I, The Betrayer – 7 EP

I, the Betrayer might quite likely be a new name to you if outside of Norway but that could very well change and in quick time if the Oslo metallers bring the rich potential of their debut EP to reality. The release is a multi-flavoured proposal with its roots firmly in a thrash/heavy metal bed which just ripples with energy, creative hunger, and imagination. The 7 EP has been garnering plaudit loaded reviews and comments since its release a matter of a few days ago and it does not take too long to hear why.

Formed in 2014, the quintet embrace a host of styles for their ear grabbing sound; the likes of blues and progressive rock entangling with those aforementioned thrash and classic metal flavours as well as darker extreme metal hues. The result is a proposition which has familiarity and originality in collusion within songs which demand rather than ask for attention. Add a vocalist in Chris Wiborg who provides another fine balance of clean and darker tones to match the same union within music skilfully conjured and crafted by the band and you have something which really warrants a close look.

The EP opens with Credulity and instantly surges through ears on a tide of thrash blossomed riffs and thumping rhythms. Wiborg is quickly in the mix with his strong expressive delivery, the riffs and grooves of Geir Prytz and Alex Bjørklund driving and binding the song with infectious energy and enterprise. Across its snarling body, the track hints at more vicious and antagonistic intent but never quite unleashes either though the brooding bassline of Kyle Sevenoaks midway has a predacious edge which hits the spot.

It is a potent start soon eclipsed by the virulent rapacity and character of Selfish Ride. Sensed in the first, the second track brings a stronger Metallica meets Machine Head like tone to its more irritable nature. That attitude is simultaneously tempered and supported by Wiborg, his mixed delivery adding fuel to the fire of the song’s rock ‘n’ roll which in turn is driven by the highly persuasive swinging beats of Terje Høias. As suggested at the beginning about the release, there is something recognisable about the track yet everything about it is equally fresh and magnetic, though it too is overshadowed by its successor as the EP just blossoms to greater heights song by song.

Conformity is next, its opening melodic lure a radiate invitation but courted by a more portentous bassline; both leading into a web of intrigue and vocal temptation. The calm introduction subsequently makes way for a fiery wash of nagging riffs and skittish rhythms, the track twisting and turning like a dervish in between its charge of chugging dexterity and moments of alluring melodic invention. Things only get more appealing once Wiborg adds a Serj Tankian like unpredictability to his presence, the song too teasing with a mercurial System Of A Down like loco.

Things are calm again as Humanity opens up its melodic arms, every melody and bass caress a suggestive moment matched by Wiborg’s great vocals. Across its melancholic yet radiate presence, the track erupts with greater volatility, fire in its belly as emotion and sonic expression flares before slipping back into its mellow reflection with ease. Things get truly heated in time with eagerly tenacious rhythms spearing a weave of progressive drama under a sweltering climate of sound and intensity.

Things begin to follow a pattern now, the calm before the storm once more enticing the listener as the outstanding Creatures Of Hate dances with a sultry gentleness in ears; ensnaring them and the imagination for the darker, almost demonic intent and imagination of its enthralling shadow woven body. The track is hypnotic, its predatory tranquillity a deceit to the dark heart at its core as humanity is exposed. It is also another fresh aspect to the I, The Betrayer sound and invention, its more primal dark metal inclinations managing to take the EP to its darkest place yet its most composed and imperious.

The release is closed up by firstly the growling thrash bred Boaster,  a track which like the opener is maybe not the most  adventurous but leaves a stronger appetite for the band’s sound and recognition of their  skills and lastly Ignorance Pt. 1, an emotive ballad with an underlying dark edge in outlook and sentiment. Though neither quite have the spark of their predecessors, each only adds to the impressive presence and adventure of 7.

Simply out, the EP is a potential rich and increasingly impressive first encounter with I, The Betrayer but more importantly a fiercely enjoyable one. Expect to hear their name and sounds much more from hereon in.

