy cloud of rigorous riffs and muscle clad rhythms soon joined by vocals and flames of inventive guitar. A mix of heavy metal and stoner dressed endeavour, the track stomps with intensity and formidable craft to lure and intimidate in equal measure. It is a potent opening to the album though not quite lighting the fuse to the passions.

    That match is lit by the following sizeable triumphs starting with Bang Boom War (Outside my Head). A sonic hostility opens up the gateway to a carnivorously toned bassline and rapacious rhythms within a whining acidic grazing of guitar. It is tremendous bait enhanced by the excellent dual vocal attack and an industrial seeded yawn of guitars and predatory stalking, a presence which merges essences of Fear Factory and Marilyn Mansion with a Sabbathesque doom bred intensity. As the album shows across its length, the song is an evolving and unpredictable beast of an incitement, a spine of rhythms the only constant to which ravenous yet seducing weaves of imagination and sound avail their temptation.

    Rising from the Ashes of our World comes next and compared to other songs takes longer to fully persuade though as soon as its stalking rhythms and heavily laden riffs seize the ears, attention and appetite are certainly heading in only one direction. Thoughts of Prong enter the mind initially but the track is soon going deeper and into darker places with its intensive weight and abrasively toned riff rabidity. The slower dare one say mellower moments of the song surprise and intrigue if without raising the same appetite as the voraciousness around them but it just accentuates the power of the sinews driving the song and the irresistible climax, a pestilential finale which savages and thrills insatiably.

    Both Give Gravitation to the People and Way to Me take the album to another level, the first a festering scourge of caustic metal with an agitated rhythmic teasing. Primarily invasive heavy unrelenting metal with a touch of early Therapy? seemingly thrown in, it is a hypnotic scourge on the senses with a melodic mystique whispering in its atmosphere whilst its successor is a dance of groove metal and grunge sculpted by again contagious rhythms and that continually irresistible snarling bass. The track swings its muscular hips and heavy handed rhythmic infectiousness with a swagger which only recruits the fullest allegiance to its call. With a progressive flair and imagination to the guitars and their melodic weaves, the song is pure magnetism.

     Through the insistent fire bred stoner heat of Temper is Rising, the classically cast heavy metal suasion of The GOD-survivor, and the smouldering I see the album continues to draw the emotions in deeper even though the last two of the trio simply please rather than fire up any intense reactions. That is left to the exceptional Leave to produce, its opening Middle Eastern kissed flavouring the coaxing leading into an ever expanding flight through incendiary climes and melodic ingenuity. It is a masterful evocation of sound and emotional narrative not forgetting pungent adventure.

    From here on in the album provides more taxing moments, infection wise if still ones making the strongest persuasion. Space Angel (Memitim) is a ten minute musical painting which is excellently crafted and imaginatively coloured but arguably over long whilst Major Tom Waits, with its great gravel clad vocals strikes a union with thoughts but misses out on sparking up the passions. The final pair of offerings though from the almost punk swung rocker Letter to a Young One and the doom flavoured furnace of stoner tempting and heavy riffery, The Everlasting Circle of Infinity provide an addictively exciting conclusion to the release.

    With just a couple of lulls come sparkless moments, D:REI is a richly rewarding, ear feasting slab of metallically framed space/melodic rock with plenty more besides, and Black Space Riders a new pleasure, certainly for us, to greedily indulge in.

http://www.blackspaceriders.com

9/10

RingMaster 23/01/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Mr. Strange – The Wonderful World Of Weird

Mr. Strange promo

Just to prove that insanity can be the sweetest potent seduction The Wonderful World Of Weird is here to exploit and uncover the darkest secrets of your mind whilst travelling the exotic and dangerous mental halls of its creator Mr. Strange. The former frontman of the UK’s greatest still to be truly discovered musical mutants The Shanklin Freak Show, though he is still healthily involved in the band, Mr. Strange voraciously stalks the senses and emotions with his fourth album. It is a release which soundtracks a bedlam of sound and adventure from a quite maniacal imagination.

