Hell Fire Jack – Chains

It is dirty, raw, and unforgiving or in the words of the band itself, “Brutal Blues” which escapes the creative throes of ‘angry bastards, loud as Hell’ British duo Hell Fire Jack. It is also one compelling trespass on the senses and emotions which has come to a glorious head in the band’s debut album Chains. Imagine Seasick Steve infested by the spirit of Lux Interior as The Hangmen infuse their own devilry and you get a sense of the rapacious roar at the heart of the band’s first full-length.

Formed in 2012, Hell Fire Jack is vocalist/guitarist Alex Trewhitt and drummer Josef Karl, a pair from Yorkshire creating addictive toxic sounds which sizzle on the senses as they get rhythmically bitch slapped. It is not for those who want their music to be a comfort; an easy going escape without danger but for those who love to feel threatened whilst rocking out like a dog in heat, Chains is a thrilling demonic puppeteer.

It is also an album which simply blossoms song by song, each bringing something fresh and varied to the blues heart which breeds their predacious incitements. It is not just the sound which lures the listener into the dark, lyrically songs find seeds in “mental instability, insecurity and a constant struggle with modern life” to provide an intimacy which works away at thoughts just as the music gets under the skin and into the psyche.

As you might have surmised, we were seriously taken by Chains, it gripping attention and appetite from pretty much the first deep breath of opener Hell-O. The coarse but inviting riffs of Trewhitt’s guitar quickly lead ears into the waiting lures of his wiry grooves and the swing of Karl’s fevered beats. The former’s vocals are soon similarly magnetic, the pair creating a rousing concussive stroll leading feet and hips into fevered antics as shadows crawl the imagination. The track is irresistible, a stirring roar of blues and garage punk trespassing air and listener with every essence shared.

Cyborg swaggers in next, every beat a shuddering lead, each riff a rapacious scour on the senses but it all as virally infectious as the vocals cruising the inescapable persuasion. As the song epitomises, there is a great nagging quality to Hell Fire Jack propositions, an imaginative persistence which has body and appetite bouncing, and success Dark Horse only emulates. Its initial atmospheric smog is soon pierced by Karl’s anthemic swipes, it all building to caustic catchiness spewed by the guitar in an In The Whale/ Dick Venom & The Terrortones spiced shuffle.

The sonic liquor of Old Whiskery echoes assumptions going by its title, a sonic intoxication which deviously flirts in groove, voice, and beat while The Hustle chugs along with many similar traits of its predecessors to equal if less striking effect. It is familiarity though which gives Hell Fire Jack its individuality and incites a greed for more as words and syllables persistently bite within it all.

A sonic liquor swollen party comes in the shape of Don’t Come Knocking next, the track harrying the senses as a rousing vocal assault grips the imagination. It swiftly has its hand on best track heights before losing that honour to the quite brilliant Mr. Sinister. The track is horror blues punk alchemy, a proposition to breed lust over even with there being something indefinably recognisable about it.

Through the controlled but open sonic fever of Take a Hold and the predatory intimation of Sunday Best the album only reinforces its potency and persuasion though neither song can quite live up to the previous slices of rock ‘n’ roll manna. Each so they just grip attention with their varied enterprise, the following Lock and Key with its old school hues and garage punk dexterity then matching their heights with its composed but incisive swing.

Another major highlight is sprung with Better the Devil, its atmospheric, haunting melodic welcome alone enough to crow about but adding the subsequent tempestuous landscape and the Danzig-esque spicing which grips its tenacious blues prowl and the track simply escalates in character and prowess as well as impressiveness.

The album’s title track brings things to a close, a song which crawls through ears and thoughts with the instinctive infection of old school rock n’ roll and the lithe meandering of blues rock, it all boiling up and igniting in sonic blazes which sear the senses. Enthralling second by second, the track is rock ‘n’ roll at its basest and most compelling and a transfixing close to one thrilling release.

Hell Fire Jack never truly hit the brakes with their high octane attack and sound but when they do give them a nudge, you get taken to the darkest most seductively menacing places. Simply put Chains is a real pleasure pretty much like no other.