The 7 EP is out now through Darkspawn Records and available @ https://ithebetrayer.bandcamp.com/releases

http://www.ithebetrayer.com/    https://www.facebook.com/ithebetrayerr    https://twitter.com/itbmetal

Pete RingMaster 14/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Barbed hook and stirring insights: talking Kill II This

A growing and attention grabbing force within the UK metal/rock underground scene from the mid-nineties, with acclaim crowded albums under their belts, it is fair to say that the demise of Manchester’s Kill II This in 2004 left many heartbroken. Their return a decade later though not only re-ignited that following but lured a new wave of fans especially recently through the recently released single Sleeper Cell. The track showed that the quartet of vocalist Simon Gordon, guitarist Mark Mynett, bassist Pete Stone, and drummer Jeff Singer had not only retained their rousing metal and heavy rock blended sound but found a fresh energy and adventure within in. We recently had the chance to explore the past, present, and beyond of the band with thanks to four string slapper Pete…

Hi Pete and many thanks for sharing your time to talk with us.

You have just released the video for new song Sleeper Cell but before we talk about that can you give some background to Kill II This and how it all came to be in the mid-nineties?

Mark, Jeff and myself were in a band called China Beach in the early 90’s – we really learned our trade in that band, touring Europe relentlessly, often just living in our van, sleeping on top of the gear….We would probably have been classed as Power metal back then, but we were getting the urge to get a lot heavier as the metal scene at that time was evolving. We decided to look for a new singer and – and that’s how we ended up with Nick Arlea who at the time was living in New York playing in a band called Power.

We had a fair bit of music already written that was just way too heavy for China Beach and so Kill II This was born. We got the album recorded fairly quickly (Another Cross II Bare) and more touring began. We already had a reputation for being a hard working reliable band and I think that helped us get some of those early tours.

Did you have a specific aim and sense of direction for the band at the time?

Just onwards and upwards really…None of us had a job so there was only the band to focus on. Things were comparatively easy back then ha ha! We never purposefully tried to fit into any genre – we started using samples a lot more adding a new dimension to the live shows and our overall sound…at the time nobody was really doing that.

How has that changed, if at all, with the reactivating of the band a couple of years back.

Well we’re a little bit older now obviously, with the responsibilities that brings! I don’t feel as desperate to prove ourselves anymore I guess…we’re not trying to be the next big thing anymore! We are immensely proud of what we do though and are thoroughly enjoying our revival. I’m loving the new stuff we’re doing and Simon has breathed new life into our back catalogue…he kills it every night on stage. I still don’t know how he didn’t end up with us way back to be honest-we’ve been mates for years!

You released a quartet of albums with for us the second in Deviate the moment the band truly clicked within the metal scene and its keenest attention. How did you find it at the time trying to make that breakthrough?

I think at that time the band felt like we had really earned any success we were getting. We had worked hard and made a lot of sacrifices in our lives. We were touring nonstop still and had some fantastic tours with the likes of Slipknot, Megadeth and Machine Head to name a few, as well as headlining in our own right, and it just felt like the natural progression of things…we worked hard and we were starting to see results. Good times!

Would you say that the album was also the moment the band’s true and distinct sound suddenly blossomed?

Undoubtedly…I think Mark had really found his riff writing groove – I think he would agree that DV8 was probably our best album too. There were some internal wranglings through this period – I had left the band for a while, Caroline joined for a while, then I came back – all sorts going on, but the end result was still that unmistakable Kill II This sound.

Fifth album, A New Spiritual Mountain was marked out by the band as being its last but eventually emerged under the moniker City Of God. What is the story behind it and that switch? Was it mostly because of the new character of sound it embraced?

I think really this is a question for Mark as I didn’t play a part in that project, however personally I don’t think it was in in the same vein as Kill II This musically. There was definitely a different feel to it. It was the first time I’d heard Simon sing like that too really-even more aggressive than his Xentrix stuff. Great album though – we often wonder if we should sneak a song or two from it into our live set…

Leaping forward to the now; Sleeper Cell undoubtedly has that signature Kill II This sound and personality but equally a fresh breath of adventure and indeed aggression. How do you see your sound as having evolved since the comeback?

A few years ago Simon and myself were in a band with a couple of the guys from Xentrix called Hellfighter, which I guess had some thrash undertones and I’m hearing some old school influences in our new stuff here and there – but I wouldn’t say there’s a massive difference. We’ve used far less samples in the new track than earlier stuff, there’s some aggression in there vocally, but importantly there are melodic hooks.

Has everything within the band been an organic shift or something you all deliberately aimed for when planning your return?

