The Tuesday Club – Art Is Magic

Trials and turbulences are no strangers to most bands but few as acute as that which impacted on British outfit The Tuesday Club and almost brought it to an end. Now though they are poised to release “unlikely album 3” in the shape of Art Is Magic, a slab of multi-flavoured rock ‘n’ roll which certainly gets under the skin in no time but an itch which just gets more delicious and addictive by the listen. It is their finest moment built across ten bold devilish tracks embracing old and new sounds with a unique imagination and their inimitable touch.

Formed in 2011 in Walmington-on-Sea, the renowned setting for British legendary comedy Dad’s Army, The Tuesday Club was an eight piece extravaganza of sound and creative revelry embracing the sights and mischief of their home town’s TV heritage. Their sound blossomed with the punk nurtured DIY attitude and inspiring sounds of the late seventies yet from day one cast its own aural image as proven by debut album See You Next Tuesday in 2013. It was a proposition though which was evolving from that first release and in open exploration by the band’s second album which was released as a quadrilogy of four EPs.

Devastation hit after the release of the first EP when drummer Terry Super Cockell tragically died. Though the band completed the album’s unveiling it was obviously without zeal; as they say the following EPs released in a ‘daze’, with the band falling to its knees and closing in on demise as members subsequently left. It was a challenging, life questioning and changing time which was not so obvious to the outside world at the time such the quality of those releases but maybe now best understood by checking out Reverse Family’s current project 365 days of songwriting, the band the solo project of TTC’s founding member Andreas Vanderbraindrain though he goes by Dermot Illogical for it. It is a still on-going colossal collection of tracks written across those times released as an EP a week for a year, many of its songs spawned from the darkness he personally fell into through those times.

TTC did survive though, its remaining members regrouping and finding a new breath and energy, stripping away “much of the old ‘glamour’ replacing it with a new urgency and directness.” Alongside vocalist Vanderbraindrain, the band now consists of guitarist Dave Worm, bassist/keyboardist Rogerio Marauder, and drummer Blairdrick Sharpely. As they suggested, the quartet has stripped back the TTC sound and brought forward its raw breath and instinctive imagination whilst broadening yet honing its creative flavourings and adventure.

Art is Magic opens with its title track, slipping in on a rhythmic coaxing until a lash of sound sparks a post punk lined stroll led by Vanderbraindrain’s distinctive tones. The song prowls the senses, keys simultaneously providing a melancholic yet mystique lined caress; it all uniting in an infectious swing and call to join its arcane devilry. Captivation was swift and only escalated as the track tempted and teased with its seventies lent enterprise.

It is a thickly potent start to the album keenly backed by the poppier rock exploits of Always taking things too far. It bounces around like a mix of Athletico Spizz 80 and Mammal Hum, a fusion of new wave and art rock which poked the appetite initially, whetted its lips further before thereon in fully teasing eager greed by the listen. It is a trait of the album as a whole, making an attention grabbing first impression but spawning lustier reactions by the play though some songs like Soulless City Syndrome had us instantly drooling. Its opening noir tinted intimation simply nurtured intrigue, the following electronic and tenacious punk ‘n’ roll of the song sparking the passions as it cantered lustfully through ears. The best track on Art is Magic, it twists and lures like an Adicts meets Zanti Misfits inspired dervish wearing a cape woven with threads of The Monochrome Set for one unique and gorgeous encounter.

It is a hard task to follow such a pinnacle yet Fruit Salad Girl with its spiky pop rock makes relatively light work of it, the infection loaded romp a nagging rock ‘n’ roll roar which had the body bouncing and vocal chords blaring in no time before Drowning My Sorrows allowed a breath to be taken with its folk pop saunter. Not that it is a dormant on the catchiness, its easy going but boisterous swing leading feet and hips away like a collusion of The Farmer Boys and Swell Maps.

Put your Faith in what you can control similarly has a laid back but tenaciously catchy gait and demeanour, again the band’s lo-fi instincts breeding a richly appetising temptation as rhythmically persuasive as it is melodically and lyrically sharp. Thus eager involvement was swift and as forcibly recruited by the bolder rousing punk ‘n’ roll of We are the Team, a song which is the band announcing they are undefeated and returning with new vigour and invention whilst creating a personal declaration for all to embrace.

