Skox – Years of Legions

Skox_RingMasterReview

If you have a sweet tooth for raw thrash metal or a soft spot for ravenous death metal, Years of Legions has plenty to eagerly embrace. To be honest, the new album from French band Skox has much for fierce metal fans in general to get their teeth in to across ten tracks which maybe do not always majorly surprise but definitely get the juices flowing.

Formed in 2003 and with their current line-up in place since 2010, the Lyon hailing Skox has shared the stages with the likes of Napalm Death, Hatesphere, Loudblast, Destinity, Blockheads, Mumakill, and No Return over the years whilst also making successful appearances at festivals such as Sylak and Ragnard Rock. An early EP also caught attention but it is with Years of Legions that it is easy to expect real attention gathering. With a sound inspired by thrash and raw metal from across the decades and an album “whose martial tones would convey the band’s ambition through the metaphor of war”, Skox is ready and equipped to wage war on a broader landscape.

The album opens with Entering the Battlefield…, a prelude and lead into individual battles posing as songs. Air and land is swiftly busy with the weapons and intent of confrontation, rhythms raising the flag as melodies lay down the sizzling colour and suggestion of things to come as the instrumental heads straight into the jaws of the album’s title track. A stable yet imposing start to the second track is soon a hellacious onslaught of vicious rhythms and violent riffs matched in grizzly kind by the tones of vocalist Jean-Charles Dupin. It is stirring stuff, a visceral dark thrash incitement driven by the hefty swings of drummer Arnaud Neyret and the grouchy bassline of Florent Claudel. Within this, guitarists Vincent Morelle and Gildas Turpin unite to savage and seduce with sonic and melodic enterprise, the band creating warfare across a rousing challenge with plenty to be beguiled by.

Years of legions_RingMasterReviewClaudel’s bass has ears and appetite enslaved in no time on the following Cell Swelling too; its throaty snarl delicious bait which is quickly matched in steely kind by invasive riffs. Provoking and enticing with every touch, the song scowls and bruises throughout but tempers its merciless intent with great unpredictable side steps into calmer rapacious exploits often led by that irresistible bass tempting. As with its predecessor, the song is not re-inventing the wheel but a fresh and individual character to each is the predominate spice which equally stirs the spirit across the likes of Running Out of Time and Thrashtastik. Amongst influences listed are the likes of Slayer, Testament, and Kreator; flavours which especially come to mind in the forcibly contagious first of the pair with its compelling trespass of a swing. Its successor is relatively less open in influence as it uncages a bedlamic shuffle of thrash voracity and ridiculously catchy endeavour. It is a death dance, a flirtation to destruction and as the previous track, one thrilling provocation.

Engine of Death is a track which stalks the senses, prowling around them with toxicity slavering grooves and brutal rhythmic teeth as the increasingly enjoyable growls and animosity fuelled squalls of Dupin rage. By its close, ears and senses feel like road kill, trodden into its sonic rancor and acid laced melodic dust before Road 666 runs over both again with its own eventful juggernaut of lethal swipes and carnivorous riffs. As with others, Skox infuses the song with tendrils of fiery and evocative melodic invention which aligns with the antagonistic side perfectly; the extremes sharing song and attention like brothers in arms.

One bassline is all March of the Dead took to spark an insatiable hunger in the imagination and appetite, its opening trap the doorway into a bestial consumption of ears whilst Smash Your Enemy matches its predatory prowess with its own particular militarist quarrel. Throughout both Skox again turns familiar essences into their own enthralling and highly incendiary sonic warfare and once more leave a certain hunger for more.

Closing with the instrumentally descriptive ‘epilogue’ of Leaving the Killingfield, the riveting album is an increasingly impressing and rousing encounter revealing more temptation with every listen. Skox is a name hard to forget from a band with a sound which seemingly has the same property going by the effect of Years of Legions over time.

Years of Legions is out now across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/Skoxband

Pete RingMaster 12/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Affliction Gate – Dying Alone

AG_RingMaster Review

Three and a half years after unleashing the Shattered Ante Mortem Illusions EP, French death metallers Affliction Gate return with their most evil and gripping offering yet in the ruinous shape of Dying Alone. The four-track EP is a brutal and ravenous affair, but equally a compelling and at times contagious violation of old school death metal expanded with Affliction Gate imagination. The band is as vicious and uncompromising as ever but to that expected proposition adding a new exploration of bold textures, insidious emotion, and raw sonic trespasses.