Chains is released February 14th on iTunes and @ http://hellfirejack.bigcartel.com/

Upcoming live dates:

Sat Feb 17 Hell Fire Jack album launch party, Harrogate, United Kingdom

Tue Feb 27 Lending Room @ The Library, Leeds, United Kingdom

Fri Apr 6 Al’s Dime Bar, Bradford, United Kingdom

Fri Apr 20 Verve, Leeds, United Kingdom

Sat Apr 28 THE FERRET, Preston, United Kingdom

http://www.hellfirejack.com/    https://www.facebook.com/hellfirejackband/    https://twitter.com/Hell_Fire_Jack

Pete RingMaster 06/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Baronen & Satan – Why Does The Blood Never Stick To Your Teeth? / Satan Is A Lady

As each year passes it seems harder to find something truly unique to feast upon so those encounters which do carry that special character make a most striking impact and hopefully temptation. The sound of Swedish outfit Baronen & Satan magnificently fits that claim and hope, its nature a psyche twisting trespass and voice a senses searing incitement which together go to make one glorious seduction on body and imagination.

Though formed in 2014 after guitarist Philippe Jean-Piere Dominique Sainz met vocalist Linda Rydelius, the pair uniting in love and creativity once meeting, our introduction to Gothenburg hailing Baronen & Satan is now through Dirty Water Records USA and their releasing of the band’s new EP, Why Does The Blood Never Stick To Your Teeth? in tandem with the re-release of 2016 album Satan Is A Lady. It is a long overdue meeting as hindsight shows the band has been teasing attention across a horde of tracks and years but one we like so many others are greedily devouring. Completed by bassist Marie Bergkvist and drummer Stefan Young Sik Olsson earlier this year, Baronen & Satan create what we assumed has been self-penned as “Garagedeath”.  Whatever you call it, the Baronen & Satan sound is a wonderfully invasive yet flirtatious trespass of reverb grafted adventure conjured from a mix of garage and psych rock, garage punk, noise, and punk rock with plenty more teasing away in its predacious and haunting swamp thick sonic psychosis.

Produced by Jim Diamond (White Stripes, Dirt Bombs), Baronen & Satan’s new EP greedily consumes the senses from its first breath. Why Does The Blood Never Stick To Your Teeth? opens up with new single Elisa and instantly consumes ears in a tide of riffs and rhythms entangled in spicily melodic tendrils. As a bass grumble teases, beats fly with fevered energy, Sainz’s guitar weaving away with salacious grooves as the distinct and unique tones of Rydelius deliciously ‘whine’. Her presence almost steals all attention but with the devilish textures and enterprise at play around her, the whole song seduces in equal measure to get things flying.

The following Buttermilk Sky has a similar but fully individual presence and sound, its psych and garage rock bred rock ‘n’ roll an incitement to appetite and hips as it dances provocatively in ears. Its citric melodic spicing is less kind in the second track compared to its predecessor but just as alluring; the song offering a beefier intrusion taken to darker temptation yet again in the EP’s title track. With the swinging biting beats of Olsson rampant and Bergkvist’s bass sound gnarly, seduction is swift from personal tastes; add the sonic squall of Sainz and Rydelius hellish beauty in voice  and submission to the track’s rapacious rock ‘n’ roll is welcome slavery which the melodic toxicity with its tinge of Echo and The Bunnymen compounds.

All three tracks unite for one unwavering increasing addictive proposal to have us reeled in hook line and sinker; a triumph equally matched by last year’s album, Satan Is A Lady. It similarly needs mere seconds to tempt and begin brewing up a tight grip as opener Lady Creature lies its initial sonic nagging upon ears. Quickly the boisterous beats of Olsson descend and romp; the track bouncing around with eager tenacity as Rydelius casts her riveting vocal antics into the stomping devilment of a proposal. At times Scottish trio The Creeping Ivies is provoked in thought by the track but a great spicing to something again as unique as all the subsequent essences and adventures across the album prove to be, all hues in viral sonic toxins particular to Baronen & Satan.

Next up is Catwalk, its feline prowl lively and predacious with Olsson’s swings marking every step with zeal. Always fuelled by a boisterous spirit, the song stalks the listener as vocals wrap their flirtatious clutches around psych and garage infestation. Magnetic drama, the song sublimely bewitches before the even more energetic exploits of Asskisser bound in. With shimmering sonic suggestion and more rhythmic rascality, a PiL-esque sheen invading its bold canter, the track commands the listener like a puppeteer, its noise nurtured tendrils veining its wonderful manipulation.