It would be a shock not to have the scent of early Adam and The Ants somewhere within a TTC encounter, Let the kids run the country the irresistible moment within Art Is Magic as the band source their own earlier traits and another influences’ for a greed brewing slice of aural virulence before the darker tone and shadows of Rock and Roll’s not a science infests ears and psyche like a viral infection you cannot shake off, or in this case want to. The song reminded of short lived Welsh punks The Table at times but again TTC spin a web of sound and addiction all their own.

The album concludes with Who and youz army, a rhythmically tenacious and infectiously barbed slice of punk rock which would have aroused air punching crowds back in the day just as now. Its hooks are familiar yet inescapable and its character old school with the irritability of today; ingredients ensuring Art Is Magic goes out on a major high.

Listening to their album just hits home what we would be missing without The Tuesday Club and how lucky newcomers will be now discovering them through such a glorious romp.

Art Is Magic is released May 6th with its launch party the same night @ The Lower Red Lion in St. Albans pre-ordering available now @ https://theperfectpopco-op.bandcamp.com/album/art-is-magic

http://thisisthetuesdayclub.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/thisisthetuesdayclub/   https://twitter.com/thetuesdayclub1    https://twitter.com/Vnderbraindrain

Pete RingMaster 30/03/2018

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No Middle Name – Another Season

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Released on Mollusc Records, the label that brought us the exceptional imaginative sounds of the debut Mammal Hum album last year, Another Season the debut single from No Middle Name is a track which ignites the imagination as it gently swarms around the ear. Offering a lo-fi bred warm enchantment the song is a soundscape for dreams and drifting thoughts in the haze of a summer heat and quite captivating

No Middle Name is the solo project of David Bailey, one half of The Title Sequence. The tale behind the single is that Rory Mansfield of Hull’s Mollusc records gave the artist the opportunity to create No Middle Name by allowing him unlimited access to Glove Box studio to craft an album. This came after a chance meeting at a garden party in Dalston. After an intense seven week period what emerged was not the acoustic piece the label was expecting but a lo-fi dream pop album employing creative and interesting uses of samples within the charms of guitars, synthesizers and the melodic songwriting that Bailey is renowned for with The Title Sequence. After a couple of teases online, Another Season is the first official release from the project and an enthralling invitation to the forthcoming album.

Featuring the delicious ethereal vocals of Lindsay West alongside Bailey, the song emerges from a distance to gently coax and draw in the senses as vocal harmonic samples and musty keys embrace the ear. Once confidently into its stride the dual vocals loudly whisper and glide over the imagination painting an elegant warm experience on their own with the vibrant sounds and enveloping atmosphere adding richer hues to the aural kaleidoscope. Simple in its touch and exquisite in its creation, the single strolls and skips over the emotions making visual suggestions as its evocative caresses and building depths wash over the senses with dreamy temptation.The almost nagging persistence of that vocal sample which haunts the ear from start to finish reminds in effect of The Somnambulist by XTC, its constant niggling a slightly sinister shadow within the golden blaze of splendour elsewhere.

Accompanied by an excellent eccentric animated video which Bailey created using a low-budget scanner and a pad of paper, as well as a series of radio shows exploring the influences behind his new musical path and featuring tracks off the album, as well as one off tracks made exclusively for the mixes at http://www.mixcloud.com/nomiddlename, Another Season is a delicious introduction to band which raises an eager appetite for the future full length release. With a sound said to be heavily influenced by the likes of Wild Nothing and Youth Lagoon, No Middle Name is a major adventure for the musical year set to expand fully when the first album, as suggested by the single, leads thoughts and passions into new arousing sun coated pastures.

https://www.facebook.com/nomiddlenamemusic

8/10

RingMaster 10/07/2013

 

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Interview with Leon Welburn of Mammal Hum

Sometimes a band steps forward to truly captivate and excite the senses, to thrill the heart and fire up the imagination like very few others are able. One such band is UK psychedelic pop band Mammal Hum, a quartet of musicians who have created not only one of the best albums this year but treated the passions to mischievous sounds of textured and layered majestic beauty. The release is a mouthwatering expanse of diversity and mesmeric soundscapes to ignite open ardour towards it. Not just wanting but needing to learn more about the band, album, and the minds behind such a unique release we had the pleasure to fire off questions to band member Leon Welburn.