Formed in 2006 with inspirations from the likes of Unleashed, Massacre, Bolt Thrower, and Asphyx sparking their ideas, Affliction Gate began proving themselves a formidable and potent force in the French metal underground with their first EP Severance (Dead to This World) in 2008 and more potently debut album Aeon of Nox (From Darkness Comes Liberation) a year later. Its release saw the band share their live presence across and beyond France into countries such as Germany, Spain, Holland, and Belgium, whilst the list of bands sharing stages with the quintet have come to include Pentacle, Mercyless, Svart Crown, Loudblast, Benighted and many more. Shattered Ante Mortem Illusions was an acclaimed proposition upon it’s uncaging in 2012 but already is being eclipsed by the response to Dying Alone.

artwork_RingMaster Review   Negative Lucidity leaps at the senses from its first breath; the opener a torrent of barbarous rhythms and toxic riffery twisted into a nagging groove that instantly has ears and appetite alert. The raw, bestial tones of vocalist Herostratos quickly lead the track’s animus of sound and intent, his intrusive delivery backed by the throaty threat of bass and entwined in the sonic trespass of guitar. Melancholy clings to the sonic suggestiveness expelled whilst despair clouds the air of the heavily satisfying incitement, those essences and hues just as rich and expressive in the following pestilential assault of Devising Our Own Chains. As its predecessor, the encounter is a challenging yet openly catchy violation bounding into the psyche on boisterously intrusive rhythms as guitars spin an acidic and virulent tapestry of rancorous bewitchment.

The EP’s title track comes next, flirting with the senses as it crawls closer and closer with cancerous intent. Led by the cantankerous tone of bass, the song subsequently grows into more volatile and eager infectiousness but still keeping its murderous breath and nature to the fore as its energy ebbs and flows in a consumption of the senses. Again a host of flavours collude within the song, more classic hues adding to the death bred malignancy.

The EP concludes with the misanthropic Manicheism Inertia, bad blood and rabid sound fuelling the contemptuous body and soul of the aural ravishing. The first two tracks within Dying Alone steal the show in many ways yet, as the song before, Manicheism Inertia has a nasty grandeur and incessant rabidity to its design which simply hits the spot.

Enjoyable on first listens and only growing to bigger success over time, Dying Alone is evidence that Affliction Gate is one of old school death metal’s emerging triumphs. Their new EP sees the band hit new heights, or should that be low corrosive depths, to get extreme metal off to a seriously strong start in 2016.

The Dying Alone EP is out now via Transcending Obscurity @ https://transcendingobscurity.bandcamp.com/album/dying-alone-death-metal

http://www.facebook.com/afflictiongate

Pete RingMaster 06/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Fleshdoll – Feeding The Pigs

Fleshdoll pic

If you like your death metal voraciously brutal and old school bred but with the balls to twist that template to its own devious ends, oh also with a tongue firmly in someone’s cheek at times, then Feeding The Pigs from French metallers Fleshdoll is one recommendation to definitely check up on. The third album from the Toulouse quintet is not a proposition sculpting something new or scarcely trodden before but for uncompromising yet mischievously adventurous extreme hostility, it is a thoroughly contagious and satisfyingly exhausting protagonist.

Formed in 2001, it was the band’s debut album [w.o.a.r.g] five years later which really awoke the French underground metal scene to the arising presence and force of Fleshdoll. Released via French label Thundering Records/Manitou Music, the album was well- received and lauded as the band spent their energies playing show after show on the way sharing stages with the likes of Svart Crown, END, Blockheads, and Zubrowska. In 2006 Fleshdoll became the first death metal band to play in Casablanca, bringing their raw spice to the Moroccan scene treading in the line set already by Kreator and Moonspell. The following year second album Animal Factory is uncaged and again the band is garnered in acclaim and attention as they take it on the road, playing with bands such as Malevolent Creation and Loudblast. A line-up change stepped up next before Fleshdoll stepped into the studio with Gorod drummer Samuel Santiago to record Feeding The Pigs. Its triumph has thrust the band into another soaking of eager plaudits and focus, a new spotlight enhanced already this year as they went on tour across France with Loudblast and Benighted, Europe with Resurrection and Cremation, and before that Japan with Vomitory, Beyond Creation, and Defeated Sanity.

