Eujenics – Meniscus

David Gunton Photography

David Gunton Photography

Making their introduction with a roaring bang, UK alternative rock band Eujenics have just released their debut single Meniscus, a track potent enough to alone suggest there is something rather tasty emerging from within the musical heart of Sunderland.

There is not a great deal we can reveal about Eujenics this time around but it is hard to imagine that they will not be offering more heavily flavoursome propositions ahead through which we can eagerly explore them more. Right now we know they are a quintet which formed this past March and made their live debut at The Academy in Newcastle to, by all accounts, a rapturous crowd. Fair to say they have stirred up a strong and loyal following already and now, with their first EP scheduled for February next year alongside a full UK tour, Eujenics is setting about laying the seeds for national awareness of their thickly enticing sound with Meniscus.

A great opening snarl of guitar with spicy grooving attached is quickly met by a just as tasty and gnarly bass proposal. It is magnetic stuff which continues as the song settle into its controlled but fiery stroll led by the swiftly enticing vocals of Nic Wood. Guitarists Chris Hanna and David Oswin continue to offer antagonistic riffs against heavily alluring grooves, the latter seeming to inspire a swagger in the confrontational attitude of the rhythms uncaged by bassist David Scott and drummer Chris Hall.

Every turn seems to bring a new line of imagination with each more fascinating and gripping than the last, culminating in a passage which is dominated by the predatory bass and the dark spoken tones of Wood. It is a moment which just puts the icing on the thrilling cake. Across the track this kind of invention and impassioned energy does spark thoughts of bands like Manic Street Preachers and Mind Museum but they are whispers in something already emerging as distinct to an attention grabbing band and song.

We reckon checking out Eujenics is a done deal for you all, though when you get a first bite this good the wait for the next nibble can seem a lifetime so be warned.

Meniscus is out now as a free download.

Pete RingMaster 24/09/2105

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Underground Ocean – I See Through You

Underground Ocean_RingMaster Review

Following a highly promising debut single, UK rockers Underground Ocean raise the ante with their second encounter, the explosively enticing I See Through You. In hindsight its enjoyable predecessor, Get Me Out, almost feels like the band was testing the water, building up to a bigger splash with its successor, and fair to say the new single is just that, a big nudge to greater attention.

Worcester bred Underground Ocean consists of vocalist/rhythm guitarist Stuart McDonnell, lead guitarist Matt Beddoes, bassist George Parker, and drummer Lee Evans and spices its music with inspirations ranging from Foo Fighters, The Police, and Manic Street Preachers to the Stereophonics and Fleetwood Mac. Formed early 2014, the quartet quickly set down a marker for their live presence, selling out home town gigs immediately with their debut staged in a 250 capacity venue. Since then they have played various shows across England to increasing success and acclaim with 2015 a rather busy year on that front. Now they look set and ready to stoke up more attention with I See Through You and its accompanying video.

The single instantly erupts in ears with force and energy, the swinging beats of Evans slicing through the just as rousing riffs cast by McDonnell and Beddoes. Things settle down a touch as the strong tones of McDonnell join the affair though there is still a raucous jangle from the guitars and the bass of Parker continues its eager dark stroll. The chorus is a rapid temptation too, its emotive and sonic roar coated with magnetic drama and anthemic urgency and with ease quickly involving the listener. The song continues to creatively bellow as new twists and scythes of fresh sound mingle in its angst lit heart right through to its final striking second.

Again the word rousing has to be used to describe the character and effect of the song, and its incendiary impact on satisfaction and appetite. Get Me Out was a potent introduction to Underground Ocean but I See Through You easily leaves it in its wake, and ahead of an EP the band is currently working towards, both songs ensure it is going to be one impatiently anticipated proposition.

