Mala Ruckus – People Mountain People Sea

Formed in Dalian, China, consisting of 5 musicians from 4 different countries and now residing in Prague, in the Czech Republic, Mala Ruckus and their seriously captivating sound is one of the music world’s best kept secrets. Maybe and hopefully that will not be the case for longer with the upcoming release of the band’s debut album, People Mountain People Sea. It is a showcase and rich introduction to the quintet’s multi-flavoured indie folk pop/rock, a collection of songs which get under the skin like a sensuous itch and has the body and emotions bouncing like the first days of summer.

Formed in 2013, Mala Ruckus first came to our attention two years later when they introduced themselves and debut EP Make the Monkey Watch to the site. It offered three lively and swiftly magnetic songs which in hindsight certainly hinted at the wider tapestry of sound now shaping People Mountain People Sea. Those tracks make up a quarter of the album and sound as fresh and exciting amongst their new companions as the first day heard. That is the key to the band’s sound, its ability to feel as refreshing as its first listen a hundred times later, that coupled to a bold imaginative and an instinctive aptitude to be virulently infectious no matter how it comes.

Fronted by the instantly magnetically distinctive voice of Canadian vocalist/guitarist Alex Montyro, Mala Ruckus swiftly get down to business with opener Run. Straight away the melody casting strings of Montyro and Ireland bred guitarist Caolon O’Neill Forde coax ears, the crisp beats of American born drummer Sean Rollins lurking and finally adding a skip to the already boisterous song. The keys of Francis Carlisle and the bass of fellow Brit Ian James add their smiling strolls to the swinging encounter thereafter, the song like a fusion of Jim Jiminee and Arctic Monkeys and quite irresistible.

In saying that it is still eclipsed by the following Hoverboards where straightaway the medieval spiced mandolin of O’Neill Forde has ears and imagination hooked. That melodic invitation sparks a boisterous stroll of indie rock pop, rhythms tenacious bait within the track’s energetically melodic shuffle. Montyro’s vocals again just hit the spot as unerringly as the sounds around him, especially the pulsating bassline, kinetic parade of hooks, and the harmonic glaze from across the band.

Trees, Fields is next, the song a calmer but no less catchy proposition with its bold rhythms within a folkier air equipped with a sighing temptation of strings. Like an Autumn sunset, the song is a fine blend of melancholy and warmth becoming increasingly vivacious by the minute before making way for the compelling croon of Words. With a country twang and a more reserved urgency compared to its predecessors, the song sways in ears, sharing another adventurous side to vocals and melodic enterprise whilst echoing the success of those around it.

The sampled opening of Sheets sets the oppressive tone of the world but one soon calmed and evolved by the emerging melodic canter of the track. As with the previous song, its energy and spirit brews by the second, every twist and turn, each vocal and musical touch escalating in creative drama and thickening emotion. There is a Coldplay like scent to the song by its close but in a good way as it stirs the passions up ready for successor East Hastings. From its own gentle and provocative entrance complete with a Latin seeded seduction, the track rises up with evocative drama for a creative helter skelter. Revolving with fervour and diversity, the track is immense; a slice of indie rock theatre as composed and fluid as it is boldly unpredictable and the best song winner.

It is persistently rivalled to be fair, from those before and following such as the jazz funk lined Nowhere Bound with its smoky tone, soulful brass, and hazy melodies,  and in turn Take It Away. The second is a frisky carnival; its Mediterranean swing and smiling melodies pure flirtation backed as teasingly by vocals and its friskier rock ‘n’ roll side. Reminding a little of UK band JacksonsWarehouse, as a few tracks do, the song has hips swinging and spirit bouncing with zeal for four delicious minutes.

New single Beast of our Babylon brings a more sombre breeze to the adventure but with no less captivation and pleasure involved. It is a folk nurtured ballad with melancholic strings and acoustic elegance round the emotive tones of Montyro which just thickens and captivates second by second, maybe missing the mischief of other encounters within the album but rich in creative beauty to spark just as much pleasure.

The following pair of Fire and Ghosts ignite their own dose of lusty acclaim, the first a prime snappy fusion of the band’s folk/indie rock recipe and quite beguiling while the second is the perfect crescendo of energy and spirit. Its build from an emotive kiss and melodic caress is simply sublime, rhythms a brewing tour de force driving the increasing tempo and rousing air looming upon the senses, and its arrival into a virulent rock ‘n’ roll escapade irresistible.

The album departs with Barmaid, a raw sepia hued slice of lively folk seduction which has feet tapping, hips swaying, and vocal chords humming in seconds. Its sorrowful sigh is just as warming as its harmonic tempting and rhythmic teasing providing the perfect way to drift off into the sunset of People Mountain People Sea.

All the promise of that first EP has been exploited within the album but taken to a level not anticipated back then. It is quite wonderful and the fact that the common words coming from those hearing it with us is “Damn this band is good” says it all.

To keep abreast of the release date of People Mountain People Sea and gig news check out https://www.malaruckus.com/     https://www.facebook.com/malaruckus/      https://twitter.com/malaruckus

Pete RingMaster 01/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Mala Ruckus – Make the Monkey Watch

MR_RingMaster Review

We have a new unexpected treat to share with you, a band and release from the modern seaport of Dalian in China. They are Mala Ruckus and they have introduced themselves to us with debut EP Make the Monkey Watch. The band is a quintet which formed in 2013 with members hailing from Canada, America, Ireland, and a pair from Britain; expatriates creating their own unique captivation of alternative and indie rock with healthy essences of folk and pop. It is a sound which flirts with ears, sparks the imagination, and in the form of Make the Monkey Watch, has triggered a keen appetite and anticipation for the band’s first album which they are currently finishing up.

Since emerging the band has played in a host of Chinese cities earning a reputation and following for their energetic live shows and irresistibly engaging sound, now rife on their EP. Times are a changing though with the band now not allowed to play live in the country but if their upcoming album sounds as full and flavoursome as Make the Monkey Watch, new spotlights and openings might and should begin stirring elsewhere.

COVER   The EP opens with Run, a song quickly engaging ears in a lively melodic coaxing courtesy of the guitars of Alex Montyro and Caolon O’Neill Forde. The song quickly slips into vibrant stroll with Francis Carlisle’s smiling keys alongside intricate guitar flirtation cupping the distinctive voice of Montyro as darker rhythmic hues spun by bassist Ian James and drummer Sean Rollins provide the shuffle to entice feet and hips. It is a ridiculously catchy proposal, like Jim Jiminee meets Arctic Monkeys but with its own original voice and mischievous air, which as the music, just gets more infectious with each passing chorus and tenacious swing.

A great start is backed and eclipsed by Hoverboards, its medieval spiced mandolin entrance already a wink on the appetite and imagination before things get hectic. A rousingly anthemic slice of folk /rock pop, the track leaps and bounds on rhythmic revelry and vocal enterprise, a success matched in prowess and adventure by eager riffs, teasing hooks, and another great pulsating bassline. The band continues to tenaciously canter through ears until taking a side step into a harmonic daze, drifting with a smile on their faces before taking the listener back to the irresistible ride it came in on.

Words is the third of the songs making up Make the Monkey Watch, another captivating encounter though with more reserve and urgency to its nature than its predecessors. What it lacks in physical dynamism it more than makes up in adventurous vocals and melodic enterprise, saving outbursts solely for a loudly vivacious magnetic chorus.

It is a fine end to an excellent first look/listen with Mala Ruckus; the first of many we are already eagerly hoping. They might be living in a restrictive musical place and time right now but given the chance the band, and we suspect album, could be inciting wider spotlights very soon.

The Make the Monkey Watch EP is out now @ http://malaruckus.bandcamp.com/releases

http://malaruckus.com/   https://www.facebook.com/malaruckus   https://twitter.com/malaruckus

Pete RingMaster 06/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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