The Isle Of Wight hailing songwriter/producer/vocalist/musician began his musical exploration as ‘The Mad DJ’ in 1998 before emerging as Mr. Strange in 2006. He founded circus rock/steampunk band The Shanklin Freak Show in 2003, guiding the band as songwriter and vocalist up until starting an extended break from performing live at the end of 2011. Alongside The Shanklin Freak Show albums including Act II – The Light Fantastic of 2009 and Welcome To The Show of 2011, a few other projects, and producing a couple of albums by Global Citizen, Mr. Strange unleashed his solo musical rapaciousness. Sounds From The Asylum came first to be followed in 2011 by the releases of The Fall and Freakshow, the last a 38 track retrospective album chronicling the songs that he wrote under the Shanklin Freak Show name  which included new, unreleased, and re-recorded or re-mixed tracks. Now the sanity puppeteer steps forward again with the magnificent temptation of The Wonderful World Of Weird, the finest Mr. Strange musical and mental examination yet.

With more flavours than a giant box of Jelly Bellies, the album is a dramatic and exhilarating flight through the darkest yet 555928_584429381594861_1695733989_nmagnetically and vibrantly compelling mind of the fictional character of its creator, employing everything and anything from industrial and steampunk to gothic rock and progressive metal, and that is just scratching the surface. With many of the tracks co-written with Gary ‘Stench’ Mason, The Shanklin Freak Show guitarist and provider of the majority of the guitar invention across the release, the album immediately lures in senses and imagination with the opening spoken narrative leading in the title track. It instantly intrigues as the scene setting premise strolls into the irresistible stomp of the song. Rhythms bounce around with a heavy mischievous gait matched by the electro and bass taunting whilst the guitar casts lines of sonic and melodic bait which is pure infectious toxicity. Best described as Dr. Jekyll meets ICP as early Marilyn Mansion helps Victor Frankenstein create aural life for them to toy with upon a set designed by Willy Wonka, the track is a delicious fascination and the first irresistible hint of the lunacy to come.

Creating the World is an expansion to the landscape previously crafted with a gentle psychedelic ambience washing the dawning scenery. It is a mesmeric, almost meditative soaring of harmonies and guitar elegance with rubs of dub and scratching teasing the riveting flight. The seducing continues right up to the doorway into the Psycho Surfing-A-Go-Go, one of the major pinnacles upon the album. Again as between numerous songs, the narrator lays down an invitation before the surf rock contagion drops its shoulders and swerves through the ear with irrepressible virulence. The grooves enslave the passions within seconds whilst the rhythmic dance only builds a cage for rapture to breed within as fire kissed keys add smouldering lures to the hot and epidemically addictive romp of sonic lava. The song is one of the best heard anywhere this year; a beach party in the mind of Hunter S. Thompson hosted by The Cramps and The Bomboras with Two Wounded Birds, B52s, and The Revillos adding extra entertainment.

From the dark sinister realm of The World’s Dark Heart, Mr. Strange lurks in the steampunk/industrial graced world of Metropolis 2984, a track which equally extends some classic metal and psyche sculpted imagination to its captivating persuasion. There is a swing and energy to the track which infects feet and emotions but equally an underlying dark tone beneath the celestially soaring harmonies which suggest more 1984 than Fritz Lang. Again the album and artist has the listener in a tight grip of pleasure and suasion, though it never slipped from the first breath of the album to be fair, which tightens with firstly Clockwork Man and explodes through Fire. The first of the two stalks the ears with the drama and theatre of a Tim Burton vision sculpted by the melodic ingenuity of Danny Elfman, though it has to be noted that every song despite the references sound like no one but Mr. Strange. This masterful manipulation of the senses and passions is soon left in the shade by its successor, the track another major peak in nothing but highs. The song is the closest to a Shanklin Freak Show tune that the album gets, its sexy tango pulsating mouth-watering foreplay for the beats and funk bred keys to add intoxicating spice to. There is something familiar to the hooks and stomp of the song aside from the earlier comparison, but it is indefinable and wholly galvanic.

Through the noir shadows of Don’t Stay (Where the Dead Ones Lay) with its jazz smooching funk lined temptation and the excellent gothic majesty of White Rabbit, the song reminding of The Damned at times, The Wonderful World Of Weird intensifies its resistance free toxin whilst the electro swing heart of Exile and the psychedelia soaked gothic tempting of Anti-Christ only spark further flames of lustful submission to the call of the release and its psychotic beauty. Every song is a wanton temptress in whatever guise and sonic clothing they frequent, and though admittedly hopes and expectations were of big things from Mr. Strange on past successes, the album left those assumptions insultingly short of the brilliant reality.