Hello Leon and welcome to the site.

Firstly please just introduce the band.

Hi everyone. We are Mammal Hum, a four-piece from Hull, made up of Nick Cammack, Simon Andrew, Sarah Mole and myself, Leon Welburn

We have to ask firstly about the band name…?

Ha! The band name was a laborious process. We very nearly all fell out over it. So, four part harmonies are an essential part of our sound. We saw it as a whole-band voice. A communal ‘hum’ with each member vital to the mix. Hum can also be extended to form the word Humber, the river by which our hometown rests. We’d like to think its different if anything else.

Can you tell us how Mammal Hum began and how Geoff Travis comes into the equation even though it is before the band is a reality I believe?

Nick formed a band a few years back in London, involved with Blanco Y Negro. Geoff Travis was linked to them at the time and basically Nick landed a deal after speaking to him. Then, the band went their separate ways. Nick returned to Hull in 2008 while the others continued to pursue different musical projects. A few months after this, I put my house up for sale, and Nick was one of the prospective buyers. He didn’t end up putting an offer in, but he did notice a Hammond Organ in the corner of the room, and we started chatting about music and bands. A week later I saw Nick in our local pub, and we agreed to have a jam one night with Sarah, who we had both known for a while. The band was pretty much formed that night.

What are the musical experiences for you all leading up to the band?

Nick and Simon have been in a variety of bands for years, Sarah is into DJing, and although this is my first serious band, I’ve been playing and recording solo music for about ten years.

Now a quartet, I read the band began life as a trio before Simon joined up, if so did that mean you used guest drummers, electronic or went without?

We started as a six-piece band with a drummer, two guitarists, bassist, two keyboards, and four singers. Quite hefty really. We lost one guitarist early on when he moved away. Then our drummer left to work abroad. For a while we tried to work as with drum machines and loops, and take it in an acoustic direction, but it just didn’t sit right. One of our ladies (Nick’s partner) departed to have their first child. At this point we realised we desperately needed drums. We knew Simon played guitar in another band, approached him one evening, and he agreed to rehearse with us. The minute he began drumming, we knew he was exactly the person we needed. A loose jazz style, with lots of heavy, rolling toms. That was, and still is, the Mammal line-up.

We used the tag psychedelic pop which most seem to use to describe your music for our review of your new album What’s Behind Us Is Not Important. It is a description which just grazes your sound to be honest, how would you explain your music and intent to newcomers?

Bright and breezy pop nuggets with layered group harmonies, chunky guitar and big drums scattered in and out of various tracks. It’s an album that tries its best not to be too serious. That’s not to say we are deliberately tongue in cheek or humoured. The songs just seem to happen this way.

What are the influences which have had the biggest impact and effect on your individual and band sound? One imagines there are many whispers which spice your ideas.

We always liked the idea of not being tied to a specific musical genre. We have so many different influences from the Beatles and Beach Boys, along with a host of 60s psychedelia, to Sparks, Super Furry Animals, 80s and contemporary electronica….there really are too many to mention, but hopefully this gives you an idea.

There are shall we say nostalgic tones to your music but with a freshness and imagination of modern times, how easy or instinctive is finding and reaching the balance in your sounds?

We used to write the tracks separately, and then it reached a point where we felt the best songs were being created organically in the rehearsal room. One of us would come up with an underlying theme for a track, and the rest of us would all contribute with lyrics and ideas. Pretty much the entire album is based on this system. We do keep influences in mind when writing songs, but always manage to pull ourselves away from being a sounding too much like our influences. I suppose we all value the importance of wanting original sounds, and creative freedom, so luckily yes it feels like a fairly easy process. Always helps!

Where do your songs seed from and how do they evolve within the band?

Our songs come from childhood memories. The Bingo Wing is about sitting in social clubs playing bingo as a kid. Mechanical Horse is about a local bus I used to travel on, and the varied and interesting characters you would see and become accustomed to week in, week out. The life of a car, bee epidemics, close and distant acquaintances, folk tales and our seemingly tiny existence in the enormity of everything which surrounds us……just some of the things we like to write about.

Though the songs upon What’s Behind Us Is Not Important are organic and breathe melodies like we do air, one senses that in the studio a lot of care, time and attention is attached to every aspect of the tracks, is that the case?

Yes. In a way. We do actually try to keep our production quite raw. Not too embellished. However, we do return to songs regularly with new ideas on how various sections can be improved, how vocals may be better structured, re-structuring sections, adding and taking out instruments……basically trying to get a song sounding as interesting as we can, usually within the space of three or four minutes. This isn’t a set rule we stick too though. It does commonly happen though.

How long did the album take to record and was it one big session or an ongoing process in its birth?

It took about two and a half years in all. We originally started recording in late 2010 on an analogue desk belonging to Nick, and then the desk lost its way, and had to be serviced…..in fact it’s still in need of a service. We had major problems with it in the end. The rest of the album was recorded during the last twelve months, by our friends Richard Gilbert from label-mates Lymes, and Patrick Tobin at Room Room Studios in Hull.

Admittedly I am no musician but it is hard to imagine where you start to compose your sprawling mesmeric soundscapes, so please give some clues haha.

Going back to the rehearsal room idea. We really do start with a riff, or drum pattern or keyboard part, or a bass run. It usually has a Captain Beefheart twang to it. What usually happens next is a twenty minute jam. I’ll usually record it on a mobile phone, and we will build the track up over a series of rehearsals, before layering it all up in the studio. It’s a four-way split from nothing. That’s how we roll in Mammal Hum

You are all multi instrumentalists I believe, does that bring a depth of ideas and imagination to songs which maybe are not as strong in other bands?

Not so much multi-instrumentalists. Well apart from Simon, who really can either play every instrument, or is learning to! We do like applying ourselves to, and experimenting with other instruments though. This definitely makes a more interesting sound. It does expand your creativity and make you much more imaginative. You don’t feel constrained to the usual formula.

How does your expansive sound transfer to a live setting, do you have to make any adjustments to bring the same effect as on recordings?

We use samplers, effects pads, overdriven bass and guitar and the big big drums, to try and reflect what goes on in the records. That combined with four voices on stage makes it quite challenging on some tracks to get the overall balance. A good challenge of course. At the same time, we like to tinker with our live set enough for it not to be a repetition of what you hear on the album. You may as well just give the crowd then an album each and send them home. We find the idea of sounding exactly like the album tracks a little……well…….constrictive! That’s absolutely no disrespect to bands who aim to achieve this. We have actually started doing more acoustic gigs to see how the tracks convert when played unplugged. We can then push the harmonies further to the front. The acoustic gigs have been working well actually! We sit in the middle of the room instead of on stage. It’s a nice vibe.

In our review of What’s Behind Us Is Not Important we brought up names of artists like Kontrust, De Staat, The Knack, XTC, The Monkees, Flaming Groovies, Ok Go and even Marilyn Manson (read the review to see why ;)), showing the diversity of your release and richness of its sounds. Any there you would agree with or have you wondered if we were drinking at the time? Haha

I can see The Monkees in there, and some Flaming Groovies. We do like XTC too………Marilyn Manson???? That’s not a comparison I’d either thought I’d hear to be honest! Interesting! Haha!

Is there a prime intention or aim you bring to your music and has it evolved over time?

No specific aim, other than for us all to be creative, enjoy it and invent! The music certainly has shifted in style slightly as band members left, and others joined. The music on the album is certainly representative of our direction over the past three years though.

Also how has your music changed since those early days in 2008?

The music has changed quite a lot, and for the better in our opinion. The voices have always remained, but we are certainly much more versatile now.

What is next for and from Mammal Hum?

We are planning a follow-up album on Mollusc Records. We are currently writing tracks for this one, and hope to start recording next year. Expect a different direction, a lot more laid-back, gentle affair. A bit of a departure really, but an idea we really want to work with. We have plenty of ideas in the pipeline……

A big thank you for sharing time to talk with us, any parting words you would like to leave behind?