Headcuts lurks and taunts with an instantly open Cramps inspiration, continuing to size up its victim before launching into a rapacious garage punk stroll with fifties rockabilly spicing. As its predecessor, the track is glorious; caustic manna for ears and instincts which a fine line of sixties garage rock a la Cradle to add another twist.

Expanding and thickening its ravenous enterprise and character, Satan Is A Lady hits another sweet spot with the sonic buzz of The Projects, a minute and a breath of irresistible niggly punk rock which Comet emulates in success with its own demonic affair for ears and imagination. As most tracks, its core is a relentless nagging which gets right under the skin; heavy dark bait bred on rhythmic and sonic almost wanton dexterity honed into a cauldron of virulent temptation as carefully woven as it is rabidly unleashed.

The album’s title track swings in with muscles tensed next, a riveting PiL meets Siouxsie and the Banshees hook circling ears as once more the compelling tones of Rydelius grip the bold intrusion. Sainz’s initial bait swiftly develops a Buzzcocks spiced essence as the track flexes its animated imagination, every second a beguiling and infectious scheme to enslave.

Through the psychotic stomp of Pony and its sonic Cramps meets the Orson Family moonshine pleasure only escalates, the latter of those hues a bolder essence in the dark saunter of Sugarwalls which too only inflames an already greedy appetite for band and sound. Invasively ethereal and ravenously portentous, the song also gives a glimpse of what you might imagine bands like Blood Ceremony and Jess and the Ancient Ones could sound like if mutant off springs of Lux Interior and Jim Morrison.

The album ends with the invasively haunting Underwater Love, an immersion into a sonic sea of intrigue and unpredictable imagination steered by the alluring vocal ingenuity of Rydelius. It is dark, bordering on suffocating and a compelling end to a quite thrilling and refreshing album.

Uniqueness is rare but when it comes it should be devoured especially when it bears the dark discord and beauty of Baronen & Satan.

Both Why Does The Blood Never Stick To Your Teeth? and Satan Is A Lady are out now @ https://baronenandsatan.bandcamp.com/album/why-does-the-blood-never-stick-to-your-teeth  and https://baronenandsatan.bandcamp.com/album/satan-is-a-lady respectively.

https://www.facebook.com/baronenochsatan/

Pete RingMaster 07/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Warped romances and deathly seductions: exploring the psyche theatre of Dedwardians

Dedwardians

The recent release of AA-sided single Love Sick/ Like An Animal reinforced UK garage punk/psyche rockers Dedwardians as one irresistibly primal and infernally seductive incitement. Breeding a raw and scuzz lit infestation of the senses and imagination from the essential essences of psychobilly, garage punk, psyche rock, fifties rock ‘n’ roll and plenty more, the London quartet has emerged as one of Britain and garage punk’s most exciting and flirtatiously inventive propositions. Already carrying a lustful appetite for the band’s sound we thought it was time to learn more about the dark sonic beast that is Dedwardians, so with thanks to drummer Ben Auston we explored the band’s origins, sound, new single and much more…

Hi and thanks for sharing time to come chat with us.

Firstly can you tell us about the background to the band and how you all linked up?

Hello there. Paul (vocals) and Gaff (guitar) found me (Ben, bass) via the bands manager at the time. We met up for a few drinks in Soho and we took it from there. We went through a couple of drummers before finding the boy wonder, Dan Bridle. As for our backgrounds, I can only guess that Paul and Gaff, being men of the North, were raised listening to Venom whilst working in a shipyard or something equally manly. We’ve all grown up playing in rockabilly, punk and rock ‘n’ roll bands….so we’ve all been cut from a similar cloth. …Faux leather.

The band members I believe hail from cities like Liverpool, Leeds, and London, but now all London based for the band. Why the choice of the Capital for the band’s home and would you Dedwardians Bencontemplate living anywhere not beginning with the letter L? 😉

We wanted to move to Aleister Crowley’s old dwelling, Boleskine House on Loch Ness, but the bedroom tax malarkey ruined that, so we settled on a 6 berth caravan in South London.

Many bands seem to start with one direction or idea of sound before emerging with or evolving to their true sound, Ministry maybe the biggest named example. With Dedwardians, I get the feeling you were all born to create the music you do, so was the sounds gracing your two singles it from day one?