The album launches at the listener with its title track, an instantly vicious and ridiculously compelling maelstrom of annihilatory rhythms, Fleshdoll coverguitar violations, and vocal predation. Into that delicious hellish mix sharp and short acid spewing grooves infest the psyche to further spawn eager rapture. It is an immediate enslavement as the rhythms settle into a controlled prowl whilst still making the most intensive demands and threats alongside a devilish swagger which drives the vocals and guitar enterprise. It is an extraordinary track, one as suggested in regard to the album, not necessarily breaking boundaries but certainly caging the essence of the genre in a virulently infectious and explosively incendiary design.

The opener is such a stunning song that certainly for a while the album struggles to match up to its strengths and toxicity though right away both Collateral Murder and A Feast For The Rats give very worthy shots. The first of the two virtually stalks down senses and imagination, its bestial provocation sizing up and crawling all over the ears and emotions whilst rhythms juggle skilfully with their bait whilst the guitars in league with the bass swarm over the listener in horde like fashion but with enough sonic endeavour and creative invention to cast a constantly intriguing premise. Its successor sits back on the tail of urgency initially before twisting its gait and body through persistently changing and unpredictable turns of direction and pace. It also is loaded with impressive craft from guitars and brutality from Santiago but like its predecessor lacks the explosive spark of the first song as well as the vaunt and open smile. Nevertheless the pair healthily feed an already greedy want from the album bred by the title track as too does the following song, The Wolf.

The album’s fourth song lives up to whatever the imagination can conjure for the song name, its vocal roars and the unrelenting jaws of the riffs worrying and tearing at the senses whilst the heavy paws of the bass and crippling swipes of the drums only compound the mouthwatering attack. Spiteful grooves latch onto the charge of the song soon after before its body switches between prowls and all out assaults again and again ensuring expectations have nothing to latch on to and full attention is taken on a feisty captivating ride. The track gets closer to bridging the gap between the starting pinnacle and the rest of the album especially with its fiery hues of the guitar and solos.

Dead Monochrome is a demonic pestilential fury which sears and consumes from its first malevolent breath, a dark venomous scourge complete with deceitful melodic tempting and addiction sculpting grooves which offer respite knowing the rest of the ruinous intent of the protagonist will suffocate any hope. From this point in many ways the album goes through a slight evolution starting with the sinister breathing instrumental The Hollow Men. It is not a big twist in the premise of the release more a stronger investigation of the melodic and adventurous hints shown in A Feast For The Rats but it does bring a slight movement from animalistic intensity to inventive exploration. The Shadow Of A Man right away certainly shows no signs of diminishing its carnivorous appetite, riffs and rhythms uniting for a tunnel of grievous chastisement, but that is subsequently joined by a flood of melodically seeded flumes. As its mass continues to fill ears, the song brings in a rhythmic enticement which in turn moves into an oppressive swamp within which acid running veins expel sonic tempting.

The pair of Ecstatic Random Carnage and King Of Patusan more dramatically bring something distinctly new to the tortuous fun, the first wrapping its savage and imposing weight around the senses before unveiling a weave of furnace bred melodies and psychotic patterns around the gutturally spawned vocals. Imagination is lit right away but given a greater thrill as the song sweeps into a heavyweight passage of invention which is jazzy in its colour and funky in its energy before returning to a keen ravaging of ears and beyond. The second is technical/progressive flavoured metal imagination within a severe and tempestuous domain and again as the previous song easily seduces thoughts, both songs stepping forward to not equal but definitely rival the first peak in the album.

Completed by the excellent North Sentinel Island, an absorbing encounter which can be onerous at one moment and within a single lung’s expulsion seduce with entrancing ambience and beauty, Feeding The Pigs is a thoroughly satisfying and enjoyable intrusion. Certainly Fleshdoll can be compared in varying degrees to the likes of Cannibal Corpse, Napalm Death, Carcass, Bolt Thrower, and Kreator as a reason to check out their album but it shows that the French band is working on forging their own unique path and it is coming along very nicely.