I think fairly organic really-we have no deadlines to live by these days so we can take our time writing – something that we never could in the old days. We haven’t deliberately set out to sound one way or the other to be honest – we’re just going with the flow creatively. We’ve all been playing together in various guises for years and it’s a bit like putting on a pair of comfy slippers when we get together!

And the return of the band, how easy was it for you all to come back together and start creating again?

For me the timing was just right. Hellfighter had just split as the other guys were reforming Xentrix, Mark and Jeff had been informally chatting about reforming at this point. I think the push was being offered a headline festival slot at Fiesta Du Rock in Belgium, even though we weren’t strictly in existence at that point. So we rehearsed and we were made up with how good it sounded. It just came together so fast, and the songs still sounded fresh and relevant. So we thought let’s do some new stuff…

Sleeper Cell is a hint to the kind of sound and imagination we can expect from future releases?

That’s a hard one to answer. Yes I think you’ll hear things in a similar vein but don’t be surprised if we throw some curveballs in there. We’re not writing for the music industry anymore. This is for ourselves as much as anything. Obviously it would be nice if everybody else likes it too….

Tell us about the single’s video. It was recorded by Carl Arnfield of Chalkman Video, who has persistently sparked visual pleasure with his films over the past few years. How did you come to link up with him?

Through friends of friends I think-he needed something to complete a show reel – we needed a video! It’s such a small world really -he was good friends with Xentrix- was actually in them briefly I think! He put us in touch with a chap called Johnathan Santry who arranged all the fight choreography and is actually in the video…Great bunch of guys.

Carl was a great – he worked really hard for us – we’re made up with the video.

What inspired its striking narrative and guerrilla like strike on the senses?

Well I think the lyrics and subject content speak for themselves. I think it really suits the aggression of the verses then the melody of the choruses adds a great hook. Then the outro is just huge!

Unfortunately on the same day, several hours after releasing the track and video the atrocity that was the Manchester Arena bombing happened. Given the subject matter of the track we have pulled back its proper release for obvious reasons.

Where did the filming take place; and a lengthy shoot?

The band shoot was done in a day at a studio in Preston, and the fight scenes were shot in Manchester over a couple of days so not too lengthy. Carl really worked hard to get it finished for us….in fact we’re still humbled by effort everybody involved put in.

What is next for Kill II This; The chance of an album being planning?

We intend to keep writing for sure. Whether or not we release an album or just drip feed one track / video at a time I’m not sure. We are looking already at festival appearances next year, plus a few more shows this year. I’d love to get back out to Europe too…it’s been too long.

Big thanks again for chatting with us; any last words you would like to add?

Thanks for showing an interest in us and we really hope you enjoy the new video…you can watch it on our website where you can also download the new track Sleepercell for FREE.

http://www.kill2this.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/pg/kill2this    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsrVYMExsQyYNt0h4WU1lRQ

The RingMaster Review 13/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Anti-Clone – The Root Of Man

Anti-Clone_RingMasterReview

If asked at the start of the year which was the one release we were most anticipating in 2016 there would have been no pause of thought involved in saying the debut album from UK metallers Anti-Clone. They had us addictively hooked into their own distinct nu-metal bred, psyche twisting sound from the outstanding Hands Sewn Together EP, which had its highly successful national release back in 2014. Its tracks were a regular part of our podcasts too, finding the same eagerness across a horde of other shows and stations with the mainstream media soon waking up to the band’s emergence in turn. Now two years on and quickly following reputation cementing and pushing performances supporting Mushroomhead and Sanguine on certain dates of their recent UK tour, the Boston hailing quintet are poised to unleash The Root Of Man.

The question was never going to be would the album live up to expectations seeded in the last EP and the hefty fuss around the band, that just seemed to be a given in thoughts, but would their music have grown and evolved enough to make them a real contender to stir up the metal scene beyond the UK as earlier songs suggested. Well, the answer is found within the first few tracks of the eleven song incitement alone. Together they give a rousing confirmation with their creative roar, only being forcibly backed by the rest of an album which in some ways continues where the Hands Sewn Together EP left off but immediately shows a craftier and imaginatively more exhilarating, not forgetting broader, weave of styles and flavours in its boldly sculpted songs. The Root Of Man is Anti-Clone on a new mature imagination drenched plateau from songwriting to sound to presentation. There is inventive confidence and fierce adventure at every turn as the scent of inspirations from the forefathers of the nu-metal scene are again embraced, twisted, and honed into openly fresh textures within the band’s own fascinating experimentation.

art_RingMasterReviewFormed in 2011 but really finding its creative mojo once the current line-up was in place a couple or so years later, the Lincolnshire band soon sparked a hungry and swiftly growing fan base for their dramatically addictive sound which reached its first pinnacle in the Hands Sewn Together EP. Live too, the band has grown to be one of Britain’s prime incitements, sharing stages with the likes of American Head Charge, Kindred, ESO, Breed 77, Sworn Amongst, Maplerun, Evil Scarecrow, and Bloodshot Dawn amongst many along the way. Linking up with EP producer Matt Hyde (Machine Head, Trivium, Fightstar, As I Lay Dying and Slipknot) again for The Root Of Man, the quintet of brothers Drew (drums/ programming) and Peter ‘Mr Clone’ Moore (vocals), Conor (guitar) and Liam Richardson (guitar), and Mike Bradbury (bass) are seemingly poised to set their place at the head table of the UK and indeed European metal scene.

Dually looking at “the beginning of the human race, starting with Eve committing original sin which resulted in us being cast out of Eden” and symbolising the band’s beginning as a band; “These are the roots that we are planting to fully establish ourselves as our own entity, to establish ourselves as Anti-Clone“, the pledge music funded The Root of Man immediately grips ears and imagination with its title track. It is a brief but inescapable lure into the album, an as expected apocalyptically ambience clouded scene setter which is soon crawling portentously over the senses as steely bass and toxic grooves wrap the enjoyably familiar tones of Mr Clone. Its dark tempest rolls straight in to Deracinated which seamlessly draws ears into its own animus of intent and creative rapacity. Straight away an industrial toning merges with the schizophrenic nu-metal prowess which flows from the band, Society 1 meets Mudvayne like essences adding to the imposing character and trespass of the fearsome magnetism on offer. Ebbing and flowing in raw confrontation, the track bewitches ears and stirs up the appetite, setting them in an unfamiliar and disorientating yet welcoming blend of old school aired modern imagination for a seriously rousing slab of predacious incitement.

SwitchBlade growls at and brawls with the senses next, vocals from Mr Clone and the Richardson brothers almost pestilential in their psyche invading animosity as the sounds around them rise and fall with constant inhospitable adventure. Melodic calms and percussive invention are just as potent lures in the agitated imagination and landscape of the song; all colluding to savage and spellbind before A Sight For Sewn Eyes prowls ears with Fear Factory/Spineshank tinged ingenuity. As replicated across the whole of the album, every moment of the song brings greed breeding drama to the listener, Mr Clone showing his clean melodic tones are as fiercely agreeable as the rawer psychosis fuelled side of his vocal character. The song persistently twists and turns from the start before reaching a bedlamic crescendo that never truly departs once erupting as the song leaves on a groove bound web of suggestiveness.

With a constant range of peaks across its landscape as momentous and memorable as the Alps, B9 adds another with its Manson-esque textured slice of predatory heavy metal whilst Twisted Neck entangles ears in the intoxicating vines of toxic grooves which wrap a calmer melody hued serenade beneath a thickly tempestuous and predatory climate of sound and personality. Both tracks present a tapestry of styles and textures, the first also flirting with steampunk like elements where, not for the last time, Anti-Clone have a touch of the now sadly demised Shanklin Freak Show to them. Its successor flirts with a colouring which is more 6:33 meets Dog Fashion Disco though as always, it is hard to pin down a flavour such the Anti-clone ingenuity as they align spices to their own enthralling ideation.

A great punk metal hue seeps into the riveting and mercurial soundscape of Mechanical Heart, the track as welcoming as it is fearsome with sinister keys and avant-garde devilry lining another almost rabid mix of nu and industrial metal carrying at times more than a whisper of death metal to it. Compelling to the extreme, the track simply wants an apocalypse based Hellraiser movie to grace to see its majesty totally fulfilled, though fair to say there is no time to linger in thought with any song during the album as here Feed The Machine steals attention instantly with its vocally anthemic and physically bracing proposal. Repetition in word and sound within the track is a glorious igniting of instincts; that simplicity employed in another rich weave of roving grooves and a cantankerous rhythms skilfully sewn into an irresistibly unpredictable but dramatically galvanic onslaught. Like early Korn in some ways and Slipknot in others, the track still stands distinctively tall as another unique Anti-Clone ravaging of the senses and passions.

