Matt Finucane – Vanishing Island

As uncertainty consumes an isle through Brexit confusion, Vanishing Island sees the troubadour of disharmony, Matt Finucane is back to confront, provoke, and captivate in his unique way. As all its predecessors, the new album is a release which comes soaked in physical and emotional discord whilst wrapped in melodic dissonance. It is another complete lure of fascination from the Brighton alternative singer songwriter and without doubt his most pop infested outing without losing any of the disharmony which gives his music its richness;  a proposition which without quite putting a finger on the actual ingredient it has added alongside a general blossoming, is easily his finest incitement yet.

The past couple of years or so has seen Finucane especially lure attention and acclaim through the likes of the Disquiet and Ugly Scene EPs, though neither success has exactly been a stranger since the release of previous album Glow In The Dark six years back. Through singles and EPs since, his sound and songwriting has thickly enticed as it has continuously grown but as suggested Vanishing Island has something extra which truly set it apart as it boisterously got under the skin.

The album carries the raw jangle of early Orange Juice, the pop disharmony of Josef K, and the sonic dissonance of Swell Maps whilst lyrically and vocally Finucane again embraces the inspirations of Mark E Smith and Lou Reed but all essences warped and mutated into its creator’s own imaginative and individual proposition. Vanishing Island opens up with War on Pain and immediately is baiting keen attention through a rhythmic pulsation swiftly joined by the inimitable tones of Finucane, his vocal delivery as maverick as his music. As the song expands with real catchiness to its swing infested hips, drone inspired melodies weave patterns in its sky colouring the route to the subsequent turbulence which from a simmer bubbles up and over.

It is a great magnetic start to the album but soon eclipsed by the following pair of Submissive Pose and Menace. The first similarly tempts with a potent rhythmic beckoning, its first lure continuing to steer the track as its pop roar and rock antics collude. Openly virulent, almost taunting ears like a blend of Television Personalities meets Marc Riley and The Creepers, the song is delicious pop cacophony and one of the albums major highlights but soon matched by its successor, The third track prowls the senses, crawling over the psyche with its singular sonic intimation but again there is an inherent catchiness in voice and character which easily seduced from within its devious drone.

Next up, Looking for a Genius is no lightweight in temptation either, its bass strolling alone enough to bait attention and more than ably assisted by the relatively calm but corrupted melodic clamour of the guitar and the general pop nurtured balladry at its heart while in turn Perilous Seat explores its own low key yet boisterous intimate clamour; both inescapable epidemics of sheer catchiness.

The dark, haunting summoning and provocative fingering of Offertory provides yet another shade to the crepuscular depths and adventures of Vanishing Island before Expensive Habits infests hips once more with its inherent pop sway; the latter carrying a hint of bands like The Only Ones and The Freshies in its eager breath.

Through the sonically suggestive, untamed croon of Yr Own Way and the seared rock ‘n’ roll of Safehouse Rules, the album expands its creative landscape further with the conclusion of the creative tour of Vanishing Island being cast by the siren sigh of Time Begins. A slow burner compared to many before, the song is an evocative shimmer on the ears and imagination, a sail into the sunset off of the album’s creative shores.

Matt Finucane is a one of a kind proposition and Vanishing Island an inimitable offering in his own creative adventure.

Vanishing Island is released May 3rd with pre-ordering available @ https://mattfinucane.bandcamp.com/album/vanishing-island

 https://mattfinucane.net/   https://www.facebook.com/Matt.x.Finucane/

Pete RingMaster 08/04/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Bear VS Rhino – Fake Fake Fake

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Ahead of a new EP due later in the month we thought we would look at the Fake Fake Fake EP, the debut from UK band Bear VS Rhino and a three track confrontation which will not be for all but one that offers something compelling for hunger of all things discord corrupted and noise bred.

Its creator is a trio from London consisting of drummer Nico, Italian bassist Carlo, and guitarist/vocalist Markus who the bio for the band says occasionally sings in Greek. Though classed as an alternative rock band, Bear VS Rhino seemingly spawn their sounds from post punk and whereas their influences are listed as the likes of Biffy Clyro, Mogwai, Queens of the Stone Age, Lou Reed, Tom Waits, Deftones, and Neutral Milk Hotel, we can only suggest that you imagine a raw obtuse mix of The Fall, Marc Riley and The Creepers, and Swell Maps to really get a flavour before taking a bite into their tempest of noise.

Opening track Useless enters on a drunken swagger with toxic sonic fumes laying their breath upon melodic discordance and vocal disharmony. It instantly strikes up thoughts of early Mark E. Smith and co, the track a cross between Rebellious Jukebox and Bingo Master’s Break Out. If that is a sound not raising the juices already, then step away from the vehicle as song and release only delve deeper into that caustic aural dissidence. Catchy and challenging the track is a richly pleasing introduction, the guitar scraping the surface of the senses for the rhythms from drums and bass to punch and gnaw on respectively, but at the same time breeding a seductive temptation which recruits thoughts and passions wholly.

The following Daisychain has to wait whilst the band struggle to find its body but once given ignition it taunts the ear with a punk vocal snarl over an aural disunity and testing that lures in and sees off mind and emotions simultaneously. There is a strong song trying to escape from within but not given the opportunity, though again there is enough bait to makes you want to return and know more.

Final track Linseed Oil returns to the same breeding ground as the opener, guitars carving an anarchical web driven by the up and down vocals as the bass prowls alongside with throaty menace. Sparking good reactions and again an appetite for more it would still be fair to say that track and EP is for a limited audience, though it also suggests a promise of adventure which makes the impending new release one needing to be investigated. Basically for all fans of the references we mentioned above…not much else left to say.

http://bearvsrhino.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/BearVsRhino

7/10

RingMaster 15/08/2013

 

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The St Pierre Snake Invasion – Everyone’s Entitled To My Opinion

tspsi

    The St. Pierre Snake Invasion is one of those bands which has the capacity to ignite an immediate rapture and lustful hunger for their sounds, something they certainly did with us with the release of their debut EP Flesh a couple of years ago. It was a startling and synapse twisting slice of devilry, a caustic brew of punk, garage rock, noise, and insatiable mischief, though to tag their sound is as easy as scaling the Shard on the back of Katy Perry, impossible but sheer fun trying. Now the UK band return…finally…with its successor Everyone’s Entitled To My Opinion, a release which rips out the essences of the earlier EP and distills them with new imaginative additives for an even greater irresistible riotous slab of Satan spawn rock n roll.

The five track EP is quite sensational, realising all the selfish expectations and hopes placed upon the band and then some. The Bristol quintet band have unleashed their distinctive venom of noise since forming in the latter months of 2010, earning a devoted and passionate fanbase and plenty of acclaim through their wild and exhausting live performances as well as the first release, but the widest recognition still waits to be triggered, something Everyone’s Entitled To My Opinion has all the potency, sonic armoury, and big boy balls to achieve.

Call The Coroner opens up the release with immediate demands upon the ear and attention, which both willingly submit to as942206_642406229109685_548624207_n chunky scything riffs and a scowling banshee cry split the air. Rhythms lay in wait as the intro lays its net with the vocals of Damien Sayell scouring the senses in expressive and tortured tones, their earnest and slightly maniacal embrace as incendiary as the hungry sounds. Into its stride the chugging riffs from Szack Notaro and Patrick Daly abrase and seduce whilst the bass of Mark Fletcher prowls with menace from note to note, the combination with the magnetic rhythms of drummer Sam Forbes chaining up any chance of escape, a deliciously bedlamic yet contagious maelstrom of energy and sonic virulence.

The following Encore! Encore! plunders the ear with raptorial riffs and mutual offensive rhythms whilst the impacting squalls of Sayell scar the air with his romantic violations. The raining down of muscular and intensive slaps from guitars and bass offer a little respite in one moment of mercy as they step back for the escape of melodies and harmonies before taking charge again and completing the face to ear incitement. It is a riveting explosion of glorious filth in tale and sound which seamlessly flows into U.S.S.A., a punk fuelled bruising riot of industrial lime like sonic scrubbing. The track strains itself and the listener with greedy glee, the growling broody bassline and insatiable riffs an unrelenting scourge with the rhythms of Forbes the ringleader to total subservience before the alchemy of noise, with the vocals a rodeo cowboy riding the rapacious charge.

Hey Kids! Do The Choke Stroke steps up next to continue the eclectic force of the EP, its reserved chain gang/gallows hung intro bursting into another punk brawl with irresistible aural theatrics and epidemic infectiousness. Like many of the band’s songs it does offer up one issue…the thing is too damn short, just as the passions and limbs, not to mention voice, are casting their additional help the track leaves them a lone voice in a big all eyes watching crowd… damn them.

The closing Say No To Stop Motion leaves one final slice of brilliance, the scuzz coated epidemic of catchiness a last stomp to lose the heart to. It rattles the cages with attitude and sonic spite, something applying to the whole release, and provokes with suggestions of who the aimless ears of today’s media led appetites should really be listening to, as well as certain artists, climaxing the track. The song leaves a lasting swipe with the final forceful recommendation of The Fall, a band which is more than a potent whisper in their sound.

It is a brilliant end to an equally sensational EP, a release which goes far beyond the assumptions from an already biased heart. As mentioned it is hard to truly describe the sound of The St Pierre Snake Invasion but at any time across Everyone’s Entitled To My Opinion there is a mix from the likes of obviously The Fall, as well as Marc Riley and The Creepers, Gang Of four, Wire, Houdini, McLusky, Dope Body, Melvins and many other similar suggestions, though the band in as many ways does not sound like any of those either. A must have release from one of the UK’s most impressive and boundary splitting bands.

http://tspsi.co.uk/

10/10

RingMaster 30/04/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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