Feeding The Pigs is available via Great Dane Records now!

http://www.fleshdollband.com

8.5/10

RingMaster 23/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Loudblast – Burial Ground

loudblast

Acclaimed as the first French death metal band and just acclaimed across underground metal worldwide over the years since forming in 1985, Loudblast add another magnificent coal to that fire with new album Burial Ground. It is a beast of an album creatively and brutally; an inventive and explosive provocation which continues the band’s impressive evolution of sound. Merging resistance free grooves, barbed hooks, and a greater contagion into their old school genre seeded sound, the Lille quartet have sculpted their finest slab of imagination savaging incitement yet.

The bands career has seen many notable turns in their potent ascent since those far ago beginnings. Early albums such as Disincarnate and Sublime Dementia in 1991 and 1993 respectively making the first striking marks on a wider attention as did shows with bands such as Death and Coroner. The band has continued to evolve and in some ways reinvent their sound without losing the core and base which makes Loudblast such a potent antagonist. As mentioned Burial Ground is the band’s most diverse adventure yet, certainly across the album but even more so within the songs themselves, each pushing its boundaries and investigating new tendencies in their designs. It continues the impressing elements which made predecessor Frozen Moments Between Life And Death in 2011 stand out, just to stronger, deeper, and more imaginative levels. Parading a line-up of bassist Alex Lenormand (ex-Locus, Code, Sic), lead guitarist Drakhian (Griffar, ex-Taake, Black Dementia), drummer Hervé Coquerel, and vocalist/guitarist and founding member Stéphane Buriez, Loudblast have set a new benchmark not only for themselves with Burial Ground but potentially also European death metal.

A Bloody Oath sets things off, an enticing lone guitar inviting attention before the band descend with heavy weight and patience upon 1017035_10152064896733091_3717457620419097246_nthe senses. Riffs and rhythms build a formidable threat, both casting an intimidating web of further menace driven by the dark tones of bass and predatory vocals of Buriez. It is a slow stalking which eventually finds a trigger to charge rapaciously through ears with incendiary riffery and controlling rhythms, all again under the menacing guide of the vocals. The track continues to twist and turn in gait and attack, a delicious passage of bass temptation swiped by caustic blazes of guitar and roaring vocals sharing its spoils whilst winding its tempting across the walls of the song a sonic lure makes its own enticement before once the track with greater relish returns to its striding intent.

The song is a masterful and compelling start, employing grooves and classic metal flavouring but just the appetiser for greater things ahead though initially its impressive standard is simply matched by the forceful challenge of Darkness Will Abide. The song strolls with resourceful bait from guitars and drums courted by even darker bass probing. There is a thrash element to the album and certainly on the second track it brings an infectious urgency to an even paced but volatile tempered track. The song continues to entice and lure greater appetite for the encounter, feeding a brewing hunger for the full meal of Ascending Straight In Circle. A single guitar also makes the first coaxing for the song, its emotive strains a spark awakening the imagination ready for the voracious narrative and aural confrontation to follow. Rhythms pump their muscular intent straight away whilst riffs consume ears with similar passion, both building a trapping wall. Within this incendiary exploit riffs and malevolent climates soak and seduce thoughts and emotions, they and the slowly emerging and slightly demented grooves which come either in small spats or with unbridled toxicity, infectious bait. Fusing plenty of classic and groove metal vivacity to the charge of the song’s heart, it is an irresistible slice of invention driven maliciousness.

Assumptions that this was the pinnacle of the album are soon put in their place as Soothing Torments steps forward, its predacious entrance a stalking of the senses. It never moves away from this intent but colours the subsequent ravishment with more toxic and vicious grooves driven on by crippling rhythms and an intensity which grins gleefully as it smothers and consumes the senses. The flair of the guitars inflames the track further whilst its aural drama and hungry rabidity ignites a rapturous submission to the annihilatory pressure.

The melodic caress of From Dried Bones to a military rhythmic skirting takes its big slice of appetite next, especially when it slips into a rigorous canter with contagion spilling hooks swinging from intensive riffery. It is a mouthwatering start which as you are climbing on board, pulls the floor away and brings a hellish demonic breath and atmosphere over a doom clad weight and intensity. The two gaits of the track eventually merge for a storming conclusion to the enjoyable onslaught, followed right away by the dark cavernous depths and consumptive weight of The Void which suffocates ears and emotions. It is a demanding and exhaustive stealing of light and hope, a pestilential asphyxiation which tests the listener but provides just enough lifeline of accessibility to keep them engrossed in its taxing offering.