I See Through You is available now

Pete RingMaster 14/09/2015

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The Endeavour – Voyage EP

The Endeavour Online Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

In a year of rich debuts, another strong and potential loaded introduction comes courtesy of UK rockers The Endeavour and their Voyage EP. Bulging with four tracks of dynamic and feisty alternative rock fuelled by impassioned energy and fiery melodies, the Peterborough quintet’s first offering has the potency and power to nudge national awareness of their already attention grabbing sound and presence. Voyage is not an explosion to alter any aspect of the landscape of British rock ‘n’ roll but it is a refreshing and accomplished roar from a band easy to see springing to greater heights from this highly enjoyable base.

The Endeavour began in 2013 and consists of four brothers, Shawn (vocals), Brandon (guitar), Shane (guitar), and Garren Radley (bass), and close friend Matthew Meadows (drums). They took little time in stirring up local support and successfully hitting the live scene, finding themselves sharing stages with the likes of Fort Hope, Anavue, Enter Shikari, Deaf Havana, and Funeral For A Friend over time. With Voyage, the five-piece is looking to emulate existing success on the broader canvas of countrywide recognition, and you can only imagine it will ensure at the very least that The Endeavour is a name a great many more will be very aware of.

The Endeavour Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review   The EP starts with a bang in the boisterous shape of Take It All. From its first lure of spicy riffs the song has ears and imagination alert, engrossed soon after as thumping beats join the provocative guitar bait. Swiftly followed by just as enticing hooks, it is a thrilling opening which never slips a gear as the song expands into a dramatic stroll equipped with still virulent rhythms, a wonderfully predatory bassline, and tangy guitar enterprise. Across this the excellent vocals of Shawn command attention as they spill the narrative over the track’s magnetic web of ideation. The song is unafraid to change its intensity, gait, and weight of textures across is enthralling body too but always it returns to that irresistible combination of sound and invention which set its thrilling presence in motion.

The following Open Heart reveals a more relaxed presence in energy and intensity yet also comes with sparkling melodies and striking hooks within a thick rhythmic lure. The bass again is almost bestial in tone, its barracuda voice perfect contrast to the warm smoulder wrapping the hearty enterprise alongside. Initially, as in the first song, there is a whiff of Manic Street Preachers in the air but eventually it slips into a sound more akin to a Young Guns or Taking Back Sunday. The opening track owns ears and appetite whilst the second is more an asking of attention as is No One Else To Blame, though both songs only find success. The third proposal has a catchy spine of tenacious riffs and spicy guitar adventure which shines even brighter in a mellower passage pierced by the military precision of Matthew’s sticks. As its predecessor, the track grows in potency and persuasion over time, emerging as another big, promise filled, declaration of the adventure and brewing depths in The Endeavour sound and songwriting.

Voyage is brought to an end by After The Storm, an emotive croon with lively rhythms and a slightly volatile landscape of melodic and sonic resourcefulness. The vocals and harmonies steal the show but every element of the band is a tantalising and riveting aspect as the song grows bolder and more tempestuous with every passing minute. It is a fine end to an impressive first listen to The Endeavour, Voyage showing that the band have the makings and more of something able to make a strong impact on the UK rock scene; we will be waiting like so many from now on in, with keen anticipation.

The Voyage EP is available from July 27th through all stores and @

Ringmaster 27/07/2015

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Kyshera – Circle

Kyshera 1

Not only did the release of Made In China, the second album from Welsh alternative rockers Kyshera, in 2012 ignite a lusty appetite and passion for the band’s sound and invention right here it also declared a coming of age of a band already stirring up the UK music scene. It was a stunning fusion of styles and intense flavours defying classification whilst sparking a fresh exploration of modern rock ‘n’ roll. It was a pinnacle which you could not complain if the band had merely continued to emulate its success with its successor. But this is Kyshera and they have pushed things on again with new album Circle. It is a release which in many ways has toned down the band’s ‘deranged’ inventive attack of sound this time around yet everything about it from songwriting, imagination, and again sheer diversity is a kaleidoscope of new maturity and irresistible enterprise.