Thanks for chatting to us, and to friends for their support, and Mollusc Records for their continued hard work. Please listen to the album…..and yeah start a band. It has ups and downs, but its good fun. What’s Behind You Is Not Important……

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mammal-Hum/11380710291

Read the review of What’s Behind Us Is Not Important @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2012/09/13/mammal-hum-whats-behind-us-is-not-important/

RingMaster Review 27/09/2012

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Mammal Hum: What’s Behind Us Is Not Important

For all the excellent and impressive releases which have captured the imagination this year those that are truly unique make up a small percentage. With its release on September 17th What’s Behind Us Is Not Important from UK psychedelic pop band Mammal Hum, will add to that limited number of mouth watering original sounding releases. The album is simply wonderful, a surprising and glorious piece of imagination full of melodic enterprise and passionate ingenuity. It is also one of the most mischievous albums to appear, its songs teasing and coaxing the heart into reaction with a wicked glint to its sonic eye.

From Kingston Upon Hull, the quartet of Nick Cammack, Simon Andrew, Sarah Mole, and Leon Welburn, create music which has multiple hearts and breaths to its songs, the flavouring and influences a widespread realm of inventiveness turned into distinct Mammal Hum conjurations. Formed in 2008 as a trio, the band expanded with the addition of drummer Andrew the following year as they realised the sound was missing something. Fully armed with the vision and musical prowess of four aural troubadours, the band began writing songs across the following three years, the best going to make what is one wonderful release in What’s Behind Us Is Not Important. Multi-instrumentalists and a group vocal contribution throughout, the band has given the album a textured and layered majestic beauty, its sound a sprawling mesmeric soundscape of eighties power pop, seventies punk, and sixties psychedelia with whispers of indie folk and garage rock. Quite simply the release is big, bold, and boisterously magnificent.

Released through Mollusc Records, the album grabs the ear and flings it into an irresistible feisty maelstrom of explosive imagination from the very start with Disco Drumbo. With a gentle hi-hat and guitar welcome the song soon erupts into a flurry of garage riffs and eager inciteful rhythms alongside group vocals. With a raw energy and offering an incessant tease, the song is brilliant, a combined mix of Kontrust, De Staat, and The Knack filtered through Eddie & The Hot Rods for music at its primal and ingenious best.

The following Man On Fire and Shallow Beep swiftly venture into different golden fields, the first a pulsating glassy melodic sun with spices of XTC to its rays. The harmonies drawn vocally and musically burn with their withering heat whilst mesmerising with sixties pop caresses. The second song starts with the magic of The Monkees to its wings, the beginning a close cousin to songs like Last Train To Clarksville. A more relaxed and tender song than the first pair it still has emotions and thoughts tumbling with total pleasure.

Already to be honest the album has drawn passionate submission before its mighty craft and sounds but as the likes of the bristling pop gem I Am A Car, the rhythmic thumping that is The Bingo Wing, and the eagerly agitated Buzz Buzz, Kill Kill!!! smother the senses with further wanton aural mischief one is in deeper raptures. Each song is unique to each other and to anything elsewhere, the first of this trio a discord drifting pop classic whilst the second sounds like a big boned hook loaded Marilyn Manson song translated through a psychedelic maelstrom of sixties progressive and folk pop warmth. The third of these is simply a blistering scuzz spiced mix of The Flaming Groovies, Magic Numbers, and Ok Go, and stunning.

Alongside the opener, easily the fiercest burning highlight on the album is Sunday Express, a song of sheer musical beauty. It starts with just voice and acoustic guitar and captivates from the first breath, note, and word. It slowly evolves as the band adds its perfect touches without rushing until it has grown in to maybe one of most infectious pieces of sunshine heard in a long time. Whilst in its company it is impossible to refrain from joining in and after its departure, it is locked inside the head for hours, days after.

A fifteen track bumper pleasure the album is a consistent ride of immense joy with further outstanding songs like Bad Anita Barden and Little Hands just opening the gates to wider adoration. What’s Behind Us Is Not Important is the truest statement but one suspects what came before was as impressive and what lies ahead will leave hearts bursting at the seams. Mammal Hum and their album are one of the best things to emerge this year, maybe the very best.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mammal-Hum/11380710291

RingMaster 13/09/2012

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