The closing stretch of the album is its most arduous but with just as many rewards and pleasing twists as the first part of the release, both Abstract God and I Reach The Sun unleashing a virulent causticity which accentuates the spite of rhythms and the voracity of the riffs. The first of the pair also lays down a captivating and alluring passage of carnivorous riffery speared by sonic prowess and spiky grooves whilst its successor toys and manipulates senses and psyche with an onerous yet invigorating weave of sonic and melodic seduction.

Closing track The Path is a towering protagonist, it’s epically honed intentions and sound a maelstrom of ravished emotions, rhythmic vitriol, and sonic cruelty but brought with a technical and artistic skill aligned to descriptive endeavour which paints an intrusive landscape for the imagination to immerse within. It is a monstrous finale to an excellent and intensive album proving that Loudblast just seem to get better and better; experience and maturity breeding greater invention and explorations within the band and constantly forging new highlights for metal.

Burial Ground is available via Listenable Records now @ https://www.facebook.com/listenablerecs

https://www.facebook.com/Loudblast.official

9/10

RingMaster 29/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Heart Attack – Stop Pretending

heart attack pic

It may have taken French metallers Heart Attack six years to unleash their debut album but the time was well spent honing their rapacious sound as Stop Pretending is one impressive and attention grabbing encounter. Consisting of ten mighty and finely sculpted aggressive provocations, the release instantly marks the band as one with a formidably promising future and an already accomplished and carnivorous enterprise.

Hailing from Cannes and formed in 2007 by schoolmates vocalist/guitarist Kevin Geyer and bassist Flora Capello, Heart Attack with guitarist Chris Cesari and drummer Chris Icard alongside the founding pair has built a strong reputation around the French Riviera through their mass of shows which has seen them play with bands such as Dagoba, Loudblast, The Arrs, Headcharger, Lolicon, Vetha, and Cliche Boys. 2009 saw the release of their Lullabies For Living Dead EP and though it is fair to say the release did not take their awareness far from home you can only suggest that the Apathia Records released Stop Pretending will amend that situation.

The promo labels the band as groove and thrash metal and though you have to agree with both suggestions there are other rich heart-attack-stop-pretending-webessences of sound ripe for use in their invention. The title track ravages the ear first, its intense riffs a heavy suasion on the ear backed up by the immediately impressive and continuing to thrill drum attack of Icard. Finding its muscular stride with a more thrash laden intent to its combativeness, the song barracks the senses with a tight acidic groove, throaty bass menace, and that already thoroughly compelling rhythm attack of the drums. Vocally Geyer grazes the ear with a strong and expressive delivery, one which reveals its ability to shift tact and attack as the album progresses along its sinewy course.

The adrenaline fuelled impressive start is immediately backed up by the following Face the Music. Emerging from a sample from Gladiator, the track rampages with the artillery of rhythms parading their irresistible might to instantly have knees buckling and a surge of intrusive riffing that leaves the appetite thoroughly awoken. Geyer mixes a death coated guttural attack with his cleaner delivery whilst the strings of Cesari dance with melodic flames trailing from their creative notes and narrative especially in a quite delirious solo. Primarily though the song is another piece of metallic rabidity that seizes and commands attention whilst employing neck and leg muscles in its predacious storm. As with a lot of the album it is fair to say boundaries are not being challenged in originality on the song but it is impossible to dismiss or refuse the craft and potent imagination at work.

The next up Sweet Hunting, which features Dagoba vocalist Shawter, again works its intensive charms on the passions with skilled antagonism and thought, its tsunami of crippling force merging with colourful enterprise. Like a mix of Machine Head, Hatebreed, and maybe John Bush era Anthrax, it is a blistering tempest of sonic danger and temptation, something you can equally apply to the likes of Lazarus and Raging Load too. There is surface chastisement across the album which does at times does blend tracks together if not paying attention but the rewards for that extra concentration are plenty and imaginative as shown by the again stunning guitar work across the first of these two songs and the rhythmic tsunami of excellent which especially makes its successor an incendiary proposition though the guitars again make their declaration openly clear. With the vocals again twisting in another dimension to their incitement the track stands out amongst numerous highlights.