Kind of…We started off with a bit more of a 1950’s rock ‘n’ roll sound with our first single – almost Jerry Lee-esque, but somehow we have gone a bit darker and twisted with the newer stuff…which I guess is more true to how we actually sound live. The name was a bit of a play on the Edwardian Drape Society/Teddy Boy thing, so we’ve not strayed too far off from the original ethos.

In our review of the new AA-sided single Love Sick/ Like An Animal we drew on comparisons to the likes of The Cramps, The Dropper’s Neck, and Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster, and we could have mentioned Gene Vincent, The Heartbreakers, early Misfits for example too. What are the predominate inspirations which have shaped your tastes and influenced your invention?

You’ve pretty much nailed it on the head with those, but The Cramps are the band we’d all agree on though if I had to pick one. We’re an eclectic bunch on the whole though. Glam through to Psychobilly, Garage Punk to Goth…we’ll borrow shamelessly from wherever. Might confuse some listeners, but hey ho.

As you just mentioned your sound really is a creative frenzy whipped up from essences of numerous styles. Has this diversity just come from all your varying tastes over time or always been there in the songwriting from day one?

It’s been there from the start. It’s becoming more diverse as things progress, which has been tricky in the past when it comes to picking what to play live as we’ve been worried about jumping too far from one style or genre to another. Somehow it always sounds like us nonetheless, so it can’t be too far off. I think we’ve got it down now though, so not too many perplexed looking faces in the crowd. Hopefully.

How would you describe your music to newcomers?

Errr, something along the lines of Gene Vincent, Lux Interior and Captain Sensible on a night bus home.

We love the band name, The Dedwardians speaking for itself and of course you touched on it earlier, but who came up with it?

I think it was Paul and his love for Teddy Boys…Or boys with teddies…Can’t remember. Good though.

Are both your singles Bang Bang Die/Stop Destroy and now of course Love Sick/ Like An Animal songs written around the same time or over different periods?

There was a bit of a gap, maybe a few months at the most. What delayed things was trying to find the right studio to get the sound we were after. Some studios we tried made us sound way too clean…completely not what we wanted, but then we didn’t want to sound too digital or heavy metal. We ended up picking Andy Brook to work with, who I’ve known for years. I wish we’d just gone to him in the first place. We’d have an album sorted by now…maybe.

Dedwardians2How are you seeing the evolution in your songwriting and sound as the band grows and matures together?

The songs are getting a bit more thought through and taking longer to sort out the final arrangements. I don’t mean in a Math Metal/Prog direction, we’re just trying to get the most out of the dynamics and avoiding becoming formulaic. Sometimes it’s tricky doing so with just one guitar, bass and drums. Saying that, Gaff is often louder than two guitarists…Sound men love him.

Is there a predominate inspiration to the lyrical and emotional side of your songs?

The only recurring theme I’ve managed to pick up on is DEATH. Which is odd, as Paul is generally a pretty cheerful chap.

Tell us about the recording of the new single. Did you have any particular intent with the tracks?

We wanted it to be loud; fuzzy guitars, big drums, over driven vocals and dirty bass. Andy Brook (engineer) pretty much got what we wanted straight away. He knew our influences better than the other studios we had recorded in, so that took a lot of the guess work out.

The songs have an instinctive, almost primal lo-fi breath. This edge makes them predatory and insatiably addictive, certainly for us drawing out the true heart of the tracks. Many bands seem almost afraid to tap into raw sounds, what lures you into this approach?

It’s probably the hatred for the opposite. We’re not Hi-Fi for sure. We’re really not about high end boutique guitar amps and overly compressed tracks. Our influences aren’t squeaky clean, perfectly auto-tuned performers. Raw is always better…Red raw.

It is fair to say you make music for you, sounds that you adore and then hope others feel the same?

Yep. Haha. Utterly selfish. When me and Gaff are writing together, we’re honestly not bothered about trying to please a certain scene or genre. If you go that route, you’d just end up sounding like you’re trying to suit a certain style.

Tell us about the video for Sick Of Love?

We shot it in a dark rehearsal room in a few hours, again, about as lo-fi as you can get. I shot most of it and edited it…DIY all the way. It’s not that we can’t afford something more grand though…we saved up enough cash to get Martin Scorsese interested, but we ended up blowing it on a night out in Skegness.