ComaSpace brings a moment of relative calm and the chance to catch breath next though unsurprisingly it too has irritability to its tone and dark imposing edge to its atmosphere. Vocally Mr Clone entices ears with a clean delivery as melodies merge acoustic and more aggravated hues into the Deftones spiced offering. Again the band has ears and appetite enthralled, though even being another impressive moment within The Root Of Man, it gets overshadowed a little by Astaroth. The band’s new upcoming single, the song is sonic slavery; the reason mosh pits and lustful reactions were bred into life. As barbarous as anything on the release and the most virulently contagious assault too, the track has everything you need to know about Anti-Clone and whether they are the tonic to your personal musical passions.

Completed by the grisly presence and voice of Sentinel, a sonic inferno of psyche burrowing riffs and grooves amidst an insatiable and concussive tempest of sound and attitude, The Root Of Man is the declaration of a new major force in UK and undoubtedly European metal. Anti-Clone is set to be one of those guiding their journeys over the following years whilst with this superb release, the band has placed themselves right there in stature alongside a great many of those who have inspired their adventure to date.

The Root Of Man is released 29th April  via PHD (Plastic Head Distribution) with more information @ http://www.anticlonehq.com

https://www.facebook.com/AnticloneHQ/   https://twitter.com/AnticloneHQ

Pete RingMaster 04/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Guardian – Revolution

Guardan Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

There is a fresh tempest about to savage the British metal scene; a bracing consumption of the senses going by the name of Revolution. It is the title of the debut album from Guardian, a Northumberland quartet which had already shown its creative intent with their earlier Tyrants EP. A long time in the making, the new twelve fury encounter is a ferocious blend of varied metal provocations driven by themes “centring on the balance of life and nature, and an emphasis on the unsustainable damage that humans are inflicting on our planet”, and a wake-up call to national attention for the great invasive roar of Guardian.

The band made their first impact with the aforementioned Tyrants EP mid-2014, inspirations from the likes of Pantera, Machine Head, Whitechapel, and Parkway Drive adding to the varied metal bred textures making up the release’s sound and even more so now, Revolution. Well-received by fans and media alike, the EP was supported by Guardian going on a month long European tour followed by a just as busy series of shows around the UK. Thoughts then turned to the band’s first album, Guardian taking their time to write and create the beast before us and proving suggestions that they are one of Britain’s exciting new breed of extreme incitement.

The short introductory climate of Resolution starts things off, its sombre yet elegant melodies the lining to an emerging portentous air as the instrumental leads ears and imagination into the volatile and combative landscape of the album’s title track. Instantly Revolution is an intimidating threat of wiry grooves and biting riffs against barbarous rhythms, the raw antagonism driven by the throat grazing vocal scowling of Matthew Hall and lit by grooved spicing from guitarist Zac Yates. It is a magnetic challenging of ears and emotions; one sculpted with open enterprise and unpredictable imagination within a ravishing cauldron bred from essences to be found in many flavours from death and thrash metal to hardcore and metalcore.

Guardian Cover Artwork_RingMaster ReviewApart from the fade-out, the track is an immense beginning backed as forcibly by the mazy dynamics and brutal tirades of Politics. Ears are instantly pushed back by its intensity as the predacious nature of the song brews, building until erupting in a hellacious outpouring loaded with the violent rhythms of drummer Joshua Stephen matched in vitriol by the bestial tones of Cory Young’s bass. Yates again veins the storm with toxic but virulent grooves and hooks, their potency successfully riding the crushing breakdowns, as here, breaching the whole of the album.

Innovate devours the senses next, its instant cantankerous character the spark to the song’s savagery in sound and vocal animosity. Inhospitable but again rabidly catchy, the blistering track inflames the appetite for voracious trespasses before the rapaciously energetic prowl of Capitalism matches its triumph. Rock ‘n’ roll to beat up on the world to; the song is an incendiary slab of heavy-duty metal vehemence leaving body and emotions with a want to take on the world.

Through the fearsome heavy metal seeded enmity of Deliverance and the outstanding hardcore toned Catharsis, band and album keep an already hungry appetite greedier, both tracks a sonic web of inventive twists and murderous inclinations before Propaganda provides a rousing if corrosive weave of winding groove honed tendrils to inflame the cancerous tapestry of sound. In some ways the three together provide the pinnacle of the album, each leading and seeming to inspire the following to new creative antipathies before the ‘mellower’ landscape of Hope hugs the senses. Its touch sears the sense from the off and of course it too unveils barbarous sounds and imagination over time, but from start to finish it enthrals with a ‘lighter’ atmosphere and infectiousness absent elsewhere within Revolution.

Nomadic leads the listener through a meandering landscape coated in raw melodic and electric sonic endeavour next, its rhythms building another bad blooded dispute as Hall’s vocals infest the psyche as supporting band roars incite the instincts. It is a crushingly invigorating proposition setting up body and emotions for the back breaking intensity of Ambivalence and finally the ravenous sonic dexterity and rhythmic rabidity of Restoration. The pair creates an intrusively dramatic and explosively volatile finale to Revolution, at the same time giving glimpse of even richer veins of exploration within the Guardian sound.

Revolution is a thoroughly satisfying and enjoyably exhausting release from a band easy to see making strong waves ahead. It is an encounter which might not live up to its name in regard to stirring up the metal scene, moments of surface similarity between some tracks and a familiar feeling to others noticeable if no issue, but for relentless seriously accomplished and stylish metal fury, Revolution is set to wake up thick attention.

Revolution will be available from 22nd January through all stores and platforms.

https://www.facebook.com/GuardianUKNEMC

Pete RingMaster 22/01/2016

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Spreading The Disease – Viral

Front art std ep_RingMaster Review

Having teased and indeed savaged ears with their first single Bulldozer recently, British metallers Spreading The Disease reveal more of their crushing sound and intensive potential with debut EP Viral. Consisting of four anthemically vicious and belligerently compelling slabs of raw rock ‘n’ roll, the release is a rousing protagonist. It comes littered with crucial grooves, predatory rhythms, and an enterprise which is as in the face hungry as the intensity fuelling each conflict within. It is early days for Spreading The Disease but the suggestion posed by Viral is that the UK has another ferocious and invigorating adventure brewing within its metal/heavy rock landscape.

Formed late 2014 by Steve Saunders, the former bassist of The Self Titled who approached his new endeavour with the intent to allow “a different approach to both band policy and creativeness”, the Kent based Spreading The Disease quickly expanded its line-up with drummer Edd Saunders. In relatively short time lead guitarist Julien Riquelme, rhythm guitarist Martin Osborne, and vocalist Adam May were completing the band’s personnel with a handful of songs soon emerging. Inspirations to their sound include the likes of Pantera, Kill or Be Killed, and Stone Sour through to Slipknot, Machine Head, and Breed 77, essences audible in the unbridled fury of first single Bulldozer. Now it is Viral poised to emulate its success with a potency which pretty much is what it says on the tin, offering an invasive and sweeping brutally with the potential to stir up the national metal scene.

POSTCARD_RingMaster ReviewF.U.C.K.U. roars through ears first, the EP opener emerging from a percussive ring of an invitation to intrude upon and stir up the senses. An initial riff is the coaxing prelude to a predatory stroll of irritable riffs and punchy rhythms swiftly bound in just as magnetic and tetchy grooves. The energy and attack of the track enjoyably ebbs and flows without ever leaving the listener void of an incentive to respond in kind to its anthemic provocation whilst the imagination gets entangled in the magnetic craft of Riquelme and Osborne. With the raw at times vitriolic squalls of May’s vocals loaded in unbridled rage and emotion, the track is a thunderous incitement and impressive start to the encounter.

Lost Generation is a matching exploit in songwriting and volatile invention, it too with a reserved entrance which soon builds into a formidable and cantankerously imposing canter. The song never quite reaches the viciousness of its predecessor but certainly emulates its success in sound and creative tenacity. More diversity to the vocals courts unpredictable and gripping twists and turns within the metal meets heavy rock ‘n’ roll powder keg whilst grooves spawned just infect the psyche with their virulent toxicity. With rhythms battering and provoking with similar potency the track is the kind of weighty rock ‘n’ roll instincts get greed over.

Bulldozer comes next and gets straight to the aggressive point as the bearish tones of May skirt the senses within a sinew driven onslaught of sound. It is an intrusion soon veined by classic metal enterprise though, that fiery sonic tempering to the brutality around it shaping the fluid fusion of calmer if still volatile moments within the bestial and contagious tempest. With a fierce climax to take on the world with, the track forcibly reminds why as that first introduction to the band, it impressed and sparked strong anticipation for Viral. Fair to say it still ensures thick satisfaction and the need to make a physical involvement with each and every listen but the fact that it is put in the shade a touch by the other tracks shows the strength and depth to the Spreading The Disease creative infection coursing through its companions on the EP.

Evolution brings the release to a storming close. From its first rigorous step, the track is a full-on infestation of riffs and hefty beats which is unafraid to build on its quick and bruising contagion by either spinning melodic meanders of peace or casting almost schizophrenic brawls of sonic imagination. The most exploratory song on the EP with an exotic hue to its melodic suggestiveness, the track does not neglect the band’s ability to create rancorous and debilitating ferocity neither, it all led by the great mix of throat scarring vocals and the ever primal and enticing bass of Saunders.

The track is a hellacious treat to end an excellent fuller glimpse at Spreading The Disease and their developing sound. As impressive as it is, Viral also suggests it is early days with much bigger bolder trespasses waiting to be nurtured and uncaged as the band evolves. With more of the same equally as palatable to anticipation, Spreading The Disease is looking like being another British brute equipped to breach the broadest spotlights ahead.

The Viral EP is out now at http://www.stdband.com/store.html

http://www.stdband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/spreadingthedisease.official

Pete RingMaster 12/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Guardian start the “Revolution” this January.

Guardan Online Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

Northern metallers ‘Guardian’ release their eagerly awaited debut album, ‘Revolution’, through all stores and platforms on Friday 22nd January 2016.

Coming at you from Northumberland and comprising of Matthew Hall (Vocals), Zac Yates (Guitar), Cory Young (Bass) and Joshua Stephen (Drums), Brit metal combo ‘Guardian’ spit out relentless riffs, hard-hitting breakdowns, and ferocious blast sections laced with inventive guitar work. Drawing from a variety of influences, from classic titans such as ‘Pantera’ and ‘Machine Head’, though to contemporary heavyweights ‘Whitechapel’ and ‘Parkway Drive’, ‘Guardian’ are quickly amassing an army of followers and it won’t be long until they break out to the national scene.

The Northern riff slingers have been described as ‘Metalcore’, but as you peel back the layers, you can clearly see that there is more diversity to this band than meets the eye. Guardian are a metal band and they thrive on delivering elephantine riffs and heavy music. Their debut EP ‘Tyrants’, which was released in 2014, rings true to the quartet’s DIY approach; the record was self-mixed, produced and mastered entirely by the studious metallers. The EP picked up extensive underground coverage, as well as national attention from Rock Sound, prompting the publication to feature Guardian inside the magazine, as well as having the self-titled track from the EP lifted onto their cover CD.

Guardian supported the EP with a full touring schedule, undertaking a month long European jaunt with Mexican Deathcore crew ‘Frozen Remains’. The tour was a huge success and saw the band play dates throughout Spain, Belgium, Holland, Germany, Czech Republic and Poland. Never ones to sit on their hands, the northern metal merchants continued to play a string of sweat-drenched shows throughout the UK, as they began to cement plans for their new album, ‘Revolution’.

Their debut full length ‘Revolution’ is a stunning piece of modern metal. The record oozes a collection of cuts that entwine technical guitar passages with bone-crushing breakdowns. It’s a very impressive album that has enough power and precision to level an apartment block. With a lyrical focus centring on the balance of life and nature, and an emphasis on the unsustainable damage that humans are inflicting on our planet, Guardian are a band that do things differently and even their lyrical output and artwork reinforces this belief. There’s nothing stopping Guardian from earning a prominent place within the UK Metal hierarchy; just watch them soar.

https://www.facebook.com/GuardianUKNEMC

Order Of 315 – Antipi

 

Photo_RingMaster Review

Three years ago French metallers Order of 315 awoke ears and attention with their debut album Near-Birth Experience, a fierce and tenacious offering which only grew in persuasion and stature over time. Now the Paris quartet have returned with its successor Antipi, raising the heat of the qualities and potential found in the first album whilst creating an even more compelling and varied confrontation. Antipi is a rousing incitement and cantankerous roar bred across eleven individual stirring aggravations of sound and imagination. Fair to say the band’s music still wears open inspirations at times but is now really showing its own character whilst unleashing tapestries of varied and aggressively delivered flavours.

Formed in 2010, Order of 315 draw on a host of styles from metalcore and hard-rock to progressive, djent, and alternative-metal; flavours bred in the experiences and tastes of its members with bands such as Black Label Society, Pantera, Machine Head, Slipknot, Stone Sour, Five Finger Death Punch, and Korn amongst individual sparks to their sound and imagination. The 2012 released Near-Birth Experience earned strong attention and acclaim from certainly the metal underground and media with its striking tempest, its seeds now blossoming into the creative voracity that is Antipi. The new album is more brutal yet equally richer in melodic tempting and certainly a more atmospherically volatile confrontation around a heart feverish in its resourcefulness.

Cover_RingMaster ReviewAntipi opens with A Slap On The Wrist and an initial sample stroked by an innocence drenched, single strand melody. It caresses the imagination, awakening ears ready for the swift assault on the senses of jagged riffs, beefy rhythms, and the instantly recognisable and welcome grizzly tones of Edgar Jabberwocky. His voice and delivery is a mighty lure alone easily igniting a pleased reaction in ears to match that being sparked by the growing rabid swing and antagonistic rumble of the sounds around him. The song is bullish rock ‘n’ roll, an easy anthem to get eager teeth into and a hungry appetite from, both fed with every passing swell of bruising enticement.

It is an outstanding start to the album quickly continued by Telescope. From its first groaning breath the track is a more imposing and intrusive proposition with the rhythms of drummer Pablo Civil unruly in their skilled design. Aligned to the predacious air of Grm Lecouflet’s bass, they make for a hostile yet gripping frame entwined by the thick winy grooves of Klaus Kersey, his guitar just as magnetic in primal riffery and sonic enterprise too. As with its predecessor, the track has hips violently gripped with its swinging challenge and ears hooked by its rapacious sound, Jabberwocky leading the incitement as masterfully as ever before The Feather Factor takes over with its industrial metal breeding and groove meets heavy/alternative metal tempestuousness. Subsequent switches into melodic flames bring a relatively undefined familiarity to things but only adds to the thick and captivating drama unfolding within ears.

Without quite finding the same dynamic impact as the first tracks, Abelian still keeps satisfaction fully whetted with its spidery melodic enterprise around a fierce tempest of a heart whilst the following Meiosis almost beats pleasure from the senses with the brutal rapier swings of Civil, though the atmospheric melodies, scything sonic trespasses, and unpredictable landscape of the assault are just as thickly tempting and alluring. Once more there is something recognisable in the spicing of the song but warped perfectly by its great bedlamic nature.

A creative composure lines Rumble Fish, the bass of Lecouflet a prowling protagonist leading the listener into the awaiting animus of the song. It never breaks its pleasing chains though, hinting and provoking with subtlety and atmospheric imagination whilst showing more of the growth in songwriting and maturity of the Order Of 315 sound, something clear across the whole of the album and indeed next up Data Warfare with its Korn meets Bloodsimple like turbulence with just a touch of Fear Factory adventure to it all.

Both the magnetically wiry Greyscale and the senses enveloping Densen keep things mean and keen; the first an inflamed mix of heavy metal and alternative rock as flirtatious as it is menacing whilst its successor crawls through ears with a slight but definite salacious sway to its evocative and intensive rock ‘n’ roll design. Both carry an attitude and hearty intimidation which, with the sonic imagination, sparks a want for more, a success just as easily drawn by the spiralling textures of Unperfect Circles. The track perpetually winds around the senses, the guitars especially influential in tempting out lusty enjoyment.

Drone brings Antipi to an end, the track a tangle of sonic craft and expression ridden by the brawly tones of Jabberwocky amidst a rhythmic tempest. Though in some ways the song takes longer to get to grips with, it is a fine end to another thrilling offering from Order Of 315. To be picky, there is a slight diminishing of unpredictability towards the rear of the release, until the final encounter anyway, but each track only ignites body and imagination to declare Order Of 315 one of the potent fresh roars within the metal scene.

Antipi is available now through numerous online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/OrderOf315

Pete RingMaster 21/12/2015

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