Kyshera (pronounced K-eye-she-ra) consists of vocalist/guitarist James Kennedy, bassist Matt Warr, and drummer Glyn Bateman, the latter joining the band between Circle and its predecessor. Made In China was as mentioned a wake-up call for a new horde of fans and media interest towards the Cardiff trio, a tsunami of warped inventiveness and melodic ferocity which ignited ears and imagination with invention and ease. Circles does the same but with a less dramatic onslaught of startling wrong-footing moments, showing less incendiary twists of gait, time changes, and conflicting yet seamlessly entangling styles. This is not to say that it does not have moments of ingenious unpredictability though, just less dramatic and more smoothly infused ones. It would be fair to say that personally those mouth-watering moments of psychotic adventure are missed at times but replaced by explorations which simply catch the breath with their creative grandeur, the band again simply igniting the passions.

Circle is a concept album based around the tale of a “central character and the journey of his life in the modern age. His rise from the bottom to the top of our consumerist, celebrity culture only DIGIPAK WITH POCKET template INHOUSEto realise that in doing so, it came at the price of losing everything that was ‘real’ and on the last song, he dies alone.” The exploration of death, morality, celebrity, love, and consequence begins with opener Napoleon, a track which in its first breath is stirring up rigorous attention and involvement from ears and emotions. Rhythms pound with intensive hunger whilst a sonic mist brews around an early scrub of riffs. It is an initial coaxing which only intensifies as thick hooks and melodic enterprise colludes with the expressive tones of Kennedy and the throaty lures of Warr’s bass. Though subsequently relaxing a little, the song does not hang around and swiftly turns into an even spicier creative roar, returning to the more aggressive and voracious essences which it started with whilst spinning a web of diversely flavoured and inventively intriguing exploits. Groove metal and melodic rock merge with electro mischief and grungy tenacity as the track continues to grow and seduce with increasing imagination.

It is an imposingly impressive start matched immediately by the scintillating stomp of Behind These Lies. Weaving in mouth-watering nu metal revelry and quirkiness, the track strides and prowls ears, revolving through varied gaits and flavours to create a Korn meets Manic Street Preachers meets System Of A Down like devilry. The track is superb, an unrelenting temptation laying an addictive and rebellious bait of metal and heavy rock which is emulated through its own unique design by Demon straight after. The third song has a similar attitude and creative nature but an even rawer snarl and a stronger whiff of the just mentioned Welsh rockers to its captivating persuasion. The track is an inescapable anthem, vocally and musically a tenacious call to arms for senses and imagination with, as the previous songs, a very healthy twisted ingenuity in its otherwise direct and raucous rock ‘n’ roll.

     New single Gone steps up next, an inviting if unspectacular harmonic croon within a melodic bellow with a southern twang to its expression and acoustic elegance to its emotive touch. Personal tastes determine it is the full-blooded stomps which go down most riotously in tastes but there is no avoiding the increasing potency of the song and the fresh ideation emerging in the band’s new direction of sound. Its smouldering persuasion is followed by the pop rock bred The Wrong Size, a magnetic stroll swiftly involving the energy and voice of the listener , pleasingly setting them up for the outstanding Break This. Courting emotional and sonic shadows in its tempestuous web of emotive discord and musical intensity, the track blazes with rich grooves and sharp hooks, they in turn aligned to fuzzy electronics and turbulent rhythms. It is imposing and contagious, a master-class of dark and light in one furious yet inviting creative outpouring.

Endgame leaps at ears right after, no breath allowed to be swallowed as its invigorated dance of vocal and sonic bedlam bounds over the senses with vivacious appetite. It is a funk fest of pulsating basslines and swinging hooks, almost pop punk at times with leanings to electro rock in other enticing moments, and a constant revolving shuffle of diverse and unbridled rock ‘n’ roll.