You have earned strong praise and acclaim for your live performances as well as the singles. Rampaging in front of the audience is where you really get a fire in the belly I am guessing?dedwardians3

Yep. We go for it on stage. Who doesn’t want to watch 4 sweaty blokes playing too loud for 25 mins?!

Where can people catch the band live next?

Butlins. No, err, The Finsbury, 18th December.

Any Christmas treats in store for fans with shows?

Yes, naturally. The venue’s ceiling will be so heavily adorned with mistletoe that it resembles stalactites. We have a list of all the naughty girls – Dan will be dressed as Santa for their pleasure. Paul will be dressed as an Elf. Me and Gaff will be head to toe in black leather, with tinsel detailing…humming Wizzard’s festive classic – I Wish It Could Be Christmas Everyday. We’re the gift that keeps on giving.

Thanks again Ben for sharing your time, anything you wish to shout out to finish off with?

A dog is for life, not just Christmas…and buy our fucking record!

Cheers Pete! Merry Crimbo!

Ben Auston

Read our review of Love Sick/ Like An Animal @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/11/22/dedwardians-love-sick-like-an-animal/

https://www.facebook.com/Dedwardians

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 11/12/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

Barnyard Stompers – Outlaws With Chainsaws

BS

After their impressive debut The Way-Gone, Wild and Rockin’ Sounds of…, anything from the Barnyard Stompers is sure to raise an eager appetite and so it was with follow-up full length Outlaws With Chainsaws. Whereas the previous album stalked the essences of rockabilly, cowpunk, and country blues stone predominantly within its mischievous sound, the Denver based duo of Casey Miller and Megan Wise have taken a deeper dip in the country side of their passion on the new release, though all essences and more have a tasty place in the mix. It is twelve songs if diverse and distinctive dark devilry brought with a fifties rawness and twenty first century devilment.

Miller and Wise have collectively played in many legendary roots music outfits including The Hillbilly Hellcats and The Bop Kings but teaming together has arguably been their finest move and certainly as evidenced by the two albums since, meant the creation of a sound which whilst merging numerous styles has evolved into something distinct and unique to them. Soon to take their Backwoods Twang across Europe and the UK this autumn, Outlaws With Chainsaws is a mighty introduction for those yet to be infected with their ‘red-neck’ power.

As with its predecessor, Outlaws With Chainsaws is rife with the band’s black and open humour as well as vintage sounds turned into 942079_603596589651616_325395941_nsomething eccentric and compelling yet true to their inspirations be that the likes of Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Carl Perkins and Hank Williams musically and also vocally. The opening title track instantly proves the point, the opening blood soaked sample replaced by a resonating rich twang from the guitar of Miller soon joined by the provocative beats of Wise. Ripe with a slow compulsive groove and throaty ambience to the sound the track lays a mix of psychobilly and cowpunk sculpting on the senses and visual evocation to the imagination. The drums of wise persistently frame the emerging red hued thoughts with accomplished incitement allowing Miller to tease discord and melodies with his guitars distinctive flavour. Though it never explodes beyond its impending dangerous breath it is an excellent start to the album and indication that we are about to have a real ride.

The following Stinkin’ Drunken S.O.B. Blues provides what its title suggests, a booze fuelled narrative wrapped in equally potent blues ‘misery’ and country bred swagger, but there are also elements of the more rockabilly aspects of say a Hasil Adkins to its engaging company. It continues the strong beginning and is soon joined in that cause by both the Cash like delivered tale of White Trash Family and Falling Down. For the first of the pair, though containing great backing vocals from Wise, it is the lyrical tale which steals the show, its story a humoured stereotypical outsider’s view of country folk whilst its successor is a slowly heated piece of emotive persuasion with hot chords and southern melodies veining a rising intensive rock embrace. It is a slow burner of a song which sounds better with each taking of its evocative breath.

For all the potency up to this point it is the tarmac rumbling Truck Drivin’ Son-Of-A-Bitch which steals the show on the album, its thumping attitude and passion guzzling energy a heavy slab of rock ‘n’ roll playing like a sixteen wheeled semi driven by The Reverend Horton Heat navigated by Carl Perkins aided by the whispers of Lux Interior. It is an excellent brute of a song finding its sinew glory in the simplicity of the drive of the duo and the dark throated tones of Miller. Its triumph is equalled immediately by the excellent Choctaw Outlaw, the flavoursome instrumental a mix of fifties craft and surf rock fire which sounds like a dessert created  by a recipe created by Johnny and the Hurricanes and The Shadows with extra spice from The Ventures and The Ghastly Ones.