Completed by the classically crafted Journeys End, an enchanting epilogue if not to the levels of what came before, The Wonderful World Of Weird is pure certifiable aural manna. The CD version also has a track exclusive to its version, a very enjoyable cover of the Dr. Steel track We Decide. The able shows that there is only one Mr. Strange and his form of weird, one you can charter a sensational cruise through via our favourite album of the year, The Wonderful World Of Weird, that is if you are brave or eccentric enough.

http://www.mrstrangemedia.com/

10/10

RingMaster 28/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Devilzwork – A Dead Horse

the devilzwork pic

Australian industrial metallers The Devilzwork set senses and fears cowering last year with their album Floodlights, a carnivorous sonic pestilence which gnawed and seduced the emotions with lethal  yet compelling severity. Now the band returns with its successor A Dead Horse and another tempest of virulent devastation hell bent on consuming and reshaping the synapses.

Hailing from Australia’s Capital Region, the 2009 formed quartet of guitarist Whiskey (also in Chud), vocalist/bassist Tobias, guitarist Kvlt and drummer Postal, has built an incendiary reputation across the regions of Melbourne and the Australian Capital Territory with their impressive live shows which has seen them stare stages with the likes of Voices of Masada, MzAnnThropik, Tim “The Ripper” Owens, and Mnemic. The self-produced demo Bad Moon Rise equally sparked concentrated attention though it was the eight track release Floodlights which stretched the bands presence much further afield as certainly an online presence and temptation. Now A Dead Horse is primed to accelerate that growing awareness. You suspect such its harsh and caustic devilry that the release will send as many running for the hills as finding those unable to resist its scourge driven charms, but if unbridled spite coursing corrosion is your idea of a treat than The Devilzwork has a nasty rewarding one lying in wait.

Opening track Obey The Worm… immediately scorches the ear with a sonic piercing before riffs and rhythms conjure up a death metal 1016963_626992130646833_1762260211_nseeded malevolence. It instantly has the hairs on flesh wilting before its vicious blaze of noise rock/industrial ferocity with the great duel vocal attack driving the aurally scurrilous fire of sound to greater depths. From the first track alone you can openly see the evolution in the songwriting and intent of the band. Whereas Floodlights was one carnally bred lime pit of intensity and noise soaked irreverence its successor has a more defined purpose and invention to its claws. A strong spicery of metal and rock adds further potency and imagination to the song and as it emerges, A Dead Horse as a whole.

The outstanding Kalifornia comes up next, its confident swagger and teasing wantonness leaving a tasty flavour of horror rock to the Ministry sounding torch of sonic animosity. A twisting feverish taunting on the senses and imagination, the track despite its too soon coming departure is the first of the major highlights on the album and ultimately the best track.

The Godflesh/Marilyn Manson lilted Prick, a track with labour to its attack but captures the passions at a glance without any resistance, and the more electro venomous Big Man follow to continue the strong start of the release if without quite matching their predecessor whilst the insidious corruption that is Hardware suffocates and invigorates simultaneously to ignite the mind and emotions. Bringing an acidic blistering groove which would rest easily in a Kyuss/Queens Of The Stone Age rage, the track pushes the diversity of the album yet again. Admittedly some work is needed to unveil some of the unique rewards to be found within the songs beneath the surface severity and taking that plunge head first only rewards all the more. The previous album was debatably short on individuality between songs in hindsight but there is certainly no issue with A Dead Horse as each track reveals given close attention.

From the pernicious Corrosive, a more than decent track which is as its title suggests, and the dark intensive exploration Vast, the album reaches another pinnacle with Insect. Thumping rhythms open up a cage of virulent toxicity, a wash of sonic itching wrapping the skin whilst vocals and restrained electronics rattle the bars and another epidemically addictive groove frequents senses and passions. The track will have you scratching the brain and emotions for hours after whilst the short burst of instrumental after its departure soothes the sore need.

Enthralling expels a raucous heavy rock fury, vocally and melodically, within another breath and atmosphere of poisonous sonic mercury to again push the envelope of invention whilst Virus Installer is just a rapacious pathogen of angry and malicious noise honed into a riveting protagonist. Both leave the senses exhausted and wondering what hit them yet thoughts alive with interpretation of their magnetic intensity.

Concluded by the tender, well in comparison to what came before, Push Yourself Around and the sinister soundscape Desolate, the album leaves a hunger for much more. The first of the final pair has a scintillating toxic swing to its pestilential might whilst the closer is just an evocative passage of sound and menace which leaves the mind exploring its own black corners. Both add further absorbing ventures to A Dead Horse, an album which shows no mercy but strikes with an intelligently sculpted persuasion offering depths of melodically spawned venom. With only the shortness of some of the most enthralling violations a niggle, the album is an impressive leap forward for The Devilzwork and a must investigation for all fans of the likes of Ministry, Godflesh, Rammstein, Marilyn Mansion and those of industrial and death metal… though are they brave enough though?

https://www.facebook.com/thedevilzwork

8.5/10

RingMaster 10/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Chud – Ominous

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Ever had that feeling of impending doom, not a sense of coming mishap but a really dark unrelenting carving up of all you survive your lives safely by. Well whether yes or no, Australian metallers Chud bring you its soundtrack through their unbridled savagery that is debut album Ominous. It is a monster of a release, a collection of tracks and sounds with teeth that tear senses, emotions, and soul asunder whilst taunting them with insidious grooves and even at times melodies that are pure sonic acidity.

The metallic scavenging of one Whiskey Jones, who also leads the equally carnivorous industrial metal beast The DevilzWork, Chud is a confrontation that takes no prisoners but at the same time has an underlying seduction and simplicity of groove that is just irresistible. It is not always easy to find but throughout the release hooks and addiction forging aspects do make their deceptive play within the raw surface abrasion. Because of the guitar style and ferocious riffing of Jones there is a firm link between both of his bands, though they also stand distinctly apart, his other project having no time for anything other than primal filth clad temptation whereas Chud has a mellower heart, well maybe stalks with a slightly less predacious and more measured sonic tempting. Ominous is an inescapable storm but one you just want to be in the middle of, devouring all of its toxic animosity.

Opener Daemonic (Gnosis) tells you all you need to know about the album, the rhythmic torrent of crippling spite and the flesh chewing heavy riffs of guitar and bass a carnal consumption. Ridden by the caustic scowling vocals of Jones, his tones a senses stripping scourge, the track has its jaws firmly clasped around the mental throat from its first second and even the arrival of a slight swing and swagger to its suffocating body cannot lessen its staggering rabidity. It is a thrilling start immediately match by the similarly rapacious Choke and surpassed by the destructive Beast. The first of the two submits another artillery of rhythms within a sonic sandstorm, its prowling parade of lethal malevolence speared by harsh melodic flames from the guitar. It is close in presence to its predecessor but has enough to be a companion rather than an imitator whilst the second of the two is simply a crawling pestilence with the sinister seduction of Rob Zombie and contagion of Ministry. Whereas the earlier tracks were straight vicious metal that would find a mutual conspirator in a Devildriver or Brujeria, there is an industrial edge and melodic death metal stare to its voice.

Through the likes of the sonic abrasion Witchcraft and the envenomed despoiler Tyrant the album continues to isolate and scorch 537992_10151386920210873_553987901_nsynapses whilst flesh is torn from any resemblance of safety though the excellent Marilyn Mansion flavoured Gauss brings much needed respite through vibrant steel girded grooves and a permeating emotive malady. Like so many of the tracks there is a repetition throughout the riffs, grooves , and hooks that badger and persuade with virulently contagious success, their irrepressible cruelty enslaving the passions so perpetual returns to its violent mouth are an unavoidable given.

The barbarous Revenant leads to another infection fuelled rancor setting up the already enflamed hunger for another pinnacle of the album in the demonically sculpted Serpentine, a track which flicks at and licks the listener with a poison coated tongue and scornful persistence. It is another striding sonic defiler but one offering an eastern mystique to its intrigue and exotic vehemence. Split by the mordant Pronto, another major highlight appears in the tyrannical sonic enticement of Kill It. Holding again an industrial/horror rock lilt to its edacious metal bred ferocity, the track is like a pack of predators not seeing food for longer than bearable and just as wild in its onslaught.

The sonic carnivore is completed by firstly the lumbering weight of Gravedigger, yet again that Manson/Zombie essence gracing the heavily burdened riffs, thumping rhythms, and melodic whispering. Its impressive bulk is then followed by the instrumental The Gift Of Fire, a track which fuses blues and southern rock with another climate of Eastern breezes all through the impressive lone guitar of Jones within a waiting shadowed ambience, and finally Angelic (Gnosis), the bestial ruinous epilogue to it all.

Though there is a surface constant to the sound of the songs mainly through the distinct playing of Jones, a turn of extra concentrated work reveals the uniqueness of songs but you do have to make that extra effort. Ominous is a thrilling primitively tasting treat, and one which is sure to see Chud laying waste to many more unsuspecting victims.

https://www.facebook.com/chudmetal

8.5/10

RingMaster 02/08/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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