The entrance of Coma next is spellbinding, simple vocal lures cast by Kennedy resonating in the psyche as they bask in the effects accentuating their coaxing. The song is soon providing a fiery and provocative mix of sonic and emotional turbulency with reflective and haunting balladry, its persuasion a transfixing and fascinating slice of songwriting and sound with simplicity as gripping as its fierce invention and claustrophobically atmospheric beauty. It is a creeping darkness contrasted by the fire like radiance and energy of Inertia which follows with its Manics meets Soundgarden like proposal. An early taster of the album as a single, the track provides a lingering pleasure matched by the more explosive but similarly melodically blazing Helen. Reminding of fellow Brits An Entire Legion, the song is a rugged and robust incitement unafraid to allow its rage and seduction to simultaneously embrace the listener.

The heavy funk romp of Full Circle strides in rigorously right after, offering a heavy rock swagger with punkish attitude as grooves and hooks enslave attention, though all is outshone by the mesmeric vocal and melodic smile of keys within the sturdy charge of the track. As you should assume here, and in all songs, there is much more going on though, heavy and classic rock a strong additional breeze and unpredictability permeating this particular impressive offering.

Circle comes to a close with acoustic ballad The End, a song which satisfies without leaving a deep mark but as a musical and lyrical epilogue to the premise of the album, ensures a potent closure. The album as a whole is simply outstanding, not a greater beast than Made In China but certainly a just as enthralling, and thrilling, unique continuation of the band’s masterful invention which in turn creates another unmissable proposition from one of the UK’s most exciting and inventive bands.

Circle is available from March 16th through Konic Records @

In April, the band embarks on their UK wide ‘Full Circle’ Tour, stopping at:

15th April – Cardiff, The Globe

16th April – Brighton, The Albert

17th April – Harlow, The Square

18th April – London, Underworld

21st April – Wolverhampton, Robin 2

23rd April – Nottingham, Rock City

24th April – Selby, The Riverside

25th April – Sheerness, The Ivy

16th May – Sheffield, The Mulberry

**Support comes from Gooding and The Broken Chords**

RingMaster 16/03/2015

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Asylums – Wet Dream Fanzine EP


What do you get if you take a pinch of Supergrass, add it to an ounce of We Are The Physics, and then spice the mixture with a further splattering of Manic Street Preachers, Devo, and We Are Scientists? Well there is a good chance it will be something like the irresistible sound of and debut release from UK psyche poppers Asylums. There have been some startling entrances and introductions over the past months alone, but it is hard to remember many getting ears and emotions as excitable as the Wet Dream Fanzine EP manages in its three short, sharp slices of angular pop rock. The release is pure contagion but with a deranged invention and devilish imagination which reminds of a few and stands thoroughly unique in its character and temptation.

Asylums hails from Southend and have already picked at rapidly growing attention through their home made videos for the tracks making up the new EP; though having the songs bound together in one addictive package seems to make them grow in greater in persuasion and flirtation again. Live too the quartet of Luke Branch, Jazz Miell, Henry Tyler, and Michael Webster have been stirring up a buzz, a tour with The Vaselines and their own headlining enterprises luring in more and more appetites from fans and media alike. Now the Wet Dream Fanzine EP steps forward, with its title track released on the same day for the band’s new single, and there is a certainty that it is poised to shake up the UK indie rock scene for the better.

That new single opens up the release, Wet Dream Fanzine instantly laying down sonic smog of guitar enterprise which with pungent rhythms, has feet and thoughts immediately engaged and enthralled. The swing of the vocal delivery matches the warm stride and swagger of the song, everything a bouncy dance of mischievous persuasion with melodies and vocal harmonies soaked in creative devilment. There is no escaping the infectiousness of the encounter or its insatiable torrent of quirky and highly flavoursome hooks, it all unrelenting for the whole of the two and a half 10868149_320437288151046_8986672175115969600_nminutes the track takes to leap all over and inflame the passions.

There is no let-up in the devilry and quality either as the punk infused tenacity and urgency of The Death of Television takes over. An initial sonic spearing is the trigger to rebellious percussion and beats aligning to vocals just as sharply edged in their delivery. The song is soon a masterful stomp of creative agitation courted by a rhythmic and riff clad proposal which leaps around like bare feet on hot coals; the type of brilliance which made Baddies so essential when around. There is also an old school punk DIY feel to the EP and songs individually, which simply energises the second song and listener during its brief but addictive stomp.

The release closes with I’ve Seen Your Face In A Music Magazine. The third song combines the spicy grooving which lit up the first song with the more caustic attitude of the last track, merging it into a melodic and discord spiced wine of sound and invention. As the other songs, attitude exudes from every pore and note of the outstanding incitement, guitars toying with the imagination as rhythms jab with their own refined tempo on the senses and pop punk sparked vocals croon and roar with perpetual captivation.

It may be only one release but it is easy to suggest Asylums is the next big thing not only in but for British rock ‘n’ roll. The last time we were this excited was when…well privacy prevents details.

The Wet Dream Fanzine EP and single are available from February 23rd via the band’s own Cool Thing Records. /

RingMaster 23/02/2015

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Thom Bowden – Searching The Brittle Light


From the release of his striking and impressive The Damage EP of 2012 there has been a healthy dose of acclaim placed around UK musician Thom Bowden and keen anticipation bred for his debut album. This week sees the unveiling of Searching The Brittle Light and those hopes are sure to be satisfied with the ten track encounter. It is not a release which impacts as potently and consistently as Bowden’s previous proposition but certainly it brings another wash of the rich potential within his songwriting and highly agreeable sound.

Surrey based, Bowden takes inspirations from the likes of The White Stripes, Nick Drake, Dresden Dolls, Fugazi, and Neil Young into his imagination catching enterprise. As mentioned The Damage EP brought strong attention and responses from fans and media alike, something you can only see the album repeating and increasing. A collection of songs written when Bowden was ‘at a low point in his life’, the album was recorded with and mixed by Steve Albini (Pixies, Nirvana, Manic Street Preachers) and mastered by Steve Rooke at Abbey Road. Inspired by some advice offered whilst the artists was in Chicago by Kim Deal, the album brings a raw honest intent and beauty to the ears. There is also a slightly more adventurous variation across the songs than on the last EP, a move you can only respect and embrace even with its slightly mixed success in comparison to the consistency of the previous release.

With guitarist Richard George and drummer Steve Matthews alongside Bowden, the album opens strongly with Click!, a song taking mere seconds to seduce ears and thoughts with its opening seduction of sultry blues kissed flames. a2137786508_2The slow swipes of guitar are soon joined by punchy beats and a darkly drawing bassline before the great expressively twanged and unpredictable voice of Bowden starts revealing the lyrical narrative. His voice and a rich essence of the music has a Frank Black like temptation which only adds to the smouldering enticement, an invitation which burns increasingly brighter as the song evolves and spreads its senses sizzling charms. The feisty stride of the track is an incessant call on the passions whilst the increasingly warped vocal delivery which by this point has a more My Red Cell essence, Bowden sounding similar to frontman Russell Toomey of the defunct Welsh band, only captivates with mischievous bait. It is a strong and gripping start to the album which without lighting fires sets up a keen appetite for its offering, a hunger soon spicily fed by the second song.

So So Long makes a controlled and infectious entrance, guitars and rhythms a simple but entrancing lure to which Bowden’s grazing tones lay angst spawned invention and caustic passion. The track never lifts its gait to anything more than a slow determined canter but with expulsions of sonic heat and expressive melodic energy, the song irresistibly wins over ears, again thoughts of the previously mentioned Welsh band coming to the fore. It is a masterful slice of sonic magnetism bringing a licking of lips. Its potent presence is followed by the ballad My Arms, the song a union of voice, guitar, and emotive textures which certainly stirs up thoughts and attention but brings an unexpected and underwhelming halt to the thrust of the album. Obviously a highly personal offering, it is hard and impossible to dismiss, or not enjoy, but the song is a wrongly positioned rein on the passions for personal preference.

The following Control brings the temperature and energy back with accomplished and thrilling enterprise. Rhythms roll invitingly through the ears as guitars swerve and let fly with melodic scythes of enticement and sonic tempting which reawakens a thirsty imagination. There is a definite eighties new wave feel to the track, another shade of familiarity which in different designs attractively flirts with most of certainly the rockier numbers on the release. As it continues to tease and impress, the glorious song casts a web of inventive guitar endeavour, melodic mischief, and sonic alchemy to treat and seduce the emotions; it all aided by an emerging Pixies sounding toxicity.

Next up How About It? slips into a gentler hug of emotive intimacy and melodic caressing around a spine of shadow involving rhythmic invention from drums and bass. It is a slowly burning temptation which takes longer than certainly the previous song to persuade but emerges as a deliciously riveting and evocative highlight of the release. Its broody success is followed by the forty five second instrumental , a piece which is just there before the outstanding With Pace unleashes its grunge spawned sinews and punkish desires. As its title suggests, the track romps with swift, heavily thumping feet and fiery riffs around which rapacious grooves and fuzz encased vocals flirt and rage respectively. There is no escaping a Nirvana comparison but as elsewhere it only spices up the brawling encounter. The album and Bowden seems to wear inspirations on their sleeve, definitely more than the EP, to predominantly bring stronger aural colours to embrace.

The raucous air and exhaustive pleasure of the triumph is swiftly tempered and brought back to the ground with the folk seeded reflection of The Water Is Cold, a decent and strikingly performed song but again an underwhelming shift in scenery and suasion. Its emerging emotional stringed flight and expressive vocal coaxing does light thoughts and feelings, but there is the thought that the track would be better served elsewhere in the order or set on a separate release to find the reaction it deserves.

The bluesy plaintive cry of In The Ground comes next to stir up a nest of satisfied thoughts and emotions with its persistent tendrils of sonic imposing and fiery enticement around another roar of vocal lament and expression. It is a track which you want more of before the final elegant balladry of Sweet And Tender brings the album to a musically and lyrically rueful close. Soaked in more folk seeded melancholy it is a captivating end to a fine if inconsistent album.

     Searching The Brittle Light is an impressive next step for Bowden but because of its intent and bravery in stretching its boundaries may be fails to match its predecessor. The songs are a clear step on in craft and maturity let alone invention but the album feels like two releases in one which defuses its impact whereas separating them into EPs of rock and ballad seeded tracks might have brought the showcase and clarity they deserve. Nevertheless Thom Bowden is an exciting talent which will be creating remarkable and keenly devoured statements ahead, we for one wait eagerly.

Searching The Brittle Light is available digitally, on vinyl, and CD now via Audio Candle Records and @


RingMaster 15/07/2014

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Post Adolescence – Goodbye from the Future


As impressive a debut and introduction that it was, the album My Nothing from US pop rockers Post Adolescence was as much potential as it was substance. Certainly the release opened up a fresh world from the band to be explored which in turn welcomed a soaking of deserved attention from certainly the underground media. It easily awoke a keen appetite in fans too for its fusion of Brit pop, post punk, and fiery melodic rock; the band finding themselves regulars on underground radio shows including ours. You can only feel though that what came before will pale against the response to the band’s recently released second album Goodbye from the Future, an encounter which realises all the promise of its predecessor and so much more. Consisting of seven thumping incitements it ripples with a maturity and confidence which leaves anything else the band has offered in the shade, offering pop infused rock ‘n’ roll of the highest compelling order to bring another sparkling highlight in the year.

The Seattle quartet seem to have taken time to hone and explore their already captivating sound over the four years between releases, resulting in as stated that maturer craft and invention to their virulent contagiousness described as songs. Formed around 2008, the band employed influences from the likes of Placebo, Manic Street Preachers, Ash, Buzzcocks, and Suede into their own imaginative songwriting and the new release again openly shows their inspirations but within a more distinctive voice to their sound. Led by the ever emotive and passionate tones of guitarist Johnny Straube, his Brian Molko like vocal warble nestling even more comfortably within the resourceful landscape of colourful sound crafted by his stringed prowess alongside the equally impressive skills of guitarist/keyboardist Adrian Garver, drummer Brian McCrossen, and bassist Gar Hooker (who since the album recording has left to be replaced by  Siobhan McCloskey), Post Adolescence has grown into a aggressively potent protagonist for ears and imagination. There is a new spark and flame to the band, and a fiercer almost punk like energy which gives life to each song as evidenced from the first moment.

Opener Asexual takes mere seconds to intrigue and stoke up an eager appetite as its initial blaze of caustic guitar comes with almost Post Adolescence - Goodbye from the Future Album Artbrawling like intent. The immediate urgency kicks up another gear as thumping rhythms batter the ear and riffs lick their lips with stronger intensity. With infectious twists and hooks playing around the distinctive vocals of Straube, the track continues to stomp with punk mischief before throwing in another curveball through a mouthwatering lure of magnetic electro inspired keys. Additional discord and warped melodies also flavour its unrelenting stride as the song makes a brilliant start to the release, an incendiary fuse to inventive revelry to come.

The following Everybody’s Sober Nowadays is given a big task to match its predecessor but it does so with individual ease, its more controlled attack and purposeful lyrical incitement swiftly captivating thoughts as keys and guitars cast a creative web to take care of ears. The song has a thick body of sound but each element is allowed clarity to add their light and shadows, the bass of McCloskey especially an appealing cloud against the more constrained rhythms of McCrossen and the fire pit of sonic endeavour and melodic intrigue offered by guitars and keys. Melancholic with the heaviest shadows, it continues the impressive flight of the album before making way for the title track where a caress of guitar coats ears first before the bass roams emotively around the emerging melodic and vocal narrative. The strongly appealing song is a tender and reflective proposition which, as all songs, is unafraid to open up its lyrical heart and show it is looking ahead with hope from within darker corners, evidencing a description of the album by Straube, “Goodbye from the Future is a final word to all the relationships from past songs, a message that won’t occupy his thoughts anymore. It’s about moving on.”

Recent single Hindsight steps up next, instantly treating ears to an electronic web as Straube’s voice opens the entrance to another sinewed proposition of honest riffs and mesmeric melodies within a raucously catchy embrace. As with the music there is a richer antagonistic edge to his delivery which brings a new potent character to sound and songs, whilst in this particular romp a devilish pop punk element is at large to create a presence which swings somewhere between Top Buzzer and Fall Out Boy. It is a masterful persuasion which ripples with ingenuity; swiping hooks, seductive harmonies, and raw passion all adding to the tenacious triumph.

The defiance soaked Fuck Off strolls in next, its tidy and keen gait making another swift persuasion if without sparking the same depth of passion for its bounty as other songs on the release. Once again there is a noticeable pop punk/power pop element to the easily pleasing stomp, a song which goes without the originality which marks the rest of the proposition and marks out the delicious Blindsighted. To be honest there is a familiarity to the glorious breeze of melodic seducing with envelops imagination and emotions too, but it only brings richer spice to the synth pop spawned beauty. It is a fascinating and irresistible weave of evocative melodic colours and sonically sculpted hues within a spellbinding web of bracing textures and mellow elegance. The best song on Goodbye from the Future it almost alone shows the new plateau Post Adolescence walks.

The album is concluded with What You Would Call Socialism (I Would Call Civilization), a final emotionally anthemic, musically enthralling dance to spark another wave of unbridled satisfaction. A sturdy yet radiant adventure with more of the unpredictable and eagerly bristling invention which has emerged in the band’s song writing and sound, the track is an exciting finale to a thoroughly impressive and thrilling release. Post Adolescence has graduated from a strong enjoyment into a mouthwatering and breath-taking proposition; it was on the cards with their first album but expectations have been left looking pretty feeble by the brilliance of Goodbye from the Future, and you still feel it is only a step in something even greater to come.

Goodbye from the Future is available now @


RingMaster 18/06/2014

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