The likes of the country stomping Topless Tuesday and the dark hillbilly croon Corn Liquor which features just Miller’s vocals and his old timer harmonica feed the appetite further whilst the diverse Cajun reaping pair of Snake Eyed Baby and the wonderfully sinister Shallow Grave take thoughts into more openly black-hearted adventure and mischief.

The album is completed by Seein’ Double and When Death Comes Knocking; two more appealing pieces of sultry rock ‘n’ roll borne of various aural nutrients. It has to be said before hearing the release that finding out the band had gone into their country seeded imagination more on the album left a small fear inside, that genre one we have never been able to embrace, but Barnyard Stompers employ it in their ingenious way to be another, though strong at times for sure, agreeable flavour. Outlaws With Chainsaws is a great album, one which personally just misses out on matching their outstanding debut but impressively sure gives it a good run for its money.

www.barnyardstompers.com

8/10

RingMaster 26/07/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

 

The Dropper’s Neck: Self Titled EP

Finding even a hint of uniqueness in music and bands is at times like waiting for snow on Christmas Day but it does happen and has with the self titled debut EP from UK rockers The Dropper’s Neck. The four songs which make up its pulsating and bristling shape do pull in thoughts and essences from other bands but there is a distinct colouring to their sound and attitude which is solely the Essex band and it is very appetizing to hear.

The quintet only formed late 2011 but took no time in drawing a loyal and growing following through their vibrant live shows and sound. Released a few weeks ago their EP looks set to build on that start with its compulsive and energetic fusion of multi-flavouring, the strains of garage and alternative rock in a blistering brew with elements of punk rock and psychedelic schizophrenic tendencies. Produced and engineered by Toby Campen, it makes for a quartet of engaging tracks with ruffle the ear as much as they openly infect, and give hints of even greater things ahead from the band.

The release opens with the scorching heat of Poor Excuse, a track which attaches itself to the senses with a mutated Queens Of The Stone Age like groove. The guitars of Chris Blake and George Barrows twist and surge with enterprise and caustic melodic invention whilst the rhythms of bassist Martin Huggett and drummer Danny Keene drive a formidable pace and intensity behind. It makes for an irresistible tease before the ear with the incessant taunting from the riffs one of those orgasmic pleasures and the craft of Blake sending delicious shards of heated melodies through to the heart. Like all the tracks, though there is an immediate connection the song grows and emerges with a stronger and more contagious hold through multiple meets. The vocals of Lloyd Mathews are another excellent stand out aspect of the sound, his at times almost dour yet hypnotic delivery having the same garage punk expressiveness which marked Lux Interior of The Cramps, though with no disrespect to Mathews he has some way to go to emulate the great man. He seemingly borders on disinterest at times tone wise and makes for a great contrast and seamless companion to the sharper burnt sounds.

The following Sick again has that desert rock groove which flares up at intermittent times to great effect whilst the track itself bruises with forceful riffs and combative rhythms. Within what are four outstanding tracks it is arguably the best but that does depend on the time and day, all having an equality to be commended. From its feistier climes the EP moves into the tight harmonic scarring of The Divorcee, a track as lustful and edgy as its subject. The song offers a slight psychobilly crawl reminding of The Orson Family from the eighties within its raw presence giving evidence of the diversity within the sound and songwriting of the band. It is hypnotic with its simple hooks and acidic melodic stirring of the senses and again is a track which takes top spot when in the ear, though one can say that about all to be fair.

The release ends with I Could and the band venturing into more direct punk n roll intent. The track swaggers with a boastful energy and finds Mathews almost unleashing the inner rocker within, his delivery livelier and with more enthused gusto as he explodes into air splitting howls. The track continues the showing of range to the sound of the band and adds to the already high anticipation for what comes in the future from the band.

The Dropper’s Neck has announced themselves with a release which it is hard to pick any real flaws from. If one was being really pedantic there is a similarity to how some of the songs begin their individual escapades but they soon evolve into their own unique guises to make it a mere quibble and of no value. This is a band which offers something different, arguably it does not happen often so make sure you do not miss out.

https://www.facebook.com/thedroppersneck

RingMaster 08/08//2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The best and easiest way to get your music on iTunes, Amazon and lots more. Click below for details.