If there is one niggle of the album it is that the fine bass craft and invention of Capello is often in the shadow of the rest of the sound. It is always there and you feel Capello’s presence throughout but sadly not always with enough clarity, though thankfully Down the Way is one song where she is allowed space to shine, and the lady can play as shown on further album pinnacles, 1902 which features William Ribeiro of Moghan Ra, and the scintillating and dirty Wasted Generation. Every song it should be said is a beast of a collision for senses and heart on this album, Thrash Your Neighbour especially savage and memorable, and leave only thorough satisfaction.

If Stop Pretending does as stated lack enough original inspiration to stand as a best of year contender it does stand as one of the better corrosive and inventively sculpted releases, one which for most is one formidable introduction to Heart Attack, a band we will hear a lot more of.

https://www.facebook.com/heartattackmetal

8.5/10

RingMaster 24/07/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Lizzard: Out of Reach

Out of Reach from French rock band Lizzard is one of those releases which is not going to exactly set the world alight but ensures with accomplished ease that the time in its company is highly enjoyable and satisfying. It is a release which draws from many seeds and influences to create its own commanding and attentive sounds to fully engagement with. Often new interpretations of existing recipes with some fresh imaginative ingredients can be as pleasing as any new invention; Out of Reach is the certain proof.

Lizzard was formed in 2006 with the meeting of vocalist and guitarist Mathieu Ricou, drummer Katy Elwell, and bassist William Knox. Finding a common musical vision the trio set about creating their own unique and powerful rock sounds, and from their demo La Criée the following year the band began grabbing close attention and acclaim. Shows around France followed as the band released their mini album Venus in 2008, all the time strong responses, reviews, and fan reception building. The past couple of years saw Lizzard sharing stages and supporting the likes of Gojira, Punish Yourself, Loudblast, Enhancer and more, again furthering their stock and standing within rock circles.

Last year the band reunited with Rhys Fulber (Paradise Lost, Fear Factory, Front Line Assembly…), who they recorded Venus with, to record their debut album which sees its release through Klonosphere/Season of Mist. The result is a collection of songs which ripple with craft and impressive songwriting. They have a distinct individuality from others whilst pulling many essences from bands to tone their appealing presences. It is a fine line the band walk, bringing a sound which has its own breath whilst using open influences in its creation but they achieve it with success.

The album opens with the powerful and impressive Disintegrity. It is a song built on striking riffs and a seductive groove fuelled by beckoning melodic whispers. With its crunching bass tones and commanding rhythms, not to mention the fine expressive vocals of Ricou, the track more than echoes the crisp sounds of Sick Puppies. There is a definite similarity which is moved into a different element by the sharp guitar play and imaginative twists in direction. Sometimes they are subtle, mere aural winks but always noticeable.

The following track The Orbiter adds extra coarse energy to the air through the perpetually impressive bass sounds of Knox and the incendiary guitar craft of Ricou. Like many of the songs it is one you feel you already know though its passage is a continually new unveiling, the effect making the enjoyment all the more instant and compelling. As it plays mixes of bands such as Tool and Soundgarden come to mind to which you can easily add spicery from the likes of Foo Fighters and Nonpoint too.

As the likes of the title track, Loose Ends, and the excellent Fake World share their varied and impressive invention, the album continues to capture the imagination and enthusiasm. It does not take one into new inspiring realms but is as potent in igniting pleasure from a band that feels like a new but destined to be friend.

The two instrumentals Skyline and Backslide are more than decent, the first the lead into or at least atmosphere setter for Loose Ends, and the latter a fiery piece of sonic expression. Both do not exactly over whelm the ear but do not feel out of place within the context of the album.

Twisted Machine stands alongside the first two tracks as the biggest highlights on Out Of Reach. It is a pulsating and snarling piece of rock which is full of intrigue and inspiring energies to leave one absorbed by its imaginative and infectious adrenaline driven attack. Once more it reminds of Sick Puppies which is not a bad thing as the track shows.

Out of Reach is a great album which is full of passion, skill, and undemanding but riveting songs, what more could you want?

http://www.lizzard.fr/

Ring Master 19/10/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright